Pixel Scroll 7/20

Eight stories, two videos, some smack and a snack in today’s Scroll.

(1) What does John King Tarpinian eat each year to commemorate the July 20th anniversary of the first Moon landing?

moon-pie-large

And if anybody asks John “Where were you that day?” he has a good story to tell them.

I was just 15 and my father took a buddy, Mike, and me to Zuma Beach and he returned home.  My parents and Mike’s parents were so engrossed in the landing they forgot about us.  This was in the olden days with no cell phone and the pay phone was broken so we could not call them to remind them about us kids.

There was a group of people with a 9” B&W TV watching the landing on the beach so we joined them.  The battery eventually drained so I took it upon myself to lift up the locked hinged viewing door of a lifeguard station to get at the electrical outlet so we could plug-in the TV and watch Neil and Buzz.

In John’s honor, here’s a Bradbury bonus:

(2) Vox Day did a little housekeeping on his blog to address a chronic problem in a clear, direct and motivating way:

For the love of all that bleeps and bloops, stop whining about spell-checker mistakes and autocorrect errors in your comments already! It’s considerably more annoying for the rest of us to read the inevitable follow-up post explaining that of course you know how to spell whatever word you just misspelled, it’s just that whatever device or software you are using introduced the error without you noticing it before hitting the blue button, than it is to simply skim past the misspelled word itself.

Drawing everyone’s attention to your claim that you really know how to spell a word that you observably didn’t know how to spell correctly is simple pride and vanity, and worse, it’s completely misplaced vanity.

Here’s why. It doesn’t make you look any less stupid to be knowingly using a device that regularly introduces errors than it does to make the occasional spelling error or typo in the first place. In fact, it makes you look at least twice as stupid, because first, either you don’t know how to turn autocorrect off or you actually rely on it. And second, given how often these errors are introduced, you are probably making more spelling mistakes due to using it than you would if you simply relied on your own spelling capabilities.

If you use a spellchecker, that’s fine, but then own it. If it screws up, it’s on you. Deal with it already and stop talking about the stupid things. To quote the VFM, WE DON’T CARE.

I see little of this at File 770 since I installed the editing option, so don’t take it as an oblique message. I just enjoyed the rant.

(3) Check out Joe Phillips’ posters recasting Old Hollywood stars in modern superhero movies.

jp-teentitans

If you’re curious to see what Marilyn Monroe would look like as Power Girl, or Humphrey Bogart as Hellboy, wonder no more! Joe Phillips’ Silver Screen Heroes series has brought this vision of a better world to life. Phillips not only has a good eye for likenesses, but also a good eye for casting. Clark Gable as Tony Stark is an especially inspired choice!

(4) George R.R. Martin’s plea on Not A Blog for fans to vote in the Hugos was picked up as a news item in the Guardian.

George RR Martin is urging “every true fan” of science fiction to vote in the Hugo awards before the ballot closes at the end of July, for what the Game of Thrones author said was “proving to be the most controversial and hotly contested Hugo race in the award’s long history”.

Larry Correia endorsed the voter participation message and gave it a signal boost:

For once I agree with GRRM. Everybody should vote. The deadline is coming up fast.

http://www.theguardian.com/books/2015/jul/20/george-rr-martin-hugo-awards-vote-game-of-thrones-science-fiction?CMP=share_btn_fb

Since we wrote a novella worth of giant blog posts back and forth, GRRM knows damned good and well the Sad Puppies campaign wasn’t motivated by racism or sexism, but that doesn’t stop him from casually tossing the “neo-nazi” accusation out there… but you should believe him when he says there was like totally never any political bias in the system.

(5) Dr. Kjell Lindgren, Sasquan’s Special Guest, is scheduled to launch to the International Space Station this Wednesday, July 22. Glenn Glazer reports NASA will be covering the launch on television. It will be at 5:02 EST.

Kjell Lindgren of NASA, Oleg Kononenko of the Russian Federal Space Agency (Roscosmos) and Kimiya Yui of the Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency (JAXA) will launch from the Baikonur Cosmodrome in Kazakhstan at 5:02 p.m. EDT (3:02 a.m. Thursday, July 23 in Baikonur). NASA TV coverage will begin at 4 p.m.

The trio will ride to space in a Russian Soyuz spacecraft, which will rendezvous with the space station and dock after four orbits of Earth. Docking to the space station’s Rassvet module will take place at 10:46 p.m. NASA TV coverage of docking will begin at 10 p.m.

The crew will open the hatches between the Soyuz and the station around 12:25 a.m. Thursday, July 23. Expedition 44 Commander Gennady Padalka of Roscosmos, as well as Flight Engineers Scott Kelly of NASA and Mikhail Kornienko of Roscosmos, will greet Lindgren, Kononenko and Yui. NASA TV hatch opening coverage begins at 11:45 p.m. Wednesday.

Lindgren, Kononenko and Yui will remain aboard the station until late December. Kelly and Kornienko, who have been aboard since March 27, will return to Earth in March 2016 at the end of their one-year mission. Padalka, who also has been aboard since March 27, will return to Earth in September, leaving Kelly in command of Expedition 45.

(6) On the SFWA Blog, Lynne M. Thomas, Curator of Rare Books and Special Collections at Northern Illinois University, discusses the importance of archiving. She is responsible for collections that include the literary papers of over 70 sf and fantasy authors as well as SFWA’s official archives.

(7) Adam-Troy Castro’s “That Sledge-Hammer was Always Meant To Hit There: A Hugo Theory” reacts to Michael Z. Williamson’s announcement that he is voting No Award in all the Hugo categories.

So far I’ve only seen the rant from {Moronic Massacre-Mocker}, who is being given a time-out from Facebook for hate speech.

But if we permit consideration of the possibility that it has become a meme, it represents a serious shift in strategy and a complete rebranding of the desired goal.

We wanted the ship to sink. We always wanted to make a point about icebergs.

We wanted our village to be sacked. It proves our moral superiority to the huns.

Yes, I just slammed myself in the balls with a sledgehammer. I meant to do that.

Maybe they know how many supporting memberships they paid for and how many they did not. Maybe they’ve convened in panic and discussed how to still pull a nominal victory out of all this. Maybe they’ve said, “We have to sell the premise that if we go down in flames, it’s what we always intended.”

Maybe they’re terrified.

This is just a conspiracy theory, mind you. It might or might not have any validity. But the shift from, “VOTING NO AWARD IS A TERRIBLE THING TO DO!” to “WE ARE NOW VOTING NO AWARD EVEN IN OUR OWN CATEGORIES!” does give me pause….

(8) Michael Z. Williamson’s FB timeout, referenced by Castro, presumably was triggered by the grotesque “joke” MZW posted after the Charleston church shootings.

Although MZW is temporarily banned from posting to one account he is rolling along posting his usual fare as “EH Michael Williamson”.

MZW FB

[Thanks to Craig Miller, Glenn Glazer, and John King Tarpinian for some of these stories.]

219 thoughts on “Pixel Scroll 7/20

  1. It is adorable to see Correia desperately trying to do damage control.

    It is less adorable to see Williamson reveal what a vile and dangerously unbalanced person he is.

  2. Regarding #7 in the list, the “I meant to do that” strategy is the standard Sad Puppy response to getting smacked on the nose with a rolled up newspaper. Larry Corriea did it last year and I think the year before as well. If they’re doing it this year it’s just more of the same.

    MZW ick. But we knew that. He has a lot of company among the Puppies.

  3. The next round of the Science Fiction Bracket will be held in this thread. I have decided to call it the Brackett Bracket in honor of Leigh Brackett. The winning book shall receive this lovely pair of brackets: [ ], suitable for framing or using as part of their text.

    For those catching up to this, it is a March Madness-style contest for science fiction books. The arbitrary rules used to select volumes included: any individual author only gets one entry, nothing published after 1999 for the “test of time” factor, works that are (at least arguably) science fiction, not pure fantasy, no series or individual short stories allowed, but an individual book from a series or a collection of short stories by a single author published as a volume are both allowed.

    Also an understanding that this is all meaningless fun and more an excuse to discuss books than anything else. 🙂

    We are currently at 8 brackets and a total of 17 books. There was a tie last round, so one bracket will have three contestants.

    Basic rules will be:

    1) You can declare one book in a pairing (or set of three) the winner. An explanation why would be nice but is not required.

    2) You may declare any pairing (or set of three) a tie or say you cannot decide, An explanation why would be nice but is not required.

    3) You may declare that a book that I have selected as a representative book by an author is clearly THE WRONG BOOK, that author wrote another book which is CLEARLY superior, and you will vote for that one instead. Explanations why, along with insults to my intelligence and ancestry, would be nice but are not required. (Please note that it should ideally be an SF book, published before 2000.)

    4) You may declare that there is a book by a completely different author which is clearly better than EITHER BOOK that I have foolishly selected for a given pairing, and vote for that instead. Explanations, insults, SF from before 2000, etc. etc. I will include in a separate post a list of books I considered and left off as an aid to this should anyone wish to do it, but such a book need not come from this list.

  4. And without further ado, here are our current contenders:

    1. FOR SOME REASON EVERYTHING IS ON FIRE
    H. G. Wells: War of the Worlds
    Ray Bradbury: Fahrenheit 451

    2. MEN CREATE MONSTERS, MONSTERS CHANGE MEN
    Mary Shelley: Frankenstein
    Arthur C. Clarke: Childhood’s End

    3. … AND ALL FANDOM WAS PLUNGED INTO WAR
    Iain M. Banks: Use of Weapons
    James Tiptree Jr.: Her Smoke Rose Up Forever (collection of stories)

    4. GIANT-SIZED THREE-WAY INTERPLANETARY BATTLE!
    Frank Herbert: Dune
    Robert Heinlein: Stranger in a Strange Land
    Isaac Asimov: Foundation and Empire

    5. THE FEMALE MAN VS. THE FEMALE/MAN
    Joanna Russ: The Female Man
    Ursula K. Le Guin: The Left Hand of Darkness

    6. PICK YOUR DYSTOPIA
    Margaret Atwood: The Handmaid’s Tale
    William Gibson: Neuromancer

    7. WAR IN SPACE VS. CIRCULAR METATEXTUALITY
    C. J. Cherryh: Downbelow Station
    Samuel Delaney: Dhalgren

    8. ENLIGHTENMENT AND ENDARKENMENT
    Roger Zelazny: Lord of Light
    Aldous Huxley: Brave New World

  5. Yes! Second set of brackets! Here are my votes:

    1. 1. FOR SOME REASON EVERYTHING IS ON FIRE
    H. G. Wells: War of the Worlds

    2. MEN CREATE MONSTERS, MONSTERS CHANGE MEN
    Mary Shelley: Frankenstein

    3. AND ALL FANDOM WAS PLUNGED INTO WAR
    James Tiptree Jr.: Her Smoke Rose Up Forever (collection of stories)

    4. GIANT-SIZED THREE-WAY INTERPLANETARY BATTLE!
    Frank Herbert: Dune

    5. THE FEMALE MAN VS. THE FEMALE/MAN
    Ursula K. Le Guin: The Left Hand of Darkness

    6. PICK YOUR DYSTOPIA
    William Gibson: Neuromancer

    7. WAR IN SPACE VS. CIRCULAR METATEXTUALITY
    C. J. Cherryh: Downbelow Station
    Samuel Delaney: Dhalgren
    (Abstaining on #7 because never read either book.)

    8. ENLIGHTENMENT AND ENDARKENMENT
    Roger Zelazny: Lord of Light

  6. 1. H.G. Wells: War of the Worlds

    2. Mary Shelley: Frankenstein

    3. James Tiptree Jr.: Her Smoke Rose Up Forever (collection of stories)

    4. Frank Herbert: Dune

    5. Ursula K. Le Guin: The Left Hand of Darkness

    6. William Gibson: Neuromancer

    7. Samuel Delaney: Dhalgren

    8. Roger Zelazny: Lord of Light

  7. I agree with Trelane about something? I better watch for a bolt from the blue!

    Maybe someone should tell MZW that this isn’t grade school and he’s not 13 anymore.

  8. Ok, lets go:

    1. H.G. Wells. Bradbury is always best in short stories, there he would have won absolutely everything.

    2. Shelley. I can’t stand Clarke.

    3. Banks. Have never read Tiptree Jr.

    4. Herbert. Heinlein would have won with Moon is a Harsh Mistress, Door into Summer, The Strange Profession of Mr. Jonathan Hoag and Double Star.

    5. Le Guin. Never read Russ.

    6. Gibson. Never read Atwood.

    7. Didn’t read.

    8. Huxley. Never read Delaney.

  9. 1. FOR SOME REASON EVERYTHING IS ON FIRE
    H. G. Wells: War of the Worlds – The alien invasion genre needs its parent. Sad to lose Bradbury but there are better (worse?) dystopias in the competition.

    2. MEN CREATE MONSTERS, MONSTERS CHANGE MEN
    Mary Shelley: Frankenstein – An easy win I think.

    3. … AND ALL FANDOM WAS PLUNGED INTO WAR
    Abstain

    4. GIANT-SIZED THREE-WAY INTERPLANETARY BATTLE!
    Frank Herbert: Dune – scope and inventiveness wins out. Headcannon: the Bene Gessirt are the descendants of the Second Foundation.

    5. THE FEMALE MAN VS. THE FEMALE/MAN
    Ursula K. Le Guin: The Left Hand of Darkness – for sheer awesomeness. Also it ate the still bleeding heart of Solaris in the last bracket and has consumed its power.

    6. PICK YOUR DYSTOPIA
    Margaret Atwood: The Handmaid’s Tale – deeper than a precis would suggest. A novel about many things and not just its dystopian premise. Shame to lose Gibson.

    7. WAR IN SPACE VS. CIRCULAR METATEXTUALITY
    Abstain

    8. ENLIGHTENMENT AND ENDARKENMENT
    Aldous Huxley: Brave New World – Plato was the original SF writer in Western literature in so far as he intentionally wrote fictions in which he speculated about other societies. The Republic gets a deft examination here by Huxley.

  10. Oh, and Williams is really horrible. Here’s to another suspended account.

  11. Idle commentary: at present, there is still significant representation in the bracket from all 5 “groups” I had arbitrarily classed the books into in my mind: Early Founders, The Golden Age, The New Wave, The Moderns, and Literary Crossovers. (Of course, they could be classified in a number of other ways as well, so it’s not all that meaningful.)

    I suspect that after this round, most choices in the brackets are going to be pretty difficult.

  12. I admit that people as prone to violent language as Williamson scare me. Most of them won’t actually act on it, but some will, and I like not being around people who make me think “And will you be the one?”

    Happier things, hopefully….

    1. FOR SOME REASON EVERYTHING IS ON FIRE
    H. G. Wells: War of the Worlds
    There are things I’m not wild about here, but that’s true of the Bradbury, too.

    2. MEN CREATE MONSTERS, MONSTERS CHANGE MEN
    Arthur C. Clarke: Childhood’s End
    Clarke builds on Shelley’s foundations, like the rest of us, but he builds brilliantly.

    3. … AND ALL FANDOM WAS PLUNGED INTO WAR
    James Tiptree Jr.: Her Smoke Rose Up Forever (collection of stories)
    Use of Weapons is my favorite Banks novel, but the stories in the Tiptree collection are just something else again. Utterly amazing.

    4. GIANT-SIZED THREE-WAY INTERPLANETARY BATTLE!
    Frank Herbert: Dune
    Isaac Asimov: Foundation and Empire
    I’m stuck with a tie vote here. Two admirable flawed works that engage me more than the Heinlein.

    5. THE FEMALE MAN VS. THE FEMALE/MAN
    Ursula K. Le Guin: The Left Hand of Darkness

    6. PICK YOUR DYSTOPIA
    Margaret Atwood: The Handmaid’s Tale
    Neuromancer isn’t the Gibson I’d have gone to for dystopia; that’d be “The Gernsback Continuum”.

    7. WAR IN SPACE VS. CIRCULAR METATEXTUALITY
    Samuel Delaney: Dhalgren

    8. ENLIGHTENMENT AND ENDARKENMENT
    Roger Zelazny: Lord of Light

  13. Round Two, my choices:

    1)-War of the Worlds, because I consider the Wells a slightly better book. The third most difficult choice.

    2)-Frankenstein, because it’s stood the test of time, though this one was close. Fourth most difficult choice.

    3)-Her Smoke Rose Up Forever, because even Banks wasn’t as good as Tip at her best.

    4)-Foundation and Empire, because, frankly, it was a coin toss and I figured this one would see the least support. Dune will likely win and that’s fine. The toughest bracket, any of the three could win here for me.

    5)-The Left Hand of Darkness, because I’ve read it more often than I have The Female Man. The second most difficult choice.

    6)-Neuromancer, because it’s a better book than The Handmaiden’s Tale.

    7)-Downbelow Station, because it’s actually readable, a better book and I’ve rather watch a marathon of Pauly Shore movies than read three pages of Dull-grin again.

    8)-Lord of Light, because it’s a fantastic novel which has aged well, unlike Brave New World, which seriously creaks at this point.

    (Can you tell I love LoL and don’t like Dhalgren)?

  14. Guys like Williamson make me laugh. Sure, come and kick my teeth down my throat. And then enjoy 8-14 in prison and the rest of your life as a convicted felon. Of course its just bluster, but man, when you raise to an internet tough guy with a quick ‘sure, but I will be pressing charges’, their threats tend to shrivel quick.

  15. 1. FOR SOME REASON EVERYTHING IS ON FIRE
    H. G. Wells: War of the Worlds
    Ray Bradbury: Fahrenheit 451

    2. MEN CREATE MONSTERS, MONSTERS CHANGE MEN
    Mary Shelley: Frankenstein
    Arthur C. Clarke: Childhood’s End

    3. … AND ALL FANDOM WAS PLUNGED INTO WAR
    Iain M. Banks: Use of Weapons
    James Tiptree Jr.: Her Smoke Rose Up Forever (collection of stories)

    4. GIANT-SIZED THREE-WAY INTERPLANETARY BATTLE!
    Frank Herbert: Dune
    Robert Heinlein: Stranger in a Strange Land
    Isaac Asimov: Foundation and Empire

    5. THE FEMALE MAN VS. THE FEMALE/MAN
    Joanna Russ: The Female Man
    Ursula K. Le Guin: The Left Hand of Darkness

    6. PICK YOUR DYSTOPIA
    Margaret Atwood: The Handmaid’s Tale
    William Gibson: Neuromancer

    7. WAR IN SPACE VS. CIRCULAR METATEXTUALITY
    C. J. Cherryh: Downbelow Station
    Samuel Delaney: Dhalgren

    8. ENLIGHTENMENT AND ENDARKENMENT
    Roger Zelazny: Lord of Light
    Aldous Huxley: Brave New World

  16. Choices have gotten significantly harder in this round, but here goes:
    1. FOR SOME REASON EVERYTHING IS ON FIRE
    H. G. Wells: War of the Worlds

    2. MEN CREATE MONSTERS, MONSTERS CHANGE MEN
    Mary Shelley: Frankenstein

    3. … AND ALL FANDOM WAS PLUNGED INTO WAR
    James Tiptree Jr.: Her Smoke Rose Up Forever (collection of stories)

    4. GIANT-SIZED THREE-WAY INTERPLANETARY BATTLE!
    Robert Heinlein: Stranger in a Strange Land

    5. THE FEMALE MAN VS. THE FEMALE/MAN
    Ursula K. Le Guin: The Left Hand of Darkness

    6. PICK YOUR DYSTOPIA
    William Gibson: Neuromancer

    7. WAR IN SPACE VS. CIRCULAR METATEXTUALITY
    C. J. Cherryh: Downbelow Station

    8. ENLIGHTENMENT AND ENDARKENMENT
    Roger Zelazny: Lord of Light

  17. My votes! (this is fun! Thanks Kyra!

    1. FOR SOME REASON EVERYTHING IS ON FIRE
    Ray Bradbury: Fahrenheit 451

    2. MEN CREATE MONSTERS, MONSTERS CHANGE MEN
    Mary Shelley: Frankenstein

    3. … AND ALL FANDOM WAS PLUNGED INTO WAR
    James Tiptree Jr.: Her Smoke Rose Up Forever (collection of stories)

    4. GIANT-SIZED THREE-WAY INTERPLANETARY BATTLE!
    Robert Heinlein: Stranger in a Strange Land
    (tough one!)

    5. THE FEMALE MAN VS. THE FEMALE/MAN
    Joanna Russ: The Female Man

    6. PICK YOUR DYSTOPIA (ARGH! Which one scares me more?)
    Margaret Atwood: The Handmaid’s Tale

    7. WAR IN SPACE VS. CIRCULAR METATEXTUALITY
    C. J. Cherryh: Downbelow Station

    8. ENLIGHTENMENT AND ENDARKENMENT
    Roger Zelazny: Lord of Light

  18. 1. FOR SOME REASON EVERYTHING IS ON FIRE
    H. G. Wells: War of the Worlds
    An early instance of “hard SF” that appreciates that biology is more difficult than physics.

    Also, I live not far from Grover’s Mills.

    2. MEN CREATE MONSTERS, MONSTERS CHANGE MEN
    Mary Shelley: Frankenstein
    Because Shelley didn’t try to think beyond her own time the way Clarke did, she seems less dated, somehow. Maybe in another couple of centuries Clarke will seem historic, too.

    3. … AND ALL FANDOM WAS PLUNGED INTO WAR
    James Tiptree Jr.: Her Smoke Rose Up Forever (collection of stories). I haven’t read the Banks, but I’m prepared to bet I’ll prefer Tiptree. It was really amazing, when we discussed short stories a while back, how often Tiptree ended up on people’s lists.

    4. GIANT-SIZED THREE-WAY INTERPLANETARY BATTLE!
    You fiend!! Frank Herbert: Dune has plot and world-building on a level the others aren’t really trying for.

    5. THE FEMALE MAN VS. THE FEMALE/MAN
    Ursula K. Le Guin: The Left Hand of Darkness

    6. PICK YOUR DYSTOPIA
    Abstain, I haven’t read the Atwood and I don’t have a sense which I’d prefer

    7. WAR IN SPACE VS. CIRCULAR METATEXTUALITY
    C. J. Cherryh: Downbelow Station
    I’m pretty much always going to go for war in space.

    8. ENLIGHTENMENT AND ENDARKENMENT
    Roger Zelazny: Lord of Light
    By a landslide.

  19. I was on my phone last night so could not get through the full brackets, let alone make nifty comments!

    But now, voila!

    1. FOR SOME REASON EVERYTHING IS ON FIRE

    Ray Bradbury: Fahrenheit 451

    I’m a Bradbury fan, much more than Wells, and I think Bradbury’s dystopia (I don’t buy the utopian ideas at the end) is a much more scathing indictment than aliens from outer space…….

    2. MEN CREATE MONSTERS, MONSTERS CHANGE MEN
    Mary Shelley: Frankenstein

    Shelley all the way (I don’t think CE is Clarke’s strongest book), but Shelley was doing all sorts of amazing stuff for the first time. And Percy was a schmuck.

    3. … AND ALL FANDOM WAS PLUNGED INTO WAR

    James Tiptree Jr.: Her Smoke Rose Up Forever (collection of stories)

    I have not read Banks (maybe, someday, but there are very few authors I would vote above Tiptree).

    4. GIANT-SIZED THREE-WAY INTERPLANETARY BATTLE!
    Frank Herbert: Dune
    Robert Heinlein: Stranger in a Strange Land
    Isaac Asimov: Foundation and Empire

    Clash of the Titans………I think I’m gonna stick with DUNE which is one of my alltime favorites (and marks the first time I disagreed with my dad about sf and presented an argument as to why he was wrong about the quality of an sf novel–he thought DUNE was bad–he didn’t change his mind, but he said I made a good argument).

    5. THE FEMALE MAN VS. THE FEMALE/MAN
    Joanna Russ: The Female Man

    Russ. All the way, every way, although LeGuin’s LHoD is amazing.

    6. PICK YOUR DYSTOPIA
    Margaret Atwood: The Handmaid’s Tale

    Atwood (I tried to read Gibson, and even though I got bored early, I had to sit through so many fanboi presentations on cyperbunk at Popular Culture Association in the early and mid-1990s that I know so much more about Gibon and Sterling than I ever wanted to know). So I have no problem declaring Atwood’s is a superior dystopia (though I think Suzette Haden Elgin’s _Native Tongue_ did it earlier, did it better, did it with more linguistic sophistication, did it more originally, and Elgin didn’t ever go around disclaiming sf as a genre). (I like Atwood as a feminist writer, but she is too anti-sf for my taste.)

    7. WAR IN SPACE VS. CIRCULAR METATEXTUALITY
    C. J. Cherryh: Downbelow Station

    I love Delany’s theory, criticism, and autobiography–I cannot (could not in years earlier and cannot now) get through his fiction.

    8. ENLIGHTENMENT AND ENDARKENMENT
    Roger Zelazny: Lord of Light

    I was a HUGE Zelazny fan, and LoL is one of my top three……I should revisit/reread at some point to see if they’ve held up.

  20. *eye roll* Pick one–either you’ve got a lawyer working on it, or you’re totally gonna fly somewhere and beat somebody up for reporting your FB account. Trying to stack both doesn’t hold together. “I’m gonna get you with the law! And then break it completely! Both at once!”

    Now we just need him to go on about how he was a sniper in Desert Storm and we’ll have a glorious internet hat trick.

    Do people not know how incredibly dorky this sort of thing makes them look?

  21. 1. Wells, if only for that opening paragraph.
    2. Clarke. It doesn’t deserve to win here but just liked it.
    3. Tiptree. This matchup is actually cruel to Banks.
    4. Asimov. I like Stranger better, but I am voting strategically because Fuck Dune anyway.
    5. LeGuin. Whatever.
    6. Atwood, cause she’s great on Twitter.
    7. Delany. The whole Maybe Jim’s favorite book thing.
    8. Zelazny. The whole Maybe Jim’s other favorite book thing.

  22. Some tough pairings here. If this comes down to Dune vs Lord of Light, I’ll probably wind up gibbering in a corner somewhere.
    ———————-
    1. FOR SOME REASON EVERYTHING IS ON FIRE
    H. G. Wells: War of the Worlds

    2. MEN CREATE MONSTERS, MONSTERS CHANGE MEN
    Arthur C. Clarke: Childhood’s End

    3. … AND ALL FANDOM WAS PLUNGED INTO WAR
    Iain M. Banks: Use of Weapons

    4. GIANT-SIZED THREE-WAY INTERPLANETARY BATTLE!
    Frank Herbert: Dune

    5. THE FEMALE MAN VS. THE FEMALE/MAN
    Ursula K. Le Guin: The Left Hand of Darkness

    6. PICK YOUR DYSTOPIA
    William Gibson: Neuromancer

    7. WAR IN SPACE VS. CIRCULAR METATEXTUALITY
    -Pass, haven’t read both-

    8. ENLIGHTENMENT AND ENDARKENMENT
    Roger Zelazny: Lord of Light

  23. @RedWombat: “Do people not know how incredibly dorky this sort of thing makes them look?”

    Introspection/ self-awareness is not really a done thing for Puppies in general, and MZW in particular.

  24. > “We can already see the finals come down to Lord of Light vs. Her Smoke Rose Up Forever, huh.”

    You think so? It’s certainly a possible one, but based on the numbers, there are multiple others I really wouldn’t count out yet.

  25. 1. FOR SOME REASON EVERYTHING IS ON FIRE
    Ray Bradbury: Fahrenheit 451

    2. MEN CREATE MONSTERS, MONSTERS CHANGE MEN
    Mary Shelley: Frankenstein

    3. … AND ALL FANDOM WAS PLUNGED INTO WAR
    James Tiptree Jr.: Her Smoke Rose Up Forever (collection of stories)

    4. GIANT-SIZED THREE-WAY INTERPLANETARY BATTLE!
    Frank Herbert: Dune

    5. THE FEMALE MAN VS. THE FEMALE/MAN
    Ursula K. Le Guin: The Left Hand of Darkness

    6. PICK YOUR DYSTOPIA
    Margaret Atwood: The Handmaid’s Tale

    7. WAR IN SPACE VS. CIRCULAR METATEXTUALITY
    C. J. Cherryh: Downbelow Station

    8. ENLIGHTENMENT AND ENDARKENMENT
    Roger Zelazny: Lord of Light

    #8 killed me to do but I had to go with RZ in the end.

  26. A few comments about how things look before I head to bed for the night, bearing in mind things can change pretty rapidly:

    Every entry has already gotten votes this round; some books might get soundly defeated, but no one is going to get totally smoked.

    Both War of the Worlds and Fahrenheit 451 eked out victories last round after close, hard-fought nail biters. This time around, however, the Wells has already pulled out well ahead of the Bradbury. Will Bradbury have a late-game surge the way Wells did last round? Or will Wells walk away with it?

    The bracketeer thought that Use of Weapons and Her Smoke Rose Up Forever were going to have a bitter fight; both have huge fanbases and both won their brackets handily last round. But so far, the Tiptree is in the lead, and the Banks has serious catching up to do if it’s going to be in contention …

    So far the Neuromancer vs. The Handmaid’s Tale dystopian showdown is actually the hardest fought battle this round, currently at an exact tie. I can’t even guess who’s going to come out ahead here.

    Downbelow Station vs. Dhalgren is still fairly close. Downbelow Station has the edge right now, but it’s well within flipping range.

    Meanwhile, after a strong early lead by Brave New World, Lord of Light is definitely now starting to pull ahead. Can Huxley fans flip it back?

    In the three-way fight, Dune is ahead of both Stranger in a Strange Land and Foundation and Empire. Barring an upset, Frankenstein currently looks likely to defeat Childhood’s End, and The Left Hand of Darkness currently looks likely to defeat The Female Man. The strength of both of last round’s Big Victors appears to continue …

  27. 1. Fahrenheit 451

    2. Frankenstein

    4. Foundation and Empire

    8. Lord of Light

  28. 1. FOR SOME REASON EVERYTHING IS ON FIRE
    H. G. Wells: War of the Worlds

    2. MEN CREATE MONSTERS, MONSTERS CHANGE MEN
    Mary Shelley: Frankenstein

    I didn’t like Childhood’s End.

    3. … AND ALL FANDOM WAS PLUNGED INTO WAR
    (Is this supposed to be an unusual state?)
    James Tiptree Jr.: Her Smoke Rose Up Forever (collection of stories)

    4. GIANT-SIZED THREE-WAY INTERPLANETARY BATTLE!
    Frank Herbert: Dune

    I’d have picked The Moon is a Harsh Mistress.

    5. THE FEMALE MAN VS. THE FEMALE/MAN
    Ursula K. Le Guin: The Left Hand of Darkness
    (Although I haven’t read The Female Man, so this is a bit unfair.)

    6. PICK YOUR DYSTOPIA
    Margaret Atwood: The Handmaid’s Tale

    7. WAR IN SPACE VS. CIRCULAR METATEXTUALITY
    Abstain (I don’t think I’ve **cough cough** read either *cough cough** of these)

    8. ENLIGHTENMENT AND ENDARKENMENT
    Roger Zelazny: Lord of Light

  29. 1. Bradbury, Fahrenheit 451.
    I’m generally not a Bradbury fan, but this one is too good.

    2. Mary Shelley: Frankenstein
    I’ve never cared much for Clarke.

    3. Tiptree, because she was Tiptree

    4. Tie. Don’t make me choose

    5. Le Guin. I respect Russ immensely, but I found The Female Man difficult to get through.

    6. Gibson: Neuromancer. Atwood is too preachy.

    7. Samuel R. Delany, because Dhalgren is a work of genius, and because he deserves a vote that gets his name correct.

    8. Zelazny, absolutely.

  30. FOR SOME REASON EVERYTHING IS ON FIRE
    H. G. Wells: War of the Worlds
    Ray Bradbury: Fahrenheit 451
    Grr. Bradbury still.

    2. MEN CREATE MONSTERS, MONSTERS CHANGE MEN
    Mary Shelley: Frankenstein
    Arthur C. Clarke: Childhood’s End
    It lives ! Frankenstein.

    3. … AND ALL FANDOM WAS PLUNGED INTO WAR
    Iain M. Banks: Use of Weapons
    James Tiptree Jr.: Her Smoke Rose Up Forever (collection of stories)
    This is not fair to Banks. Tiptree.

    4. GIANT-SIZED THREE-WAY INTERPLANETARY BATTLE!
    Frank Herbert: Dune
    Robert Heinlein: Stranger in a Strange Land
    Isaac Asimov: Foundation and Empire
    Dune. Anyone watch the Sony Pictures documentary on the failed movie ? Very neat.

    5. THE FEMALE MAN VS. THE FEMALE/MAN
    Joanna Russ: The Female Man
    Ursula K. Le Guin: The Left Hand of Darkness
    Abstain.

    6. PICK YOUR DYSTOPIA
    Margaret Atwood: The Handmaid’s Tale
    William Gibson: Neuromancer
    Neither. Snow Queen by Vinge. Schysmatrix by Sterling. Davy by Pangborn.

    7. WAR IN SPACE VS. CIRCULAR METATEXTUALITY
    C. J. Cherryh: Downbelow Station
    Samuel Delaney: Dhalgren
    Cherryh. And this should still be Chanur’s Saga.

    8. ENLIGHTENMENT AND ENDARKENMENT
    Roger Zelazny: Lord of Light
    Aldous Huxley: Brave New World
    Neither. Isle of the Dead if anything instead. But I would prefer a different choice. Arstoi by Walter Jon Williams than Lord of Light.

  31. Man, how clever do you have to be to put IN PUBLIC that you’re going to be using lawyers to get information so you can commit a felony, and worse yet, to put it ON THE NETWORK owned by the people from which you are seeking that information?

    Come to think of it, I’m pretty sure “Criminal Threats” are breaking the law in Michigan or wherever Williamson hides his carcass.

  32. (The Moon Is A Harsh Mistress is starting to threaten to make the three-way fight a four-way fight.)

  33. 1. FOR SOME REASON EVERYTHING IS ON FIRE
    The Wells for sensawunda.
    H. G. Wells: War of the Worlds
    Ray Bradbury: Fahrenheit 451

    2. MEN CREATE MONSTERS, MONSTERS CHANGE MEN
    Tough choice but the Shelley which I think is better-written.
    Mary Shelley: Frankenstein
    Arthur C. Clarke: Childhood’s End

    3. … AND ALL FANDOM WAS PLUNGED INTO WAR
    Ultimately, Banks is the one I re-read.
    Iain M. Banks: Use of Weapons
    James Tiptree Jr.: Her Smoke Rose Up Forever (collection of stories)

    4. GIANT-SIZED THREE-WAY INTERPLANETARY BATTLE!
    Not a hard choice at all; I’m such a fan I also enjoy the sequels and Dune is re-read every so often. I’ve even read the BH/KJA Dune books (but only once).
    Frank Herbert: Dune
    Robert Heinlein: Stranger in a Strange Land
    Isaac Asimov: Foundation and Empire

    5. THE FEMALE MAN VS. THE FEMALE/MAN
    Hangs head in shame for not having read either.
    Joanna Russ: The Female Man
    Ursula K. Le Guin: The Left Hand of Darkness

    6. PICK YOUR DYSTOPIA
    Both worthy but Neuromancer gets my vote.
    Margaret Atwood: The Handmaid’s Tale
    William Gibson: Neuromancer

    7. WAR IN SPACE VS. CIRCULAR METATEXTUALITY
    Haven’t read these either
    C. J. Cherryh: Downbelow Station
    Samuel Delaney: Dhalgren

    8. ENLIGHTENMENT AND ENDARKENMENT
    Best Worst. Pun. Ever.
    Roger Zelazny: Lord of Light
    Aldous Huxley: Brave New World

  34. > “… and because he deserves a vote that gets his name correct.”

    Er.

    Oops.

  35. Kurt Busiek on July 20, 2015 at 6:23 pm said:

    1. Fahrenheit 451

    2. Frankenstein

    4. Foundation and Empire

    8. Lord of Light

    but Lord of Light doesn’t start with an ‘F’?

  36. Jim Henley on July 20, 2015 at 5:48 pm said:

    We can already see the finals come down to Lord of Light vs. Her Smoke Rose Up Forever, huh.

    My guess would be Frankenstein versus Ursula LeGuin (and yes I did write it that way so that it sounds like a literary Abbot and Costello movie)

  37. Camestros Felapton

    8. Lord of Light

    but Lord of Light doesn’t start with an ‘F’?

    Yeah, should have made it “Ford of Light” and counted as a vote for Brave New World.

  38. … and this seems like a good time to recommend Michael Bishop’s brilliant book Brittle Innings, an SF book (sort of) about baseball. And like the equally brilliant The Universal Baseball Association, Inc., J. Henry Waugh, Prop., by Robert Coover, it’s worth reading even if, like me, you’re not any kind of baseball fan. Explaining why the Bishop is relevant to today’s thread would be a spoiler, but for those of you who like spoilers, bar bs gur znva punenpgref vf Senaxrafgrva’f zbafgre, erghearq sebz gur nepgvp jnfgrf naq cynlvat onfronyy.

  39. Someone should inform Mr. Beale that a spelling-checker is the tool used to make sure one’s words are legible.

    A spell-checker is a tool used by students at Hogwarts.

  40. And it is for his Twitter tweets and Facebook writing that Michael Z. Williamson has been nominated for the Best Fan Writer Hugo…?

    [ crickets chirping ]

  41. 1. Ray Bradbury: Fahrenheit 451

    2. Mary Shelley: Frankenstein

    3. James Tiptree Jr.: Her Smoke Rose Up Forever (collection of stories)

    4. Frank Herbert: Dune

    5. Ursula K. Le Guin: The Left Hand of Darkness

    6. Margaret Atwood: The Handmaid’s Tale

    7. Samuel Delaney: Dhalgren

    8. Aldous Huxley: Brave New World

    Also, good grief, MZW comes across as a singularly unpleasant individual even among the ill-behaved puppy crowd.

    Finally, moon landing! Third birthday and earliest memory.

  42. I just realized that the Maybe Jim’s Two Favorite Books in this tournament each have looping structures. So it’s pretty clear what needs to happen if either loses.

  43. Of the classic stars/sf mashups I thought the Danny Kaye/Shirley McLean Joker&Harley poster was the best. I could almost see that one being made.

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