Pixel Scroll 7/31 Happy Hour at Paulk’s Tavern

Lions roar, kittens tweet, and other animals make noise in today’s Scroll.

(1) Recommended – Gregory Benford reviews Kim Stanley Robinson’s Aurora in “Envision Starflight Failing”.

Aurora depicts a starship on a long voyage to Tau Ceti four centuries from now. It is shaped like a car axle, with two large wheels turning for centrifugal gravity. The biomes along their rims support many Earthly lifezones which need constant tending to be stable. They’re voyaging to Tau Ceti, so the ship’s name is a reference to Isaac Asimov’s The Naked Sun, which takes place on a world orbiting Tau Ceti named Aurora. Arrival at the Earthlike moon of a super-Earth primary brings celebration, exploration, and we see just how complex an interstellar expedition four centuries from now can be, in both technology and society.

In 2012, Robinson declared in a Scientific American interview that “It’s a joke and a waste of time to think about starships or inhabiting the galaxy. It’s a systemic lie that science fiction tells the world that the galaxy is within our reach.” Aurora spells this out through unlikely plot devices. Robinson loads the dice quite obviously against interstellar exploration. A brooding pessimism dominates the novel.

There are scientific issues that look quite unlikely, but not central to the novel’s theme. A “magnetic scissors” method of launching a starship seems plagued with problems, for example. But the intent is clear through its staging and plot.

I’ll discuss the quality of the argument Aurora attempts, with spoilers.

 

 

(2) Spacefaring Kitten is one of many people posting their Hugo ballot today, but one of the few who has an interesting analysis of my favorite category.

Best Fanzine

  1. Journey Planet
  2. Tangent SF Online
  3. Elitist Book Reviews
  4. No Award
  5. The Revenge of Hump Day

Journey Planet is easily the most interesting of these publications. Black Gate would have been able to put up a fight here, but they chose to withdraw because of Puppy-related embarrassment.

Tangent SF Online and The Revenge of Hump Day were probably on the Puppy ballots as a sort of payback for, respectively, the public outcry following Tangent’s umm… let us say fatherly review of the Women Destroy Science Fiction issue of Lightspeed and the disinvitation of Tim Bolgeo (the guy behind The Revenge of Hump Day) as a Fan Guest of Honor in Archon after accusations of racism. However, I chose to place Tangent second and well above No Award, because I think all venues in which short SFF fiction is discussed are important.

As far as I can see, Tangent’s short fiction reviews are quite good, even if the editor’s attitudes smell a bit aged. Take a look at their 2014 Recommended Reading List, for example. Tangent lists noteworthy stories in four categories (0, 1, 2 and 3 stars), and I couldn’t resist counting that together all the 14 Puppy finalists get four mentions and one star. In contrast, the five short story nominations I made myself (none of which made the final ballot, obviously) collect three mentions and eight stars. The Tangent seems like a useful resource for finding the sort of fiction I’d enjoy, and I plan to take a look at some of the three-star stories I haven’t read yet.

There was nothing terribly amiss with Elitist Book Reviews either, even though they seem to generally like books that I don’t and I found their practice of discussing recommended age and levels of offensive language, violence and sex amusingly over-protective. You don’t really have to be 16 to be able to read a curse word, do you? However, they’re number three.

 

(3) By now I think everybody has seen Adam Roberts’ cheery thoughts about the Hugos in the Guardian:

What the Puppies have done is within the rules of the awards, and key figures in the movement have already declared their intention to repeat the process next year. But this is larger than one set of awards. It is about the direction of science-fiction as a whole, and it poses larger cultural questions.

The truth is that this year’s Hugo awards are wrecked. Can you imagine anyone saying that of the Pulitzer, Man Booker, or Nobel? Yet here we are, and if the Puppies succeed in gaming the awards again in 2016 we may as well give up on the Hugos forever.

This is what is so frustrating about the Puppies’ campaign. Not that it has resulted in a bunch of frankly inferior works being shortlisted – although it has. And not that it values old-fashioned SF over more experimental, literary and progressive writing – that’s a matter of taste. What is so annoying is that it so ostentatiously turns its back on the global context out of which the best writing is happening today.

 

Can it be true that Roberts values rhetoric about diversity over rules changes that preserve it as a possibility?

(4) The Guardian article sure revived Larry Correia! Yesterday’s limp “fisking” of The New Yorker’s Delany interview has been succeeded his vibrant smackdown “Fisking the Guardian’s Latest Sad Puppy Article of the Week”. Correia’s remarks in boldface, Guardian text in regular text.

Considering that the Hugo awards hadn’t even ever nominated a single work of media tie in fiction until Sad Puppies came along, I don’t know where the hell you’re getting this idea that the insular little inbred cliques were combing the whole world for worthy new talent before. Hell, I believe the first ever INDY PUBLISHED novel nomination came from Sad Puppies, and you expect that little cliquish circle jerk of friends who’ve been taking turns giving each other awards, to suddenly teach themselves Spanish in order to check out the best sci-fi from Uruguay? 

This whole train of thought is just a stupid diversion. The Guardian is just being its normal snooty self. Look at us, we read MOAR GLOBALLY (no, actually, they probably don’t. From inaccuracies in previous articles about various classics we’re already pretty sure Damien skates by reading Wikipedia synopsis of books and then pretending to be well read). 

Science fiction, if it is about anything, is about hospitality to otherness,

Just not conservatives or libertarians, because screw those guys.

 to the alien and the unusual, about freeing one’s mind and boldly going where no one has been before. It is, centrally, about diversity. Locking out women writers, writers of colour, gay and trans writers does a violence to the heart of the genre.

That concluding paragraph is just regurgitated tripe.  We’re not the ones trying to lock out anyone. Female, “writers of colour” (oh how I hate that stupid racist term), gay, trans, left handed ginger pygmy wolf-riding garden squirrels, WE DON’T CARE. Write books. Entertain people. Fans get to judge books by the content of their pages rather than the author’s bio. Then give the really good ones awards.

This isn’t exactly rocket science, not that you jackasses didn’t literally try to make actual fucking rocket science all about sexism too.

If the Puppies win, nobody wins.

No. The Puppies would win. That’s sort of what the word win means, dumbass.

 

 

(5) Sasquan guest astronaut Kjell Lindgren is at the International Space Station.

 

(6) Mark your calendars. Vox Day has announced the release date for his next project:

This is interesting. Apparently the SJWs are more than a little worried about my upcoming book, SJWS ALWAYS LIE: Taking Down the Thought Police….

Just wait until August 27th, the one-year anniversary of #GamerGate, which I plan to celebrate by publishing the book.

You read it here first. Or possibly second. But more likely first. Maybe you can leave town that day – does Kjell Lindgren have a spare cot?

(7) The Final Interview of C. S. Lewis, conducted by Sherwood Eliot Wirt, appeared in Decision magazine in September 1963.

From Part I —

Wirt: How can we foster the encounter of people with Jesus Christ?

Lewis: “You can’t lay down any pattern for God. There are many different ways of bringing people into his Kingdom, even some ways that I specially dislike! I have therefore learned to be cautious in my judgment.

“But we can block it in many ways. As Christians we are tempted to make unnecessary concessions to those outside the faith. We give in too much. Now, I don’t mean that we should run the risk of making a nuisance of ourselves by witnessing at improper times, but there comes a time when we must show that we disagree. We must show our Christian colors, if we are to be true to Jesus Christ. We cannot remain silent or concede everything away.

“There is a character in one of my children’s stories named Aslan, who says, ‘I never tell anyone any story except his own.’ I cannot speak for the way God deals with others; I only know how he deals with me personally. Of course, we are to pray for spiritual awakening, and in various ways we can do something toward it. But we must remember that neither Paul nor Apollos gives the increase. As Charles Williams once said, ‘The altar must often be built in one place so that the fire may come down in another place.’”

In Part II, Lewis answers questions about Heaven, Earth and Outer Space.

Wirt: Do you think there will be widespread travel in space?

Lewis: “I look forward with horror to contact with the other inhabited planets, if there are such. We would only transport to them all of our sin and our acquisitiveness, and establish a new colonialism. I can’t bear to think of it. But if we on earth were to get right with God, of course, all would be changed. Once we find ourselves spiritually awakened, we can go to outer space and take the good things with us. That is quite a different matter.”

[Thanks to JJ, Gregory Benford, and John King Tarpinian for some of these links. Title credit belongs to File 770 contributing editor of the day JJ.]

230 thoughts on “Pixel Scroll 7/31 Happy Hour at Paulk’s Tavern

  1. Considering that the Hugo awards hadn’t even ever nominated a single work of media tie in fiction until Sad Puppies came along,

    Well, except for Serenity: Better Days, of course. Unless “Graphic Story” doesn’t count as fiction for some reason.

    And The Science of Discworld, depending on your definition of “media” “tie-in” and “fiction”.

    Hell, I believe the first ever INDY PUBLISHED novel nomination came from Sad Puppies

    No, Lines of Departure was published by 47North, which is an publishing imprint of Amazon. It may buy up a lot of previously self-published content, but it doesn’t count as indie.

  2. @Nat Lovin

    Hell, I believe the first ever INDY PUBLISHED novel nomination came from Sad Puppies

    No, Lines of Departure was published by 47North, which is an publishing imprint of Amazon. It may buy up a lot of previously self-published content, but it doesn’t count as indie.

    In fact, novels from independent publishers have been nominated for Hugos before, and even won.

    Ah, Larry. Neglecting to mention that Sad and Rabid Puppies did everything in their power to keep Three Body Problem off the ballot; even declining your own nomination wasn’t enough to make room for it.

    And the “unconventional views” of John Wright that everyone is so tickled with…are that he’s a Catholic. Riiiiight.

  3. “In fact, novels from independent publishers have been nominated for Hugos before, and even won.”

    “Indy published” doesn’t mean “non-big six/five publisher”, it’s basically a less derogatory way of saying “self published” (or at least that’s the main way I’ve seen it used).

  4. Now that I have voted, I was going start blogging about my picks but a conversation with a police officer(no one’s in trouble! Not that sort of conversation), gave me a more important topic to talk about.

    Perhaps tomorrow.

  5. @Nat Lovin
    Then he should just say “self-published.”

    “Indy published” means whatever we agree it means. To me, it means “by an independent publisher.”

  6. No, Lines of Departure was published by 47North, which is an publishing imprint of Amazon. It may buy up a lot of previously self-published content, but it doesn’t count as indie.

    Unless he’s trying to argue that the self-published “Wisdom From My Internet” counts as a novel? (Or has forgotten which of the Puppy picks was self-published in the first place? That . . . wouldn’t surprise me.)

    Lots of complaining about how the awards should reward literary merit, not the author’s politics. Still no word from Larry on what the literary quality of the Puppy picks was. And no explanation for why he’s so explicit about the need for championing conservative authors while also claiming author politics should be irrelevant.

    How shocking.

  7. I saw it pop on his blog. Worse than usual. When he started talking about Democrats being responsible for lynchings, I just stopped reading. And told him so. And told him was being intellectually dishonest. He isn’t so stupid is to not understand the shift in American political parties after passage of civil rights legislation. And obviously with rhetoric like that, it is all about politics and has nothing to do with books and awards.

    Jon Stewart explains the radical tea people so well….

    http://www.huffingtonpost.com/2015/02/26/jon-stewart-50-fox-news-lies-in-6-seconds_n_6758614.html

  8. I though Roberts’ last paragraph was good, and he seems to know more about SF and the kerfuffle than earlier Guardian writers.

  9. I’m half tempted to go over to LC’s blog and fisk his fisking in my Bangkok stopover tonight, but that would be a lot of effort and I have better things to do with my time than waste words on someone like that. Suffice to say, he seems to manage to be wrong about everything he says.

    Also, is Adam Roberts not that big in the US? He seems like kind of a big deal over here. Also I really liked Yellow Blue Tibia and New Model Army and Jack Glass and By Light Alone. I need to buy his other books still, but I’m sure he’s rather a good writer. I’m most impressed by his ability to not get bogged down in one particular part of SF and seemingly write in a different sub-genre for every novel.

  10. Oneiros on August 1, 2015 at 1:37 am said:

    I’m half tempted to go over to LC’s blog and fisk his fisking in my Bangkok stopover tonight, but that would be a lot of effort and I have better things to do with my time than waste words on someone like that

    Was it intentional that those sentences seem to have a really good metre to them?

    I’m half tempted,
    to go over,
    to LC’s blog
    and fisk his fisking,
    in my Bangkok stopover tonight,
    but that would be,
    a lot of effort,
    and I have better things to do
    with my time,
    than waste words
    on someone {something something] like that

  11. @Camestros: I’d honestly love to say it was intentional, but it was absolutely an accident. Sorry to disappoint.

  12. At first I thought this was going to be a literary post; the prose was far too sophisticated, and the signalling was all wrong. The initial link signals were all new elite literati SFF books which are coming out, so the sudden inclusion of a bad 80’s hair band music video threw me – and this in the first few links.

    I’m so confused.

  13. JJ: Thank god it’s afternoon here so I didn’t have an opportunity to spray my morning coffee all over my laptop.

  14. The first day had not gone entirely as expected.

    Oh, some of the victories had been accurate predicted by the seers, there was no doubt about that. But all watched in shock as the singer bested the warrior. As the cabbage farmer outwitted the witch queen. As the two dark tyrants fought each other to a standstill and neither could conquer the other. As the mayor and the fair folk clasped hands in friendship and vowed that they would fight no more this day.

    Now, twenty remain. Seven women and thirteen men. Twelve from The Us, six from the Land of Sharp Angles, and two from other realms.

    How will they fare?

    BRACKET

    Part II

    You may vote for either member of a pair, a tie, abstain, or vote for a work off the bracket entirely (any fantasy published up until 1999). Seeded works were given their own slot, then all other works were matched with them by random dice roll.

  15. And here we go!

    1. REBEL AGAINST THE SYSTEM
    Tigana, Guy Gavriel Kay
    The Tombs of Atuan, Ursula K. Le Guin

    2. RENEWAL AND DECAY
    The Dying Earth, Jack Vance
    Lud-in-the-Mist, Hope Mirrlees

    3. THE CONVOLUTED SCHEMES OF PLOTTING NOBLES
    The Dragon Waiting, John M. Ford
    The Princess Bride, William Goldman

    4. THE PHOUKA AND THE HLESSIL
    Watership Down, Richard Adams
    War for the Oaks, Emma Bull

    5. MUCH MORE THAN I SEEM
    Tea with the Black Dragon, R. A. MacAvoy
    Nine Princes in Amber, Roger Zelazny

    6. PRETTY GOOD MOVIES, TOO
    The Last Unicorn, Peter S. Beagle
    Harry Potter and the Prisoner of Azkaban, J. K. Rowling

    7. ASCENDING TO OTHER REALMS
    Little, Big, John Crowley
    Bridge of Birds, Barry Hughart

    8. HEAD TO THE NORTH!
    The Riddle-Master of Hed, Patricia McKillip
    The Golden Compass/Northern Lights, Phillip Pullman

    9. LEARNING PHILOSOPHY ON THE ROAD
    Taran Wanderer, Lloyd Alexander
    Small Gods, Terry Pratchett

    10. GROWING UP TO BECOME A HERO
    The Once and Future King, T. H. White
    Fire and Hemlock, Diana Wynne Jones

  16. We do, indeed!

    1. The Tombs of Atuan

    2. The Dying Earth

    3. The Dragon Waiting

    4. War for the Oaks

    5. Nine Princes in Amber

    6. Potter

    7. Bridge of Birds

    8. Yet more riddles…

    9. Small Gods

    10. The Once and Future King

  17. Just voting on one

    1. REBEL AGAINST THE SYSTEM
    The Tombs of Atuan, Ursula K. Le Guin. Tigana is slaughtered by Manan and buried to be consumed by the nameless ones.

  18. 1. REBEL AGAINST THE SYSTEM
    The Tombs of Atuan, Ursula K. Le Guin

    3. THE CONVOLUTED SCHEMES OF PLOTTING NOBLES
    The Princess Bride, William Goldman

    6. PRETTY GOOD MOVIES, TOO
    The Last Unicorn, Peter S. Beagle

    While I would vote for The Last Unicorn anyway, I feel like it’s necessary to add that it would take some extraordinary circumstances for me to vote for Harry Potter.

    7. ASCENDING TO OTHER REALMS
    Bridge of Birds, Barry Hughart

    8. HEAD TO THE NORTH!
    Northern Lights, Phillip Pullman

    9. LEARNING PHILOSOPHY ON THE ROAD
    Small Gods, Terry Pratchett

    10. GROWING UP TO BECOME A HERO
    The Once and Future King, T. H. White

  19. 1. REBEL AGAINST THE SYSTEM
    Tigana, Guy Gavriel Kay
    The Tombs of Atuan, Ursula K. Le Guin
    {something witty}…Le Guin!

    2. RENEWAL AND DECAY
    The Dying Earth, Jack Vance
    Lud-in-the-Mist, Hope Mirrlees

    3. THE CONVOLUTED SCHEMES OF PLOTTING NOBLES
    The Dragon Waiting, John M. Ford
    The Princess Bride, William Goldman

    4. THE PHOUKA AND THE HLESSIL
    Watership Down, Richard Adams
    War for the Oaks, Emma Bull
    The more of my picks fall to Watership Down, the more I move from dislike to animosity towards rabbits.

    5. MUCH MORE THAN I SEEM
    Tea with the Black Dragon, R. A. MacAvoy
    Nine Princes in Amber, Roger Zelazny

    6. PRETTY GOOD MOVIES, TOO
    The Last Unicorn, Peter S. Beagle
    Harry Potter and the Prisoner of Azkaban, J. K. Rowling

    7. ASCENDING TO OTHER REALMS
    Little, Big, John Crowley
    Bridge of Birds, Barry Hughart

    8. HEAD TO THE NORTH!
    The Riddle-Master of Hed, Patricia McKillip
    The Golden Compass/Northern Lights, Phillip Pullman
    An army of armored bears canot make up for poor, preachy writing.

    9. LEARNING PHILOSOPHY ON THE ROAD
    Taran Wanderer, Lloyd Alexander
    Small Gods, Terry Pratchett

    10. GROWING UP TO BECOME A HERO
    The Once and Future King, T. H. White
    Fire and Hemlock, Diana Wynne Jones

  20. 1. The Tombs of Atuan, Ursula K. Le Guin

    2. Lud-in-the-Mist, Hope Mirrlees

    3. The Princess Bride, William Goldman

    4. Watership Down, Richard Adams

    5. Nine Princes in Amber, Roger Zelazny

    6. Harry Potter and the Prisoner of Azkaban, J. K. Rowling

    7. Bridge of Birds, Barry Hughart

    8. The Golden Compass/Northern Lights, Phillip Pullman

    9. Small Gods, Terry Pratchett

    10. The Once and Future King, T. H. White

  21. 1. The Tombs of Atuan, Ursula K. Le Guin

    2. The Dying Earth, Jack Vance

    3. The Princess Bride, William Goldman

    4.Watership Down, Richard Adams

    5. Nine Princes in Amber, Roger Zelazny

    6. The Last Unicorn, Peter S. Beagle

    7. Bridge of Birds, Barry Hughart

    8. God Stalk for Jim Henley

    9.Taran Wanderer, Lloyd Alexander

    10. The Once and Future King, T. H. White

  22. Oh, joy, moar bracket!

    1. Le Guin.
    2. Vance.
    3. Morgenstern… dammit.
    4. Adams.
    5. Zelazny.
    6. Ouch. Rowling, but that’s gonna leave a scar.
    7. Write-in: Lovecraft’s Cthulhu cycle. With strange fiskings, even elimination may be eliminated…
    8. Pullman.
    9. Pratchett.

  23. 1. Tigana, Guy Gavriel Kay

    2. Lud-in-the-Mist, Hope Mirrlees

    3. The Dragon Waiting, John M. Ford

    4. Watership Down, Richard Adams

    5. Nine Princes in Amber, Roger Zelazny

    6. The Last Unicorn, Peter S. Beagle

    7. Little, Big, John Crowley

    8. The Riddle-Master of Hed, Patricia McKillip

    9. Small Gods, Terry Pratchett

    10. The Once and Future King, T. H. White

  24. 1. REBEL AGAINST THE SYSTEM
    The Tombs of Atuan, Ursula K. Le Guin

    2. RENEWAL AND DECAY
    The Dying Earth, Jack Vance

    3. THE CONVOLUTED SCHEMES OF PLOTTING NOBLES
    The Princess Bride, William Goldman

    4. THE PHOUKA AND THE HLESSIL
    Watership Down, Richard Adams

    5. MUCH MORE THAN I SEEM
    Nine Princes in Amber, Roger Zelazny

    6. PRETTY GOOD MOVIES, TOO
    The Last Unicorn, Peter S. Beagle

    7. ASCENDING TO OTHER REALMS
    Little, Big, John Crowley

    9. LEARNING PHILOSOPHY ON THE ROAD
    Taran Wanderer, Lloyd Alexander

    10. GROWING UP TO BECOME A HERO
    The Once and Future King, T. H. White

  25. Rev. Bob

    I read your votes, and found myself idly wondering why you were writing in Julian of Amber’s horse.

    There are vast numbers of things I should be doing, and am not, but you are aiding and abetting my talent for procrastination…

  26. 1. The Tombs of Atuan, Ursula K. Le Guin

    8. The Riddle-Master of Hed, Patricia McKillip

    9. Taran Wanderer, Lloyd Alexander

  27. Never nominated a work of media tie-in fiction? How bizarre that Corriea should overlook Redshirts when the Pups are so obsessed with Scalzi. I hadn’t known about Serenity: Better Days or The Science of Discworld, either though; I haven’t been following the Hugos very long. Obviously I should be paying better attention.

    What a shame conservatives and libertarians can’t feel at home in a place that is no longer so prone to wink at slurs on women and minorities. It’s almost like they’re prejudiced or something. Or maybe that’s just Correia.

    Just write good books–Puppies don’t care! Except that if a good book that wins an award happens to be by a female or minority writer Correia and Torgersen will call it an “affirmative action” pick of course. But, you know, aside from that Puppies don’t care.

  28. Statistics:

    In round one, the bracket was 30.6% women (11/36) and 69.4% men (25/36). This round it is 35% women (7/20) and 65% men (13/20).

    Only 20% of the seeded candidates this round were women, however (2/10), and seeded candidates may be a bit more likely to win, although unseeded candidates can and do win. Last round 30% of the winners (6/20) had been unseeded candidates going in.

    In terms of country, last round we had 58.3% U.S. (21/36), 25% England (9/36), and 16.7% from other countries (6/36). This round we have 60% U.S. (12/20), 30% England (6/20), and 10% from other countries (2/20).

    The distribution among seeded candidates this round is 70% U.S. (7/10) and 30% England (3/10).

    In the first round, obviously, works were fairly even distributed in certain time periods by the nature of the method used to pick them. In this round, of the original categories, we have 20% from the 90’s (4/20), 30% from the 80’s (6/20), 35% from the 60’s and 70’s (7/20), and 15% from the 50’s and before (3/20). Breaking that down a bit more finely, which may make more sense at this point, gives us:

    90’s: 20% (4/20)
    80’s: 30% (6/20)
    70’s: 25% (5/20)
    60’s: 10% (2/20)
    50’s: 10% (2/20)
    Earlier: 5% (1/20)

    Of the seeded candidates, however, we have 20% from the 50’s (2/10), 10% from the 60’s (1/10), 50% from the 70’s (5/10), 10% from the 80’s (1/10), and 10% from the 90’s (1/10). The love of 70’s SFF remains strong on this site.

    Work in translation continues not to fare well, and no such works remain at this stage of the bracket.

  29. 1. By a nose, The Tombs of Atuan, Ursula K. Le Guin
    2. Abstain
    3.Abstain
    4.Abstain
    5.Nine Princes in Amber, Roger Zelazny
    6.Harry Potter and the Prisoner of Azkaban, J. K. Rowling
    7.Bridge of Birds, Barry Hughart
    8. Abstain
    9.Small Gods, Terry Pratchett
    10.Abstain

  30. 1. REBEL AGAINST THE SYSTEM
    Tigana, Guy Gavriel Kay

    2. RENEWAL AND DECAY
    The Dying Earth, Jack Vance

    3. THE CONVOLUTED SCHEMES OF PLOTTING NOBLES
    The Dragon Waiting, John M. Ford

    4. THE PHOUKA AND THE HLESSIL
    War for the Oaks, Emma Bull

    5. MUCH MORE THAN I SEEM
    Nine Princes in Amber, Roger Zelazny

    6. PRETTY GOOD MOVIES, TOO
    The Last Unicorn, Peter S. Beagle

    7. ASCENDING TO OTHER REALMS
    Little, Big, John Crowley

    8. HEAD TO THE NORTH!
    The Golden Compass/Northern Lights, Phillip Pullman

    9. LEARNING PHILOSOPHY ON THE ROAD
    Small Gods, Terry Pratchett

    10. GROWING UP TO BECOME A HERO
    The Once and Future King, T. H. White

  31. Cat

    I suspect that even the puppidum’s vanguard knows considerably less about the Hugos than you do; they have no desire to learn, nor any comprehension that their lived experience is entirely alien to the vast majority of the population of this planet.

    In such circumstances it’s unsurprising that they are not very good at lying; they do it a lot, and are rarely, if ever, challenged on it in their circle. That is, I think, why Brad can’t wrap his head around the fact that Eric Flint and George Martin can see through him so easily; he has his, admittedly not vast, but devoted following who tell him what he wants to hear, and then all of a sudden the stuff which works so brilliantly on his blog is being laughed at by guys who sell vast numbers of books, not to mention the odd tv series, i.e. guys who are what he wants to be.

    And he doesn’t learn; he has his rear end presented to him on a plate, retreats to his blog to lick his wounds and then does it all over again…

  32. Oh, the pains.
    1. LeGuin
    2 Leneaaargh – Mirrlees
    3. Ford
    4. Adams
    5. Last hurrah write-in for The Third Policeman by Flann O’Brian.
    6. Rowling
    7. Hughart
    8. Pullman
    9. This one has teeth. I’ve been ruthless with others, I can’t with this. Abstain.
    10. White.

  33. (Brackets)

    1. REBEL AGAINST THE SYSTEM
    The Tombs of Atuan, Ursula K. Le Guin
    (So much good here, so hard to choose. But LeGuin steals it at the last)

    2. RENEWAL AND DECAY
    The Dying Earth, Jack Vance
    (Vance’s lyricism wins the day!)

    3. THE CONVOLUTED SCHEMES OF PLOTTING NOBLES
    The Dragon Waiting, John M. Ford
    (You can’t do this to me, you can’t. But then I think, Ford…)

    4. THE PHOUKA AND THE HLESSIL
    Watership Down, Richard Adams
    (Beeches over oaks)

    5. MUCH MORE THAN I SEEM
    Tea with the Black Dragon, R. A. MacAvoy
    (Ah, tea)

    6. PRETTY GOOD MOVIES, TOO
    The Last Unicorn, Peter S. Beagle
    (Beagle writes so well)

    7. ASCENDING TO OTHER REALMS
    Little, Big, John Crowley
    (Daily Alice and the fishes)

    8. HEAD TO THE NORTH!
    The Golden Compass/Northern Lights, Phillip Pullman
    (True north!)

    9. LEARNING PHILOSOPHY ON THE ROAD
    Small Gods, Terry Pratchett
    (Belief is)

    10. GROWING UP TO BECOME A HERO
    Fire and Hemlock, Diana Wynne Jones
    (A very British faerie)

  34. All right, let’s see if I can accomplish some more reliable markup this time around.

    1. REBEL AGAINST THE SYSTEM
    Tigana, Guy Gavriel Kay
    The Tombs of Atuan, Ursula K. Le Guin

    3. THE CONVOLUTED SCHEMES OF PLOTTING NOBLES
    The Dragon Waiting, John M. Ford
    The Princess Bride, William Goldman

    4. THE PHOUKA AND THE HLESSIL
    Watership Down, Richard Adams
    War for the Oaks, Emma Bull

    5. MUCH MORE THAN I SEEM
    Tea with the Black Dragon, R. A. MacAvoy
    Nine Princes in Amber, Roger Zelazny

    6. PRETTY GOOD MOVIES, TOO
    The Last Unicorn, Peter S. Beagle
    Harry Potter and the Prisoner of Azkaban, J. K. Rowling

    8. HEAD TO THE NORTH!
    The Riddle-Master of Hed, Patricia McKillip
    The Golden Compass/Northern Lights, Phillip Pullman

    I wasn’t aware that I felt so strongly about Riddle-Master, but I’ve yet to see it in a match-up in which I wasn’t its immediate partisan.

    10. GROWING UP TO BECOME A HERO
    The Once and Future King, T. H. White
    Fire and Hemlock, Diana Wynne Jones

  35. @Stevie: “I read your votes, and found myself idly wondering why you were writing in Julian of Amber’s horse.”

    Because I prefer the unexpurgated edition to the “good parts” version, of course.

  36. @Kyra:

    Do you have ANY idea how hard it is for me not to make a really low “good parts” joke out of that question?

  37. Brackets, aka I still hate your dice, Kyra.

    1. REBEL AGAINST THE SYSTEM
    Tigana, Guy Gavriel Kay
    The Tombs of Atuan, Ursula K. Le Guin

    2. RENEWAL AND DECAY
    The Dying Earth, Jack Vance
    Lud-in-the-Mist, Hope Mirrlees

    3. THE CONVOLUTED SCHEMES OF PLOTTING NOBLES
    The Dragon Waiting, John M. Ford
    The Princess Bride, William Goldman

    4. THE PHOUKA AND THE HLESSIL
    Watership Down, Richard Adams
    War for the Oaks, Emma Bull

    5. MUCH MORE THAN I SEEM
    Tea with the Black Dragon, R. A. MacAvoy
    Nine Princes in Amber, Roger Zelazny

    6. PRETTY GOOD MOVIES, TOO
    The Last Unicorn, Peter S. Beagle
    Harry Potter and the Prisoner of Azkaban, J. K. Rowling
    ARGH!!!

    7. ASCENDING TO OTHER REALMS
    Little, Big, John Crowley
    Bridge of Birds, Barry Hughart

    8. HEAD TO THE NORTH!
    The Riddle-Master of Hed, Patricia McKillip
    The Golden Compass/Northern Lights, Phillip Pullman

    9. LEARNING PHILOSOPHY ON THE ROAD
    Taran Wanderer, Lloyd Alexander
    Small Gods, Terry Pratchett
    Double argh!!!

    10. GROWING UP TO BECOME A HERO
    The Once and Future King, T. H. White
    Fire and Hemlock, Diana Wynne Jones
    Triple argh with a back flip!

    If I wasn’t heading out to the storage unit shortly, I would be lying down with my cold cloth and tea. As it is, I’m just having the tea.

  38. @ Stevie

    And he [Torgersen] doesn’t learn; he has his rear end presented to him on a plate, retreats to his blog to lick his wounds and then does it all over again…

    This is what he calls “Puppy-kicking”–when people point out that he’s saying things that are not true, or dissect his errors in logic.

  39. 1. The Tombs of Atuan, Ursula K. Le Guin
    2. The Dying Earth, Jack Vance
    3. TIE
    4. War for the Oaks, Emma Bull
    5. Nine Princes in Amber, Roger Zelazny
    6. The Last Unicorn, Peter S. Beagle
    7. Bridge of Birds, Barry Hughart
    8. The Riddle-Master of Hed, Patricia McKillip
    9. Small Gods, Terry Pratchett
    10. Fire and Hemlock, Diana Wynne Jones

  40. little cliquish circle jerk of friends who’ve been taking turns giving each other awards

    I’m beginning to think that the defining feature of the Puppies is not their ressentiment, their cronyism, or their lack of critical faculties. Its their incapacity for reflection. They should call themselves Sad Vampires.

  41. @ Ray

    I dunno, lack of self-reflection is certainly a thing with the Puppies, but so is projection–but “the sad projectors” doesn’t have the same ring, alas.

  42. Shorter Puppies: “We hate you all and demand that you shower us with praise!”

  43. About tie-in works: I’m glad that the Puppies include people who cheered on Queers Dig Doctor Who, then, and who presumably celebrated the earlier win for Chicks Dig Doctor Who.

    1. REBEL AGAINST THE SYSTEM
    Tigana, Guy Gavriel Kay
    The Tombs of Atuan, Ursula K. Le Guin

    2. RENEWAL AND DECAY
    The Dying Earth, Jack Vance
    Lud-in-the-Mist, Hope Mirrlees

    3. THE CONVOLUTED SCHEMES OF PLOTTING NOBLES
    The Dragon Waiting, John M. Ford
    The Princess Bride, William Goldman

    4. THE PHOUKA AND THE HLESSIL
    Watership Down, Richard Adams
    War for the Oaks, Emma Bull

    5. MUCH MORE THAN I SEEM
    Tea with the Black Dragon, R. A. MacAvoy
    Nine Princes in Amber, Roger Zelazny

    6. PRETTY GOOD MOVIES, TOO
    The Last Unicorn, Peter S. Beagle
    Harry Potter and the Prisoner of Azkaban, J. K. Rowling

    7. ASCENDING TO OTHER REALMS
    Little, Big, John Crowley
    Bridge of Birds, Barry Hughart

    8. HEAD TO THE NORTH!
    The Riddle-Master of Hed, Patricia McKillip
    The Golden Compass/Northern Lights, Phillip Pullman

    9. LEARNING PHILOSOPHY ON THE ROAD
    Taran Wanderer, Lloyd Alexander
    Small Gods, Terry Pratchett

    10. GROWING UP TO BECOME A HERO
    The Once and Future King, T. H. White
    Fire and Hemlock, Diana Wynne Jones

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