Pixel Scroll 7/30 Gonna Scroll the Bones

A lot of material out there because of the Hugo voting deadline tomorrow but if you want more than the three items I included in today’s Scroll then Google is your friend.

(1) Today in History!

1932: Walt Disney released his first color cartoon, “Flowers and Trees,” made in three-color Technicolor.

1976: NASA released the famous “Face on Mars” photo, taken by Viking 1

Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter image by its HiRISE camera of the "Face on Mars". Viking Orbiter image inset in bottom right corner.

Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter image by its HiRISE camera of the “Face on Mars”. Viking Orbiter image inset in bottom right corner.

(2) And Today’s Birthday Boy and Girl – what a coincidence!

Born 1965: J. K. Rowling

Born: Harry Potter (main character of Harry Potter series)

(3) “The Tom-cademy Awards: The Only Awards Show Exclusively for Tom Cruise Movies” is part of a weeklong Cruise-themed series on Grantland. The author anoints Emily Blunt as the Best Supporting Actress of any Cruise movie.

The wonderful thing about EoT is that it’s really funny. It achieves that by not pretending the audience has never seen a time-travel movie. Instead, Edge of Tomorrow claps the audience firmly on the shoulder and, smiling, asks (rhetorically), “Hey, wanna see Tom Cruise get iced?” And, as it turns out, watching The Character Named Tom Cruise getting killed in fun and interesting ways, ways that show just enough exposed cranium to make the exercise mean something, is pretty invigorating.

But! Do we not, paradoxically, also want to see The Character Named Tom Cruise succeed? To save the world and get the girl? Yeah, of course we do. This is Tom Cruise we’re talking about. And it’s Blunt, playing it straight the whole time while kicking a Ripley-in-Aliens level of xenomorph butt, who has to downshift from hero-on-a-recruiting-poster to woman-who-we-kind-of-want-to-see-kiss-Tom-Cruise in order to make Cage’s journey from charming coward to soldier/love interest believable. He’s the hero we deserve, that we also need to see die.

Genre films Minority Report (Best Visual Effects) and Interview With The Vampire (Best Costume Design) also take home the hardware.

(4) Janis Ian, who now writes in the sf field, has her own Bill Cosby story from when she was a teenager preparing to sing her hit song on The Smothers Brothers show in 1967.

“No, I was not sexually bothered by Bill Cosby,” said Ian in a Facebook post Tuesday, reacting to a New York magazine report featuring 35 women who accuse Cosby of sexual impropriety.

In her post, Ian accused Cosby of publicly outing her as a lesbian, based on a chance meeting backstage at a television show.

“Cosby was right in one thing. I am gay. Or bi, if you prefer, since I dearly loved the two men I lived with over the years. My tilt is toward women, though, and he was right about that.”

(5) On to tamer subjects – the Worldcon business meeting. Kevin Standlee hopes to discourage complaints while rewarding the reader’s attention with a good discussion of why meetings adopt Roberts Rules or the equivalent:

The reason that parliamentary procedure is complex is that it’s trying to balance a bunch of contradictory rights. If you’re someone who is convinced that your personal, individual right to speak for as long as you want and as many times at you want trumps the rights of the group to be able to finish the discussion and reach a decision in a reasonable time, well, it’s unlikely that you’ll ever be happy with any rules that allow for limits on debate. If you’re someone who has no patience with debate and just wants the Strong Man to Make Decisions, you’ll never be pleased with rules that allow for people to debate and reach a group decision through voting….

And he invites your help to improve how WSFS meetings are run.

WSFS rules are complicated because the people who attend the meetings have effectively voted for complexity, but also because some of the complexity is required to protect the rights of members, both individually and in groups, and including the members who aren’t even at the meeting. If you have a better way for deciding how we should run things, the onus is on you to propose something. As long as you just complain that “it’s too complicated,” without proposing something both easier and workable, don’t expect to be taken seriously.

(6 ) Russell Blackford on Metamagician and the Hellfire Club delivers “The Hugo Awards – 2015 – Summation”.

Even if there is a legitimate grain of truth somewhere amongst the complaints of the Sad Puppies group, their actions have led to an exceptionally weak Hugo field this year and to some specific perverse outcomes. If the Sad Puppies campaigners merely thought that there is a “usual suspects” tendency in recent Hugo nomination lists, and that politically conservative authors are often overlooked in recent times, they could have simply argued their case based on evidence. Likewise, they could have taken far wiser, far more moderate – far less destructive – actions to identify some genuinely outstanding works that might otherwise have been missed. What we saw this year, with politicised voting on an unprecedented scale, approached the level of sabotaging the awards. I repeat my hope that the Sad Puppies campaign will not take place next year, at least in anything like the same form. If it does, my attitude will definitely harden. I’ve been rather mild about the Sad Puppies affair compared to many others in SF fandom, and I think I can justify that, but enough is enough.

I really can’t understand how Blackford processes the ethics of the 2015 situation, this being the third go-round for Sad Puppies, that “enough” had not happened already to warrant a stronger expression of his disapproval, but a fourth iteration will.

(7) The shortest “fisking” in history — Larry Correia strikes back at Sad Puppies references in The New Yorker’s Delany interview The boldfaced sentences below are literally 66% of what he had to say.

The ensuing controversy has been described, by Jeet Heer in the New Republic, as “a cultural war over diversity,” since the Sad Puppies, in their pushback against perceived liberals and experimental writers, seem to favor the work of white men.

Diversity my ass. Last years winners were like a dozen white liberals and one Asian liberal and they hailed that as a huge win for diversity. 

Delany said he was dismayed by all this, but not surprised. “The context changes,” he told me, “but the rhetoric remains the same.”

Well, that’s a stupid conclusion. 

Alert the bugler to blow “Taps” over the fallen standards of Correia fisks….

(8) Cheryl Morgan tells fans don’t give up.

Look, there will be some weird stuff in the results this year. There may well be a few No Awards given out, and possibly some really bad works winning awards. It is not as if that hasn’t happened before, though perhaps not in the same quantities. On the other hand, people are talking about the Hugos much more this year than they ever have before, and in many more high profile places. In addition vastly more people have bought supporting memberships, and we are looking at a record number of people participating in the final ballot. All of those people will be eligible to nominate next year. This isn’t the way I would have liked to get that result, but it is a result all the same.

(9) John Scalzi realized he would have a more restful day if instead of discussing the Hugos he spent his time doing computer maintenance.

[Thanks to Martin Morse Wooster, David K.M. Klaus and John King Tarpinian for some of these stories. Title credit to File 770 contributing editor Soon Lee.]

372 thoughts on “Pixel Scroll 7/30 Gonna Scroll the Bones

  1. There is, if memory serves, no other sexual violence in the Covenant books. (I’ve heard that this isn’t true of his other series, and is one more reason I haven’t read them.) This one, though, is presented in as uncompromisingly rejecting terms as any I can think of.

    Good points – for me it was the repetition of the theme of sexual violence in his other books that made it harder to not see its use in Lord Foul’s Bane as cynical. I think particularly in the Mordant’s Need books which in other ways was a lighter story.

  2. Camestros: Oh, yeah, retrospective evaluation is a huge thing (and important, and valid). It always sounded like the Gap series is strongly deficient in qualities I loved about the Covenant books, so I skipped it, and so far nobody’s made me feel like I really ought to regret the choice.

  3. JJ on July 30, 2015 at 8:40 pm said:
    69. Nate July 30, 2015 4:29 PM: the talks about the goals of Rabid Puppies took place off the blog between Vox and Brad and Larry. Vox wanted to burn it all down… and Brad talked him out of it. All of this took place before Vox put up the first Rabid Puppies post.

    That may all be true, but given we don’t know who “Nate” is or how they acquired the information, I’m not trusting the statement.

    @Bruce Baugh,
    Good points. I read the Thomas Covenant books (the first six anyway) as an angsty teen, and they spoke to me, which is why I am reluctant to re-visit them.

  4. Soon Lee,

    That may all be true, but given we don’t know who “Nate” is or how they acquired the information, I’m not trusting the statement.

    Correia confirmed it. VD intended to strike back after he was no-awarded and mocked last year – for what was admittedly not a very good story! – and they talked him out of it.

    Personally, I think y’all played right into his hands, prompting even observers unsympathetic to the “puppies,” like Blackford (or me, frankly) to note that the anti-puppy reaction has been “unfair, hurtful, and excessive.”

  5. Bruce Baugh, et al.,

    It is a book folks should read, but the criticisms are also fair. I reread Lord Foul’s Bane recently, and I don’t think the aspect we are discussing holds up as great literature. But other aspects – particularly the others you highlighted – were revelatory, and I agree that they remain very powerful today. The books stand on their merit, but there is a real flaw.

  6. Hampus: Mike Glyer has chosen a couple puppy posts for discussion, but I’m not supposed to cite what they said and note if I agree with it or not? Come on. I didn’t say Vox Day’s behavior was admirable, or a mark of his stunning super-genius. I said those who over-reacted played into his hands.

  7. @Bruce Baugh – wow, thanks for posting that; very interesting and eloquent. Disclaimer: I’m a huge fan of the first two trilogies – I’m not finished with the last quartet (but am not as into it).

    @Various – I don’t have a problem with Donaldson’s writing, even early on. Yes, okay, argent argent argent, why not just say silver once, etc. 😉 But he does some interesting things with words and language, even if he overdoes it at times. I’m enar the beginning of book 3 of 4 in the final quartet – not as enamoured of this series as the earlier ones – but still enjoying it.

  8. @Kendall

    writing

    If you need another fix, go read The Last Dark. I’d hesitate to call it a good book, but it was a satisfying conclusion.

  9. Brian Z.

    Personally, I think y’all played right into his hands, prompting even observers unsympathetic to the “puppies,” like Blackford (or me, frankly)…

    Yes, you’ve been very successful running the Xanax gambit.

  10. Brian Z.: I said those who over-reacted played into his hands.

    No one “overreacted”. The anti-puppy reaction was neither “unfair” nor “excessive”. And if the Puppies found the reaction “hurtful”, perhaps they should stop and consider just how hurtful their actions were — the actions they took first, which caused the anti-Puppy reaction.

    The Puppies feeling that the anti-Puppy reaction was “hurtful” are like the domestic abuser feeling that it was “hurtful” for their partner to call the cops and file for a restraining order.

    If anything, the reaction to the Puppies taking a big poo on the Hugos has been rather restrained in comparison to what was done.

  11. Brian Z:

    “Mike Glyer has chosen a couple puppy posts for discussion, but I’m not supposed to cite what they said and note if I agree with it or not? Come on. I didn’t say Vox Day’s behavior was admirable, or a mark of his stunning super-genius. I said those who over-reacted played into his hands.”

    Stop misrepresenting. What I said is that you were doing victim blaming. And you should stop that.

  12. @Mike “Yes, you’ve been very successful running the Xanax gambit.”

    I regret that I have no likes/ upvotes that I can give this.

  13. The poor guy. He works for years on his story. Maybe it isn’t the best thing ever, but it was his own. He sends it out into the world with humble pride – look, look, my little bird can fly! Wonder of wonders, some other kind folk see his little story, and nominate it for an award. The Hugos, even to be named in such company is such an honour!
    But then the dreams turn to nightmares. His story is mocked, the heartfelt emotions he poured into it are scorned. He is No Awarded.
    On that dreadful day, the SJWs created their nemesis – and who can blame him if his revenge is terrible?

  14. @Mike

    Yes, you’ve been very successful running the Xanax gambit.

    I oh, for a Like/up vote button….

  15. Mike Glyer: Thank God it’s almost over.

    Just to be clear: I think Vox Day has been trying to provoke such a reaction from from the start and thus deserves to get one.

    But the way it spilled over on, I don’t know, Sarah Hoyt, who sees Marxists under her bed, or Brad Torgersen, who would enjoy putting a whoopie cushion on his teacher’s chair, or even John Wright who has said a couple questionable and even damning things himself but still shouldn’t be held to account for what others have said, was too extreme.

    Like Blackford said, if they try to hijack the awards next year – then they would deserve serious condemnation.

  16. ::blink:: clearly drug names go straight to the spam filter. Regardless:

    “Yes, you’ve been very successful running the X.n.x gambit.”

    Niiice.

  17. Brian Z.: But the way it spilled over on… Sarah Hoyt… Brad Torgersen… John Wright…

    That wasn’t “spillover”. Hoyt, Torgersen, and Wright (along with numerous others) were active participants in the slating, and they reaped what they had sown.

    It’s funny how that “personal accountability for one’s own actions” things works.

  18. Ray,

    The poor guy. He works for years on his story. Maybe it isn’t the best thing ever, but it was his own. He sends it out into the world with humble pride – look, look, my little bird can fly! Wonder of wonders, some other kind folk see his little story, and nominate it for an award. The Hugos, even to be named in such company is such an honour!
    But then the dreams turn to nightmares. His story is mocked, the heartfelt emotions he poured into it are scorned. He is No Awarded.
    On that dreadful day, the SJWs created their nemesis – and who can blame him if his revenge is terrible?

    I agree with pretty much all of this.

    Also: he might agree himself. Note he acknowledges that Correia talked him down.

  19. @Ray
    Wonder of wonders, some other kind folk mendacious dickweasels see his little story, and nominate it for an award decide to use his story as a political tool in a fight neither he or the mainstream wanted or deserved. The Hugos, even to be named in such company is such an honour!

    There. I fixed that for you.

  20. JJ: I don’t want to argue with you, and you can keep saying “puppy crap” and “poo on the carpet” all the way up to midnight on the 31st if you want.

    But while I don’t agree with MZW on much anything else – and I didn’t even bother looking at the book of tweets because I can imagine what they are like – I did feel a twinge of sympathy when he wrote these words:

    One former winner, whom I feel did in fact deserve his award, piled on to the point of equating us in exact words to domestic abusers, which is not only egregiously ridiculous, it is morally corrupt and a gross insult to actual victims and survivors of domestic abuse. Including me.

  21. Yes, Brian, you’ve made your sympathy for the aggressors and the abusers in this fiasco crystal clear.

    Your worldview, and theirs, is seriously out-of-whack.

  22. re: Donaldson, I really liked the Gap books when I read them. But. But I’ve pretty much never recommended them, because the necessary caveats are absurd; “Uh, okay, the first book has an incredible amount of sexual violence. The second book has a lot, but less. The third has some, but a lot less. And then it’s…mostly over? And if you can get through/tolerate all that, it’s so good.”

    I mean really, who am I going to say that to, ever? Also, since I haven’t read it in a decade, and I when I did read it I had minimal awareness of feminism and zero awareness rape culture, I can’t even comment intelligently on how well Donaldson handles the incredible amounts of sexual violence in the story.

    So, yeah: I thought it was great when I read it, but I can’t imagine ever recommending it.

  23. snowcrash: I think Mike either intended a pun on “xanatos gambit” involving anxiety or it was autocorrect. If the latter, looking to 2016, maybe it is more of a Kansas City Shuffle.

  24. MaxL: I haven’t read the Gap books. But rereading the first Covenant book, in terms of what he was reaching for – something like what Bruce Baugh described – in hindsight, he failed.

  25. I did feel a twinge of sympathy when he wrote these words:

    One former winner, whom I feel did in fact deserve his award, piled on to the point of equating us in exact words to domestic abusers, which is not only egregiously ridiculous, it is morally corrupt and a gross insult to actual victims and survivors of domestic abuse. Including me.

    I don’t.
    Read Wisdom from My Internet -[ not everybody, just Brian ]
    Page 48 in the category ‘Sex’, second statement down. Starts with ‘Before you…’

    Comparing his words with domestic abusers is accurate.

  26. I am amused by the reactions of VP commenters to JCW’s statement of his approximate royalty per book sold. “Wow, you’re getting screwed, no wonder you hate your publisher!” about sums it up… to which I say, these people clearly know nothing about traditional publishing. Everybody’s gotta get paid: your publisher, the distributor, and the eventual vendor.

    Common rule-of-thumb wisdom used to be, as I recall, that each step in the chain took half of the remaining value. For an $8 mass-market paperback, that gives the store $4 and the distributor $2, leaving $2 to split between the publisher and the author’s royalty. If JCW’s getting 75 cents of that, that sounds somewhere between reasonable and pretty good. (I’m lumping art and printing costs in with the publisher’s portion for this, along with editing, formatting, and the other services they’re responsible for.) Yes, that only amounts to about 9% of MSRP, but those other things ain’t free!

    I would not be at all shocked to see Tor/Macmillan pursue action against JCW over this – not as a punitive matter, but out of simple self-defense. While I freely admit that I haven’t seen one of their contracts, Tor is electronically publishing the books that JCW is offering up in Comment 61. That means Tor has purchased those electronic rights, and most likely exclusive rights, at least for the US market. If they let him get away with violating that part of his contract, that leaves them very vulnerable in a legal sense.

    Rights ownership is a big deal for authors, and JCW’s e-publication rights for these books have definitely not reverted back to him yet. He may wish it were otherwise, but he’s just taken a shotgun to his own feet, and not just with Tor. If I were a publisher in a position to offer him a contract, I’d certainly take this stunt very seriously. It may not be enough to withhold the offer altogether, but you’d better believe I’d have a stiff penalty clause in any contract I offered him. I wonder if VD has considered that aspect of these events…

  27. I generally liked Donaldson’s Gap series when I read it a long time ago, but there where some pretty glaring plot holes, and some cardboard cut-out characters, that annoyed me greatly.

    I actually didn’t notice much sexual violence in them, (there’s a young woman who was taken prisoner and mistreated by a criminal, but I can’t remember that the mistreatment involved gratuitous amounts of sexual violence) but like MaxL I read them at a time when I had “minimal awareness of feminism and zero awareness rape culture”.

    And I agree with Bruce’s praise of the Chronicles of Thomas Covenant.

  28. Wait, what did Correia dissuade Vox Day from doing? It seems to me that VD is pretty much responsible for the escalation of effect of Sad Puppies 3, and he couldn’t have fucked fandom up more if he’d had a clue how to. Whatever he does next year will build on lessons learned this year, and may well be worse, but he wouldn’t be able to get there without the experience of this year.

    And for goodness’ sake, Brian, this is the internet. You can always find someone who’ll take a perfectly normal reaction and dial it up to 22. That there’s someone out there who dislikes the Puppies and wants them hung, drawn and quartered and their heads stuck on a pike in front of the Worldcon is in no way representative of anti-puppy reaction.

    Whereas the actual leaders of the Sadly Rabid Puppies started out vitriolic and delusional, and have gotten worse as time progressed. For all your denial, there is no moral equivalence here. Calling the Puppies Dadaist, as though they were a public performance that we’ve all badly misunderstood, is as revisionist as they come. It was always a badly-motivated, cynical and inept attempt to steal the glittering prizes.

  29. I would not be at all shocked to see Tor/Macmillan pursue action against JCW over this

    I think if Tor wanted to bust JCWs balls then they’ve already been given plenty enough reason to do so with all his “as an honourable man I cannot call for a boycott, but I suggest you read what these other honourable men are saying, at least until the entire management of my publishers resigns, for surely they can no longer work with honourable men” bullshit.
    They’re presumably trying to play things down, but it may come up privately next time there’s a contract to negotiate. We will probably never know.

  30. Danny Sichel on July 30, 2015 at 7:38 pm said:

    Kurt – as I understand it, Brad Torgersen called Mike Williamson and said “I’m gonna nominate you for a Hugo. What do you have that’s eligible?”.

    Williamson said “uh… this collection of tweets and blog posts and e-mail forwards I put together, it’s called Wisdom From My Internet.”

    and Torgersen said “Done!”

    Funny thing, that. Yes, I have also seen that story. However, in the foreword to the edition of the book that’s included in the Hugo packet, Williamson writes:

    I need to thank Brad Torgersen for asking if I’d accept publicity for a nomination, and of course I said yes. Any positive publicity is good for writers and I’ll come back to that in a moment.
    I had actually expected he’d reference my short story, “Soft Casualty,” which I think has merit as both dark SF, military psychology, and possibly horror.

    Both stories have Torgersen asking Williamson “is it OK if I put you on my recommendation list?” But in one story (the older one, as far as I know), W assumed that T meant to recommend his short story and was surprised when T picked “Wisdom …”. In the other version, W didn’t remember that “Soft Casualty” was eligible and it’s W who mentions “Wisdom …” as a possible nominee.

    So like most of the things the Puppies have said about their agendas, the story about how “Wisdom …” ended up on Torgersen’s slate is also unclear and involves conflicting narratives.

    (And for added irony, I think “Soft Casualty” is a better short story than most of the stories the puppies actually did put on the ballot.)

  31. All throughout the night, they came to the Bracket.

    There were eleven women and five-and-twenty men (and one more waited in the wings, cloaked in shadow – what did he wait for, and what did he plan?) All had passed arduous tests to make it even this far. Half would survive no longer than the first day.

    One-and-twenty came from a land known as “The Us”; a country without kings, a vast expanse of fifty squabbling principalities. As a people they were innovative, experimental, but sometimes arrogant. They approached both magic and swordplay with an eye towards precision and creativity.

    Nine came from The Land of Sharp Angles, once the hub of a vast, world-encircling empire, now fallen into decadence. For a span of more than six decades they had been ruled by their omnipotent Queen. The spells and weapons they brought mixed the ancient traditions of their land with strange new technologies forged in the hearts of their vast cities.

    And six came from still other lands, with other rules, and powers young and old, but all potent and unpredictable.

    They came to do battle. They came to win victory. But most would fall. Even the Great Powers might meet their match on this field.

    For victory could come only to one.

    BRACKET

    (Part I)

    You may vote for either member of a pair, a tie, abstain, or vote for a work off the bracket entirely (any fantasy published up until 1999). Seeded works were given their own slot, then all other works were matched with them by random dice roll.

  32. @Johan P
    I have certainly read MZW forgetting that he’d published that story and so not reminding Brad of it. On one of their blogs.
    Since the Hugo packet came out well after the shortlists were announced, which obviously was after the slates were drawn up, I think assuming that the introduction in the Hugo packet was the first story is massively unsound.

  33. THE COMPLEAT FANTASY BRACKET, FIRST ROUND (THE BIG ONE)

    1. EVERYONE LOVES AN ECCENTRIC WIZARD
    The Silent Tower, Barbara Hambly
    The Once and Future King, T. H. White

    2. FROM YOUR SMALL HOME TOWN TO THE GREAT BEYOND
    The Riddle-Master of Hed, Patricia McKillip
    Stardust, Neil Gaman

    3. ADVENTURERS TWO
    Two Sought Adventure, Fritz Leiber
    Bridge of Birds, Barry Hughart

    4. OF COURSE YOU REALIZE THIS MEANS WAR
    A Game of Thrones, George R. R. Martin
    War for the Oaks, Emma Bull

    5. SERIOUSLY TARAN WHAT’S UP SHOULD WE SEND HELP
    Taran Wanderer, Lloyd Alexander
    Dracula, Bram Stoker

    6. ONE DAY YOU WAKE UP AND EVERYTHING IS DIFFERENT
    Nine Princes in Amber, Roger Zelazny
    The Metamorphosis, Franz Kafka

    7. TEA AND CACOASTRUM
    To Reign in Hell, Steven Brust
    Tea with the Black Dragon, R. A. MacAvoy

    8. 1990 VS. 1999
    Harry Potter and the Prisoner of Azkaban, J. K. Rowling
    Tigana, Guy Gavriel Kay

    9. TALES OF THE SUBTLE FAE
    Fire and Hemlock, Diana Wynne Jones
    Lud-in-the-Mist, Hope Mirrlees

    10. GRAND ADVENTURES
    Watership Down, Richard Adams
    The Sword of Conan, Robert E. Howard

    11. TI-JEANNE VS. BUTTERCUP
    Brown Girl in the Ring, Nalo Hopkinson
    The Princess Bride, William Goldman

    12. LOVE WILL TEAR US APART
    The Golden Compass/Northern Lights, Phillip Pullman
    Magic’s Price, Mercedes Lackey

    13. EVERYTHING SLOWLY GOING DOWNHILL
    One Hundred Years of Solitude, Gabriel Garcia Marquez
    The Dying Earth, Jack Vance

    14. LEARNING THAT YOU’RE UNHAPPY
    The Tombs of Atuan, Ursula K. Le Guin
    The King of Elfland’s Daughter, Lord Dunsany

    15. I CAN’T REMEMBER WHO I AM
    The Last Unicorn, Peter S. Beagle
    Soldier of the Mist, Gene Wolfe

    16. ACROSS THE SCOPE OF HISTORY
    Little, Big, John Crowley
    Silverlock, John Myers Myers

    17. VICTORY BY DROPPING STUFF ON PEOPLE’S HEADS
    The Hero and the Crown, Robin McKinley
    Small Gods, Terry Pratchett

    18. STRANGE DOINGS UP AT THE CASTLE
    Gormenghast, by Mervyn Peake
    The Dragon Waiting, John M. Ford

  34. 1. EVERYONE LOVES AN ECCENTRIC WIZARD
    The Once and Future King, T. H. White

    2. FROM YOUR SMALL HOME TOWN TO THE GREAT BEYOND
    The Riddle-Master of Hed, Patricia McKillip

    3. ADVENTURERS TWO
    Two Sought Adventure, Fritz Leiber

    4. OF COURSE YOU REALIZE THIS MEANS WAR
    War for the Oaks, Emma Bull

    5. SERIOUSLY TARAN WHAT’S UP SHOULD WE SEND HELP
    Dracula, Bram Stoker

    6. ONE DAY YOU WAKE UP AND EVERYTHING IS DIFFERENT
    Nine Princes in Amber, Roger Zelazny

    7. TEA AND CACOASTRUM
    To Reign in Hell, Steven Brust

    8. 1990 VS. 1999
    Tigana, Guy Gavriel Kay

    9. TALES OF THE SUBTLE FAE
    Fire and Hemlock, Diana Wynne Jones

    10. GRAND ADVENTURES
    The Sword of Conan, Robert E. Howard

    11. TI-JEANNE VS. BUTTERCUP
    The Princess Bride, William Goldman

    12. LOVE WILL TEAR US APART
    The Golden Compass/Northern Lights, Phillip Pullman

    13. EVERYTHING SLOWLY GOING DOWNHILL
    The Dying Earth, Jack Vance

    14. LEARNING THAT YOU’RE UNHAPPY
    The Tombs of Atuan, Ursula K. Le Guin

    15. I CAN’T REMEMBER WHO I AM
    The Last Unicorn, Peter S. Beagle

    16. ACROSS THE SCOPE OF HISTORY
    Silverlock, John Myers Myers

    17. VICTORY BY DROPPING STUFF ON PEOPLE’S HEADS
    Small Gods, Terry Pratchett

    18. STRANGE DOINGS UP AT THE CASTLE
    The Dragon Waiting, John M. Ford

    Tough bracking AGAIN, Kyra. But I’m delighted to share my irrational love of SILVERLOCK! 🙂

  35. Kurt – as I understand it, Brad Torgersen called Mike Williamson and said “I’m gonna nominate you for a Hugo. What do you have that’s eligible?”.

    Yes, I read that too. But assuming for the sake of argument that that’s true, all that explains is how it got on the slate. I was wondering (among others things) if any of the people who then nominated it for the actual ballot read it. Or anything else they nominated, for that matter.

    And wow, Brian’s really desperately spinning tonight. It’s what they wanted, it’s our own fault, it’s a deserved reaction, it’ll be worse next year because we weren’t nice, won’t someone think of the innocent shit-slingers who started all this and don’t deserve the reaction they got for wreaking havoc on the Hugo ballot, poor Vox, they’re all so misunderstood, if they do it again it’ll be unforgivable but this year it’s the anti-puppies who got everyone upset, yow yowl yow yow yow. He must be very dizzy.

  36. 2. FROM YOUR SMALL HOME TOWN TO THE GREAT BEYOND
    Stardust, Neil Gaman

    4. OF COURSE YOU REALIZE THIS MEANS WAR
    War for the Oaks, Emma Bull

    5. SERIOUSLY TARAN WHAT’S UP SHOULD WE SEND HELP
    Dracula, Bram Stoker

    6. ONE DAY YOU WAKE UP AND EVERYTHING IS DIFFERENT
    Nine Princes in Amber, Roger Zelazny

    9. TALES OF THE SUBTLE FAE
    Lud-in-the-Mist, Hope Mirrlees

    10. GRAND ADVENTURES
    The Sword of Conan, Robert E. Howard

    11. TI-JEANNE VS. BUTTERCUP
    The Princess Bride, William Goldman

    13. EVERYTHING SLOWLY GOING DOWNHILL
    The Dying Earth, Jack Vance

    14. LEARNING THAT YOU’RE UNHAPPY
    The King of Elfland’s Daughter, Lord Dunsany

  37. 1. The Once and Future King, T. H. White

    2. No vote. Read Stardust, but can hardly remember anything of it, so it can’t have been that impressive.

    3. No vote. Only read Leiber, but will not vote for him as I never really been into Mouser and Fafhrd. Prefer Leibers horror books.

    4. A Game of Thrones, George R. R. Martin. But that series is turning sour, the last book was extremely boring with nothing happening.

    5. Taran Wanderer, Lloyd Alexander. Will not vote for a horror book in a fantasy competition.

    10. Watership Down, Richard Adams. But Solomon Kane would have won.

    14. The Tombs of Atuan, Ursula K. Le Guin

  38. Camestros,

    I’m sure you were not expecting me to defend that joke. That list of jokes is not original to MZW, though. According to Women Aren’t Supposed to Fly: The Memoirs of a Female Flight Surgeon by Harriet Hall (2008), in the 80s someone in the air force came up with this “list of possible slogans to promote national condom week.” It has been reprinted in humor books dozens of times and Google, which filled it in for me before I was halfway through typing, seems to think it appeared in a Judd Apatow comedy.

  39. 1. EVERYONE LOVES AN ECCENTRIC WIZARD
    The Once and Future King, T. H. White

    2. FROM YOUR SMALL HOME TOWN TO THE GREAT BEYOND
    Stardust, Neil Gaman

    3. ADVENTURERS TWO
    Two Sought Adventure, Fritz Leiber

    4. OF COURSE YOU REALIZE THIS MEANS WAR
    A Game of Thrones, George R. R. Martin

    6. ONE DAY YOU WAKE UP AND EVERYTHING IS DIFFERENT
    The Metamorphosis, Franz Kafka

    8. 1990 VS. 1999
    Tigana, Guy Gavriel Kay

    12. LOVE WILL TEAR US APART
    The Golden Compass/Northern Lights, Phillip Pullman

    14. LEARNING THAT YOU’RE UNHAPPY
    The Tombs of Atuan, Ursula K. Le Guin

    15. I CAN’T REMEMBER WHO I AM
    Soldier of the Mist, Gene Wolfe

    18. STRANGE DOINGS UP AT THE CASTLE
    The Dragon Waiting, John M. Ford

  40. 1. EVERYONE LOVES AN ECCENTRIC WIZARD
    The Silent Tower, Barbara Hambly
    The Once and Future King, T. H. White

    2. FROM YOUR SMALL HOME TOWN TO THE GREAT BEYOND
    The Riddle-Master of Hed, Patricia McKillip
    Stardust, Neil Gaman

    3. ADVENTURERS TWO
    Two Sought Adventure, Fritz Leiber
    Bridge of Birds, Barry Hughart

    4. OF COURSE YOU REALIZE THIS MEANS WAR
    A Game of Thrones, George R. R. Martin
    War for the Oaks, Emma Bull

    5. SERIOUSLY TARAN WHAT’S UP SHOULD WE SEND HELP
    Taran Wanderer, Lloyd Alexander
    Dracula, Bram Stoker

    Oh, it’s crazy pairing time is it?

    6. ONE DAY YOU WAKE UP AND EVERYTHING IS DIFFERENT
    Nine Princes in Amber, Roger Zelazny
    The Metamorphosis, Franz Kafka

    OK, good link

    7. TEA AND CACOASTRUM
    To Reign in Hell, Steven Brust
    Tea with the Black Dragon, R. A. MacAvoy

    Pass

    8. 1990 VS. 1999
    Harry Potter and the Prisoner of Azkaban, J. K. Rowling
    Tigana, Guy Gavriel Kay

    Pass

    9. TALES OF THE SUBTLE FAE
    Fire and Hemlock, Diana Wynne Jones
    Lud-in-the-Mist, Hope Mirrlees

    10. GRAND ADVENTURES
    Watership Down, Richard Adams
    The Sword of Conan, Robert E. Howard

    Just for “My chief’s told me to defend this run”

    11. TI-JEANNE VS. BUTTERCUP
    Brown Girl in the Ring, Nalo Hopkinson
    The Princess Bride, William Goldman

    12. LOVE WILL TEAR US APART
    The Golden Compass/Northern Lights, Phillip Pullman
    Magic’s Price, Mercedes Lackey

    The series goes to pot as Pullman becomes too famous (and late) to get the editing he needs, but the first book is faultless.

    13. EVERYTHING SLOWLY GOING DOWNHILL
    One Hundred Years of Solitude, Gabriel Garcia Marquez
    The Dying Earth, Jack Vance

    14. LEARNING THAT YOU’RE UNHAPPY
    The Tombs of Atuan, Ursula K. Le Guin
    The King of Elfland’s Daughter, Lord Dunsany

    15. I CAN’T REMEMBER WHO I AM
    The Last Unicorn, Peter S. Beagle
    Soldier of the Mist, Gene Wolfe

    16. ACROSS THE SCOPE OF HISTORY
    Little, Big, John Crowley
    Silverlock, John Myers Myers

    Pass, read neither.

    17. VICTORY BY DROPPING STUFF ON PEOPLE’S HEADS
    The Hero and the Crown, Robin McKinley
    Small Gods, Terry Pratchett

    What kind of choice is that?

    18. STRANGE DOINGS UP AT THE CASTLE
    Gormenghast, by Mervyn Peake
    The Dragon Waiting, John M. Ford

    Gah!

  41. NelC,

    Calling the Puppies Dadaist, as though they were a public performance that we’ve all badly misunderstood, is as revisionist as they come.

    I thought Sad Puppies 1 was Dadaist. I think in the second round things started to get a little too spiteful. By Round 3 it had become really stupid to hang on to Correia’s old “get the SMOFs” schtick any longer.

  42. THE COMPLEAT FANTASY BRACKET, FIRST ROUND (THE BIG ONE)

    1. EVERYONE LOVES AN ECCENTRIC WIZARD
    The Once and Future King, T. H. White

    3. ADVENTURERS TWO
    Two Sought Adventure, Fritz Leiber

    5. SERIOUSLY TARAN WHAT’S UP SHOULD WE SEND HELP
    Taran Wanderer, Lloyd Alexander

    6. ONE DAY YOU WAKE UP AND EVERYTHING IS DIFFERENT
    Nine Princes in Amber, Roger Zelazny

    7. TEA AND CACOASTRUM
    To Reign in Hell, Steven Brust
    A near-perfect imitation of prime Zelazny.

    8. 1990 VS. 1999
    Harry Potter and the Prisoner of Azkaban, J. K. Rowling

    9. TALES OF THE SUBTLE FAE
    Fire and Hemlock, Diana Wynne Jones

    10. GRAND ADVENTURES
    Watership Down, Richard Adams

    13. EVERYTHING SLOWLY GOING DOWNHILL
    One Hundred Years of Solitude, Gabriel Garcia Marquez

    14. LEARNING THAT YOU’RE UNHAPPY
    The King of Elfland’s Daughter, Lord Dunsany

    15. I CAN’T REMEMBER WHO I AM
    The Last Unicorn, Peter S. Beagle

    16. ACROSS THE SCOPE OF HISTORY
    Little, Big, John Crowley

    18. STRANGE DOINGS UP AT THE CASTLE
    Gormenghast, by Mervyn Peake

  43. 1. The Once and Future King, T. H. White

    2. The Riddle-Master of Hed, Patricia McKillip

    4. A Game of Thrones, George R. R. Martin

    5. Taran Wanderer, Lloyd Alexander

    6. The Metamorphosis, Franz Kafka

    10. Watership Down, Richard Adams

    13. One Hundred Years of Solitude, Gabriel Garcia Marquez

    14. The Tombs of Atuan, Ursula K. Le Guin

    18. Gormenghast, by Mervyn Peake

  44. 1. The Once and Future King, T. H. White

    2. The Riddle-Master of Hed, Patricia McKillip

    3. Two Sought Adventure, Fritz Leiber

    4. War for the Oaks, Emma Bull

    5. Dracula, Bram Stoker

    6. Nine Princes in Amber, Roger Zelazny

    7. To Reign in Hell, Steven Brust

    8. Tie

    9. Lud-in-the-Mist, Hope Mirrlees

    10. Watership Down, Richard Adams

    11. The Princess Bride, William Goldman

    12. God Stalk for Jim Henley

    13. Tie

    14. The Tombs of Atuan, Ursula K. Le Guin

    15. Soldier of the Mist, Gene Wolfe

    16. Tie

    17. Small Gods, Terry Pratchett

    18. Gormenghast, by Mervyn Peake

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