2015 Prometheus Award Goes to Suarez

Daniel Suarez’ novel Influx has won the Libertarian Futurist Society’s Prometheus Award for Best Novel of 2014.

Influx, the fourth techno-thriller by Daniel Suarez (Dutton Adult, Feb. 20, 2014), dramatizes the evils of totalitarian government control over people’s lives by depicting a government so concerned about politically destabilizing and potentially dangerous innovations that it creates the Bureau of Technology Control to manage the introduction of new technologies. Inventors who don’t follow their edicts are sentenced to a high-tech prison with fiendishly oppressive use of new technology. To end the impending new dark age, the prisoners must fight ruthless individuals already living in our future and armed with mind-blowing genetic technology.

This was Suarez’s second Prometheus award nomination, following Kill Decision, which was a Prometheus Award finalist in 2013.

The award, which includes a gold coin and plaque, will be presented Friday, August 21 at Sasquan, the 2015 World Science Fiction Convention in Spokane, Washington.

The full press release follows the jump.

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE, July 13, 2015

LFS announces 2015 Prometheus Award winner

The Libertarian Futurist Society has announced that Daniel Suarez’ novel Influx has won the Prometheus Award for Best Novel (of 2015).

The award will be presented Friday afternoon Aug. 21 during Sasquan, the 73rd annual World Science Fiction Convention August 19-23, 2015 in Spokane, Washington.

Influx, the fourth techno-thriller by Daniel Suarez (Dutton Adult, Feb. 20, 2014), dramatizes the evils of totalitarian government control over people’s lives by depicting a government so concerned about politically destabilizing and potentially dangerous innovations that it creates the Bureau of Technology Control to manage the introduction of new technologies. Inventors who don’t follow their edicts are sentenced to a high-tech prison with fiendishly oppressive use of new technology. To end the impending new dark age, the prisoners must fight ruthless individuals already living in our future and armed with mind-blowing genetic technology.

This was Suarez’s second Prometheus award nomination, following Kill Decision, which was a Prometheus Award finalist in 2013.

The other Best Novel finalists were The Three-Body Problem, by Liu Cixin (TOR Books), Raising Steam, by Terry Pratchett (Knopf Doubleday)  and A Better World, by Marcus Sakey (Amazon, Thomas & Mercer.)

Ten novels were nominated for this year’s award, including these other nominees: The Break, by Sean Gabb (The Hampden Press), The Little Green Book of Chairman Rahma, by Brian Herbert (TOR Books), Counteract, by Tracy Lawson (Buddapuss Ink), The Stars Came Back, by Rolf Nelson (Castalia House), The Collection: A Registry Novel, by Shannon Stoker (William Morrow/Harper Collins); and Archetype, by M.D. Waters (Plume/Dutton).

The Prometheus awards, sponsored by the Libertarian Futurist Society (LFS), honor outstanding science fiction/fantasy that explores the possibilities of a free future, champions human rights (including personal and economic liberty), dramatizes the perennial conflict between individuals and coercive governments, or critiques the tragic consequences of abuse of power – especially by the State.

The Prometheus Award was established by novelist L. Neil Smith in 1979, making it one of the most enduring awards after the Nebula and Hugo awards, and one of the oldest fan-based awards currently in sf. Presented annually since 1982 at the World Science Fiction Convention, the Prometheus Awards include a gold coin and plaque for the winners.

For a full list of past Prometheus Award winners in all categories, including Best Novel, Best Classic Fiction (Hall of Fame) and occasional Special Awards, visit www.lfs.org.

Membership in the Libertarian Futurist Society is open to any science fiction fan interested in how fiction can promote a greater appreciation of the value of liberty.

For more information, contact LFS Board President William H. Stoddard  ( president@lfs.org)

12 thoughts on “2015 Prometheus Award Goes to Suarez

  1. Since I’m in a book buying mood I had a look at this one; the reviews suggest that this is the weakest of his novels to date, so I will be passing on it, but thank you for flagging it up for me..

  2. OK, is it just me, but is the Prometheus award given more to novels about oppressive totalitarian dystopias instead of explorations what libertarian worlds and societies would be like with new technologies?

    Naomi Kritzer’s Beck Garrison stories seem better fits than what I get reading the summaries of the nominees and winners.

  3. Just looked at a list of past winners and there are some excellent novels on there as well as some rubbish. Moon of Ice I found to be unreadable when I tried to tackle it in the early 90’s. I have to admit I chuckled when I saw Ken McLeod won it thrice considering his politics.

  4. Bravo Lima Poppa: is it just me, but is the Prometheus award given more to novels about oppressive totalitarian dystopias instead of explorations what libertarian worlds and societies would be like with new technologies?

    It’s not just you.

    Alain: Just looked at a list of past winners and there are some excellent novels on there as well as some rubbish.

    Yes and yes. Some of the novel nominee descriptions give me the heebie-jeebies.

    Alain: I have to admit I chuckled when I saw Ken McLeod won it thrice considering his politics.

    As well as Cory Doctorow, whom John Scalzi says has “won it three times and he’s as pinko as they come” — not to mention socialist Charles Stross.

  5. Time to go look at the past years’ winners to get an idea of when the change happened.

    I’ll admit I’m much more curious about the why…

  6. Alain: I have to admit I chuckled when I saw Ken McLeod won it thrice considering his politics.

    As well as Cory Doctorow, whom John Scalzi says has “won it three times and he’s as pinko as they come” — not to mention socialist Charles Stross.

    Historically, the word “libertarian” has been associated far more with the left than the right.

  7. Books Edit: Not sure what happen while typing out my original post but there was premature posting going on.
    @JJ Interesting about Doctorow it’s obvious that he is interested about freedom of information and governments attempt to stifle that but beyond that I had no clue about his politics. I go to Boing Boing and mostly read his reviews of books that are aimed at his daughter.

  8. @Kate H did not know that interesting that it now connotes the US right wing fringe.

  9. @Bravo Lima beyond Liberty’s Daughter, which I loved, what are the other Beck Garrison stories? I felt that there was another fantastic universe there but could not find anything else written there. (Please tell me there’s a novel as well as short stories.)

  10. I’m disappointed that A Better World by Marcus Sakey didn’t win. It’s part of his Brilliance series, which is basically X-Men in book form (1% of Generation Y starts exhibiting “powers”) and lots of fun.

  11. Jason,
    I wish there was. I’ve tracked down as many of the stories as I can, and it looks like I may have to head to eBay to get the issues I can’t easily find.

  12. @jason there are two more Beck Garrison stories High Stakes appeared in November 2012 issue of Fantasy and Science Fiction and Solidarity in the March 2013 issue. No novel or plans for one as far as I know.

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