So some strange thoughts transcend our wonted themes, and into glory creep

By John Hertz: Happening to read D. Hoffman, The Billion-Dollar Spy (2015; Adolf Tolkachev 1927-1986), I came across this striking passage (p. 163) about the subject’s son in 1981.

Oleg … a teenager [1966-  ] … interests ran … toward … arts, culture, music, and design….  attended a special school that emphasized English instruction.  He was already reading Kipling and Asimov

– my emphasis.  There’s glory for you!

                                            

[Title ref.] H. Vaughan, “They Are All Gone into the World of Light”, Silex Scintillans [“The Flashing Flint”] 2nd ed. 1655, no. 1; L. Carroll, Through the Looking-Glass ch. 6 (1871)

MacFarlane, Stewart, Lee Interviews

Curated by Carl Slaughter:

SETH MACFARLANE

Wall to wall carpet, wood, leather, house plants.  “It looked like a really plush corporate office.  That makes it the most realistic portrayal what it’s like in space.  If you’re out there for years and years, you’d go crazy if you were in something that looks like a submarine.”   Pre-Discovery and pre-Orville interview with Seth MacFarlane.

 

“When I look at the television shows that I responded to, if I watch a cop show, if I watch a medical show, I’m going to see the murder of the week, I’m going to see the disease of the week.  Growing up, I liked things like ‘The Twilight Zone.’ I was a ‘Star Trek’ fan because I didn’t know if I was going to see and adventure story, or a quiet relationship story, or a story involving some sort of social and political commentary.  To turn on a show and not have any idea what it is you’re going to see.”  Plus Seth MacFarlane’s imitation of Captain Kirk.  Also pre-Discovery and pre-Orville.

 

PATRICK STEWART

  • Patrick Stewart didn’t think Next Generation would last

  • Patrick Stewart on the moment he knew he was finished playing Professor X

  • Patrick Stewart:  “Warning:  Unknown British Shaekespearian Actor”

  • Patrick Stewart –  Larry King interview

STAN LEE

  • Larry King – Stan Lee interview

 

Star Wars Video Roundup

Compiled by Carl Slaughter:

(1) Last Jedi Easter eggs

(2) New Hope – deleted Scenes

(3) Empire Strikes Back  –  deleted scenes

(4) 45,000 signatures on a petition to remove Last Jedi from the canon.

(5) John Williams recruited for Han Solo project:

Solo will stay in the Star Wars family with veteran franchise composer John Williams set to write the theme for the standalone film about Han Solo, slated for release on May 25. It will be Williams’ ninth assignment.

(6) If the Caretakers aren’t your favorite Last Jedi characters, you can’t sit with us

While the hype swirling around those silly little Porgs that pepper the screen in Star Wars: The Last Jedi is completely understandable based on looks alone, one group of characters has been vastly underrated, and frankly, it’s an abomination if you ask me. The dark horse I have in mind? The caretakers who keep the Jedi village on Ahch-To looking fresh as hell, that’s who.

Canadian SFF Authors’ Quest to Help Homeless Man

For months Canadian fantasy author Caitlin Sweet and her husband, sf writer Peter Watts, had a homeless man living in the ravine behind their house in the east end of Toronto.

Last week Sweet shared their experience on Steve Paikin’s nightly TVO program, The Agenda, viewable on YouTube. (Air date: December 15.)

City living includes all kinds of unexpected encounters. But it doesn’t usually include having someone take up residence in your backyard. That is what happened to novelist Caitlin Sweet, giving her a glimpse into the world of those in this city who regularly navigate Ontario’s very complicated mental health and shelter system. The Agenda welcomes Sweet to learn more about her experience.

 

Sweet also wrote a long article for the TVO website — “What to do about Kevin: Demons, little fires, and the man who lived in my ravine”.

For months, he lived behind my house. He was friendly and well-educated. He loved his cat, Blueberry Panda. He shouted at demons and started fires. I wanted to make him get help—shelter, medication, support. But this is Ontario

We call 911 on a rainy night in October. Kevin’s in our yard again, though he promised us he wouldn’t be. He shouts that he’s alone with Blueberry Panda (his cat) on the surface of a giant sun, and nothing else exists in time or space and only he, almighty, can harness the power of this sun for the purposes of destruction.

The paramedics arrive after five minutes, and the first police car a couple of minutes after that. Others follow. Just like two weeks ago.

Six officers, all with flashlights, tromp along the narrow, overgrown path that leads to the back of the yard at our house in the east end of Toronto. Kevin’s hunkered down with his sodden sleeping bag over his head, rocking, looping, round and round.

“Kevin—let’s get you up,” one of the officers says. “Let’s get you somewhere dry.”

“No,” he snaps, briefly free of the loop. Then he resumes: “You are not speaking English. Blueberry Panda and I are in an unknown location because we are the only creatures in all of time and space. Blueberry Panda and I are in an unknown—”

“Kevin.”

No.”

He’s standing now. His wild, curly hair and beard look even wilder in the glow of the flashlights; his brown skin looks grey.

In the end he goes with the officers quietly.

…. At 3 a.m., long after Kevin leaves with the cops, the phone rings. It’s a frontline worker from the Centre for Addiction and Mental Health; she tells us Kevin has just been sent away in a taxi, having not been assessed or medicated. He was lucid again by the time someone at the ER had spoken to him. He answered their questions. He got in the cab. He’s supposed to end up at a shelter.

He’s back at our place six hours later, calling for Blueberry Panda.

…The first time Kevin was taken away, I thought everything was going to get better—I was convinced that professional and qualified people would be looking after him from then on. That was before I learned about Ontario’s rules for involuntary admission.

It works like this: Someone (typically a police officer) sees a person exhibiting signs of mental illness and decides they should be taken to hospital. At hospital, that person is examined and assessed. If various criteria are satisfied, the examining doctor can fill out a Form 1—that is, an application for psychiatric assessment—which allows the hospital to hold the person for up to 72 hours, without legal review.

…Back in September, Kevin started shouting in the middle of the night. He explained later that he could see the demons most clearly after dark. Shouting was how he banished them. So we’d lie in bed, listening to him shout the demons away.

One night, he sang instead: first Whitney Houston’s “Greatest Love of All,” then Madonna’s “Like a Prayer.” Another night, we looked out the window and saw flames: Kevin had made a fire. For a few moments the flames leapt high, toward the rain-soaked trees.

We didn’t call the police; we wanted to avoid involving law enforcement, if at all possible, as we’d read too many stories about Toronto cops and their sometimes violent interactions with mentally ill people. So who were we supposed to contact?

I sent our city councillor a long, wordy email that boiled down to: Help. We don’t want anything bad to happen to this man, but he’s mentally ill and now he’s making fires in our yard and he won’t go anywhere without his cat and please help. I got a response from a staffer a few minutes later: she said she’d refer the issue to someone from the city’s Streets to Homes program. She thanked Peter and me for being such caring people.

Five days later, I’d heard nothing more, so I emailed our councillor again, and again I received a quick reply: she’d follow up with the city. She’d keep me in the loop. Thanks again for all we were doing.

I didn’t hear from the councillor’s office again, and I never heard from the city….

Peter Watts also blogged about it – “We Need to Talk About Kevin”.

A few nights back I found myself standing out in the rain at 2 a.m., peering through the fence to see if the fire Kevin had lit was in danger of burning down our shed or setting the ravine alight. It wasn’t; but obviously the guy needs help. I just don’t know if the current system can give him any. In terms of mental health this place has gone to shit ever since the government decided to cut costs by classifying everyone as an outpatient. It’s a lesser-evil sort of thing.

Gateway guy has made no progress; Big Cop (Officer Baird, I learn later) approaches me and says, “I think we got off on the wrong foot. You don’t know me, you’re judging me by the uniform. I’m honestly trying to help this guy; you say you have a relationship with him? Maybe you could try talking to him?”

“Well, sure,” I say, suddenly feeling like kind of a dick.

We go back to Kevin’s tent— my tent, until I gave it to him on the condition that he stop screaming death threats in the middle of the night (or at least that he make it really clear that those death threats were not aimed at us). I remember he smiled when I said that, looked kind of rueful. Now that I think back, though, I realize he made no promises.

He’s originally from Trinidad. Speaks with this cool accent. Back in the nineties he earned a degree from the University of Toronto: dual major in chemistry and philosophy. How cool is that?

Now he huddles half-naked in the woods, and rages against monsters at three in the morning….

Sweet and Watts were actually able to get Kevin into the only shelter that allows pets, by incredible persistence. Sweet wrote on her blog —

November 1

There’s room at the inn. I’ve called every couple of hours, as the front desk person told me to weeks ago. And at last, at last, a bed at the Bethlehem United shelter for Kevin, and a place for Blueberry Panda with him.

I’m at work. Peter hurries to the ravine and tells Kevin. Peter rents a Zipcar and hurries to pick it up at a Canadian Tire sort of near our house. When he gets back, Kevin is starting little fires. There’s no Blueberry in the carrier. “She got upset,” Kevin says. “She ran away. I can’t go without her.”

Peter yells at him—articulately, I’m sure. He convinces Kevin to put his stuff in the trunk and himself in the front seat. Drives him to Bethlehem United, way north-west of our place. He tells me later that Kevin was conversational.

He drops Kevin off at the shelter. Promises to bring Blueberry Panda as soon as we can wrangle her (which will be hard; she gets skittish when Kevin’s not around). We don’t catch her that day or the morning of the next—but that’s OK, because Kevin comes back, of course, swearing he’s going to get her into that carrier this time; swearing he’s going back to the shelter. He’ll be gone before 4 p.m., he tells Peter, who tells me that he doesn’t believe him. But when Peter goes out onto the porch at 4, Kevin’s stuff is gone. The carrier’s gone. He calls the shelter; yes, Kevin showed up, carrier in hand.

We call for Blueberry one more time that night, as we put out kibble. Just in case.

November 3

I wake up at 5 because I think I hear him across the fence. “Did you hear that?” I whisper. “Yes,” says Peter. But in the morning there’s no sign that anyone’s been there.

If people wish to support the only pet-friendly shelter in Ontario, click the link — Bethlehem United Shelter.

Several years ago, Fred Victor and Street Health presented a photo-journal study at a national conference on homelessness in Toronto on the role pets play in the lives of people living on the street.  They called the study, Paws for Thought.  We found out how important it was for people to stay connected to their four-legged friends when everything else seemed to have been taken away from them.

So, when, Fred Victor got involved in opening a new shelter in northwest Toronto (Caledonia and Lawrence), everyone agreed that pets should be welcomed into the shelter with their owners.  It is the only pet-friendly shelter in Toronto.  By creating this unprecedented access, Fred Victor has kept close to its mandate of meeting the needs of people who would otherwise spend a night on the street.

[Thanks to JJ for the story.]

How to Write Criticism

By John Hertz:   Actually it’s a lesson from Hilaire Belloc.  He (1870-1953) wrote 150 books; his comic poems Cautionary Tales for Children (1907) include “Rebecca, who Slammed Doors for Fun and Perished Miserably”; two of his essay collections are On Everything (1909) and On Nothing (1910); his polemical biographies of Wolsey (1930) and Cranmer (1931) are masterly; by the first decade of the 20th Century people who did not agree with him – I often don’t (literary present tense) – were among those who called him the greatest living prose writer.

Here he is, writing in those days and in the style of his time, about what had just been.

In one epoch lubricity, in another fanaticism, in a third dulness and a dead-alive copying of the past, are the faults which criticism finds to attack.  None of these affected the Victorian era.  It was pure — though tainted with a profound hypocrisy; it was singularly free from violence in its judgments; it was certainly alive and new; but it had this grievous defect (a defect under which we still labour heavily), that thought was restrained upon every side.  Never in the history of European letters was it so difficult for a man to say what he thought and to be heard.  A sort of cohesive public spirit (which was but one aspect of the admirable homogeneity of the nation) glued and immobilized all individual expression….

It is to be carefully discerned how many apparent exceptions to this truth are, if they be closely examined, no exceptions at all.  A whole series of national defects were exposed and ridiculed in the literature as in the oratory of the day; but they were defects which the mass of men secretly delighted to hear denounced and of which each believed himself to be free.

Preface to Froude’s Essays in Literature and History (1906)

in J. De Chantigny ed., Hilaire Belloc’s Prefaces, p. 86 (1971;
B goes on to say “In such a time Froude maintained an opposing force”, p. 87)

Rocket Stack Rank Issues Apology, Hullender Off Locus Panel

Rocket Stack Rank has answered “An Open Letter With Respect to Reviews Published on Rocket Stack Rank” with an apology and commentary. The open letter was coauthored by Brooke Bolander, Indrapramit Das, Ada Hoffmann, Keffy R.M. Kehrli, Rose Lemberg, Sunny Moraine, Suzanne Palmer, Charles Payseur, A. Merc Rustad, K.M. Szpara, Bogi Takács, and JY Yang, and has been cosigned by well over 100 others since it was posted yesterday.

Rocket Stack Rank’s “Apology & Open Letter Responses” begins:

We apologize to all readers and authors we’ve harmed and offended. Greg [Hullender] has withdrawn from the Locus Recommended Reading List panel.

We apologize for offending non-binary and trans people who use “they” as their pronoun. Our criticism of fictional non-binary characters in stories hurt real people who read and identify with those characters. What we’d previously dismissed as differences of personal preference or as “neutral” linguistic arguments, actually exposed a major blind spot.

We also apologize for trying to “explain” trans people to a cis audience in two reviews (The Black Tides of Heaven & The Red Threads of Fortune). It is not our place to do that no matter how much history Greg had in the LGBT movement, and we should have known that.

Moving forward, we will no longer single out the use of “they” as pronouns for non-binary characters as a Pro or Con of a story. We will treat non-binary characters the same way we treat gay, lesbian, bisexual, and trans characters. For existing reviews, we will update each with a correction and comment that links to this post. In general, if people tell us about errors in pronouns or gendering, we’ll thank them for their feedback and correct the errors.

We continue to listen and to learn, and we will do better.

The apology is followed by a paragraph-by-paragraph response to the Open Letter, accepting some of the criticisms, disagreeing with others, for example —

We do not promote ourselves as the one-and-only authority on short fiction, as evidenced by the search link we provide with every story that lets readers find reviews written by people with very different tastes from RSR, as well as direct links to recommendations from prolific reviewers where available.

Other parts of the response vary between accepting the criticisms and making further apology, explaining measures being taken to avoid similar problems in the future, and trying to document the inaccuracy of a few specific criticisms.

Meanwhile, Locus, which has been under pressure to drop Hullender from the Recommended Reading List panel, has issued this statement:

[Editor’s note: I have been covering this story in the Scroll, however, I did not want to delay reporting these developments for eight or ten hours til the Scroll is ready to post.]

Sci-Fi Roundup for November 28

Compiled by Carl Slaughter: (1) Vandalization of Star Trek

(2) We now know Ash is Voq, but these super fans compiled plenty of evidence before the big reveal.

(3) Discovery is Section 31

(4) Everything Wrong with the Wonder Woman movie

(5) Thor deleted scenes

(6) Green Lantern versus Batman

(7) Klingon nonsense: ScreenRant’s list “Star Trek: 15 Things That Make No Sense About Klingons” starts with forehead bumps.

Thank you Star Trek for giving us Klingons: the original TV bad guys in space who ultimately became good guys. Thy’re also the butt of so many jokes, now and in the fictional future.

Klingons are true alien icons; a mysterious race with rich traditions, a guttural language which is taught on earth in real life – even though they don’t actually… exist – and a whole lot of really odd narrative inconsistencies. When Gene Roddenberry first came up with the empirical nemesis to Starfleet’s interplanetary do-goodery, he probably had no idea that Klingon mythology would blow up into a sub-cultural mini-movement, inspiring everything from group cosplay to a staged production of Shakespeare in Klingonese.

Over the course of hundreds of TV episodes and movies, that extraterrestrial lore got very confused.

(8) Top 10 Marvel Heroes and Villains You Will Never See in the MCU

(9) Most of these are probably not your favorite Marvel characters.  But Marvel has an obligation to the fans to maintain continuity.  Don’t leave us hanging, Stan.

(10) 10 times Marvel lost their damn minds

(11) 10 Most Inappropriate Comics Storylines Of All Time

(12) Superhero commercials

(13) Storm Trooper paradox

(14) Social order revealed in Wall-E

(15) Stranger Things Cast Answer the Web’s Most Searched Questions

(16) Suppose a technologically advanced alien race is 65,000,000 light years from Earth.  Are they taking pictures of dinosaurs?

Harassment Scandal Reaches Swedish Academy

By Hampus Eckerman: File 770 has reported on the Nobel Prize before (with regards to Dylan), so this might be of interest.

First some background. The #metoo is an enormous thing in Sweden now in a way it can’t really be in a larger country. Politicians are forced to resign. TV-personalities. There are groups for collecting information in the church, in the unions, in the healthcare, absolutely everywhere.

A few days ago, the scandal reached the Swedish Academy, the group not only responsible for handing out the Nobel Prize in Literature, but an enormous amount of other prizes. It is absolutely one of the most powerful cultural groups in the country. And now it turns out that the husband of one of the members has been involved not only in abuse and harassment, but also most likely in rapes. And the rapes have taken place in an apartment in Paris, owned by the Swedish Academy. Also, one of the members recommended the harasser for a medal (which the harasser received) and another said he was “a gentleman”. At the same time as he was well-known among the whole cultural elite for who he was since the 80s. In fact, in the 90s, one of the largest Swedish newspaper made long exposé about his harassment. The Swedish Academy did nothing at that time. Neither did any publishers.

In English: “Man banned from Nobel Prize party over sex assault claims”. (Warning: Article contains graphic details.)

The Swedish Academy made the following press release:

Press release from The Swedish Academy

23 NOV 2017

At its meeting this evening, the Swedish Academy has unanimously taken the decision to immediately suspend all contact and all further funding of all activities conducted by the person in the media under the name The Culture Person. This is partly about the support given to the man’s cultural scene (since 2010 it is about SEK 126,000 per year – no payments have been made to him personally) and partly about the assignment he had in charge of the Academy’s apartment in Paris .

This is our first action and it is motivated by two things. On the one hand the examination made by the Swedish newspaper Dagens Nyheter, which we welcome, on the other hand, when it was found during the meeting that members, daughters of members, wives of members and staff at the Academy’s office have all been exposed to unwanted intimacy or inappropriate treatment by the person concerned. These experiences had not come to light without the recent attention to these problems.

Secondly, decisions have also been taken to review the Swedish Academy’s earlier relationship with this man and, in particular, examine whether this has had any influence, directly or indirectly, on the Academy’s award of prizes, scholarships and other funding, as well as investigating whether he has influenced The Academy’s work in general.

The third measure concerns the future. Work should be initiated to ensure that a repetition can not be done, and determine how our routines and working methods can be improved. We have already found that we have violated our own rules against bias and that they must be tightened.

The Swedish Academy wants as much transparency as possible on this issue. More detailed information regarding the economic collaboration, for example, will be reported shortly.

Note that they say that the man’s harassment would not have come to light if there hadn’t been a newspaper article about it, even though their own members had been among those abused(!).

I do think this link might be interesting when judging the impact of the metoo-campaign internationally. As you see, Sweden is in its own league — https://trends.google.com/trends/explore?q=Metoo

Sci-Fi Roundup for November 24

Compiled by Carl Slaughter. (1) The Joss Whedon Wonder Woman movie that wasn’t (fortunately). ScreenRant reveals “15 Things You Didn’t Know About Joss Whedon’s Canceled Wonder Woman Movie”.

  1. Cobie Smulders was (maybe) going to be Wonder Woman

Whedon ended his post announcing that his involvement with Wonder Woman was over by saying, “Finally and forever: I never had an actress picked out, or even a consistent front-runner. I didn’t have time to waste on casting when I was so busy air-balling on the script.

However, in a post-script, he mentions, facetiously or not, that he was looking at Cobie Smulders for the role. We mention this not because we think it was actually going to shake out that way, but because we think that, jokes aside, that would have been some solid casting. We love Gal Godot’s take, but we would have also loved Smulders’ version.

Whedon eventually directed Smulders in his Avengers movies, so at least that worked out.

(2) Another ScreenRant list: “15 things you completely missed in the Punishe”

  1. Pete Castiglione

If you thought the alias Frank Castle took on to hide his identity sounded familiar, there’s a good reason for that. It’s his family’s given name in the comics.

As immigrants came through Ellis Island in the early 20th century to gain citizenship to the United States, many surnames were changed to be simpler for officials to spell or pronounce. (Ever wondered why there are so many “Smiths” in the U.S.?) The Castiglione family came to the States from Italy, but upon arrival, their name became the simpler Castle.

Of course, the name does pop up in alternate timelines and “What If” comic book stories as well where the family didn’t change their name.

It was also revealed in more recent comics that there are other members of the Castiglione family in the U.S. besides Frank Castle, but they’ve all been living under assumed names. Maybe Frank still has some family out there in the MCU as well.

(3) Discover “15 superpowers you never knew the Punisher had” at ScreenRant.

  1. Invulnerability to the Penance Stare

Ghost Rider has some of the coolest superpowers, both known and unknown. By far his most powerful is the Penance Stare. By making eye contact the Rider can force someone to experience all the pain they’ve ever caused anyone while simultaneously reliving every painful memory they’ve ever had.

The end result is your eyeballs catching fire, insanity, death and, in some special cases, spontaneous combustion. To say the least it is not a pleasant experience. There are only a few in a existence immune to Ghost Rider’s deadly glare, and Frank Castle is one of them.

You would think if anyone was to feel the repercussions of the Penance Stare it would be the Punisher. After all he has brutally killed millions of people in any number of excruciating ways. Remember, the time he shot Wolverine in the face and groin? You just know that had to hurt.

Yet amazingly the Punisher was unaffected when he locked eyes with Ghost Rider. Why? Because he feels no guilt for the suffering he’s caused his victims. That’s badass. Realize for a second that the Penance Stare once brought Galactus to his knees. It didn’t even make the Punisher blink.

(4) Marvel Heroes players demand refund. ScreenRant reports: “Marvel Heroes Players Are Demanding Refunds Since It’s Shutting Down”

Fans of Marvel Heroes are not happy with the announcement of the game’s closure, and have begun to demand refunds for purchases made. Disney confirmed that the free-to-play RPG was being closed down earlier this week, with the company officially planning to shut the game down at the end of December and bringing with it the end of its relationship with developer Gazillion.

(5) 15 trivia facts about the Upside Down world of Stranger Things courtesy of ScreenRant.

  1. Eleven may be the first person to have encountered it

In season 1, we get multiple glimpses of Hawkins Lab’s cruel, torturous methods of training Eleven to cross dimensions and space in order to learn confidential information. However, during one of her sensory deprivation attempts, it isn’t a government entity or foreign message that Eleven comes across, but rather, the Demogorgon itself.

It’s in this expansive, black, void-like space that Eleven first encounters the Demogorgon and presumably the suggestion of the Upside Down with it. Further, she even comes into physical contact with the monster, perhaps establishing a physical link between the two.

Yet, while this is the first sign of the Upside Down’s existence (or creation?) that we are given, we still have no real idea about what this jarring moment suggests. Did the Upside Down exist before this point in time? Did the Demogorgon? Or was Eleven’s interference in the breach somehow responsible for their creation?

(6) ScreenRant fills in the blanks — “Star Wars: 15 Things You Never Knew Happened Between Episodes 3 And 4”.

  1. Han Solo Marries… someone who isn’t Leia

One of the most surprising moments in the Star Wars comics set after A New Hope was when a female smuggler showed up claiming to be the wife of Han Solo. Perhaps Leia wasn’t always the woman for him…

The backstory for this goes back to Han’s early days as a smuggler, long before that fateful cantina meeting in Mos Eisley. A crime lord had become known for double-crossing spice smugglers, and a gang of such smugglers devised a plan to get revenge. As part of this con, two of the gang – Han Solo and Sana Starros – had to have a marriage ceremony.

So it wasn’t exactly a marriage of love, and it wasn’t even completely legitimate. But that didn’t stop it being incredibly awkward when “Sana Solo” later crossed paths with Han and Princess Leia.

(7) Paranormal Action Squad pilot.  Think Ghost Busters meets Scoobie Doo with a bit of Futurama.

(8) Bizarre movies coming out in 2018.

(9) Movies that will blow everyone away in 2019.

(10) Jason Isaacs and Shazad Latif talk about Discovery at Den of Geek: “Jason Isaacs & Shazad Latif interview: Star Trek Discovery”

What was your relationship to Star Trek before you were cast?

Shazad Latif: My granddad was obsessed with it, my uncle had every episode on VHS. I grew up with TNG, which was on after Fresh Prince Of Bel Air.

Jason Isaacs: Yeah I’m so much older than you. I watched the original series when I was a kid, crammed on the couch with my brothers and parents. We always argued about which of the existing three channels we should watch, but we never argued when Star Trek was on, so I watched TOS on repeat many many times and I’ve watched nothing since then. None of the other series.

(11) It’s not a prop, it’s not a trinket. “Star Trek fans: Live your best life with this Bluetooth communicator”

However, there is one piece of merchandise that hovers above the rest — possibly because it literally looks like it fell straight out of the show’s set. The Star Trek Bluetooth communicator is the thing that fans never knew they needed.

The Bluetooth communicator seriously looks like an exact replica of the one from the original series. The attention to detail can be attributed to the fact that it was designed using a literal 3D scan of one of the last remaining communicator props. To boost the authenticity even more, it features 20 voice clips and conversation fragments from the show. Who else can say they can have a conversation with Spock when they’re bored?