Star Trek Reunions and Anniversaries

Compiled by Carl Slaughter: (1) Marina Sirtis and Jonathan Frakes discuss reunion of the Rikers

(2) Marina Sirtis on Counselor Troi

(3) Marina Sirtis talks about the first Next Generation movie

(4) Next Generation 30th anniversary cast panel

(5) Voyager 20th anniversary cast panel

(6) Vulcan ambassador Sarek links Star Trek Discovery to the original series

SFWA Offers Adventures in Science Fiction Humble Book Bundle

[Reblogged from the SFWA Blog]

SFWA is delighted to feature another Humble Book Bundle. This time it’s Adventures in Science Fiction presented by Open Road Media.

When you purchase a bundle, you can direct that proceeds be donated to SFWA’s Giver’s Fund, which provides grants to deserving organizations that work in and for the SFF community. Past recipients include the Alpha SFF Teen Writing Workshop, Launch Pad, Clarion West, Northern Illinois University ?Archives, the Parsec YA ?Lecture Series, and more. The Giver’s Fund also supports SFWA’s Emergency Medical Fund and SFWA’s legal support fund.

The promotion runs from Wednesday, October 4th, 11:00am Pacific to Wednesday October 18th, 11:00am Pacific.  Don’t miss out!

The $1 bundle features:

  • A Woman of the Iron People by Eleanor Arnason
  • Expendable by James Alan Gardner
  • Jaran by Kate Elliott
  • Vacuum Flowers by Michael Swanwick
  • The Genome by Sergei Lukyanenko

The $8 bundle includes all of the above, and:

  • Encounter with Tiber by Buzz Aldrin and John Barnes
  • Orbital Decay by Allen Steele
  • Midshipman’s Hope by David Feintuch
  • A Choice of Treasons by J. L. Doty
  • Echoes of Earth by Sean Williams and Shane Dix
  • The Shockwave Rider by John Brunner
  • The Zero Stone by Andre Norton

The $15 bundle includes all of the above, and:

  • The Forge of God by Greg Bear
  • The City on the Edge of Forever by Harlan Ellison
  • Across a Billion Years by Robert Silverberg
  • Blackcollar by Timothy Zahn
  • Schismatrix Plus by Bruce Sterling
  • Starrigger by John DeChancie
  • Steelheart by William C. Dietz
  • Dawn by Octavia E. Butler

The $18 bundle includes all of the above, and:

  • Playing God by Sarah Zettel
  • The Icerigger Trilogy by Alan Dean Foster
  • All My Sins Remembered by Joe Haldeman
  • Orion Shall Rise by Poul Anderson

From Humble Book Bundle:

To read will be an awfully big adventure. With this bundle of science fiction titles from Open Road Media, the whole universe is at your fingertips. Explore other worlds from Buzz Aldrin, Octavia E. Butler, Greg Bear, and more!

Pay what you want. All together, these books would cost over $199. Here at Humble Bundle, you choose the price and increase your contribution to upgrade your bundle! This bundle has a minimum $1 purchase.

Read them anywhere. These books are available in PDF, ePUB, and MOBI formats, meaning you can read them anywhere at any time. Instructions and a list of recommended reading programs can be found here.

Support charity. Choose where the money goes – between the publisher and the Science Fiction and Fantasy Writers of America, and, if you’d like, a charity of your choice via the PayPal Giving Fund. If you like what we do, you can leave us a Humble Tip too!

Adventure Sci-Fi Storybundle Helps Challenger Learning Centers for Space Science

The Adventure Sci-Fi Storybundle curated by Kevin J. Anderson launched today.  For the next three weeks you can get the 13 books in the bundle for as little as $15 — works by KJA, Paul diFilippo, Jody Lynn Nye, Robert Lynn Asprin, Brenda Cooper, Gray Rinehart, and many others. You name your own price, and a portion of the proceeds goes to support the Challenger Learning Centers for Space Science Education.

 

On Anderson’s blog he gave a rundown on the books in the bundle:

Strap into your cockpit, fire up the faster-than-light engines, and set course for the nearest star. I’ve got a grab bag of 13 excellent science fiction books all in one new Adventure SF StoryBundle. Get them all for as little as $15, and help out a great charity, too!

I put in a brand new action-packed story, The Blood Prize, featuring the popular character Colt the Outlander from Heavy Metal magazines, with all new art by the Aradio Brothers. Robert J. Sawyer offers his classic novel Far Seer (a planet of intelligent dinosaurs!). Raymond Bolton’s Awakening shows a fantasy civilization on the cusp of the industrial revolution faced with an alien invasion.

You’ll read different adventures on very different lunar colonies in Gray Rinehart’s Walking on a Sea of Clouds, Lou Agresta’s Club Anyone, and T. Allen Diaz’s Lunatic City, as well as Louis Antonelli’s alternate space race and murder on the moon in Dragon-Award nominee Another Girl, Another Planet.

Jody Lynn Nye’s Taylor’s Ark follows the adventures of a star-traveling MD with a specialty in environmental medicine, and Brenda Cooper’s Endeavor-Award winning The Silver Ship and the Sea is a gripping story of prisoners of war abandoned on a rugged colony planet. Acclaimed, award-winning author Paul di Filippo gives a collection of his best stories in Lost Among the Stars.

And for thrilling military SF, the bundle also has Honor and Fidelity by Andrew Keith and William H. Keith, Recruit by Jonathan P. Brazee, and the hilarious adventures of Phule’s Company in Robert Lynn Asprin’s Phule’s Paradise.

Buyers can choose to donate part of every purchase to help support the Challenger Learning Centers for Space Science Education, was founded in 1986 by the families of the astronauts who died in the Space Shuttle Challenger disaster.

The organization offers hands-on exploration and discovery opportunities to students around the world the chance to become astronauts and engineers and solve real-world problems as they share the thrill of discovery on missions through the Solar System. Using space simulation and role-playing strategies, students bring their classroom studies to life and cultivate the skills needed for future success.

The Adventure Sci-Fi Storybundle runs for only three weeks. You can get the base level of five books for $5, or all 14 for as little as $15.

From Philly with Fantasy: NYRSF Readings Feature Gardner Dozois and Michael Swanwick

By Mark L. Blackman: On the evening of Tuesday, October 3, 2017, the New York Review of Science Fiction Readings Series continued its newly-opened 27th Season with the phenomenal line-up of  Gardner Dozois and Michael Swanwick (a “dynamic duo”) at its venue, the Brooklyn Commons Café in Brooklyn.

The evening opened, as ever, with producer and executive curator Jim Freund (and host of the long-running sf/fantasy radio program Hour of the Wolf) sounding his duck call (inherited from Simon Loekle) and welcoming the audience, reminding those who can to donate to the Series ($7 is the suggested donation, but no one is ever turned away for not kicking in), and announcing future readers:

Tuesday, November 7th (Election Day), the readers will be S.A. Chakraborty and a second writer to be named;

Tuesday, December 5th will be a musical event – an “SFF: Singing Friends Fest” – featuring Sarah Pinsker and Catherynne M. Valente, among others, “pro sf writers doing music.”

He continued into 2018 (of note, there will be special evenings memorializing Ama Patterson and Thomas M. Disch), then heralded that on Monday, October 16, 3-5 p.m. (that’s “p.m.” with a “p,” not quite “the Hour of the Wolf;” one hopes that Jim’s listeners can stay up that late) on WBAI (99.5 FM), he would be celebrating (5 months late) his 50th anniversary at WBAI. (It’s also the 50th anniversary of the production of Samuel R. Delany’s The Star-Pit.)

He concluded by thanking House Manager (and Nebula finalist) Barbara Krasnoff, Tech Director Terence Taylor (who was not present, but managing things remotely), “the roadie” Madeline Flieger, and the Brooklyn Commons Café.

Michael Swanwick

Michael Swanwick, the evening’s first reader, is the author of ten novels, including Vacuum FlowersStations of the TideThe Iron Dragon’s DaughterJack FaustBones of the EarthThe Dragons of BabelDancing With BearsChasing the Phoenix, and the forthcoming The Iron Dragon’s Mother; and roughly 150 stories, many of which have been reprinted in Best of the Year anthologies. Notable among his non-fiction is Being Gardner Dozois, a book-length interview. Since his first story was published in 1980, Swanwick has been honored with the Nebula, Theodore Sturgeon and World Fantasy Awards, and received a Hugo Award for fiction in an unprecedented five out of six years.  (He also has “the pleasant distinction of having lost more major awards than any other science fiction writer,” making him, as an audience member suggested, “the Susan Lucci of SF.”) Last year he was Guest of Honor at MidAmeriCon II, the 2016 World Science Fiction Convention. (He was also, by the way, Writer GoH at Lunacon 2005.)

Swanwick’s selection was the third chapter, and a paragraph or so into the fourth, of The Iron Dragon’s Mother, which completes a fantasy trilogy begun almost 25 years ago. (One novel is a novel, he observed; “two is an uncompleted trilogy.”) He began with an apology; for the first time ever since he’s been reading his work in public, he forgot to bring the text. Instead, he read a copy that he had e-mailed himself off a borrowed laptop. (It worked out fine.) In it, he introduces a new character, Caitlin, the half-elven bastard daughter of the Lord of House Sans Merci, who has returned home to see her dying father, to a family that’s magically dysfunctional. (Dinner was a poisonous spider.) More troubles await her when she returns to her base, he hinted.

During the intermission, a raffle was held (for those who donated), with the prizes being copies of a not-yet-published book by Robert Silverberg, and a copy of Being Gardner Dozois.

Gardner Dozois

It’s been a while since Gardner Dozois has done a NYRSF Reading, said Freund, in his introduction; he and Swanwick were among the Series’ first readers. Dozois was, of course, the editor of Asimov’s Science Fiction magazine for almost 20 years. He has won the Hugo Award as the year’s Best Editor 15 times and the Locus Award 31 times (including an unprecedented 16 times in a row), and the Nebula Award twice, as well as a Sidewise Award for his own short fiction (which has been most recently collected in When the Great Days Come). He is the author or editor of more than a hundred books, including a novel written in collaboration with George R.R. Martin and Daniel Abraham, Hunter’s Run, many solo anthologies, among them the annual series The Year’s Best Science Fiction (which has won the Locus Award for Best Anthology – more than any other anthology series in history), as well as a number of anthologies co-edited with GRRM. (Martin, he mused, has vanished from the scene, “disappeared into television – Beauty and the Beast?”) He has been inducted into the Science Fiction Hall of Fame, and won the Skylark Award for Lifetime Achievement in Science Fiction. Born in Salem, Massachusetts (somehow he evaded the Witch Trials), he now lives in Philadelphia (as does Swanwick).

Dozois remarked that he had stopped writing fiction years ago, “until recently, when ideas began popping into my head.” He offered two short pieces, the first of which was “Neanderthals” (which he pronounced correctly, with a “t” rather than, as commonly done, a “th”). An assassin on the moon to kill the head of a clandestine drug operation faces a Neanderthal bodyguard. Here (as similarly in Robert J. Sawyer’s Neanderthal Parallax Trilogy) they are not “lumbering brutes,” but quick-moving and our intellectual equals. Were they brought by time machine (and is the assassin a time traveler) or created by genetic manipulation (they weren’t wiped out, but survive genetically “in our blood”)? In the second story, “Watchman,” a dead man is reawakened – and not for the first time – for a mission, to slay a dragon; the dragon (if it is indeed one) is in the semblance of a harmless-looking old man making breakfast. Dozois concluded by plugging his new solo fantasy anthology, The Book of Swords.

The traditional Jenna Felice Freebie Table offered a small assortment of books. The audience of about 40 included Melissa C. Beckman (who, as usual, photographed the event), Madeline Flieger, Amy Goldschlager, Barbara Krasnoff, John Kwok, Gordon Linzner, Marianne Porter, Mark W. Richards, Ian Randal Strock, and Alex Whitaker.

Throughout the evening and afterward, the readers and some audience members enjoyed the Café’s fare. (Regrettably, the downside of the venue was noise, most disturbingly loud voices, coming from the Café.)

For those unable to have attended (and who lack access to a time machine), the events were captured on Livestream.

Paddington 2 – International Trailer

Paddington 2 opens in the UK on October 11, and the US on December 1. I like these international trailers much more when they have Japanese subtitles, but there’s no denying this one’s still a lot of fun.

The much-anticipated sequel to the worldwide hit family film finds Paddington happily settled with the Brown family in Windsor Gardens, where he has become a popular member of the community, spreading joy and marmalade wherever he goes. While searching for the perfect present for his beloved Aunt Lucy’s hundredth birthday, Paddington spots a unique pop-up book in Mr. Gruber’s antique shop, and embarks upon a series of odd jobs to buy it. But when the book is stolen, it’s up to Paddington and the Browns to unmask the thief…

 

Is Discovery Unloved?

By Carl Slaughter: Around the web in search of positive reviews of Discovery  –  and still searching

(1) “I couldn’t believe how one dimensional the Discovery characters were.  This Burnham chic has two gears.  Intense, brooding, semi constipated, judgmental angry mode.  Also, the actress is really unsuited for this role.  I don’t like her performance at all.  There’s no comradery between the characters.  Nothing relatable about them.  No relationships to become invested in.  The show is written so poorly, the actors just rattle off dialog in a fast paced manner.  Let’s just get through the scenes and get them over and done with.  Nobody speaks like this in the real world.  It’s not believable.  It’s also one dimensional, wooden, and forced.  They’re like robots.  There’s nothing hopeful, thought provoking, optimistic, or intelligent about this plot.  We’ve seen all of this kind of stuff before.  It’s just a series of action scenes and haphazardly written exposition dialog that just feels rushed.  The whole affair feels joyless.”

(2) We can’t see the bridge, why do we have to have Spock’s father in every series, the Klingons have their facial expressions, the only interesting character dies in the pilot, etc.

(3) Deus Ex Machino says Discovery’s main character gets off to a very bad start.

(4) Discovery and diversity