Adventure Sci-Fi Storybundle Helps Challenger Learning Centers for Space Science

The Adventure Sci-Fi Storybundle curated by Kevin J. Anderson launched today.  For the next three weeks you can get the 13 books in the bundle for as little as $15 — works by KJA, Paul diFilippo, Jody Lynn Nye, Robert Lynn Asprin, Brenda Cooper, Gray Rinehart, and many others. You name your own price, and a portion of the proceeds goes to support the Challenger Learning Centers for Space Science Education.

 

On Anderson’s blog he gave a rundown on the books in the bundle:

Strap into your cockpit, fire up the faster-than-light engines, and set course for the nearest star. I’ve got a grab bag of 13 excellent science fiction books all in one new Adventure SF StoryBundle. Get them all for as little as $15, and help out a great charity, too!

I put in a brand new action-packed story, The Blood Prize, featuring the popular character Colt the Outlander from Heavy Metal magazines, with all new art by the Aradio Brothers. Robert J. Sawyer offers his classic novel Far Seer (a planet of intelligent dinosaurs!). Raymond Bolton’s Awakening shows a fantasy civilization on the cusp of the industrial revolution faced with an alien invasion.

You’ll read different adventures on very different lunar colonies in Gray Rinehart’s Walking on a Sea of Clouds, Lou Agresta’s Club Anyone, and T. Allen Diaz’s Lunatic City, as well as Louis Antonelli’s alternate space race and murder on the moon in Dragon-Award nominee Another Girl, Another Planet.

Jody Lynn Nye’s Taylor’s Ark follows the adventures of a star-traveling MD with a specialty in environmental medicine, and Brenda Cooper’s Endeavor-Award winning The Silver Ship and the Sea is a gripping story of prisoners of war abandoned on a rugged colony planet. Acclaimed, award-winning author Paul di Filippo gives a collection of his best stories in Lost Among the Stars.

And for thrilling military SF, the bundle also has Honor and Fidelity by Andrew Keith and William H. Keith, Recruit by Jonathan P. Brazee, and the hilarious adventures of Phule’s Company in Robert Lynn Asprin’s Phule’s Paradise.

Buyers can choose to donate part of every purchase to help support the Challenger Learning Centers for Space Science Education, was founded in 1986 by the families of the astronauts who died in the Space Shuttle Challenger disaster.

The organization offers hands-on exploration and discovery opportunities to students around the world the chance to become astronauts and engineers and solve real-world problems as they share the thrill of discovery on missions through the Solar System. Using space simulation and role-playing strategies, students bring their classroom studies to life and cultivate the skills needed for future success.

The Adventure Sci-Fi Storybundle runs for only three weeks. You can get the base level of five books for $5, or all 14 for as little as $15.

On This Day In History 6/18

Sally Ride on the deck of Challenger during mission STS-7 in 1983.

Sally Ride on the deck of Challenger during mission STS-7 in 1983.

In 1983, Sally Ride became the first American woman in space, launched from Cape Canaveral aboard the shuttle Challenger as part of the crew of STS-7.

The five-person crew deployed two communications satellites and conducted pharmaceutical experiments. Ride was the first woman to use the robot arm in space and the first to use the arm to retrieve a satellite.

Nearly Gone With The Wind

Guy Lillian III says he had never seen a twister and regretted it. Then on October 29, while the latest in a series of terrible thunderstorms was marching across his section of Louisiana, Guy started driving home from work down the Old Benton Road and got caught in something much stronger and more dangerous than he expected:

A trashcan lid spun over my hood like a giant frisbee. The rain turned white. The white became opaque. I couldn’t see the road. I hit my emergency blinkers and pulled over, hoping I wouldn’t find a ditch… I remembered some of that twister [documentary]: the sudden white wind tearing hell out of the world. I said to myself, “Hell, I’m in the middle of it,” because I knew what was coming inside that depthless white pall. 

Now I was heading away from the action.  I floored Little Red and ran for it…. I turned back to Old Benton Road.  The tall sign of one of the car dealerships was twisted like a pipecleaner and leaning. That just happened, I said to myself…. 

Guy assures everyone that he came through “Unscathed, both me and car — except for a small crack in the windshield (the car, not me). Found out that the twister was a Force 2.  I’m not rattled about it, just … thoughtful.” A full write-up is coming in the next Challenger.

Challenger 29

The latest issue of Guy Lillian III’s fine genzine Challenger can be read online at www.challzine.net/. Guy’s twenty-ninth issue serves up a long list of delights:

Beautiful and funny cover by Alan White, articles by Cheryl Morgan, Rich Lynch, Mike Resnick, Joe Green, Warren Buff, Steve Silver, many others. Our theme this issue is sports, but there’s much else, and we hope you’ll enjoy it. (Buff’s op-ed on “The Graying of Fandom” is an important piece. Read! Respond!)

Challenger #28 Online

Guy H. Lillian III has posted a new issue of Challenger, his Hugo-nominated fanzine. It’s a tremendous zine, with outstanding articles by Resnick, Benford, Toni Weisskopf, James Bacon, and Joseph Green.

My contribution is “Flashman at Klendathu.” Guy invited me to pay tribute to George Macdonald Fraser, author of the popular series of Flashman historical novels, who had recently passed away. As a fan’s imagination is prone to do, mine wandered from the stack of books Fraser had actually written to the novels we now would never see – such as the oft-hinted adventure that would explain how Flashman ended up fighting on both sides of the American Civil War. I knew I’d miss Fraser’s sharp wit and his gift for deflating pretensions about the glory of war. The free association set in motion by those thoughts at last made me wonder what Starship Troopers would have taught about military life if it had been Flashman telling the story instead of Johnny Rico. “Flashman at Klendathu” fills in that blank. (And the Charlie Williams illo is perfect!)

A final word: The Challenger website has announced a contest for the best-designed favicon, the little image that appears next to the URL address line in your web browser (if the site has one loaded.) Entries should be sent to challzine@gmail.com by the deadline, which somewhat arbitrarily is before “The next issue of Challzine — or December 31, 2008 — whichever comes first.” Entries will be displayed in the next issue and voted upon by the readers.