Pixel Scroll 11/1 Rank Election

(1) If you are fan who drinks, the newly reopened Clifton’s Cafeteria would like to tempt you with these two science fictional libations –

drinks at Cliftons

(2) “Another Word: Chinese Science Fiction and Chinese Reality” by Liu Cixin, translated by Ken Liu, in Clarkesworld, talks about the themes of other Chinese writers after these introductory comments about the domestic reception for his own work.

China is a society undergoing rapid development and transformation, where crises are present along with hopes, and opportunities coexist with challenges. This is a reality reflected in the science fiction produced there.

Chinese readers often interpret science fiction in unexpected ways. Take my Three Body series as an example. The alien-invasion story takes as its premise a “worst-case” scenario for relationships among members of the cosmic society of civilizations, which is called the “Dark Forest” state. In this state, different starfaring civilizations have no choice but to attempt to annihilate each other at the first opportunity.

After publication, the novels became surprisingly popular among those working in China’s Internet industry. They saw the “Dark Forest” state portrayed in the novels as an accurate reflection of the state of brutal competition among China’s Internet companies….

Authors (myself included) are often befuddled by such interpretations.

(3) From “’Star Wars’: Their First Time” in the New York Times.

Ridley Scott: I had done a film called “The Duellists” and was in Los Angeles to shoot at Paramount, and I honestly think Paramount had forgotten. I remember saying, I’m Ridley Scott, and they said who? So David Puttnam, one of the greatest producers I’ve ever worked with and the most fun, said, “Screw them, let’s go see [“Star Wars”] at the Chinese [theater].” It was the first week. I’ve never known audience participation like it, absolutely rocking. I felt my “Duellist” was this big [holds thumb and forefinger an inch apart], and George had done that [stretches arms out wide]. I was so inspired I wanted to shoot myself. My biggest compliment can be [to get] green with envy and really bad-tempered. That damn George, son of a bitch. I’m very competitive.

(4) Andrew Porter was interviewed, complete with photo, for “Longtime Brooklynites Reflect on a Changing Brooklyn” on Brownstoner.com:

Now you can put a face to me and my non SFnal opinions about recent changes in Brooklyn Heights, where I’ve lived for 47 years.

I’m sure you’ll also appreciate the comments, one of which accuses me of hating Brits!

(Daveinbedstuy accuses – “Andrew Porter sounds cranky; as he usually does on BHB. I wonder what he has against ‘Brits.’ And bringing up ‘granite countertops’ Really????????”)

(5) Jim C. Hines on Facebook:

I HAVE WRITTEN THE FIRST 22 WORDS OF MY NANOWRIMO NOVEL!

The NaNo word counter says at this rate, I’ll finish by January 20, 2022.

I suppose I should probably keep writing, eh?

(6) “Fantastic Worlds: Science and Fiction, 1780-1910” is on exhibit through February 26, 2017 in the newly renovated Smithsonian Libraries Exhibition Gallery of the National Museum of American History.

Travel with us to the surface of the moon, the center of the earth, and the depths of the ocean – to the fantastic worlds of fiction inspired by 19th century discovery and invention.

New frontiers of science were emerging. We took to the air, charted remote corners of the earth, and harnessed the power of steam and electricity. We began unlocking the secrets of the natural world. The growing literate middle class gave science a new and avid public audience. Writers explored the farther reaches of the new scientific landscape to craft hoaxes, satires and fictional tales.

Fantastic Worlds: Science and Fiction, 1780-1910 is accompanied by an online exhibit.

(7) Francis Hamit, a novelist and film producer who is a graduate of the Iowa Writers Workshop, has published A Perfect Spy, a memoir about his first two years at the University of Iowa when he was a dual major in Drama and Business. While he narrates the ongoing dramatic social changes that were transforming society and the university in 1965 and 1966, he also covers the impact of the sexual revolution, the sudden rise of a drug culture, and the beginnings of the anti-war movement at the University of Iowa, from a first-person perspective.

“I saw the first draft card burnt,” Hamit says; “And I would see the last anti-war riot there several years later. I was also very disturbed by the rise of all kinds of drug use in and around Iowa City. Unlike almost everyone else I knew, I did not think this ‘cool’. I saw people ruining thier lives by refusing to tell the police who’d sold them the drugs: facing years in prison. I offered to help them find the dealers if they would leave my friends alone. How I did this is narrated in A Perfect Spy, which is a 118-page excerpt from my forthcoming book Out of Step: A Memoir of the Vietnam War Years.

“I was already in place,” Hamit added; “A perfect spy who made no pretenses of approving of recreational drugs. I didn’t do anything with them, but simply watched and listened so I could collect some useful intelligence for the police. At the same time, I became involved with some very interesting women who were part of the Sexual Revolution. That was part of a larger social revolt. None of what happened then can be viewed in isolation, so I’ve just tried to be as truthful as possible while changing a lot of the names of the people to prevent embarrassment.”

A Perfect Spy will be available exclusively at first from November 12, 2015 on Amazon Kindle for $5.00 and can be pre-ordered now. A print edition will be available in March, 2016 with a suggested retail price of $12.00 from most bookstores.

(8) “The artist who visited ‘Dune’ and ‘the most important science fiction art ever created’” – a gallery of Schoenherr at Dangerous Minds.

Frank Herbert said John Schoenherr was “the only man who has ever visited Dune.” Schoenherr (1935-2010) was the artist responsible for visualising and illustrating Herbert’s Dune—firstly in the pages of Analog magazine, then in the fully illustrated edition of the classic science fiction tale. But Herbert didn’t stop there, he later added:

I can envision no more perfect visual representation of my Dune world than John Schoenherr’s careful and accurate illustrations.

High praise indeed, but truly deserved, for as Jeff Love pointed out in Omni Reboot, Schoenherr’s illustrations are “the most important science fiction art ever created.”

(9) Jason Sanford posted a collection of tweets under the heading “The fossilization of science fiction and fantasy literature”. Here are some excerpts.

https://twitter.com/jasonsanford/status/660782118356783104

https://twitter.com/jasonsanford/status/660783781654233088

https://twitter.com/jasonsanford/status/660789856075948034

Although I have friends that do exactly what Sanford complains about, he doesn’t hang with them, read their fanzines, or (I’d wager) even know their names, so I’m kind of curious whose comments sparked off this rant.

Personally, I’m prone to recommend Connie Willis or Lois McMaster Bujold if I’m trying to interest someone in sf – though both have been around over 25 years and aren’t spring chickens anymore either.

People recommend what they know and esteem. It’s perfectly fine to argue whether recommendations will win fans to the genre, but it seems petty to act as if pushing “classic” choices is a war crime.

(10) John Scalzi was more or less content with Sanford’s line of thought, and responded with “No, the Kids Aren’t Reading the Classics and Why Would They”.

Writer Jason Sanford kicked a small hornet’s nest earlier today when he discussed “the fossilization of science fiction,” as he called it, and noted that today’s kids who are getting into science fiction are doing it without “Asimov, Clarke, Heinlein and Tolkien.” This is apparently causing a moderate bit of angina in some quarters.

I think Sanford is almost entirely correct (the small quibble being that I suspect Tolkien is still common currency, thanks to recent films and video games), nor does this personally come as any particular shock. I wrote last year about the fact my daughter was notably resistant to Heinlein’s charms, not to mention the charms of other writers who I enjoyed when I was her age… thirty years ago. She has her own set of writers she loves and follows, as she should. As do all the kids her age who read.

The surprise to me is not that today’s kids have their own set of favorite authors, in genre and out of it; the surprise to me is honestly that anyone else is surprised by this.

(11) “The kids” who don’t read the classics are one case, would-be sf writers are another, explains Fynbospress in “Slogging forward, looking back” at Mad Genius Club.

Kris Rusch has also noted how many young writers she’s run into who are completely ignorant of the many, many female authors who’ve been in science fiction and fantasy since the start. Among other reasons, many of their works have gone out of print, and the new writers coming in may not have read the old magazines, or picked up the older, dated-artwork books at the used bookstores. So they really, truly, may not know that their groundbreaking new take has been done to death thirty years before they came on the scene, or that they’re trying to reinvent a wheel that has not only been invented, it’s evolved to all-wheel drive with traction control.

(12) I can’t say that Vivienne Raper is going where no one has gone before in responding to the latest Wired article about the Hugos — “Five reasons why the ‘Battle for Pop Culture’s Soul’ isn’t about ‘white men’”.

[First three of five points.]

There are many reasons why I might be “angered” by previous Hugo winners.  And none of them are anything to do with ‘the increasingly multicultural makeup’ of the awards:

ONE

Science fiction’s most prestigious award‘ for Best Novel was decided in 2014 by fewer than 4,000 voters.

TWO

The Best Short Story for 2014 got onto the ballot with fewer than 43 nominations.

THREE

Popular blogger John Scalzi has won more Hugo Awards (inc. best fan writer) than Isaac Asimov – author of I, Robot – or Arthur C. Clarke. He also has 90K+ Twitter followers.

(13) Jeb Kinnison at Substrate Wars is more analytical and lands more punches in “The Death of ‘Wired’: Hugo Awards Edition”. Here are his closing paragraphs.

The various flavors of Puppies differ, but one thing they’re not is anti-diverse — there are women, people of various colors, gays (like me), religious, atheists, and on and on. The one thing they have in common is that they oppose elevating political correctness above quality of writing, originality, and story in science fiction. Many of the award winners in recent years have been lesser works elevated only because they satisfied a group of progressives who want their science fiction to reflect their desired future of group identity and victim-based politics. For them, it is part of their battle to tear down bad old patriarchy, to bury the old and bring themselves to the forefront of culture (and incidentally make a living being activists in fiction.) These people are often called “Social Justice Warriors” – they shore up their own fragile identities by thinking of themselves as noble warriors for social justice. Amy Wallace places herself with them by portraying the issues as a battle between racist, sexist white men and everyone else.

She then goes on to give some space to Larry Correia, Brad Torgerson, and Vox Day (Ted Beale). While her reporting about them is reasonably truthful, they report that she promised to interview Sarah Hoyt (who ruins the narrative as a female Puppy) but did not do so, and left out material from other interviews that did not support her slant. Tsk!

The piece is very long, but written from a position of assumed moral superiority and elite groupthink, a long fall from classic Wired‘s iconoclastic reporting. It’s sad when a quality brand goes downhill — as a longtime subscriber, I’ve noticed the magazine has grown thinner in the last year as ad revenues declined and competition from upstarts like Fast Company ate into their market. Now they are me-tooing major controversies for clicks. Once you see this dishonesty in reporting, you should never view such sources as reliable again.

(14) Sometimes I suspect AI stands for “artificial ignorance.”

If the programmer of this tweet-generating robot was literate, they could easily discover that the words Portugal and Portuguese are not even mentioned in this U.S. Census definition of “Hispanic or Latino.”

(15) “The Original Star Wars Trilogy Gets An Awesome Force Awakens-Style Trailer” via Geek Tyrant.

I’d warn that there are too many spoilers, except you’ve already seen the original trilogy how many times?

[Thanks to Andrew Porter, Mark-kitteh, Will R., JJ, Trey Palmer, Francis Hamit, and John King Tarpinian for some of these stories. Title credit goes to File 770 contributing editor of the day Jack Lint.]

594 thoughts on “Pixel Scroll 11/1 Rank Election

  1. Gibson started to bore me around Idoru and so I stopped reading him. Which means that even if he wrote a book made of bunnies and cyberpunk orgasms, I wouldn’t know. I probably looked at it in the bookstore, said “oh, him again,” and didn’t bother to pick up the book. I have entirely too much to read in this lifetime from authors who I have not grown weary of, I rarely go back to ones I don’t care about any longer.

    Which means I don’t nominate those books that I have not read.

    Now, if someone I trusted turned up and said “No, really, this is glorious!” it might ding my radar to go back and at least read the jacket copy, but nobody did.

    Ta-da! Mystery solved. Now we can all have ice cream.

  2. Last year I went out and read everything that appealed to me off the bat and everything I could get my hands on that was recommended by people whose opinions I respected and whose tastes seemed reasonably likely to coincide with mine.

    Then I picked my 5 favorites from that bunch.

    This year I’m going to do the same thing. There’s no point in fretting about “what is popular enough to have a chance” since the Puppies will be slating again anyway. Might as well pick my honest favorites. Last time I was lucky and 2 of my faves wound up on the Best Novel ballot. This time, who knows?

  3. My take-home from all of this is that, somehow, the next William Gibson book is going to be made of ice cream.

  4. Having been sucked into active participation in the Hugos only after SP3 locked up most of this year’s ballot, I can’t claim even a sliver of the credit/blame for The Peripheral not being on even the long list this year. I didn’t even read it until spring of this year. However, had I been actively reading for Hugo nominating purposes, I doubt it would have been on my nominating ballot. To me it read as Gibson in reasonably good form until the climax of the action, which fell rather flat. Also, sorting virtually all the major characters who weren’t already coupled into couples in the denouement struck me as lame. For my money, all three books in the Blue Ant trilogy are better, though their science-fictionality is slight.

  5. Sounds as if part of the reason it wasn’t fully considered was that people assume Gibson only writes near-future lightly sci-fied fashion sociology, which wouldn’t necessarily be a terrible assumption based on recent years. But again–and I don’t argue that it should have won everyone’s vote for best novel, though it might have won mine–I just wonder why the system (realizing “system” = emergent property of mysterious fandom) doesn’t “find” exactly that kind of book for, at least, consideration. More succinctly, I wish some system did. Just my opinion, of course.

  6. @RedWombat

    “A book made of bunnies and cyberpunk orgasms”

    I would read the heck out of that book! Please write it. 🙂

  7. I didn’t read “The Peripheral” until a couple of months ago. It would been a worthy Hugo finalist with a good chance to have won. I hadn’t read it in time to nominate because I’d downgraded Gibson from my “must buy & read on release” list to my “will get round to it at some stage” list. His recent output hadn’t impressed me as much as other writers I follow.

    But if we are going to re-hash the “[INSERT AWARD HERE] is broken because [INSERT WORK HERE] didn’t get nominated” argument, count me out. By that criterion, ALL awards are broken.

  8. Only five slots. Fiiiiive. Lots of worthy, awesome books aren’t going to be on that shortlist. Because only five books fit on it.

    (Well, in the unlikely but not impossible event of lots of the books right at the top having the same number of votes, theoretically you could have more, but that doesn’t happen very often. The only case I can think of off the top of my head was in the Editor Long category and that also required two editors to refuse their nominations so I doubt it will get repeated terribly often.)

    Not many spots on the longlist, either, so again, lots of worthy, awesome books won’t be on there. Because there isn’t room. It doesn’t mean those books no longer count as worthy and awesome. It doesn’t mean Hugo voters collectively either hated or ignored those books. It just means that enough of them liked different books more.

  9. Anna Feruglio Dal Dan on November 2, 2015 at 10:35 pm said:
    My mom was an avid consumer of La settimana enigmistica, a weekly magazine of crosswords and cryptic things and stuff like that (like my grandfather before her). In between the serious puzzles they used to publish cartoons (which were the only thing I read, not being interested in the puzzles).

    They were still going on about hippies in the late nineties. I don’t know if they stopped, but maybe they are still publishing to this day cartoons about long-haired male youths who don’t wash.

    There seems to be some sort of obliviousness that causes people to latch onto and keep using clichés of people of their youth long after such have vanished from the world of the living.

    For example, I can recall as a child eventually realizing that I had never once seen in real life a scruffy newsboy yelling “Extra! Extra! Read all about it!”, nor even for that matter any kind of corner newsboy at all, although they still infested children’s cartoons and newspaper comics and other art made without much thought.

    Newspapers came from morning deliveries or vending machines or drugstores. Newspaper boys had been extinct for two generations at least. And yet there they were, roaming through popular entertainment as if it were somehow still the Great Depression.

  10. re: Nominating

    I’ve been going through much of what others describe about deciding my “strategy” for nominating. This will be my first time and I’ve been obsessing a bit about doing it “right”. So much so that the reading was becoming a chore instead of a joy. I decided to take a break for at least a week (or until I can ‘open’ a book without tensing up) and chill out.

    As far as whether or not to pick 1 or 2 known popular books to counter the puppies, I decided that I’m going to go with the ones I love only. I won’t let the slate campaigns force me to act against the spirit of the Hugos the very first time I participate!

    Of course, given that I’ll probably waffle around about which stories to cull from my long lists (if I even get to more than 5 in some categories), and change my mind half a dozen times, including immediately after nominations close…I probably shouldn’t be making huge declarations of intent at this point. :^]

    ETA: Yeah, this is painful and hard work and I am in awe of all you people who have done this in previous years! I’m glad, though, that I found this group to hold my digital hand through the process.

  11. @Peace – And when you draw a TV, you put rabbit ears on it. I had another children’s book illustrator point that out to me once. We almost all do it. Kids reading the books weren’t born when we went to cable in this country, but…rabbit ears.

  12. Indeed, it made me curious about Sanford’s crime novels, which rarely happens. If I had to put my finger on it, its that in spite of the the manly veteran dudebro character, and the strong hand of the security forces, it lacked the resentment and fear that seems to permeate everything the Puppies wright… I mean write.

    Sanford’s crime novels are fun. They’re not literature for the ages, but they’re engaging and exciting, and make returning to these characters’ lives book after book an enjoyable thing.

    And he’s absolutely excellent at writing the relaxed bullshitting of seasoned professionals on a job.

  13. FILE 770 LIVE-ACTION TV TOURNAMENT AND BRACKETS – FINAL FOUR

    1. SHOULD I STAY OR SHOULD I GO?
    Babylon 5 (1 – Coreward)
    Doctor Who [Classic] (3 – Spinward)

    2. TO BOLDLY GO WHERE I AM NO MAN
    Buffy the Vampire Slayer (1 – Rimward)
    Star Trek: The Original Series (1 – Trailing)

    (Fun fact: in the Elite Eight, B5 and Classic Who each scored 38 points. Their opponents scored 27 and 26 respectively. Meanwhile, Buffy won her match 41-25 while the Enterprise won 43-25. On paper, these should be close matches.)

  14. 1. Classic Doctor Who. Easy choice, it’s my favorite sf TV series of all time. I do love B5, but no need for a headcloth here.
    2. Star Trek: TOS

  15. Easy one first

    1. SHOULD I STAY OR SHOULD I GO?
    Babylon 5 (1 – Coreward)
    Doctor Who [Classic] (3 – Spinward)

    Now…forehead cloths please

    2. TO BOLDLY GO WHERE I AM NO MAN
    Buffy the Vampire Slayer (1 – Rimward)
    Star Trek: The Original Series (1 – Trailing)

    @Jim

    I really, REALLY hope you’re gonna do a 3rd place playoff as well.

  16. I’m going WHO TREK SPINWARD TRAILING.

    Or, you know:

    1. SHOULD I STAY OR SHOULD I GO?
    Babylon 5 (1 – Coreward)
    Doctor Who [Classic] (3 – Spinward)

    2. TO BOLDLY GO WHERE I AM NO MAN
    Buffy the Vampire Slayer (1 – Rimward)
    Star Trek: The Original Series (1 – Trailing)

  17. Jim Henley on November 3, 2015 at 8:17 pm said:

    FILE 770 LIVE-ACTION TV TOURNAMENT AND BRACKETS – FINAL FOUR

    1. SHOULD I STAY OR SHOULD I GO?
    Babylon 5 (1 – Coreward)
    Doctor Who [Classic] (3 – Spinward)

    Protest vote or hate vote…protest vote or hate vote… Since I have never actually watched Bab 5, I guess we’ll go with protest: Slings and Arrows

    2. TO BOLDLY GO WHERE I AM NO MAN
    Buffy the Vampire Slayer (1 – Rimward)
    Star Trek: The Original Series (1 – Trailing)

    Cally!!!!! They don’t help enough! Ow ow ow.

  18. 1. SHOULD I STAY OR SHOULD I GO?
    Babylon 5 (1 – Coreward)

    2. TO BOLDLY GO WHERE I AM NO MAN
    Buffy the Vampire Slayer (1 – Rimward)

    At least, based on which from each pair I most enjoy watching.

  19. FILE 770 LIVE-ACTION TV TOURNAMENT AND BRACKETS – FINAL FOUR

    1. SHOULD I STAY OR SHOULD I GO?

    This sort of like a “butterscotch or prime rib” choice. They’re entirely different things. And I don’t have any usefully irrational emotional attachment to either. But I lean just the slightest toward the unified comprehensive (if not always comprehensible) story of B5.

    Babylon 5 (1 – Coreward)
    Doctor Who [Classic] (3 – Spinward)

    2. TO BOLDLY GO WHERE I AM NO MAN

    This may sound odd, but I was kind of hoping that Farscape would win against TOS because I figured Buffy was more likely to win against it than against TOS. What I’m voting for here is a series that took its female characters very very seriously. And that’s always the surest way to my heart. (Although the second surest way is Mr. Pointy.)

    Buffy the Vampire Slayer (1 – Rimward)
    Star Trek: The Original Series (1 – Trailing)

  20. Forehead Cloths! Getcher nice, cool, soothing Official Bracket Forehead Cloths here! Sooth the fevered brow of bracket indecision! Make comforting Forehead Cloth forts, and refuse to acknowledge the contests! Use Forehead Cloths as earplugs to muffle the agonized moans of the other voters! Whatever your Forehead Cloth needs, the purveyors of fine Forehead Cloths stand ready! Order a dozen or a case today!

    And speaking of voting, I’m going to have to grab a handful of Forehead Cloths out of stock. Ouch. At least I can only vote in one pairing again….

    1. SHOULD I STAY OR SHOULD I GO?
    Babylon 5 (1 – Coreward)

  21. 1. SHOULD I STAY OR SHOULD I GO?
    Babylon 5 (1 – Coreward)

    2. TO BOLDLY GO WHERE I AM NO MAN
    Buffy the Vampire Slayer (1 – Rimward)

    That was easy

  22. 1. SHOULD I STAY OR SHOULD I GO?
    Babylon 5

    2. TO BOLDLY GO WHERE I AM NO MAN
    Star Trek: The Original Series

  23. Oh lordy, Jim:

    1. Doctor Who [Classic] (3 – Spinward Marches dammitall)

    I feel a bit guilting, having seen almost no Babylon 5, but IMHO the fact that it didn’t interest me counts heavily against it, and makes me eligible to vote. But I almost abstained.

    2. Buffy the Vampire Slayer (1 – Rimward)

    Trek is a classic, but Buffy was a whole ‘nother level.

  24. @Bitty: I’m baffled; it sounds like book X was your favorite, but misses some ineffable “Hugo” quality – yet it doesn’t sound like it has flaws. I understand “book X is great but obviously not one of the best this year” . . . but it doesn’t sound like that’s your problem here? Vote for it. 😉 Also, don’t vote tactically; just clean it up on the final ballot. ;-(

    @junego: Gah, it should not be painful! Read what sounds interesting to you, then when nomination time comes, nominate the ones you felt were the best, and (many would say) award quality. That’s it. Don’t overthink it like . . . many of us . . . do. . . . 😉

  25. 1. SHOULD I STAY OR SHOULD I GO?
    Doctor Who [Classic]

    2. TO BOLDLY GO WHERE I AM NO MAN
    Buffy the Vampire Slayer

  26. FILE 770 LIVE-ACTION TV TOURNAMENT AND BRACKETS – FINAL FOUR

    1. SHOULD I STAY OR SHOULD I GO?
    Babylon 5 (1 – Coreward)
    Doctor Who [Classic] (3 – Spinward)

    2. TO BOLDLY GO WHERE I AM NO MAN
    Buffy the Vampire Slayer (1 – Rimward)
    Star Trek: The Original Series (1 – Trailing)

    And now I go bury myself under several cases of Cally’s forehead cloths.

  27. B5 and Dr Who; both stand on their lengthyness. B5 had an overarching preplanned plot for the entire series. Dr Who… hell, even at the most epic, Trial of a time lord was mostly framing-device-for-unrelated-plots. BABYLON 5.

    I feel that too much attention is paid to the best points of particular series, so I’m basing my vote on who had the least bad ‘three worst episodes.’ Buffy gave us a few real clunkers; ‘I Robot, You Jane‘ has aged particularly poorly in this digital world, but the clumsiness that was post-high-school ‘Beer Bad and the absurdist misstep that was ‘Doublemeat Palace‘ also put up a strong fight. Against them, TOS fields ‘Turnabout Intruder‘ and ‘The Omega Glory‘ for a nice bit of even-by-the-standards-of-the-time heavy-handed reactionary message fic, then tops it all off with the magnum opus that is ‘Spock’s Brain‘… ‘Hush’ may not clearly overtop ‘City on the Edge of Forever’, but nothing — Nothing! — out-fails ‘Spock’s Brain’. BUFFY THE VAMPIRE SLAYER.

  28. It rubs the lotion on its skin or else it gets the hose again.

    1. SHOULD I STAY OR SHOULD I GO?
    Babylon 5 (1 – Coreward)

    Uneven seasons vs. uneven incarnations; dated low-res effects vs. garbage-bag monsters. B5 is more consistently ambitious, so it gets the vote.

    2. TO BOLDLY GO WHERE I AM NO MAN
    Buffy the Vampire Slayer (1 – Rimward)

    I really loved Buffy at the time (and even did meticulous VHS taping of it); TOS is a classic, a milestone, the start of a behemoth, and the locus of a very early crush (Janice!).

    In the end, I vote for the Zeppo (although his portrayer is currently a wreck).

  29. @RedWombat: And when you draw a TV, you put rabbit ears on it. I had another children’s book illustrator point that out to me once. We almost all do it. Kids reading the books weren’t born when we went to cable in this country, but…rabbit ears.

    Even if you cut off your cable subscription, and then you find you have to go buy an antenna for your flatscreen TV so you can get over-the-air broadcast, if your antenna-shopping experience is anything like ours, it won’t be rabbit ears. All the antennas at Best Buy looked like miniature flat-screen TVs themselves, which could be attached to the wall or stood up upon its pedestal-like base, whichever got you better reception. No rabbit ears whatsoever.

    Which didn’t, as it turned out, obviate the need to sometimes put your hand on the antenna and strike a funny pose to get the signal to come in clearly, mind you.

  30. 1. SHOULD I STAY OR SHOULD I GO?
    Doctor Who [Classic] (3 – Spinward)

    I would have picked The Twilight Zone if it had won last round.

    2. TO BOLDLY GO WHERE I AM NO MAN
    Buffy the Vampire Slayer (1 – Rimward)

    The first touch choice for me, I almost went with a tie.

  31. 1. SHOULD I STAY OR SHOULD I GO?
    Babylon 5 (1 – Coreward)

    2. TO BOLDLY GO WHERE I AM NO MAN
    Buffy the Vampire Slayer (1 – Rimward)

  32. 1. SHOULD I STAY OR SHOULD I GO?
    Babylon 5 (1 – Coreward)

    Forehead cloth. But this seems the place for a funny story. Despite a house full of TARDISes, Babylon 5 is the first thing I knew about the man I would eventually marry. Really. (He was in BC doing University courses, and sent the VHS tapes to a mutual friend of ours in Winnipeg, where the show was not yet available. Said mutual friend showed it around (except Infection, which I still never bothered to watch). Then my now-husband stopped sending them. Two episodes into Season 2. If you know the series you’ll understand why that had a lot of us screaming. Thankfully for his survival, it wasn’t much longer before we in Winnipeg got access to it ourselves, including reruns of the show to date.

    2. TO BOLDLY GO WHERE I AM NO MAN
    Buffy the Vampire Slayer (1 – Rimward)

    Not so much forehead cloth.

  33. 1. SHOULD I STAY OR SHOULD I GO?
    Babylon 5 (1 – Coreward)

    Doctor Who [Classic] (3 – Spinward)
    Babylon 5 upsetting one of my remaining faves Twilight Zone last round has got to be one of the bigger bracket upsets we’ve had and yet… I am not bothered. You go, you scrappy little multi-season show!

    2. TO BOLDLY GO WHERE I AM NO MAN
    Buffy the Vampire Slayer (1 – Rimward)
    Star Trek: The Original Series (1 – Trailing)
    Joss Whedon has always been my master, and I am his devoted acolyte.

  34. Regarding my Hugo nominating procedure, it’s the same as it always is: I read stuff that sounds good, and put down the things that really speak to me.

    I’m not worried about gaming the system or picking things that “should” be on the list. I’m putting stuff that I liked and I think are quality. Even if I’m the only person who mentions it, it’ll be there on the long-long list. WITNESS ME!!! 😉

    I do require beginnings, middles, and ends. A plot, whether the action is galaxy-spanning or just in the mind of one person. Correct grammar, spelling, punctuation, and word use. Characters which resemble people, not simply plot point advancers. And no insulting and belittling of people for simply being what they are.

    ‘Splosions are good too.

  35. Augh!
    FILE 770 LIVE-ACTION TV TOURNAMENT AND BRACKETS – FINAL FOUR

    1. SHOULD I STAY OR SHOULD I GO?
    Babylon 5 (1 – Coreward)

    2. TO BOLDLY GO WHERE I AM NO MAN
    Buffy the Vampire Slayer (1 – Rimward)

    I think. Sort of…

    nanowrimo: 9031 words so far and my head feels weird — I think the time change is hitting.

  36. 1. SHOULD I STAY OR SHOULD I GO?
    Babylon 5 (1 – Coreward)
    Doctor Who [Classic] (3 – Spinward)

    This poll is like…like…being nibbled to death by cats!

    2. TO BOLDLY GO WHERE I AM NO MAN
    Buffy the Vampire Slayer (1 – Rimward)
    Star Trek: The Original Series (1 – Trailing)

    Tough choice, but Trek is just far more influential.

  37. Bracket

    1. SHOULD I STAY OR SHOULD I GO?

    Doctor Who [Classic]

    2. TO BOLDLY GO WHERE I AM NO MAN

    Star Trek: The Original Series

    You’ve just got to go with the classics against these upstart newcomers.

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