Pixel Scroll 8/4 The Dead Wallaby of Clown Town

Money, money, money – we cover the spectrum from scarcity to infinite wealth in today’s Scroll.

(1) David Pascoe (“Trekking With The Green-Eyed Monster” on According To Hoyt) knows something that nobody else knows. ‘Cause he made it up:

It occurs, what with the Hugo voting just finished, and the results to be announced in a couple of week, that most of the Puppy Kickers are suffering from an excess of envy. I mean, think about it: the prospect of Jim Butcher (or Kevin Anderson, etc.) receiving a shiny, rocket-shaped object is so painful to them that they’re willing to ruin the award’s (remaining shreds of) credibility to prevent it. It’s accepted wisdom at this point that a move to limit voting to attending memberships will be advanced at the WSFS business meeting at Sasquan. While there’s a good deal of speculation over whether such a motion will even get approved (what then, would supporting members get for their hard earned filthy lucre? How could WorldCon possibly garner any kind of diverse, international support by shutting out anybody who can’t afford to fly across an ocean to come to the majority of conventions?), that it’s not reduced to backroom rumor mills is a sign of how strong the desire is to keep out the undesirable types.

Use this link to keep track of new business actually submitted to Sasquan.

(2) Bob Eggleton has some more anecdotes and critiques about Worldcon art shows, and in the last paragraph alludes to professional shows that are competing effectively for artists’ attention, which may be the most important influence on the fate of the Worldcon art show.

Illuxcon had risen in 2008 and, it started being for many pro artists the model for such a quality artshow. Security, professional hangings, a sense of overall quality to the show and one where artists, art fans and art collectors could come and be treated all well. No politics or stupidity or getting caught in some “fan” feud or political battle. Everyone gets on. Everyone does fairly well. Spectrum Live also fills a similar need. So maybe there is hope, but it requires a new and consistent sustainable model for such shows.

(3) Ahrvid Engholm’s post about Girl With The Dragon Tattoo author Stieg Larsson at Europa SF reminds readers about Larsson’s beginnings as a fanzine fan, and draws attention to a successor’s work on a new Millennium series novel that is coming out late this month.

An avid science fiction reader from an early age, he became active in Swedish science fiction fandom around 1971; co-edited, together with Rune Forsgren his first fanzine, Sfären, in 1972; and attended his first science fiction convention, SF•72, in Stockholm. Through the 1970s, Larsson published around 30 additional fanzine issues; after his move to Stockholm in 1977, he became active in the Scandinavian SF Society where he was a board member in 1978 and 1979, and chairman in 1980. In his first fanzines, 1972–74, he published a handful of early short stories, while submitting others to other semi-professional or amateur magazines. He was co-editor or editor of several science fiction fanzines, including Sfären and FIJAGH!; in 1978–79, he was president of the largest Swedish science-fiction fan club, Skandinavisk Förening för Science Fiction (SFSF).

The Swedish morning paper Dagens Nyheter August the 2nd published an “exclusive diary” by David Lagercrantz, covering his work with writing the new Millennium novel.

(4) Responding to a report that “Most of the [Hugo] votes were cast in the final week before the deadline, over 3,000,” Vox Day suggests —

Something to consider: on July 24th, I posted my complete Hugo recommendations. I am NOT saying those are all Puppy votes, only that there may be a connection.

(5) J. A. Micheline explains “Why I’m Boycotting Marvel Comics” at Comics Alliance.

First, came your quiet decision to hand the new Blade book over to two white creators. To be clear, I have no reason to think either creator will do a bad job on this book, but I was disappointed that one of Marvel’s most prominent black heroes would be handed to white people yet again.

I feel like I have to say this five or six times. Whenever this comes up, I get a tsunami of white people wondering what my problem is and suggesting I’m racist for saying white people can’t write about people of color. It’s not that white people can’t; it’s not even that they shouldn’t (except in some circumstances that I have written about almost ad nauseam recently) — it’s that white people are the ones who, historically and systemically, are consistently offered the opportunity. And in 2015, perhaps the right thing to do is to let people of color have a turn.

But that wasn’t the dealbreaker for Micheline, it was the string of gaffes that followed, beginning with —

The moment you and I really started having a problem, Marvel, was when your editor-in-chief all but laughed off the numerous critiques of the variants. Axel Alonso’s interview with CBR was unspeakably condescending and horrendously dismissive. From using scare quotes to frame the discussion to referring, to outcry from David Brothers and other readers/critics as a “small but very loud contingent,” to — and this is the part that I pretty much can’t forgive — indicating that we had suddenly learned the phrase ‘cultural appropriation’ and were eager to use it in an essay.

(6) Monty Python’s Terry Gilliam will appear at Live Talks Los Angeles on October 19, 2015 at the Alex Theatre. It’s the launch event for Gilliam’s memoir.

Gilliamesque-hc-s-227x300In Gilliamesque, his “pre-posthumous memoir,” he offers an intimate glimpse into his world in this fascinating book illustrated with hand-drawn sketches, notes, and memorabilia from his personal archive.

From his no-frills childhood in the icy wastes of Minnesota, to some of the hottest water Hollywood had to offer, via the cutting edge of 1960s and ’70s counter-culture in New York, L.A. and London, Terry Gilliam’s life has been as vivid, entertaining and unorthodox as one of his films.

(7) Larry Correia is selling a second series of challenge coins. Jack Wylder gives the details at the link.

2) Instead we’re doing it through the MHI Swag page: https://mhiswag.myshopify.com/ Important: Do NOT order yet! Wait until all 12 designs are finalized and up there so you only have to order once. Even if you’re planning on buying a complete set, hold off- we have a few other items we’ll be introducing along the way that might interest you. In fact, I’m not even going to put them on the site until all has been revealed…

This is the first of the series —

ProvisionalPUFF

(8) At Bloomberg, Noah Smith writes about “Star Trek Economics: Life After the Dismal Science”.

I grew up watching “Star Trek: The Next Generation” (easily the best of the Star Trek shows). There’s one big, obvious thing missing from the future society depicted in the program. No one is doing business. There is almost no one buying and selling, except for a few species for whom commerce is a form of traditional religion. Food and luxuries are free, provided by “replicators” — machines capable of creating essentially anything from pure energy. Recreation, provided by virtual reality, is infinite in scope. Scarcity — the central defining concept of economics — seems to have been eliminated.

Is this really the future? Is it possible? Is it something we want?

Wait ‘til Smith discovers the Culture novels of Iain M. Banks…

[Thanks to Martin Morse Wooster and John King Tarpinian for some of these stories. Title credit goes to File 770 contributing editor of the day Kurt Busiek.]

363 thoughts on “Pixel Scroll 8/4 The Dead Wallaby of Clown Town

  1. @Brian Z: I read Hao Jingfang’s Folding Beijing just now. It’s certainly an interesting story. I may have some more thoughts on it later, or in a few days maybe. I enjoyed reading it, anyway. It seems to be a critique of economics and the widening divide between rich and poor, etc. etc. Also really lovely personal touches, characters that feel like they have real, human motivations for their actions rather than just doing things because that’s what they’d do in a story… anyway, I’m going to be seeking out some more of Hao Jingfang’s writing in the near future. I think the best thing that’s come out of this (for me) is reading more short fiction.

    Also, damn, Ken Liu is good at this translation thing isn’t he?

  2. Folding Beijing didn’t work for me. The premise was a sillier version of Dayworld (yes! it is possible!) and the writing never carried me past that.

  3. although there was a dead wallaby down at the bottom so the frogs could lie easy and not rattle around in there and maybe wallabies have wings, I don’t know for sure, Australian animals not being my area of expertise, with one significant exception I’m not going to bore you with now–anyway,

    So long as they were actually frogs and not cane toads. Those toads don’t mix well with Australian mammals – particularly the carnivorous kind.

    Oh and I’m all out of internets, please accept this web instead – apparently it is worldwide.

  4. It is time.

    The Champion is at last unleashed.

    But was anyone prepared for the … SHOCKING FINAL ACT TWIST?!

    BRACKET

    Part VI

    You may vote for any member of a pair, declare a tie, or abstain. A special section has been reserved for off-bracket choices, see the comment section soon to be posted. Essays and speeches regarding your choices, naked or otherwise, are encouraged but not required.

  5. THE WINNERS

    1. THE FELLOWSHIP OF THE RING OF ERRETH-AKBE
    The Lord of the Rings, J. R. R. Tolkien
    The Tombs of Atuan, Ursula K. Le Guin

    2. THE TWO-FLOWERS
    The Lord of the Rings, J. R. R. Tolkien
    Small Gods, Terry Pratchett

    THE RUNNERS-UP

    3. THE RETURN OF THE KIN
    The Lord of the Rings, J. R. R. Tolkien
    Nine Princes in Amber, Roger Zelazny

    4. THE RED BULL OF WESTMARCH
    The Lord of the Rings, J. R. R. Tolkien
    The Last Unicorn, Peter S. Beagle

    THE SPECIAL CATEGORY

    5. THE MONSTERS AND THE CRITICS
    What Book Should Have Won?

  6. 1. The Lord of the Rings, J. R. R. Tolkien
    2. The Lord of the Rings, J. R. R. Tolkien
    4. The Lord of the Rings, J. R. R. Tolkien
    5. The Wizard of Earthsea, Ursula K. Le Guin

  7. Comments:

    1) I decided to treat The Lord of the Rings as one book, since the whole thing was intended to be a single novel.

    2) Two of the non-winners were so close (The Last Unicorn was behind the winners by only two votes; Nine Princes in Amber was behind The Last Unicorn by only one vote) that I decided to give them a shot too, to see what would happen.

    3) Bracket 5 is your chance to say why another book altogether should totally have won, or possibly why one of these books should totally win, or else why the question itself is nothing more than a plot by me to drive you, at last, completely insane.

  8. So will there then be a boss fight between the Lord of the Rings, The Lord of the Rings, The Lord of the Rings and The Lord of the Rings?

  9. Love Wizard of Earthsea.
    But I still remember the excitement of getting The Return of the King from the library, and sitting down right there to start reading it. And I reread it every year for the next 5/6 years. And another couple of times since then. And again before the CGI CRAPTASTIC INFANTILISED WIZARD-BATTLING DWARF-THROWING PETER JACKSON YOU MORON AAAAAAARRRRRGGGGGHHHHH (but New Zealand looks nice) movies. Everything else is in the shadow of Lord of the Rings. It wins all the prizes.

  10. I took one of those LoTR-tours in New Zealand, was real fun. The guide was walking around with a laptop, showing places from the movies on it and then telling us exactly where we should stand to see the same trees, bushes, etc.

    But the best is when he told med where the playground from Braindead could be found. Thats where I became a real fanboy.

  11. 1. THE FELLOWSHIP OF THE RING OF ERRETH-AKBE
    The Lord of the Rings, J. R. R. Tolkien

    2. THE TWO-FLOWERS
    Small Gods, Terry Pratchett

    THE RUNNERS-UP

    3. THE RETURN OF THE KIN
    Nine Princes in Amber, Roger Zelazny

    4. THE RED BULL OF WESTMARCH
    The Lord of the Rings, J. R. R. Tolkien

    THE SPECIAL CATEGORY

    5. THE MONSTERS AND THE CRITICS
    What Book Should Have Won?
    Might I finally (re-)vote for Silverlock here? Well, I might, at that.

  12. 1. THE FELLOWSHIP OF THE RING OF ERRETH-AKBE
    The Lord of the Rings, J. R. R. Tolkien

    2. THE TWO-FLOWERS
    Small Gods, Terry Pratchett

    THE RUNNERS-UP

    3. THE RETURN OF THE KIN
    Nine Princes in Amber, Roger Zelazny

    4. THE RED BULL OF WESTMARCH
    The Lord of the Rings, J. R. R. Tolkien

    THE SPECIAL CATEGORY

    5. THE MONSTERS AND THE CRITICS

    Gah. I’ll dance with who brought me: Nine Princes in Amber.

  13. @RedWombat:

    The scary thing is… well, I can’t tell you. You won’t believe me unless I show you. Take a look at the left-hand column, the last entry above “Gazebo.”

    (“Macadamia!” “Hush, you.”)

  14. 1. THE FELLOWSHIP OF THE RING OF ERRETH-AKBE
    The Lord of the Rings, J. R. R. Tolkien

    2. THE TWO-FLOWERS
    Small Gods, Terry Pratchett

    THE RUNNERS-UP

    3. THE RETURN OF THE KIN
    Nine Princes in Amber, Roger Zelazny

    4. THE RED BULL OF WESTMARCH
    The Lord of the Rings, J. R. R. Tolkien

    5. La Morte D’Arthur

  15. Finally, an easy bracket. All I have to do is vote for whichever work isn’t LOTR. (I really didn’t care for that as a written work.)

    1. LeGuin.
    2. Pratchett.
    3. Zelazny.
    4. Beagle.
    5. Tom Holt, Odds and Gods, because dammit, someone has to give Pterry a run for his money…

  16. …that started somewhere and then I got really distracted with the frog bit. Sorry.

    Sorry, Red Wombat? Why? That was glorious.

  17. 1. THE FELLOWSHIP OF THE RING OF ERRETH-AKBE
    The Lord of the Rings, J. R. R. Tolkien
    This would be closer if it were the entire Earthsea trilogy rather than just the middle volume, but still Tolkein.

    2. THE TWO-FLOWERS
    The Lord of the Rings, J. R. R. Tolkien

    THE RUNNERS-UP

    3. THE RETURN OF THE KIN
    The Lord of the Rings, J. R. R. Tolkien

    4. THE RED BULL OF WESTMARCH
    Tie
    Manages to tie with Tolkein by being the book that does something completely different.

    THE SPECIAL CATEGORY

    5. THE MONSTERS AND THE CRITICS
    The Lord of the Rings
    There’s a reason, or several, why its the champ.

  18. 1. The Tombs of Atuan, Ursula K. Le Guin (standing for Earthsea as a whole – don’t see why the English guy should be the only one to get 3 for 1)

    2. Small Gods, Terry Pratchett

    THE RUNNERS-UP
    3. The Lord of the Rings, J. R. R. Tolkien

    4. The Last Unicorn, Peter S. Beagle

    THE SPECIAL CATEGORY
    5. Islandia should have been included, and Silverlock should have done better than it did.

  19. 1. THE FELLOWSHIP OF THE RING OF ERRETH-AKBE
    The Lord of the Rings, J. R. R. Tolkien
    The Tombs of Atuan, Ursula K. Le Guin

    2. THE TWO-FLOWERS
    The Lord of the Rings, J. R. R. Tolkien
    Small Gods, Terry Pratchett

    THE RUNNERS-UP

    3. THE RETURN OF THE KIN
    The Lord of the Rings, J. R. R. Tolkien
    Nine Princes in Amber, Roger Zelazny

    4. THE RED BULL OF WESTMARCH
    The Lord of the Rings, J. R. R. Tolkien
    The Last Unicorn, Peter S. Beagle

    THE SPECIAL CATEGORY

    5. THE MONSTERS AND THE CRITICS
    What Book Should Have Won?
    Geez, I don’t know. Comparisons at this level are hard for me.

  20. Wow, RedWombat, I laughed all the way through the following comments down to here…

    As a satire of Dave Freer it fails to be true to the original in one or two points 1) it was funny 2) I could understand what it was trying to say.

    I can’t decide if 2 destroys it or is the final touch that makes it a complete success. I’m coming down on the side of success–it can’t have been destroyed because in that case 1 and 2 couldn’t be true.

    I’m tempted to try to filk it but fear my powers may not be up to the task of doing it justice…

    Yes, by all means, please accept this internet. I’m having it engraved; would you like your handle, your name or your pen name?

  21. <whimper>

    1-4 — The Lord of the Rings in all categories. But it hurts us, my precious, it hurts us….

    THE SPECIAL CATEGORY

    5. THE MONSTERS AND THE CRITICS
    What Book Should Have Won?

    Hodgell’s God Stalk should have done better.

  22. 5.) Watership Down should have won simply because I love it the most. That’s really the one criteria that should matter the most to all of us.

    (Not that you should be voting for what I love the most, but what you love the most.)

    (The metaphorical ‘we,’ as it were.)

    (You get the idea.)

  23. 1. Le Guin
    2. JRRT
    3. JRRT
    4. Beagle
    5. This will take thought. I will vote later.

  24. Something to consider: on July 24th, I posted my complete Hugo recommendations. I am NOT saying those are all Puppy votes, only that there may be a connection.

    It’s not that VD is asserting the world revolves around him. It’s just that he thinks it’s a theory the rest of us ought to give serious consideration.

  25. As for VD’s contention, I voted the day before the deadline because I just hadn’t gotten around to it yet. Perhaps that is a better explanation for the surge of late votes.

  26. It’s not that VD is asserting the world revolves around him. It’s just that he thinks it’s a theory the rest of us ought to give serious consideration.

    I think little Teddy should be preparing himself for disappointment.

  27. 1. THE FELLOWSHIP OF THE RING OF ERRETH-AKBE
    The Tombs of Atuan, Ursula K. Le Guin

    2. THE TWO-FLOWERS
    The Lord of the Rings, J.R.R. Tolkien

    3. THE RETURN OF THE KIN
    Nine Princes in Amber, Roger Zelazny

    4. THE RED BULL OF WESTMARCH
    The Lord of the Rings, J.R.R. Tolkien

    5. THE MONSTERS AND THE CRITICS
    The Island of the Mighty, Evangeline Walton

  28. Stephen Colbert Truthiness lives and prospers in the puppy crowd.
    RedWombat thanks for making my morning infinitely better.

  29. 5. Eddison for the prose from the Worm Ouroboros to Mistress of Mistresses; Hodgel for the sky king’s pants and blind snakes in mazes; Clark Ashton Smith for Zothique

    Curse the dice of Kyra

  30. 1. THE FELLOWSHIP OF THE RING OF ERRETH-AKBE
    The Tombs of Atuan, Ursula K. Le Guin

    2. THE TWO-FLOWERS
    Small Gods, Terry Pratchett

    3. THE RETURN OF THE KIN
    The Lord of the Rings, J. R. R. Tolkien

    4. THE RED BULL OF WESTMARCH
    Abstain

    5. THE MONSTERS AND THE CRITICS
    Small Gods is my goto here.

  31. I did vote 2 hours before closing, but that was a small tweak after I was persuaded that a puppy nominee deserved better. Most decisions made in the month before.

    And Mr Pascoe – it’s not envy. It’s having read your rather dreadful nominees. Like you wanted us to.

  32. By the way a women in science fiction story bundle is available. Curated by Kristine Kathryn Rusch.

    https://storybundle.com/scifi

    Crossfire by Nancy Kress
    Memory by Linda Nagata
    Recovering Apollo 8 by Kristine Kathryn Rusch
    Near + Far by Cat Rambo
    The Phoenix Code by Catherine Asaro

    Even better, if you pay $15 or higher, you unlock five more titles, which include:

    Starfarers by Vonda N. McIntyre
    The Diving Bundle by Kristine Kathryn Rusch
    Forgotten Suns by Judith Tarr
    Strong Arm Tactics by Jody Lynn Nye
    Stars – The Anthology by edited by Janis Ian and Mike Resnick

  33. @snowcrash: Thing about the Hudlin Black Panther is, I decided it wasn’t for me in the first instance. And that’s okay. The Hudlin BP run makes perfect sense if you think of it as wish-fulfillment fantasy for black kids. In the sense that it was written with a youth audience in mind, it was something of a throwback comic, in a good way. So I enjoyed it, despite the part of my mind muttering, “But autarky doesn’t work…”

  34. 1. THE FELLOWSHIP OF THE RING OF ERRETH-AKBE
    The Lord of the Rings, J. R. R. Tolkien

    2. THE TWO-FLOWERS
    The Lord of the Rings, J. R. R. Tolkien

    3. THE RETURN OF THE KIN
    Nine Princes in Amber, Roger Zelazny

    4. THE RED BULL OF WESTMARCH
    The Lord of the Rings, J. R. R. Tolkien

    THE SPECIAL CATEGORY

    5. THE MONSTERS AND THE CRITICS
    The Broken Sword, Poul Anderson.

  35. Okay I have a filk ready… I don’t know that it does the original justice, but that is a perennial problem with filks.

    Frogwings
    lyrics by Cat
    story by RedWombat

    Along the road I told Bob, “ahoy”
    Not the Reverend Bob, you know, Marlene’s boy.
    “What’s with the bucket of frogs?,” I said ” and how are things?”
    He said to me, he said “I wanted the wings.”

    (chorus)
    . Bob is one of your masterminds;
    . But like the bible says, I guess it takes all kinds
    . Life is like the granola biz;
    . It’s the nuts that make it the place it is!

    I wasn’t going to figure that one soon,
    ‘Cause in the drawer of life, I ain’t the sharpest spoon
    But I looked again; they looked like frogs to me,
    Though they were on top of a wallaby.

    I said “Bob,” I said, “Those frogs don’t have wings
    And I’m no expert on these things,
    But wallabies don’t–” but then he let me know.
    That he meant the wings the frogs were gonna grow.

    He said “maybe man wasn’t meant to fly,
    But neither were frogs.” I looked him in the eye
    I said, “wait, frogs fly?” he looked mighty vexed;
    “And once I have wings,” he said, “Pluto’s next!”

    Marlene said when we had a talk.
    She said he tends those frogs like a lovesick hawk.
    She said he’s keeping notes at every stage
    He even has a tab for their facebook page!

    So Bob’s not gonna change his tune.
    Those wings will get him to Pluto soon
    This is all I am gonna say;
    It’s getting mighty strange down Marlene’s way.

  36. 1. THE FELLOWSHIP OF THE RING OF ERRETH-AKBE
    Tomb of Atuan, Ursula K. Le Guin

    2. THE TWO-FLOWERS
    The Lord of the Rings, J. R. R. Tolkien

    3. THE RETURN OF THE KIN
    The Lord of the Rings, J. R. R. Tolkien

    4. THE RED BULL OF WESTMARCH
    The Lord of the Rings, J. R. R. Tolkien

    5. MONSTERS AND THE CRITICS
    Moonwise by Greer Gilman

  37. 1. THE FELLOWSHIP OF THE RING OF ERRETH-AKBE
    The Tombs of Atuan, Ursula K. Le Guin

    2. THE TWO-FLOWERS
    Small Gods, Terry Pratchett

    THE RUNNERS-UP

    3. THE RETURN OF THE KIN
    The Lord of the Rings, J. R. R. Tolkien

    4. THE RED BULL OF WESTMARCH
    The Lord of the Rings, J. R. R. Tolkien

    THE SPECIAL CATEGORY

    5. THE MONSTERS AND THE CRITICS
    Well it’s got to be Gormenghast for me 😉

  38. @ Shambles
    That bundle looks awesome. Thanks for pointing it out. I have read the Nagata, Kress and about 20% through Forgotten Suns by Judith Tarr.
    All very good.

  39. Ray, I can see how the echo of Dayworld would be a turn-off. On the other hand, movable and collapsible urban micro-housing is already in the works, it kind of makes sense to think about rotation beyond the 90 degrees of a murphy bed, and what the Chinese government will do with on the order of one and a half billion people once the farms and factories are all completely automated is an actual weighty question. So on balance, the story worked for me.

  40. Jon on August 5, 2015 at 4:59 am said:

    Something to consider: on July 24th, I posted my complete Hugo recommendations. I am NOT saying those are all Puppy votes, only that there may be a connection.

    It’s not that VD is asserting the world revolves around him. It’s just that he thinks it’s a theory the rest of us ought to give serious consideration.

    I’m trying to figure out now if Beale has never heard the phrase “correlation does not imply causation”, or if he’s just sure none of his acolytes will point that out.

  41. RedWombat, that was hysterical! Thank you!!

    And now, the bracketses!

    THE WINNERS

    1. THE FELLOWSHIP OF THE RING OF ERRETH-AKBE
    The Lord of the Rings, J. R. R. Tolkien
    The Tombs of Atuan, Ursula K. Le Guin

    2. THE TWO-FLOWERS
    The Lord of the Rings, J. R. R. Tolkien
    Small Gods, Terry Pratchett

    THE RUNNERS-UP

    3. THE RETURN OF THE KIN
    The Lord of the Rings, J. R. R. Tolkien
    Nine Princes in Amber, Roger Zelazny

    4. THE RED BULL OF WESTMARCH
    The Lord of the Rings, J. R. R. Tolkien
    The Last Unicorn, Peter S. Beagle

    THE SPECIAL CATEGORY

    5. THE MONSTERS AND THE CRITICS
    argh too many must think. Oh, wait.
    Good Omens by Terry Pratchett and Neil Gaiman.

  42. That time the party was attacked by a Gazebo. I remember it well.

    I suppose the whole puppy thing should be used as a cautionary tale to get people to constantly question their own beliefs and to check the sources. Plus don’t follow leaders and watch the parkin’ meters.

  43. And Mr Pascoe – it’s not envy. It’s having read your rather dreadful nominees. Like you wanted us to.

    The Puppies are desperate to come up with any story other than people simply don’t like the same books they do. Other people are envious of them. Other people vote for things they don’t actually like because of affirmative action, or because Tor told them to, or because of spite. Anything other than admit the voters don’t like the Puppy picks and like other books.

    It is really kind of sad. But then again, just about everything about the Puppies is kind of sad and pathetic.

  44. what the Chinese government will do with on the order of one and a half billion people once the farms and factories are all completely automated is an actual weighty question

    yes, but rotating cities is not an answer to that question. It’s an answer to the question, “how do we fit more people into Beijing?” You can have millions of people work in recycling whether or not the city rotates. The story would work in almost exactly the same way if the three zones were laid out in a line. Along the banks of a river for example, or as steps in a terrace.
    I could have ignored all that if the writing grabbed me, but it didn’t.

  45. I have to admit that in a moment of weakness, i clicked on the link to Pascoe’s piece on Hoyts’s blog. I really wish I hadn’t.

    These people are obsessed with Marxists. It’s ridiculous.

Comments are closed.