Jeanne Gomoll Wins 2017 Rotsler Award

The 2017 Rotsler Award has been given to Jeanne Gomoll, of Madison, Wisconsin.

The award, established in 1998 and named for the talented, prolific artist Bill Rotsler (1926-1997), is for long-time artistic achievement in amateur publications of the science fiction community.  The winner receives a plaque and an honorarium of US$300.

Gomoll (“go-MOLL”) was a Guest of Honour at the 72nd World Science Fiction Convention, held at London, England, in 2014.  She created the covers for its Pocket Programme Guide.  The 24th issue of the amateur magazine Chunga had covers by her, with a discussion in Chunga 25 (February 2017).  She has been praised for illustration, graphic design, and focus, in monochrome and color.

She was twice a finalist for the Hugo Award (Best Fanartist, 1978, 1980).  She created the logos for the Tiptree Award, and for the fanzine-interest convention Corflu.  She did covers and interiors for many issues of Janus, which she co-edited with Janice Bogstad.  Janus won two Fan Activity Achievement Awards and was three times a Hugo finalist (Best Fanzine, 1978-1980).

Gomoll co-founded Wiscon, the leading feminist S-F convention, and served on the board of its sponsoring organization for almost forty years.  She was elected the Trans-Atlantic Fan Fund delegate in 1987 and was sent to the 45th Worldcon, held at Brighton, England.

She worked for the State of Wisconsin, then started her own firm Union Street Design, serving State-agency clients and others.

The Rotsler is sponsored by the Southern California Institute for Fan Interests, a non-profit corporation which has produced the World Science Fiction Convention three times.  Current judges are Sue Mason, John Hertz, and Mike Glyer.  The Rotsler is announced at Loscon, the annual Los Angeles SF convention, sponsored by the Los Angeles Science Fantasy Society, a non-profit corporation.

This year Loscon XLIV was held November 24-26 at the Los Angeles International Airport Marriott Hotel.  A display of Gomoll’s work was in the Art Show.

Stathopoulos Portrait Wins Prize

Nick Stathopoulos has won the 2017 Black Swan “People’s Choice Prize” worth $5,000 for his portrait of Sudanese refugee and lawyer, Deng Thiak Adut titled “Deng 2.”

The Black Swan Prize is a set of three cash awards for portrait art associated with the City of Perth’s showcase at the Art Gallery of Western Australia. The People’s Choice Prize is determined by popular vote.

Stathopoulos is a long-time fan, 10-time winner of the Australian NatCon’s Ditmar Award, and a past Hugo and Chesley Award nominee.

His previous portrait of Deng Adut was a runner-up for the 2016 Archibald Prize.

Sudanese refugee and lawyer Deng Adut came to the attention of Nick Stathopoulos through an advertisement for Western Sydney University, where Adut was a graduate. It movingly documented how he came to Australia following life as a child soldier in Sudan and how he put himself through law school, becoming a formidable refugee advocate and community leader.

See other Black Swan prize-winning art at the link.

Ault and Stathopoulos with Archibald entry in 2016.

2018 Grammy Awards Nominees

The nominees for the 60th Grammy Awards have been announced. The awards will be presented at New York’s Madison Square Garden on January 28 and televised on CBS.

Neil Degrasse Tyson, Carrie Fisher, and the music from sff productions like ArrivalGuardians of the Galaxy 2, Game of Thrones, Hidden Figures and Moana are all up for the award.

Here are the categories with nominees of genre interest:

SPOKEN WORD FIELD 

Best Spoken Word Album (Includes Poetry, Audio Books & Storytelling):

  • Astrophysics For People In A Hurry — Neil deGrasse Tyson
  • Born To Run — Bruce Springsteen
  • Confessions Of A Serial Songwriter — Shelly Peiken
  • Our Revolution: A Future to Believe In (Bernie Sanders) — Bernie Sanders And Mark Ruffalo
  • The Princess Diarist — Carrie Fisher

MUSIC FOR VISUAL MEDIA FIELD 

Best Compilation Soundtrack For Visual Media:

  • Baby Driver — (Various Artists)
  • Guardians Of The Galaxy Vol. 2: Awesome Mix Vol. 2 — (Various Artists)
  • Hidden Figures: The Album — (Various Artists)
  • La La Land — (Various Artists)
  • Moana: The Songs — (Various Artists)

Best Score Soundtrack For Visual Media:

  • Arrival — Jóhann Jóhannsson, composer
  • Dunkirk — Hans Zimmer, composer
  • Game Of Thrones: Season 7 — Ramin Djawadi, composer
  • Hidden Figures — Benjamin Wallfisch, Pharrell Williams & Hans Zimmer, composers
  • La La Land — Justin Hurwitz, composer

PACKAGE FIELD 

Best Boxed Or Special Limited Edition Package:

  • Bobo Yeye: Belle Epoque In Upper Volta — Tim Breen, art director (Various Artists)
  • Lovely Creatures: The Best Of Nick Cave And The Bad Seeds (1984 – 2014) — Tom Hingston, art director (Nick Cave And The Bad Seeds)
  • May 1977: Get Shown The Light — Masaki Koike, art director (Grateful Dead)
  • The Voyager Golden Record: 40th Anniversary Edition — Lawrence Azerrad, Timothy Daly & David Pescovitz, art directors (Various Artists)
  • Warfaring Strangers: Acid Nightmares — Tim Breen, Benjamin Marra & Ken Shipley, art directors (Various Artists)

Delany Campaigns to Make Katherine MacLean a SFWA Grand Master

Katherine MacLean

Samuel R. Delany called on SFWA today to honor Katherine MacLean as a Grand Master:

Let’s make Kathryn McLean [sic] a Grand Master of Science Fiction. She is in her 90’s and the award can only go to a living writer!

It is the renewal of a plea he made in 2013 when his own selection as a Grand Master was announced.

His latest Facebook post quoted praise for the author from the Wikipedia entry for MacLean:

Damon Knight wrote, “As a science fiction writer she has few peers; her work is not only technically brilliant but has a rare human warmth and richness.”[1] Brian Aldiss noted [citation needed] that she could “do the hard stuff magnificently,” while Theodore Sturgeon observed [citation needed] that she “generally starts from a base of hard science, or rationalizes psi phenomena with beautifully finished logic.”

The full title of the SFWA honor being the Damon Knight Memorial Grand Master Award, Knight’s accolade should count for even more.

Delany adds:

Since it is not about quantity, but quality and influence, that is why the award should be given her. As I wrote to her when I the award was announced for me:

“Among the great absurdities of the SF world is that I am a grand master and you are not. Happy birthday and much love.” By not honoring her, we make our awards mean less. Her single collection of short stories (The Diploids) and her Nebula Award winning novel [sic] (Missing Man) pointed a new generation of writers the way sentences had to be put together to tell a story both humanly and intellectually satisfying, and an older generation recognized it.

MacLean’s novella “The Missing Man” won a Nebula Award in 1971. The expanded novel-length version was nominated for a Nebula in 1976. In 2003 MacLean was honored as an SFWA Author Emeritus. In 2011, she received the Cordwainer Smith Rediscovery Award.

[Thanks to Brian Z. for the story.]

Clarke Foundation Names 2017 Arthur C. Clarke Award Winners

The Arthur C. Clarke Foundation will present its annual awards at the “Unleash The Imagination” conference on December 9 at George Washington University.

The 2017 winners are:

Lifetime Achievement Award

Stephen Hawking

Stephen Hawking
(by video), PhD, Theoretical physicist, cosmologist, author and Cambridge professor

Innovator Award            

John Hendricks

John Hendricks
Founder and former Chairman of Discovery Communications, Founder and Chairman of CuriosityStream

Award for Imagination in Service to Society

Kim Stanley Robinson

Kim Stanley Robinson
Author of science fiction, including the Mars trilogy

[Thanks to Martin Morse Wooster for the story.]

2017 Premio Ignotus Winners

The winners of the Premio Ignotus 2017 (2017 Ignotus Awards) announced November 18 include Liu Cixin for the Spanish translation of Three-Body Problem, and Ken Liu for  “The Bookmaking Habits of Select Species”. And author Guillem López won the Best Novel category for the second consecutive year.

The awards, sponsored by Spain’s Asociación Española de Fantasía, Ciencia Ficción y Terror, were presented at HispaCon, the Spanish National SF convention.

The translation of category names and story titles comes from Ricardo Manzanaro’s article for Europa SF.

2017 Premios Ignotus Winners 

Novela / Best Novel

  • La polilla en la casa del humo, Guillem López

Novela Corta / Best Novella

  • En tierra extraña, Felicidad Martinez

Cuento / Best Short Story

  • La segunda muerte del padre, Cristina Jurado (Cuentos desde el otro lado)

Antologia / Best Anthology

  • La mirada extraña, de Felicidad Martínez, ed. Sportula

Libro de ensayo / Best related Book

  • En regiones extrañas, Lola Robles

Articulo / Best related work

  • Escritoras españolas de ciencia ficción, Lola Robles (SuperSonic 4 y 5)

Ilustración / Best Cover

  • Futuros perdidos, Enrique Corominas

Producción audiovisual / Audiovisual production

  • El ministerio del tiempo (Television)

Tebeo / Comics

  • Providence, Jacen Burrows y Alan Moore (ed. Panini)

Revista / Magazine

  • SuperSonic

Novela extranjera / Foreign Novel

  • El problema de los tres cuerpos (Three Body Problem), Liu Cixin

Cuento extranjera / Foreign story

  • Acerca de las costumbres de elaboración de libros en determinadas especies (“The Bookmaking Habits of Select Species”), Ken Liu

Sitio web / Web

[Via Sense of Wonder.]

2017 Endeavour Award

Two writers from the Pacific Northwest are winners of the 19th annual Endeavour Award, given for books published in 2016.

  • Dreams of Distant Shores (Tachyon) by North Bend, OR, writer Patricia McKillip
  • Lovecraft Country (Harper) by Seattle, WA, writer Matt Ruff

They will split the $1,000.00 grant that accompanies the Award. The Award was announced Friday, November 17 at OryCon in Portland.

The other finalists were:

  • Arabella of Mars by Portland, OR, writer David D. Levine, Tor Books;
  • Eocene Station by Victoria, BC, writer Dave Duncan, Five Rivers Publishing;
  • Waypoint Kangaroo by Portland, OR, writer Curtis Chen, Thomas Dunne
    Books/St Martin’s Press

The Endeavour Award honors a distinguished science fiction or fantasy book, either a novel or a single-author collection, created by a writer living in the Pacific Northwest. All entries are read and scored by seven readers randomly selected from a panel of preliminary readers. The five highest scoring books then go to three final judges, who are all professional writers or editors from outside of the Pacific Northwest.

The judges for the 2017 Award were Ginjer Buchanan, retired Editor-in-Chief, Ace/Roc Books; editor and writer John R. Douglas; and Nebula and World Fantasy award winning author Andy Duncan.

AWARD ELIGIBILITY FOR 2018: To be eligible for next year’s Endeavour Award the book — either a novel or a single-author collection of stories — must be either science fiction or fantasy. The majority of the book must have been written, and the book accepted for publication, while the author was living in the Pacific Northwest (Oregon, Washington, Idaho, Alaska, British Columbia, or the Yukon.)

The deadline to enter books published during 2017 is February 15, 2018. Full information on entering the Award is available on the Endeavour Web site: www.osfci.org/endeavour. Click on Entry Form in the left hand column for a fill-in PDF of the form.

The Endeavour Award is sponsored by Oregon Science Fiction Conventions, Inc. (OSFCI), a 501(c)(3) non-profit corporation.

[Thanks to Jim Fiscus for the story.]

Dragon Awards Category Changes

Today the Dragon Awards officially declared nominations are being taken for the 2018 awards. The site had already been updated and opened to participants some days ago.

They also announced the creation of a new category, and the retirement of another.

We are excited to announce, Best Media Tie-In Novel, as a new category for the 2018 Dragon Awards!

Qualifications for this new category include: that it is a novel, 70,000 words in length, containing a single story, (no anthologies) based on a media property: comic book, game, graphic novel, literary work, movie or television series.

The category of Best Apocalyptic Novel has been retired. In the award’s first two years it was won by Nick Cole for Ctrl Alt Revolt! (2016) and Cory Doctorow for Walkaway (2017).

[Thanks to Laura for the story.]

2017 Nommo Awards

The inaugural Nommo Awards were presented November 16 during the AkeFest in Abeokuta, Nigeria.

Tade Thompson

The awards are sponsored by the African Speculative Fiction Society of professional and semiprofessional African writers, editors, publishers, graphic artists and film maker. ASFS was founded last year with 60 charter members.

The winners are:

BEST NOVEL – The Ilube Award

  • Tade Thompson for Rosewater

BEST NOVELLA

  • Nnedi Okorafor for Binti

BEST SHORT STORY

(Tied)

  • Lesley Nneka Arimah with “Who will Greet You at Home”
  • Tendai Huchu with “The Marriage Plot”

BEST COMIC OR GRAPHIC NOVEL

  • Chimurenga’s “Chronic: The Corpse Exhibition and Older Graphic Stories” – Chronic no. 3. Various writers and artists. Edited by Ntone Edjabe.

The Nommos are voted on by ASFS members. Eligible works must be produced by Africans, and may be self-published.

ASFS’ definition of who is an African includes:

  • citizens of African countries,
  • people born on the continent and raised there for substantial periods of time,
  • citizens or people born on the continent who live abroad
  • people who have at least one African parent or
  • Africans without papers, and
  • some migrants to African countries*.

*’African country’ is defined as any country or contested area on the Continent of Africa, ending at the Egyptian border, and including islands such as Zanzibar and Madagascar.

The award has been funded for four years, by Mr Tom Ilube. The prize for best novel is $1,000, best novella $500, best short story $500, and best graphic novel $1000 to be shared.

[Via Locus Online.]

2017 Prix de l’Uchronie Winners

Congratulations to Jo Walton, who won a 2017 Prix de l’Uchronie for the French translation of her novel My Real Children. All the winners were announced November 13 by ActuSF.

The award is given in three categories:

  • The Literary Prize, rewarding essays and novels.
  • The Prix Graphisme, rewarding comics, covers and other pictorial initiatives.
  • The Special Prize, rewarding an original uchronic work, be it a game, an exhibition, etc.

As explained at Europa SF:

Uchronia” refers to a hypothetical or fictional time-period of our world, in contrast to altogether fictional lands or worlds.

A concept similar to alternate history but different in the manner that uchronic times are not easily defined (mainly placed in some distant or unspecified point before current times), sometimes reminiscent of a constructed world.

…“Uchronia” was coined by the French philosopher Charles Renouvier as the title of his 1876 novel.

 Prix Littéraire

  • Mes vrais enfants, de Jo Walton, (Trad. de l’anglais par Florence Dolisi), Editions Denoël coll. Lunes d’Encre, 2017

Prix Graphique

  • Série Erased, de Kei Sanbe, Editions Ki-Oon

Prix Spécial

  • Philippe Éthuin pour son travail uchronique au sein des éditions Publie.Net (Histoire de ce qui n’est pas arrivé de Joseph Méry, Le passé à vapeur, Les autres vies de Napoléon Bonaparte Uchronies & Histoires Secrètes, Une autre histoire du monde, 2500 ans d’uchronies).

The awards jury was composed of Éric Henriet, Président; Étienne Barillier; Bertrand Campeis, Secretary; Karine Gobled; Jean Rébillat; and Jean-Luc Rivera.

The awards will be presented at the Festival de l’Imaginaire de la ville in Sèvres, France in December.

[Via Locus Online.]