2018 Chesley Awards Nomination List

The Association of Science Fiction & Fantasy Artists has released the finalists for the 33rd annual ASFA awards, the Chesleys. The Chesley is named for astronomical artist Chesley Bonestell.

The winners will be voted by ASFA members. The awards will be presented at a ceremony to be held during Worldcon 76 in San Jose.

Note that each category has a link to an album with images of the finalists.

Best Cover Illustration – Hardback Book

Album: https://photos.app.goo.gl/dLNApxEe8czyUsoeA

  • Tommy Arnold     Horizon by Fran Wilde, Tor, September 2017
  • Marcela Bolívar     Julia by Peter Straub, Centipede Press, December 2017
  • Julie Dillon         Final Girls by Mira Grant, Subterranean Press, April 2017
  • Donato Giancola     Assassin’s Price by L.E. Modesitt Jr., Tor, July 2017
  • John Harris         The Man in the Tree by Sage Walker, Tor, September 2017
  • Elizabeth Leggett     Retrograde by Peter Cawdron, Houghton Mifflin Harcourt, September 2017
  • Marc Simonetti     The Sword of Shannara by Terry Brooks, Grim Oak Press, August 2017

Best Cover Illustration – Paperback Book or Ebook

Album: https://photos.app.goo.gl/MThpAouoVebnSZ3V2

  • Julie Dillon         Beyond the Stars: New Worlds, New Suns – A Space Opera Anthology, edited by Ellen Campbell, CreateSpace Independent Publishing Platform, April 2017
  • Aly Fell         Magic for Nothing by Seanan McGuire, DAW, March 2017
  • Jaime Jones         The Tiger’s Daughter by K. Arsenault Rivera, Tor, October 2017
  • Miranda Meeks     The Fisher of Bones by Sarah Gailey, Fireside Fiction, October 2017
  • Gene Mollica         Call of Fire by Beth Cato, Harper Voyager, August 2017
  • Dave Palumbo         Binti: Home by Nnedi Okorafor, Tor, January 2017
  • Stephen Youll         Acadie by Dave Hutchinson,Tor, September 2017

Best Magazine Illustration

Album: https://photos.app.goo.gl/2jF2th7EMhaC2PGb9

  • Julie Dillon         Clarkesworld #128 May 2017
  • Ingrid Kallick         Cricket Magazine January 2017
  • Eddie Mendoza        Clarkesworld #130 July 2017
  • Reiko Murakami     Lightspeed #82 March 2017
  • Sergei Sarichev    Clarkesworld #126 March 2017

Best Interior Illustration

Album: https://photos.app.goo.gl/JEWYafv1NidMuNcj9

  • Gregory Manchess     Above the Timberline by Gregory Manchess Saga Press, October 2017
  • John Picacio         “When the Devil Drives” by Melinda Snodgrass Tor.com July 2017
  • Dan Dos Santos     The Name of the Wind: 10th Anniversary Deluxe Edition by Patrick Rothfuss DAW, October 2017
  • Omar Rayyan         Goblin Market by Christine Rosetti Donald M. Grant, Jan. 2017
  • Marc Simonetti     The Sword of Shannara by Terry Brooks Grim Oak Press, August 2017
  • Sam Weber         “These Deathless Bones” by Cassandra Khaw Tor.com, July 26, 2017

Best Gaming Related Illustration

Album: https://photos.app.goo.gl/o6sjoSdFjZFJjJSG8

  • Kari Christensen     Chandra Gremlin Wrangler Heroes of the Realm WotC September 2017
  • Melissa Gay         Offering Sagaborn RPG Core Rule Book Lone Wanderer Entertainment August 2017
  • Piotr Jablo?ski     Moaning Wall Magic card for Hour of Devastation WotC July 2017
  • Jaime Jones         The Ur- Dragon Magic card for Commander 2017 WotC, August 2017
  • Sara Winters         Compulsive Research Magic card for Modern Masters 2017 WotC, March 2017

Best Product Illustration

Album: https://photos.app.goo.gl/Zif6qgngtQkyNjB02

  • Kari Christensen     Call of Cthulhu, FilmQuest Festival, 2017
  • Julie Dillon         American Gods Promo art for Black Phoenix Alchemy Lab/Trading Post, 2017
  • Annie Stegg Gerard     Stormy Serenade, DragonCon Tshirt art 2017
  • Adam Hughes         In a Galaxy Far, Far Away LE Art Print by Acme Archives, July 2017
  • James Jean         The Shape of Water teaser poster FOX Searchlight, December 2017
  • Rachel Quinlan     Knight of Cups, 78 Tarot Astral 2017

Best Color Work – Unpublished

Album: https://photos.app.goo.gl/geXR3MLbGco6VQa89

  • Serena Maylon         Erebor Watercolor and Gouache
  • Alessandra Pisano     Kindred Spirits Oils
  • Cynthia Sheppard     Deconstructing Wonderland Digital
  • Charles Urbach     Not All Treasure is Gold Colored Pencil
  • Eric Velhagen         Respite Oils

Best Monochrome – Unpublished

Album: https://photos.app.goo.gl/XEWnQPNhy3ivGe1e7

  • Ed Binkley         “Thistledown” Digital
  • Bobby Chiu         “Romeo and Juliet” Digital
  • Karla Ortiz         “Ada” Oil
  • Christine Rhee         “Gumiho” Graphite
  • Shawn E. Russell     “Release” Graphite
  • Ruth Sanderson     “Dragon Drum” Ink
  • Kaysha Siemens     “Pensive” Oils

Best Three Dimensional Art

Album: https://photos.app.goo.gl/BWFvrV6pBwPxvOuf1

  • Skink Chen         “Resentful Beast” Painted cast resin
  • Ellen Jewett         “The Burden of Motion and Ambition” Cold porcelain and polymer clay
  • Colin & Kristine Poole     “Gift of the Faun” Bronze
  • Forest Rogers         “Octopoid Descending” Kato polyclay
  • Lisa Sell         “Manifesting Orb Dragon” Aves Apoxie Sculpt
  • Vincent Villafranca     “Fever Dream #17” Bronze

Best Art Director

  • Neil Clarke          Clarkesworld
  • Christine Foltzer      Tor.com Publishing
  • Irene Gallo          Tor Books/Tor.com
  • Lauren Panepinto      Orbit Books and for Muddy Colors blog articles
  • Cynthia Sheppard      Wizards of the Coast

Lifetime Achievement

  • Richard Hescox
  • Alan Lee
  • Gregory Manchess
  • William O’Connor
  • Allen Williams

 

Pixel Scroll 4/28/18 The Great Emu-Scroll War Was Lost When The Pixels Attacked The Gazebo

Now, where were we when we were so rudely interrupted?

(1) INFURNITY. Camestros Felapton, the world’s most understanding cat owner, provides his pet with “Tim’s Facial Hair Guide to Infinity War”.

So, I’ve explained before that Timothy doesn’t distinguish human faces well. He is also confused by facial hair. OK strictly speaking he is confused by human skin, which he assumes is fur and hence is doubly confused by facial hair which he thinks is fur that is growing out of fur. Look, the main thing is he finds beards confusing and panics if I shave.

So, Marvel’s Infinity War has many characters and about 40%+ of them have facial hair (90%+ if we count eyebrows – do eyebrows count as facial hair? I assume so.) Some of them i.e. Captain America have gained beards for this film.

So to assist Tim to keep track, here is a field guide to various beard styles in the film….

(2) PUBLIC ASKED FOR PODCAST NOMINATIONS. The Parsec Awards Steering Committee is accepting nominations of podcasts for the 2018 Parsec Awards through June 15. Nominate here.


Any material released between May 1, 2017 and April 30, 2018 is eligible for the 2018 awards. Material released needs to be free for download and released via a mechanism that allows for subscriptions. Thus, YouTube, Facebook, etc.. series are eligible.

If you are a podcaster or author, please feel free to nominate your own podcast or story

 

(3) MORE STAR WARS. Disney announced “Star Wars Resistance, Anime-Inspired Series, Set for Fall Debut”. The series is set in the era before The Force Awakens.

StarWars.com is thrilled to announce that production has begun on Star Wars Resistance, an exciting new animated adventure series about Kazuda Xiono, a young pilot recruited by the Resistance and tasked with a top-secret mission to spy on the growing threat of the First Order. It will premiere this fall on Disney Channel in the U.S. and thereafter, on Disney XD and around the world.

(4) BROADDUS JOINS APEX. Maurice Broaddus has been named nonfiction editor for Apex Magazine. Jason Sizemore, Editor-in-Chief, made the announcement April 2.

Maurice is a prolific and well-regarded author who works in a multitude of genres. He is also the Apex Magazine reprints editor and now wears two hats for our publication. Upcoming authors Maurice has lined up for essays include Mur Lafferty, Mary SanGiovanni, and Tobias S. Buckell.

You can find Maurice Broaddus on Twitter at @mauricebroaddus and online at www.mauricebroaddus.com. His novella “Buffalo Soldiers” was recently published at Tor.com.

(5) SWANWICK CITES LE GUIN ON PRESENT TENSE: Michael Swanwick would be authority enough for many, but first he appeals for support to “Le Guin on Present Tense” before handing down the stone tablets:

Here’s the rule, and it covers all cases: Only use the present tense if there is some reason for doing so that justifies losing some of your readers and annoying others. (This rule goes double for future tense.) Otherwise, use the past tense.

(6) THINGS FALL APART; THE CENTRE CANNOT HOLD: Aalto University reports 2.7 billion tweets confirm: echo chambers in Twitter are very real.

Bipartisan users, who try to bridge the echo chambers, pay a price for their work: they become less central in their network, lose connections to their communities and receive less endorsements from others.

(7) STARTING OUT AS A WOMAN SFF AUTHOR. From Fantasy Café: “Women in SF&F Month: Ann Aguirre”:

…I first sold to New York in 2007, over eleven years ago. That book was Grimspace, a story I wrote largely to please myself because it was hard for me to find the sort of science fiction that I wanted to read. I love space opera, but in the past, I found that movies and television delivered more of the stories I enjoyed. At the time, I was super excited to be published in science fiction and fantasy.

My first professional appearance was scheduled at a small con in Alabama. I was so excited for that, so fresh and full of hope. Let’s just say that my dreams were dashed quite spectacularly. I was sexually harassed by multiple colleagues and the men I encountered seemed to think I existed to serve them. To say that my work wasn’t taken seriously is an understatement. That was only reinforced when I made my first appearance at SDCC (San Diego Comic Con) six months later.

There, the moderator called me the ‘token female’, mispronounced my last name without checking with me first (she checked with the male author seated next to me), and the male panelists spoke over me, interrupted me at will, and gave me very little chance to speak. I remember quite clearly how humiliated I was, while also hoping that it wasn’t noticeable to the audience.

Dear Reader, it was very noticeable. Afterward, David Brin, who was in the audience, came up to me with a sympathetic look and he made a point of shaking my hand. He said, “Well, I was very interested in what you had to say.” With a pointed stress on the word “I.”…

(8) WTF? Can you believe somebody is comparing what they’re marketing to “The Veldt” as if it’s a good thing? “Madison Square Garden cites Ray Bradbury as an influence on upcoming Sphere Arena in Las Vegas”.

Madison Square Garden officials lifted the curtain a bit on their MSG Sphere Arena entertainment venues coming to Las Vegas and London, with a demonstration Thursday that hinted at advanced technology going into the design and experiences for audiences within the new-generation venues.

In his presentation at the Forum in Inglewood, which his company rejuvenated in 2014 with a $100-million face and body lift, Madison Square Garden Co. chairman James L. Dolan cited a short story from science-fiction author and futurist Ray Bradbury’s 1951 anthology “The Illustrated Man” as something of a spiritual model for the new facilities.

In particular, he referenced Bradbury’s story “The Veldt,” which centered on a high-tech room of the future, called the “liquid crystal room,” which could synthesize any environment in which children desired to play or explore.

(9) TODAY IN HISTORY

  • April 28, 2007 — Ashes of actor James Doohan and of Apollo 7 astronaut Gordon Cooper soared into space aboard a rocket.

(10) SIXTY-THREE. Galactic Journey’s Gideon Marcus takes his monthly whack at my favorite-in-the-Sixties prozine: “[April 27, 1963] Built to Last?  (May 1963 Analog)”.

If this trend continues, we can assume that our children and grandchildren will not only have Burroughs, Wells, Verne, Shelley, and Baum to read, but also reprinted copies of our present-day science fiction, as well as the SF of the future (their present).  Perhaps they’ll all be available via some computerized library — tens of thousands of volumes in a breadbox-shaped device, for instance.

The question, then, is whether or not our children will remember our current era fondly enough to want reprints from it.  Well, if this month’s Analog be a representative sample, the answer is a definitive…maybe.

(11) HORTON ON HUGOS. Catching up with Rich Horton’s commentaries about the 2018 Hugo nominees and who he’s voting for.

My views here are fairly simple. It’s a decent shortlist, but a bifurcated one. There are three nominees that are neck and neck in my view, all first-rate stories and well worth a Hugo. And there are three that are OK, but not special – in my view not Hugo-worthy (but not so obviously unworthy that I will vote them below No Award.)…

This is really a very strong shortlist. The strongest shortlist in years and years, I’d say. Two are stories I nominated, and two more were on my personal shortlist of stories I considered nominating. The other two stories are solid work, though without quite the little bit extra I want in an award winner….

This is by no means a bad shortlist. Every story on it is at least pretty decent. …

(12) SIPPING TIME. Charles Payseur finds stories with reasons for the season: “Quick Sips – Fireside Magazine April 2018”.

Spring might finally be arriving, and at Fireside Magazine that means the stories are about rebirth and new beginnings, even as they’re about decay and endings. For me, at least, spring always brings to mind thaw. A thawing of the world after the long freeze of winter. Which means new growth, new green, but also means revealing all the death that the snow concealed. The roadkill, the rot, the dead leaves not yet turned to mulch. And these stories find characters at this point, seeing all around them the evidence of death and pain, and having to make the decision to also see the life. To see the good, and to try and foster that good, to help it grow. These are stories that show people pushing back against the pressure to die, to be silent, and embrace a future full of the possibility of failure, yes, but also full of the hope of success. To the reviews!

(13) GENIUSES AT WORK. Nine letters from the 1940s by Freeman Dyson show “Another Side of Feynman” at Nautilus.

l through a long life I had three main concerns, with a clear order of priority. Family came first, friends second, and work third.”

So writes the pioneering theoretical physicist Freeman Dyson in the introduction to his newly published collection of letters, Maker of Patterns. Spanning about four decades, the collection presents a first-person glimpse into a life that witnessed epochal changes both in world history and in physics.

Here, we present short excerpts from nine of Dyson’s letters, with a focus on his relationship with the physicist Richard Feynman. Dyson and Feynman had both professional and personal bonds: Dyson helped interpret and draw attention to Feynman’s work—which went on to earn a Nobel Prize—and the two men traveled together and worked side by side.

Taken together, these letters present a unique perspective of each man. Feynman’s effervescent energy comes through, as does Dyson’s modesty and deep admiration for his colleague.

(14) ADVANCED TRAINING. Did MZW graduate from this course?

(15) EJECT. Yes, this is me: I sometime I feel like I have finished delivering the info yet haven’t figured out how to end the sentence. “Your Speech Is Packed With Misunderstood, Unconscious Messages” at Nautilus.

Imagine standing up to give a speech in front of a critical audience. As you do your best to wax eloquent, someone in the room uses a clicker to conspicuously count your every stumble, hesitation, um and uh; once you’ve finished, this person loudly announces how many of these blemishes have marred your presentation.

This is exactly the tactic used by the Toastmasters public-speaking club, in which a designated “Ah Counter” is charged with tallying up the speaker’s slip-ups as part of the training regimen. The goal is total eradication. The club’s punitive measures may be extreme, but they reflect the folk wisdom that ums and uhs betray a speaker as weak, nervous, ignorant, and sloppy, and should be avoided at all costs, even in spontaneous conversation.

Many scientists, though, think that our cultural fixation with stamping out what they call “disfluencies” is deeply misguided. Saying um is no character flaw, but an organic feature of speech; far from distracting listeners, there’s evidence that it focuses their attention in ways that enhance comprehension.

Disfluencies arise mainly because of the time pressures inherent in speaking. Speakers don’t pre-plan an entire sentence and then mentally press “play” to begin unspooling it. If they did, they’d probably need to pause for several seconds between each sentence as they assembled it, and it’s doubtful that they could hold a long, complex sentence in working memory. Instead, speakers talk and think at the same time, launching into speech with only a vague sense of how the sentence will unfold, taking it on faith that by the time they’ve finished uttering the earlier portions of the sentence, they’ll have worked out exactly what to say in the later portions.

(16) A MARCH IN MAY. Naomi Kritzer tweeted photos from a Mayday parade – including a notorious purple cat (who may or may not be named Timothy!…) Jump on the thread here:

(17) WHAT’S THAT SMELL. BBC tells how “Sentinel tracks ships’ dirty emissions from orbit” — unclear they’re picking up individual polluters yet, but that could come.

Sentinel-5P was launched in October last year and this week completed its in-orbit commissioning phase.

But already it is clear the satellite’s data will be transformative.

This latest image reveals the trail of nitrogen dioxide left in the air as ships move in and out of the Mediterranean Sea.

The “highway” that the vessels use to navigate the Strait of Gibraltar is easily discerned by S5P’s Tropomi instrument.

(18) EGGING THEM ON. Did anybody see this coming? “Chicken Run 2: Sequel confirmed after 18-year wait”.

The Oscar-winning animation studio hasn’t set a release date yet. Its announcement comes 18 years after the original flew onto the big screen.

Chicken Run is the highest-grossing stop-motion animation film of all-time – banking £161.3m at the box office.

 

(19) HOLD THE BACON. On the other hand, don’t expect to see this anytime soon: Hollywood Reporter headline: ““Tremors’ Reboot Starring Kevin Bacon Dead at Syfy”

Here’s a headline you don’t read every day: A TV reboot of a feature film toplined by the original star is not moving forward.

Syfy has opted to pass on its TV follow-up to 1990 feature film Tremors, starring Kevin Bacon.

…Bacon broke the news himself, writing on his verified Instagram page that he was “[s]ad to report that my dream of revisiting the world of Perfection will not become a reality. Although we made a fantastic pilot (IMHO) the network has decided not to move forward. Thanks to our killer cast and everyone behind the scenes who worked so hard. And always keep one eye out for GRABOIDS!”

(20) CHESLEYS. Here is the Association for Science Fiction and Fantasy Artists (ASFA) “2018 Chesley Award Suggestions List (for 2017 Works)”. The members have finished making nominations and ASFA says the finalists will be posted in a few weeks.

(21). UNSUSPECTED GOLDMINE. American news infamously neglects most countries of the world, but who knew there were big sf doings in Bulgaria? At Aeon, Victor Petrov discusses “Communist robot dreams”.

The police report would have baffled the most grizzled detective. A famous writer murdered in a South Dakota restaurant full of diners; the murder weapon – a simple hug. A murderer with no motive, and one who seemed genuinely distraught at what he had done. You will not find this strange murder case in the crime pages of a local US newspaper, however, but in a Bulgarian science-fiction story from the early 1980s. The explanation thus also becomes more logical: the killer was a robot.

The genre was flourishing in small Bulgaria in the last two decades of socialism, and the country became the biggest producer of robotic laws per capita, supplementing Isaac Asimov’s famous three with two more canon rules – and 96 satirical ones. Writers such as Nikola Kesarovski (who wrote the above murder mystery) and Lyuben Dilov grappled with questions of the boundaries between man and machine, brain and computer. The anxieties of their literature in this period reflected a society preoccupied with technology and cybernetics, an unlikely bastion of the information society that arose on both sides of the Iron Curtain from the 1970s onwards.

[Thanks to Martin Morse Wooster, Cora Buhlert, Cat Eldridge, JJ, John King Tarpinian, Chip Hitchcock, Jason, Carl Slaughter, and Andrew Porter for some of these stories, Title credit goes to File 770 contributing editor of the day johnstick.]

Pixel Scroll 3/3/18 Scrolling Occupants Of Interpixellary Craft

(1) STRANGE TOY. Robin Sloan offers “Voyages in sentence space”.

Imagine a sentence. “I went looking for adventure.”

Imagine another one. “I never returned.”

Now imagine a sentence gradient between them—not a story, but a smooth interpolation of meaning. This is a weird thing to ask for! I’d never even bothered to imagine an interpolation between sentences before encountering the idea in a recent academic paper. But as soon as I did, I found it captivating, both for the thing itself—a sentence… gradient?—and for the larger artifact it suggested: a dense cloud of sentences, all related; a space you might navigate and explore.

…My project called sentencespace, now public on GitHub, serves up an API that provides two things.

  1. Sentence gradients: smooth interpolations between two input sentences.
  2. Sentence neighborhoods: clouds of alternative sentences closely related to an input sentence.

Sentence neighborhoods are simpler than gradients. Given an input sentence, what if we imagine ourselves standing at its location in sentence space, peering around, jotting down some of the other sentences we see nearby?

Mlex sent the link together with a screenshot of his own experiment with gradients between two sentences: “I put in the opening and closing phrases of Dhalgren and got the output (in the screenshot attached).”

(2) JUKKA WINS. The Finnish Science Fiction and Fantasy Writers Association presented Worldcon 75 chair Jukka Halme with the Cosmos Pen Award, their highest honor.

(3) SPIRIT AWARDS. Get Out won the top two categories at today’s Film Independent Spirit Awards ceremony, Best Feature and Best Director.

The Spirit Awards recognize independent filmmakers. Read the full list of winners here.

(4) SUGGEST CHESLEY AWARD NOMINEES. The Association of Science Fiction and Fantasy Artists is seeking suggestions for 2017 works for consideration for this year’s Chesley Awards in the categories Hardback Cover, Paperback Cover, Magazine Cover, Interior Illustration, Gaming Related Illustration, Product Illustration, Color Work Unpublished, Monochrome Work Unpublished, Three Dimensional Art, Art Director, and Lifetime Artistic Achievement. Anyone can suggest works for consideration, you do not need to be an ASFA member.

The Suggestion form is here: https://goo.gl/v8QuzP

The gallery of works suggested so far is here.

The deadline is March 5.

(5) THESE BOOTS. Will Terry Goodkind get a veto over his next book cover? Although not yet displayed on the Macmillan website, another service is circulating this draft cover art for the third novel in his Nicci Chronicles series. Siege of Stone goes on sale December 31, 2018. Unfortunately, the banner obscures the character’s footwear, one of the things Goodkind criticized in his recent blast about the cover for Shroud of Eternity.

(6) DID PKD EVER COMPLAIN ABOUT HIS COVERS? Alicia Kroell, in “33 of the Weirdest Philip K. Dick Covers We Could Find” at LitHub, has unearthed some truly creepy covers!

(7) ASSEMBLY REQUIRED. Roy Scranton reviews an Iraqi sf novel in New Republic — “A Surreal Story from Baghdad”.

Frankenstein in Baghdad begins with an explosion in Baghdad’s Tayaran Square, the full significance of which doesn’t become clear until later, when the junk dealer Hadi tells his story to a group of journalists at a coffee shop. One, a German documentary-maker, leaves halfway through, laughing off Hadi’s tale as a fable stolen from a Robert De Niro movie. But Mahmoud al-Sawadi, an Iraqi magazine journalist, stays and listens closely, because what Hadi’s telling him is genuinely weird, even for Baghdad: how after the explosion he’d picked up someone’s nose off the street and sewed it onto the face of a corpse he’d been building in his shed. Then how, while he was sleeping, the corpse apparently got up and walked away.

Hadi’s a well-known liar, and a drunk to boot, but as Mahmoud discovers, this time the junk man was telling the truth. His story sparks the plot of Ahmed Saadawi’s brilliant, rueful novel, which won the 2014 International Prize for Arabic Fiction and has recently appeared in a crisp, moving, and mordantly humorous English translation from Jonathan Wright and Penguin Books. Hadi, it turns out, created a monster.

(8) STIERS OBIT. David Ogden Stiers, best known for playing Major Charles Emerson Winchester III on MAS*H, died March 3 at the age of 75. He also appeared in several genre TV shows, and had numerous voice acting roles in animated films.

Stiers was a prolific voice actor, working in eight Disney animated features including 1991’s Beauty and the Beast (in which he played Cogsworth), The Hunchback of Notre Dame (the Archdeacon), Pocahantas (Governor Ratcliffe) and Lilo & Stitch (Dr. Jumba Jookiba). He also voiced Kamaji in the English-dubbed version of Hayao Miyazaki’s Spirited Away.

(9) TODAY’S BIRTHDAYS

  • Born March 3, 1920James Doohan, Actor (Star Trek)
  • Born March 3, 1945George Miller, Director & Producer (Mad Max franchise)
  • Born March 3, 1958Miranda Richardson, Actor (Blackadder, Harry Potter)
  • Born March 3, 1980Katherine Waterston, Actor (Fantastic Beasts and Where to Find Them, Alien: Covenant)
  • Born March 3, 1982Jessica Biel, Actor (Blade: Trinity, Total Recall)

(10) TODAY’S BIRTHDAY DOMAIN

(11) WAKANDA AND COSPLAY. NPR explores how “‘Black Panther’ Brings New Visibility To Cosplayers Of Color”.

The film “Black Panther” has inspired black cosplayers around the country to be more visible within the cosplay community.

Cosplay, which is short for “costume play,” is when people wear often-handmade costumes to embody fictional characters from comic books and popular movies like Captain America and Star Wars. But black and other non-white cosplayers often feel excluded because non-white characters are rarely featured prominently in the fantasy worlds of comics. They are often relegated to the roles of sidekicks or villains rather than the superheroes.

But Black Panther, which features a black lead and a predominantly black cast, offers a multifaceted depiction of African life where people of color play both the villains and the heroes. These characters are transforming the playing field for non-white cosplayers like Tamara Heredia, a black cosplayer from Houston, Texas. …

(12) ANCIENT SAILORS. Learn Moana’s real history — “DNA sheds light on settlement of Pacific”.

Prof Reich, who is lead author of the study in Current Biology, added that Vanuatu was a “gateway to the remote Pacific islands… through that region of Vanuatu and neighbouring islands, people spread all over the Pacific”.

The first people to arrive in the islands belonged to the Lapita culture, who expanded out of Taiwan between 5,000 and 6,000 years ago, reaching Vanuatu about 3,000 years ago. “They were really talented seafaring people,” said Dr Cosimo Posth, from the Max Planck Institute for the Science of Human History in Jena, Germany. Dr Posth was co-author of the study in Nature Ecology & Evolution.

Their secret was the specialised outrigger canoe, which is characterised by the addition of lateral support floats which stabilise the main hull. This innovation, says Dr Posth, “allowed them to cover immense distances of the ocean”.

(13) BUTLER TALK. The Pasadena (CA) Museum of History will host a lecture, “Telling My Stories: The Pioneering Fiction of Octavia E. Butler”, on March 29 at 6:30. Tickets now on sale.

Join Natalie Russell, Assistant Curator of Literary Collections at the Huntington Library and curator of the recent Huntington exhibition, Telling My Stories: The Pioneering Fiction of Octavia E. Butler, for this lecture in celebration of Womens History Month and in conjunction with the new exhibition Dreaming the Universe. Octavia E. Butler was the first female African American writer to make science fiction her career. A shy, only child from Pasadena, she dreamed of ordinary people in extraordinary worlds, and extraordinary people in ordinary worlds, and put them on the page. Her stories brought the voice of women of color to a genre traditionally dominated by white men. That powerful voice tackled issues, not just about race, but themes that continue to resonate with a wide audience: power, identity, gender, class, the environment, and what it means to be human.

This program is presented in partnership with the Historical Society of Southern California – George A. V. Dunning Lecture Series.

Tickets include light refreshments and entrance to the exhibition Dreaming the Universe: The Intersection of Science, Fiction, & Southern California starting at 5:30 pm. Tickets: Members $10; General $15. Advanced ticket purchase is recommended, visit https://octaviabutlerlecture.brownpapertickets.com.

(14) APPRENTICED TO A PILOT. From 2012, John Hodgman presents “Dana Gould as Maurice Evans as Dr. Zaius as Hal Holbrook as Mark Twain.” And I’ll throw in a twisted Gilbert & Sullivan reference as the headline.

[Thanks to JJ, Chip Hitchcock, Alan Baumler, Mark Hepworth, Cat Eldridge, John King Tarpinian, Carl Slaughter, Martin Morse Wooster, Mike Kennedy, and Andrew Porter for some of these stories. Title credit goes to File 770 contributing editor of the day Kurt Busiek.]

2017 Chesley Award Winners

Tran Nguyen, Kushiel’s Dart

ASFA, the Association of Science Fiction & Fantasy Artists, has announced the winners of the 32nd annual Chesley Awards.

Best Cover Illustration:  Hardcover  

  • Tran Nguyen Kushiel’s Dart by Jacqueline Carey Subterranean Press, October 2016

Best Cover Illustration:  Paperback or Ebook

  • Julie Dillon Beyond the Stars: At Galaxy’s Edge by Assorted Authors Astral books Amazon Digital Services, August 2016

Best Cover Illustration: Magazine  

  • Galen Dara, Uncanny Issue 10, May/June 2016

 

Best Interior Illustration

  • Greg Ruth, “Freedom is Space for the Spirit” by Glen Hirshberg Tor.com, April 2016

Best Gaming Related Illustration

  • Ryan Yee, Die Young, Kaladesh card set WotC, Sept. 2016

Best Product Illustration

  • Donato Giancola, Portal Promotional art for Illuxcon

Best Color Work: Unpublished

  • Michael Whelan, In a World of Her Own, Acrylic

Best Monochrome Work: Unpublished

  • Allen Williams, The Fall of Night, Pencil

Best Three Dimensional Art

  • Forest Rogers, La Belle Crustace, premier air-dry clay & washi paper

Best Art Director

Lifetime Artistic Achievement Award

  • Hayao Miyazaki

Hayao Miyazaki

2017 Chesley Award Finalists

ASFA, the Association of Science Fiction & Fantasy Artists, has announced the nominees for the 2017 Chesley Awards. ASFA members have until May 14 to cast their votes for the winners.

The Chesley Awards were established in 1985 as ASFA’s peer awards to recognize individual works and achievements not otherwise recognized by the Hugo Awards, during a given year. The Chesleys were initially called the ASFA Awards, but were later renamed to honor famed astronomical artist Chesley Bonestell after his death in 1986. The awards are usually presented annually at the World Science Fiction Convention or at the North American Science Fiction Convention when the Worldcon is held outside of North America.

2017 Chesley Award Final Nomination List (for 2016 Works)

Best Cover Illustration: Hardcover

Album https://goo.gl/photos/Ms1RqFpsTQp6Pdpy6

  • Dan dos Santos  Fables: Cubs in Toyland by Bill Willingham  (Vertigo, September 2016)
  • Todd Lockwood Summer Dragon by Todd Lockwood (DAW, May 2016)
  • Tran Nguyen Kushiel’s Dart by Jacqueline Carey (Subterranean Press, October 2016)
  • Cliff Nielsen Lady Midnight by Cassandra Clare (McElderry Books, March 2016)
  • David Palumbo Arcanum Unbounded by Brandon Sanderson (Tor, November 2016)
  • John Picacio In the House of the Worm by George R.R. Martin (Baltimore Science Fiction Society, May 2016)

Best Cover Illustration: Paperback or Ebook

Album https://goo.gl/photos/n7rLm6WRQx8oE56h6

  • Tommy Arnold  A Taste of Honey by Kai Ashante Wilson (Tor.com Publishing, October 2016)
  • Julie Dillon Beyond the Stars: At Galaxy’s Edge by Assorted Authors (Astral books Amazon Digital Services, August 2016)
  • Sarah Anne Langton Central Station by Lavie Tidhar (Tachyon Publications, May 2016 )
  • Gene Mollica Breath of Earth by Beth Cato (Harper Voyager, August 2016)
  • Victo Ngai Forest of Memory by Mary Robinette Kowal (Tor, March 2016)

Best Cover Illustration: Magazine

Album https://goo.gl/photos/eTTAWtG7V4f8TLY68

  • Galen Dara Uncanny Issue 10, May/June 2016
  • Elizabeth Leggett  LIGHTSPEED #69, February 2016
  • David Palumbo Swallowed Whole, Aliens – Life and Death #1 (Dark Horse, September 2016)
  • Paolo Rivera Hellboy and the B.P.R.D. 1953 (Dark Horse, February 2016)
  • Jeremy Wilson Chimera Brigade #1 By Serge Lehman and Fabrice Colin  (Titan Comics, October 2016)

Best Interior Illustration

Album https://goo.gl/photos/7vJkVu63StdPWVqEA

  • Rovina Cai “Tom, Thom” by K.M. Ferebee (Tor.com, February 2016)
  • Kari Christensen Gethsemoni, Court of the Dead: Chronicle of the Underworld by Tom Gilliland (Sideshow Collectibles 2016)
  • Tran Nguyen Kushiel’s Dart by Jacqueline Carey (Subterranean Press 2016)
  • Greg Ruth “Freedom is Space for the Spirit” by Glen Hirshberg (Tor.com, April 2016)
  • Ivica Stevanovic The Bestiary edited by Ann Vandermeer (Centipede Press, March 2016)

Best Gaming Related Illustration

Album https://goo.gl/photos/1VqM4odHaXVHEmTt6

  • Mauricio Calle Encounter at Stygeon Prime- Star Wars: The Card Game (Fantasy Flight Games 2016)
  • Cliff Childs Long-Finned Skywhale Kaladesh card set (WotC, Sept. 2016)
  • Ryan Pancoast Inventor’s Apprentice Kaladesh card set  (WotC, Sept. 2016)
  • Matthew Stewart Mastertrinketeer Kaladesh card set (WotC, Sept. 2016)
  • Ryan Yee Die Young Kaladesh card set (WotC, Sept. 2016)

Best Product Illustration

Album https://goo.gl/photos/DkxYUiB5ASL4fnQy9

  • Donato Giancola  Portal Promotional art for Illuxcon
  • Clark Huggins Advertisement for RECKLESS DECK Imagine FX, February 2016
  • John Picacio La Corona (The Crown) Loteria Lone Boy
  • Cynthia Sheppard 2017 Llewellyn’s Astrological Calendar
  • Greg Spalenka banner art to promote Roxana Illuminated Perfume 2016

Best Color Work: Unpublished

Album https://goo.gl/photos/1wF16zG6GU9EE61P9

  • John Harris The Ark, Oil
  • Vanessa Lemen Holding On and Letting Go, Oil on canvas
  • Miranda Meeks December, Digital
  • Shreya Shetty The Dragon Charmer, Digital
  • Michael Whelan In a World of Her Own, Acrylic

Best Monochrome Work: Unpublished

Album https://goo.gl/photos/VVrMNjUUgdFwRKtZ8

  • Marcela Bolivar White Crown, Photoshop
  • Jana Heidersdorf Darkness  Acrylics, pencil and digital
  • Travis Lewis Soul Engine, Graphite
  • Ruth Sanderson Luna, Scratchboard
  • Allen Williams The Fall of Night, Pencil

Best Three Dimensional Art

Album https://goo.gl/photos/tVmpAewdX2bLbTS26

  • Akihito Ikeda Nephila, Mixed media
  • Thomas Kuebler Medusa, Mixed media
  • Forest Rogers La Belle Crustace, premier air-dry clay & washi paper
  • Virginie Ropars The Evil Eye, Mixed media
  • Lee Shamel “The Scepter of the Crystal Flame”, Mixed media

Best Art Director

  • Neil Clarke Clarkesworld Magazine
  • Irene Gallo Tor/tor.com
  • Sheila Gilbert & Betsy Wollheim DAW Books
  • Lauren Panepinto Orbit Books
  • Cynthia Sheppard Wizards of the Coast

Lifetime Artistic Achievement Award

  • Iain McCaig
  • Greg Manchess
  • Hayao Miyazaki
  • Wendy Pini
  • Drew Struzan
  • Berni Wrightson

Update: 04/25/2017: Made minor corrections provided by ASFA.

Chesley Awards 2016 Nominees

ASFA-logo1The Association of Science Fiction & Fantasy Artists (ASFA) has announced the Chesley Awards 2016 nominees.

Voting runs through June 26. ASFA members in good standing are eligible to vote. The awards will be given out at MidAmeriCon II in Kansas City.

Best Cover Illustration: Hardcover Book

  • Richard Anderson    The Dinosaur Lords by Victor Milan (Tor, July 2015)
  • Lius Lasahido        Hannu Rajaniemi: Collected Fiction by Hannu Rajaniemi (Tachycon, May 2015)
  • Todd Lockwood        Voyage of the Basilisk by Mark Brennan (Tor, March 2015)
  • Cynthia Sheppard    Karen Memory by Elizabeth Bear (Tor, February 2015)
  • Sam Weber        Dune by Frank Herbert (The Folio Society, April 2015)

Best Cover Illustration: Paperback Book

  • Julie Dillon        The Very Best of Kate Elliott by Kate Elliott (Tachycon, February 2015)
  • Tyler Jacobson        Beyond the Pool of Stars by Howard Andrew Jones (Tor, October 2015)
  • Jeffery Alan Love    Wolfhound Century by Peter Higgins (Gollancz, May 2015)
  • David Palumbo        Binti by Nnedi Okorafer (Tor, September 2015)
  • John Picacio        Invasion of the Body Snatchers by Jack Finney (Simon & Schuster, October 2015)

Best Cover Illustration: Magazine

  • Maurizio Manzieri    Asimov’s, Oct/Nov 2015
  • Reiko Murakami    Lightspeed #63, August 2015
  • Tran Nguyen        Uncanny #4, May/June 2015
  • Greg Ruth        Alabaster: The Good, the Bad, and the Bird #1, Dark Horse Comics, Dec. 2015
  • shichigoro-shingo    Clarkesworld #109, October 2015

Best Interior Illustration

  • Galen Dara        “Tuesdays with Molakesh The Destroyer” by Megan Grey (Fireside Magazine #19)
  • Marcel Mercado        Southlands RPG (Kobold Press, July 2015)
  • Peter Mohrbacher    Angelarium: Book of Emanations by Peter Mohrbacher & Eli Minaya
  • Tran Nguyen        “Transition Management Survey” (Chief Investment Officer, September 2015)
  • Sam Weber        Dune by Frank Herbert (The Folio Society, July 2015)

Best Color Work: Unpublished

  • Joseph Bellofatto    Star Ship, Oil
  • Donato Giancola        Beron and Luthien in the Court of Thingal and Melian, Oil
  • Wayne Haag        Desert Wreck, Oil
  • Jessica TC Lee        Enchanted, Digital
  • Elizabeth Leggett    After Hours, Digital
  • Mark Poole        Memories, Oil
  • Eric Velhagen        Felines, Oi

Best Monochrome Work: Unpublished

  • Rovina Cai        Cold Wind
  • Jeremy Enecio        Progeny, Graphite on Moleskin
  • Travis Lewis        Symbiosis, Graphite
  • Mark Molchan        Return, Graphite
  • Ruth Sanderson        Invoking the Dragon, Ink/Scratchboard
  • Chris Seaman        Family Portraithausen, Acrylic
  • Allen Williams        Bound, Graphite & Gold leaf accent

Best Three-Dimensional Art

  • Devon Dorrity        Flight of the Merrow, Clay & Bronze
  • Thomas Kuebler        Adelpha and Her Sister, Mixed
  • Stelios Mousarris    Inception Coffee Table, Wood
  • Forest Rogers        The Morrigan, Mixed
  • Virginie Ropars        Okunoshima, Mixed
  • Vincent Villafranca    Dark Day for the Metal Heads, Bronze

Best Product Illustration

  • Linda Adair        Adolescence – Promo art for IlluXcon 2016
  • Mitchell Bentley        Mitchell Davidson Bentley 2015 Calendar – Albon Lake & Atomic Fly Studios
  • Rovina Cai        Black Hole – card for Cosmos Tarot & Oracle Deck, The Light Grey Art Lab
  • Jacob Murray        A Game of Thrones: The Card Game – 2nd edition box art, Fantasy Flight Games
  • John Picacio        El Arbol – Loteria card, Lone Boy
  • Magali Villeneuve    George R.R. Martin: Song of Ice and Fire – 2016 calendar, Bantam

Best Gaming – Related Illustration

  • Clint Cearley        Mind Rot – Dragons of Tarkir Magic Card, WotC
  • Vincent Proce        Guardian Automaton – Magic Origins Magic Card, WotC
  • Anna Steinbauer    Blessed Spirits – Magic Origins Magic Card, WotC
  • Ryan Yee        Fruit of the First Tree – Fate Reforged Magic Card, WotC
  •  Min Yum         Sandblast – Fate Reforged Magic Card, WotC

Best Art Director

  • Neil Clarke        Clarkesworld magazine
  • Irene Gallo        Tor Books & Tor.com
  • Jeremy Jarvis        Wizards of the Coast
  • Elizabeth Leggett    Lightspeed magazine
  • Lauren Panepinto    Orbit Books & Muddy Colors contributor
  • Betsy Wolheim & Shelia Gilbert    DAW Books

Lifetime Artistic Achievement

  • Kinuko Y. Craft
  • David A. Hardy
  • Greg Manchess
  • Iain McCaig
  • Wendy Pini
  • Drew Struzan

The Chesley Awards were established in 1985 as ASFA’s peer awards to recognize individual works and achievements not otherwise recognized by the Hugo Awards, during a given year. Initially called the ASFA Awards, they were renamed to honor famed astronomical artist Chesley Bonestell after his death in 1986.

2015 Chesley Awards

Just for the record… The Chesley Awards were given in a ceremony held at Sasquan.

Best Cover Illustration / Hardcover

  • Julie Dillon, Shadows Beneath: The Writing Excuses Anthology edited by Brandon Sanderson; Dragonsteel Entertainment, June 2014

Best Cover Illustration – Paperback

  • Raoul Vitale, Nebula Awards Showcase 2014 edited by Kij Johnson; Prometheus/Pyr

Best Cover Illustration – Magazine

  • Julie Dillon Analog April 2014

Best Interior Illustration

  • Anna Balbusso and Elena Balbusso, “Ekaterina and the Firebird” by Abra Staffin-Wiebe; Tor.com, January 2014

Best Gaming Related Illustration

  • Peter Mohrbacher, Pharika, God of Affliction Magic card, Journey into Nyx; WotC, May 2014

Best Product Illustration

  • Donato Giancola, George R.R. Martin Song of Ice and Fire 2015 calendar Bantam, 2014

Best Color Work – Unpublished

  • Michael C. Hayes, Alegretto oils

Best Monochrome Work – Unpublished

  • Allen Williams, “Sphynx” graphite

Best Three-Dimensional Art

  • Dan Chudzinski, The Mudpuppy, resin & mixed media

Best Art Director

  • Irene Gallo, Tor & Tor.com

Lifetime Artistic Achievement Award

  • John Harris

 

2015 Chesley Award Shortlist

The complete list of 2015 Chesley Award Finalists has been posted by John Picacio. (The official ASFA page requires membership to access.)

Best Cover Illustration / Hardcover

  • Julie Dillon, Shadows Beneath: The Writing Excuses Anthology edited by Brandon Sanderson; Dragonsteel Entertainment, June 2014
  • Jon Foster, Zombie Baseball Beatdown by Paolo Bacigalupi; Subterranean Press, 2014
  • Todd Lockwood, The Tropic of Serpents by Marie Brennan; Tor, March 2014
  • John Picacio, Endymion by Dan Simmons; Limited Edition, Subterranean Press, December 2014
  • Michael Whelan, Words of Radiance by Brandon Sanderson; Tor, March 2014

Best Cover Illustration – Paperback

  • John Harris, Ancillary Sword by Ann Leckie; Orbit October 2014
  • Jon Sullivan, The Return of the Discounted Man by Mark Hodder; Pyr, July 2014
  • Raymond Swanland, The Lady by K.V. Johansen; Pyr, December 2014
  • Danielle Tunstall, Unseaming by Mike Allen; Antimatter Press, October 2014
  • Raoul Vitale, Nebula Awards Showcase 2014 edited by Kij Johnson; Prometheus/Pyr

Best Cover Illustration – Magazine

  • Julie Dillon Analog April 2014
  • Matt Dixon, Clarkesworld #90 March 2014
  • Wayne Haag, Interzone #253 July/August 2014
  • Patrick Jones, Analog March 2014
  • Jae Lee, Batman/Superman #14 DC Comics October 2014
  • Peter Mohrbacher, Lightspeed #48 May 2014
  • Dan Dos Santos, Serenity: Leaves on the Wind #3 Dark Horse, March 2014

Best Interior Illustration

  • Anna Balbusso and Elena Balbusso, “Ekaterina and the Firebird” by Abra Staffin-Wiebe; Tor.com, January 2014
  • Galen Dara, “A City of Its Tentacles” by Rose Lemberg; Lackinton’s #1 February 2014
  • Julie Dillon, Imagined Realms: Book 1 July/August; Kickstarter December 2014
  • Scott Gustafson, Classic Bedtime Stories; Artisan, September 2014
  • Karla Ortiz, “The Walking Stick Forest” by Anna Tambour; Tor.com May 2014
  • John Picacio, Nuestra Senora de la Esperanza; Tor.com October 2014

Best Gaming Related Illustration

  • Noah Bradley, Drown in Sorrow Magic card, Born of the Gods; WotC, Feb. 2014
  • Eric Deschamps, Ephara, God of Polis Magic card, Born of the Gods; WotC, Feb. 2014
  • Michael Komarck, D&D The Rise of Tiamat; WotC, Oct. 2014
  • Peter Mohrbacher, Pharika, God of Affliction Magic card, Journey into Nyx; WotC, May 2014
  • Karla Ortiz, Ghoulcaller Gisa Magic card, Commander 2014; WotC, Nov. 2014
  • Chris Rahn, Ajani the Steadfast Magic card, 2015 Core Set; WotC, July 2014

Best Product Illustration

  • Frank Cho & Brandon Peterson, Fast Food New York ComicCon 2014 art print
  • Donato Giancola, George R.R. Martin Song of Ice and Fire 2015 calendar Bantam, 2014
  • Patrick Jones, Conan The Conquered Illuxcon promotional art
  • John Picacio, La Calavera Loteria card Lone Boy
  • Raymond Swanland, One with the Light Limited Edition Giclee on canvas Acme Archives 2014

Best Color Work – Unpublished

  • Linda Adair, Dragonsbride oil
  • Michael C. Hayes, Alegretto oils
  • Reiko Murakami, Giving Name Photoshop
  • Mark Poole, Omens oils
  • Dorian Vallejo, Crossing oil on canvas
  • Annie Stegg Gerard, The Lady of Lorien oil on linen

Best Monochrome Work – Unpublished

  • Kristina Carroll, “Dragonslayer” charcoal
  • Sean Murray, “Gateway: The Storkfriars” graphite
  • John Picacio, El Venado, graphite
  • Olivier Villoingt, “The Soul of War” graphite & acrylic
  • Allen Williams, “Sphynx” graphite
  • Rebecca Yanovskaya, “Wisdom” ink & mixed media

Best Three-Dimensional Art

  • Dan Chudzinski, The Mudpuppy, resin & mixed media
  • David Meng, Sun Wukong, the Monkey King
  • Michael Parkes, Meditation, bronze
  • Forest Rogers, A Fish from Versailles, Kato polyclay
  • Virginie Ropars, Morrigan, polymer clay & mixed media
  • Vincent Villafranca, Modernity’s Squeaky Child, bronze & steel

Best Art Director

  • Lou Anders, Pyr
  • Shelly Bond, DC/Vertigo Comics
  • Irene Gallo, Tor & Tor.com
  • Jeremy Jarvis, Wizards of the Coast
  • Lauren Panepinto, Orbit Books

Lifetime Artistic Achievement Award

  • Kinuko Craft
  • John Harris
  • Gregory Manchess
  • Iain McCaig

The awards ceremony will be held at Sasquan, the 2015 Worldcon, on August 19-23.

ASFA members have until June 30 at 11:45 p.m. (Eastern) to submit a final ballot. According to Picacio, “If you’re not currently an ASFA member, join! It only costs a measly $35 and you gain full voting privileges.”

 

2014 Chesley Award Winners

Lifetime Achievement Award winner Jim Burns

Lifetime Achievement Award winner Jim Burns

The 2014 Chesley Awards were presented by the Association of Science Fiction & Fantasy Artists (ASFA) at Loncon 3 on August 15.

Best Cover (Hardback): Todd Lockwood for A Natural History of Dragons by Marie Brennan

Best Cover (Paperback): Kerem Beyit for The Scroll of Years by Chris Willrich

Best Cover (Magazine): Dan Dos Santos for Fables #136

Best Interior Illustration: Brian Kessinger for “Walking Your Octopus”

Best Three Dimensional Art: Devin Dorrity for “Cecaelia, Queen of the Ocean,” clay

Best Color Unpublished: Donato Giancola for Huor and Hurin Approaching Gondolin, oil on linen

Best Monochrome Unpublished: Ruth Sanderson for “The Descent of Persephone,” scratchboard

Best Gaming Related Illustration: Lucas Graciano for “The Last Stand of Thorin Oakenshield,” The Battle of Five Armies Board Game, Ares Games

Best Product Illustration: Julie Bell/Boris Vallejo for “Jeannie’s Kitten,” IlluXCon 6 promotional art

Best Art Director: Irene Gallo, Tor and Tor.com

Lifetime Achievement: Jim Burns

2014 Chesley Awards Shortlist

The finalists for the 2014 Chesley Awards have been announced. The awards will be presented at Loncon 3. Galleries of shortlisted artists and works are available at the Association of Science Fiction Artists (ASFA) website here.

Best Cover Illustration: Hardback Book

  • Jason Chan – Lost Covenant: A Widdershins Adventure by Ari Marmell; Pyr, Dec. 2013
  • Kekai Kotaki – Quintessence by David Walton; Tor, March 2013
  • Maurizio Manzieri – Book of Iron by Elizabeth Bear; Subterranean Press, Sept. 2013
  • Todd Lockwood – A Natural History of Dragons by Marie Brennan; Tor, Feb. 2013
  • Michael Whelan – A Memory of Light by Robert Jordan & Brandon Sanderson; Tor, Jan. 2013
  • Allen Williams Light Reading, Queen Victoria’s Book of Spells, edited by Ellen Datlow and Terri Windling; Tor, March 2013

Best Cover Illustration: Paperback Book

  • Kerem Beyit – The Scroll of Years by Chris Willrich; Pyr, Sept. 2013
  • Jason Chan – Harbinger by Phillippa Ballantine; Ace, July 2013
  • Julie Dillon Ancient Discovery; Crossed Genres Magazine 2.0 Book One; Crossed Genres Publications, April 2013
  • Justin Gerard – Power Under Pressure (The Society of Steam) by Andrew P. Mayer; Pyr, Jan. 2013
  • Dehong He Shield of Sea and Space by Erin Hoffman; Pyr, May 2013

Best Cover Illustration: Magazine

  • Julie Dillon – Elliptic, Clarkesworld, December 2013
  • Dan Dos Santos – Fables #136 Vertigo, Dec. 2013
  • Maurizio Manzieri – The Magazine of Fantasy & Science Fiction, March/April 2013
  • Cynthia Sheppard – Bull Spec, Spring 2013

Best Interior Illustration

  • Robert Hunt “Fire Above, Fire Below” by Garth Nix; Tor.com, May 2013
  • Brian Kesinger – Walking Your Octopus, July 2013; Baby Tattoo Books
  • John Jude Palencar – “A Terror” by Jeffrey Ford; Tor.com, July 2013
  • John Picacio – “The Button Man and the Murder Tree” by Cherie Priest; Tor.com, May 2013)
  • John Picacio – The Good Life; Popular Science Magazine, June 2013
  • Greg Ruth – “Dragonkin” by Lavie Tidhar; Tor.com, July 2013
  • Greg Ruth – The Running of the Bulls, The Running of the Bulls by Harry Turtledove; Tor.com, March 2013

Best Three-Dimensional Art

  • Devon Dorrity – Cecaelia, Queen of the Ocean, clay
  • Thomas Kuebler – Krampus the Yule Lord, mixed
  • David Meng – Leatherback, resin
  • Michael Parkes – Goddess of the Hunt, 1/2 life-size bronze
  • Forest Rogers – Goblin Spider, Kato polyclay
  • Vincent Villafranca – Star Smith, bronze

Best Unpublished: Color Work

  • Rhea Ewing – Ancestor Series – Neanderthal
  • Donato Giancola – Huor and Hurin Approaching Gondolin, oil on linen
  • Stephanie Pui-Mun Law – Ships Passing in the Night, watercolor
  • Dave Leri – Death Squealer, oil on masonite
  • Annie Stegg – Lilaia the Naiad, oil on paper

Best Unpublished: Monochrome Work

  • Justin Gerard The Fox Princess, pencil
  • Rebecca Guay – Tender Morsels, graphite
  • John Picacio – La Luna
  • Travis Lewis Bone Collector, graphite
  • Ruth Sanderson – The Descent or Persephone, scratchboard

Best Product Illustration

  • Julie Bell & Boris Vallejo – Jeannie’s Kitten, IlluXCon 6 promotional art
  • Mitchell Bentley – 2014 Space Art Calendar; Atomic Fly Studios and Alban Lake Publishing, December 2013
  • Julie Dillon – 2014 Llewellyn’s Astrology Calendar June 2013
  • Justin Gerrard – “Morzag! Lord of Destruction” poster
  • Iain McCaig – Call of the Muse, Spectrum 20 Call for Entries poster
  • John Picacio – El Arpa (Loteria Card Illustration from Lone Boy)

Best Gaming-Related Illustration

  • Lucas Graciano – The Last Stand of Thorin Oakenshield for The Battle of Five Armies Board Game Ares Games
  • Tyler Jacobson – Ruric: Thar the Unbowed (2014 Core Set Magic card) WotC, July 2013
  • Todd Lockwood Observant Alseid (“Theros” Magic card) WotC, Sept. 2013
  • David Palumbo Serene Rememberance (“Gatecrash” Magic card) WotC, Feb. 2013
  • Steve Prescott – Prognostic Sphinx (“Theros” Magic card) WotC, Sept. 2013
  • Chris Rahn – Ashen Rider (“Theros” Magic card) WotC, Sept. 2013

Best Art Director

  • Lou Anders – Pyr
  • Irene Gallo – Tor & Tor.com
  • Lauren Panepinto – Orbit Books
  • William Schafer – Subterranean Press
  • Jon Schindehette – Wizards of the Coast

Lifetime Artistic Achievement Award

  • Jim Burns
  • Kinukyo Craft
  • Diane Dillon
  • Drew Struzan