Cats Sleep on SFF: Dune and Dune Messiah

ULTRAGOTHA writes, “Here is Leto Purrrtreides, Son of Meow’d Dib with Dune and Dune Messiah. Our copy of Children of Dune seems to have gone missing.”


Photos of your felines resting on genre works are welcome. Send to mikeglyer (at) cs (dot) com

16 thoughts on “Cats Sleep on SFF: Dune and Dune Messiah

  1. Our copy of Children of Dune seems to have gone missing.

    Did they check under the cat? It looks like there’s room, and when I’ve lost something it’s often because the cat is on top of it.

    Also: what a handsome boy! Truly a worthy God-Emperor.

  2. HI’ve never gotten beyond Dune Messiah. Would do folks here think of the rest of the Frank Herbert written novels?

    And would anybody like to review Dune For Green Man? A new trade paper edition just came in for review. As usual, alll reviewers get good chocolate with their first review for me.

  3. It’s diminishing returns all the way, and the character of the series changes quite radically. Children and God Emperor do quite a good job of completing the philosophical themes, and then Heretics/Chapter House dive fully into the gothic weirdness angle with very…mixed….success.

    Reading the full six* is an experience all right, but one I’d recommend out of curiosity rather than because they’re good.

    *there.are.only.six.

  4. Children of Dune isn’t too bad. But boy, after that they … erm … aren’t as good.

    And I highly recommend, if you go beyond Children, that you stop at the point Frank Herbert did.

    Leto Purrrtreides, Son of Meow’d Dib, accepts his due praise from you all in splendored dignity.

    (We had such a giggle fit when we came up with that name. The rest of his name is “God Empurrror of Dune”.)

  5. ULTRAGOTHA says Children of Dune isn’t too bad. But boy, after that they … erm … aren’t as good.

    Figured as much but wanted confirmation. There is by the worm an audiobook version of Dune as a full cast production in which everyone has BBC announcer style accents.

    And I highly recommend, if you go beyond Children, that you stop at the point Frank Herbert did.

    I read a few of the Brian Herbert penned barely worthy of being called fan fiction. Proof that some publishers really don’t care if the writing’s shit do long as it sells.

  6. LOL at the names and then the jokes upthread. And I ::bow:: to the Empurror. (I had to fight autocorrect for that spelling, BTW.)

    @Cat Eldridge: I loved the books through Children of Dune and I liked God Emperor of Dune a lot at the time. I was less into the last couple by Frank Herbert, “Heretics” and “Chapterhouse.”

    There are at least two full Dune audiobooks, BTW; I have two versions and there may be a third.

  7. God Emperor of Dune has the distinction of being the first book I ever did not finish. (I would have thrown it against the wall, another first, if only it hadn’t been a library book and I was too respectful of library property to do that.)

  8. Big fan of the Frank Herbert written ones and agree with Mark-kitteh’s description of how the series changes as it goes along.

    I’m enough of a fanboy that I read the Brian Herbert Kevin J. Anderson prequels & the “end” of the series “Hunters of Dune” & “Sandworms of Dune” based on Frank Herbert’s notes. Those I found annoying. The writing is clunky, and the plots kept messing with the elder Herbert’s continuity in ways that diminish the originals.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *