Lee and Miller Win Year’s Best Military and Adventure SF Award

The winner of the third annual Year’s Best Military and Adventure Science Fiction Readers’ Choice Award is “Wise Child” by Sharon Lee & Steve Miller.

The award was decided by a public vote among the 15 short stories in Baen Books’ The Year’s Best Military and Adventure SF, Vol. 3, edited by David Afsharirad.

The Readers Choice Award was presented at the Baen Traveling Roadshow at Dragon Con in Atlanta this past weekend, with Baen editor Jim Minz accepting for Lee and Miller.

Sharon Lee told her readers of blog:

Thanks to everyone who voted for Tolly and Disian.  Steve and I are very proud authors, indeed.

The winning authors receive an inscribed plaque and a $500 prize.

Voting Opens for Year’s Best Military and Adventure SF Readers’ Choice Award

Today Baen Books released The Year’s Best Military and Adventure SF, Vol. 3, edited by David Afsharirad, and started taking votes for the third annual Year’s Best Military and Adventure Science Fiction Readers’ Choice Award. The public will pick one of the 15 short stories in the anthology as the award-winner:

  • ”Cadet Cruise” by David Drake
  • “Tethers” by William Ledbetter
  • “Unlinkage” by Eric Del Carlo
  • “Not in Vain” by Kacey Ezell
  • “Between Nine and Eleven” by Adam Roberts
  • “Sephine and the Leviathan” by Jack Schouten
  • “The Good Food” by Michael Ezell
  • “If I Could Give this Time Machine Zero Stars, I Would” by James Wesley Rogers
  • “Wise Child” by Sharon Lee & Steve Miller
  • “Starhome” by Michael Z. Williamson
  • “The Art of Failure” by Robert Dawson
  • “The Last Tank Commander” by Allen Stroud
  • “One Giant Leap” by Jay Werkheiser
  • “The Immortals: Anchorage” by David Adams
  • “Backup Man” by Paul Di Filippo

Registration with Baen Ebooks is required to vote. Alternatively, people may send a postcard or letter with the name of their favorite story from this volume and its author to Baen Books Year’s Best Award, P.O. Box 1188, Wake Forest, NC 27587. Voting closes August 31, 2017.

The winning story will be announced at Dragoncon in Atlanta, held over Labor Day Weekend 2017, and at Baen.com. The author will receive an inscribed plaque and a $500 prize.

Baen Readies The Year’s Best Military and Adventure SF Vol. 3

Baen Books has announced the table of contents for The Year’s Best Military and Adventure SF series, Vol. 3 edited by David Afsharirad. One of these stories will be voted the winner of The Year’s Best Military and Adventure SF Readers’ Choice Award in a proctored online poll that will begin in the near future.

The victorious author receives $500 and a plaque commemorating the award at Dragon Con. The first two winners were Michael Z. Williamson for his short story “Soft Casualty” (2014), and David Drake for “Save What You Can” (2015), set in his genre-defining Hammer’s Slammers series.

The Year’s Best Military and Adventure SF, Volume 3 will be released June 6, 2017. The third volume contains a preface by Afsharirad and an introduction by New York Times best-selling author David Weber, as well as fifteen short stories, selected from online and print periodicals, and original anthologies.

Table of Contents

  • “Cadet Cruise” by David Drake
  • “Tethers” by William Ledbetter
  • “Unlinkage” by Eric Del Carlo
  • “Not in Vain” by Kacey Ezell
  • “Between Nine and Eleven” by Adam Roberts
  • “Sephine and the Leviathan” by Jack Schouten
  • “The Good Food” by Michael Ezell
  • “If I Could Give this Time Machine Zero Stars, I Would” by James Wesley Rogers
  • “Wise Child” by Sharon Lee & Steve Miller
  • “Starhome” by Michael Z. Williamson
  • “The Art of Failure” by Robert Dawson
  • “The Last Tank Commander” by Allen Stroud
  • “One Giant Leap” by Jay Werkheiser
  • “The Immortals: Anchorage” by David Adams
  • “Backup Man” by Paul Di Filippo

David Weber’s introduction asks “What Is ‘Military Science Fiction’?” He says it has a mission:

Today, in the Western World, personal experience of military conflict is actually quite rare and concentrated in hugely disproportionate fashion among those who volunteer for military service. Civilians take it for granted that they will be protected from conflict by those who serve in the military, and those who do not serve in the military have little or no first-hand familiarity with what our military guardians experience in our place. Most professional Soldiers, Sailors, Airmen, and Marines of my acquaintance think that’s the way it’s supposed to be. That if it isn’t that way, they aren’t doing their jobs. But because they are, those of us standing behind them have no personal, experiential guide to what it is we truly ask of them.

One of the responsibilities of those of us who write military fiction is to provide a window into what we ask of them. Into the consequences of what is demanded of them. Not simply to venerate them, or to celebrate the “thin line of heroes,” although that is one of our responsibilities, because the men and women who have died for us deserve to be venerated and celebrated, but also to help us understand. To recognize not just what they have given and are giving for us, but the fact that they stand where they stand, face what they face, because we put them there.

And we need to understand the price they pay for being there because if we don’t—if we trivialize it or romanticize it into something one bit less horrible than it is—we forget that the reason we put them there had damned well better be worth that price.

More information about the book, and voting instructions once that begins, will be found on the Baen website.

A Dozen “Year’s Best”

By Carl Slaughter: A dozen editors, some of them household names in the speculative community, take their stab at the year’s best stories.

The Year’s Best Science Fiction: Thirty-Third Annual Collection, edited by Gardner Dozois

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The Best Science Fiction of the Year: Volume One edited by Neil Clarke

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The Best American Science Fiction and Fantasy 2015 edited by Joe Hill and John Joseph Adams

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The Year’s Best Science Fiction & Fantasy 2016 Edition edited by Rich Horton

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The Best Science Fiction and Fantasy of the Year: Volume Ten edited by Jonathan Strahan

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The Best American Science Fiction and Fantasy 2016 edited by Karen Joy Fowler and John Joseph Adams

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The Year’s Best Science Fiction & Fantasy Novellas 2016 edited by Paula Guran

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The Year’s Best Dark Fantasy & Horror 2016 Edition edited by Paula Guran

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Nebula Awards Showcase 2016 edited by Mercedes Lackey

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The Year’s Best Military & Adventure SF 2015: Volume 2 edited by David Afsharirad

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The Best Horror of the Year Volume Eight edited by Ellen Datlow

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The Year’s Top Ten Tales of Science Fiction 8  edited by Allan Kaster

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Year’s Best Military and Adventure SF Paperback Is Out

Years Best milSF 2015

Baen Books released the paperback of The Year’s Best Military and Adventure SF 2015, edited by David Afsharirad, on June 7.

File 770 got an advance look at the table of contents in March, and in April announced the opening of online voting for the associated Readers’ Choice award for the best overall story in the anthology. Voting continues until August 31.

Baen now has posted some preview material from the volume.

David Afsharirad says in his Preface:

When assembling the first volume in the series, I asked Baen publisher Toni Weisskopf about those stories that were excellent but were only kinda sorta space opera and/or military SF. Would we rather have superlative stories that didn’t quite fit the theme of the book, or merely great ones that certainly did fit the theme? We both agreed that we’d be willing to stretch the definitions to ensure that we got the best of the best. And stretch we did, though I should say not to the breaking point. For this year’s volume, we decided that the old title just wasn’t inclusive enough. Hence the name change to The Year’s Best Military and Adventure SF. And now, as Paul Harvey used to say, you know the rest of the story.

David Weber explains in his Introduction:

Military sci-fi comes in all flavors, but good military sci-fi, enduring military sci-fi, is seldom of the “fluff” type. Seldom what I think of as “splatter porn” or of the sort that romanticizes the ugliness of combat and the taking of human life or suggests the “good guys” will get off without paying a horrible price of their own simply because they’re the good guys. I’m not saying all of it has the gritty realism of a Drake, and I’m certainly not saying “good” military sci-fi has to be an anti-military screed. But as Toni Weisskopf once pointed out in a conversation with me, there’s a distinct difference between military science fiction and militaristic science fiction. The biggest difference is that the former is normally written by someone who at least has a clue about how militaries and warfare work whereas the latter is written by someone who doesn’t have a clue about how they work but thought it would be really cool to write about a war.

Click here to find out how to vote for The Best Military and Adventure Science Fiction Reader’s Choice Award. The award-winning story will be announced at Dragon Con.

Fans Will Crown Best Military SF Story of 2015

Years Best milSF 2015David Afsharirad has revealed the table of contents for his next collection of The Year’s Best Military and Adventure SF, picked from short fiction published in 2015.

  • Preface by David Afsharirad
  • Introduction by David Weber
  • “The Siege of Denver” by Brendan DuBois
  • “Save What You Can” by David Drake
  • “For the Love of Sylvia City” by Andrea M. Pawley
  • “The Wizard of the Trees” by Joe R. Lansdale
  • “Helping Hand” by Claudine Griggs
  • “Morrigan in Shadow” by Seth Dickinson
  • “Remembery Day” by Sarah Pinsker
  • “Gyre” by Brad R. Torgersen
  • “Twilight on Olympus” by Eric Leif Davin
  • “The Trouble with Telepaths” by Hank Davis
  • “This is the Way the Universe Ends: With a Bang” by Brian Dolton
  • “The Tumbledowns of Cleopatra Abyss” by David Brin

The volume is slated for publication in June. It’s available for preorder from Amazon and
Baen ebooks.

Baen once again will host a readers’ poll for best story from the collection. The official name now is The Year’s Best Military and Adventure SF Readers’ Choice Award. The voting site is not yet live, but will be by the time the book is released. Like last year, winner will be announced at DragonCon.

Update 03/09/2016: Corrected title, added art and preorder links.

Editor David Afsharirad with Michael Z. Williamson, winner of the first Year’s Best Military SF and Space Opera Award for his 2014 story “Soft Casualty.”

Editor David Afsharirad with Michael Z. Williamson, first winner of the Year’s Best Military SF and Space Opera Award (as it was then called) for his 2014 story “Soft Casualty.”

Williamson Story Wins “Year’s Best Military SF”

“Soft Casualty” by Michael Z. Williamson has been voted the accolade “Year’s Best Military and Adventure Science Fiction Story” by readers of Baen’s The Year’s Best Military SF & Space Opera edited by David Afsharirad.

The announcement was made at the Baen Travelling Road Show (with Prizes) at Dragon Con. Williamson received an inscribed plaque and five hundred dollars.

[Thanks to Toni Weisskopf for the story.]

Baen Holds Vote For Best MilSF of 2014

cover years best military sfBaen released The Year’s Best Military SF & Space Opera edited by David Afsharirad on June 2, at the same time throwing open voting for the work in the volume most deserving of the accolade “Year’s Best Military and Adventure Science Fiction Story.”

The award honors the best of the best in this grand storytelling tradition, and its winner will receive an inscribed plaque and a $500 prize.

Table of Contents

  • Preface by David Afsharirad
  • Excitement! Adventure! Science Fiction! by David Drake
  • “Codename: Delphi” by Linda Nagata (Lightspeed, April 2014)
  • “Persephone Descending” by Derek Künsken (Analog Science Fiction and Fact, November 2014)
  • “The End of the Silk Road” by David D. Levine (The Magazine of Fantasy & Science Fiction, May/June 2014)
  • “Picket Ship” by Brad R. Torgersen (Baen.com, September 2014)
  • “Decaying Orbit” by Robert R. Chase (Asimov’s Science Fiction, October/November 2014)
  • “Morrigan in the Sunglare” by Seth Dickinson (Clarkesworld, March 2014)
  • “Light and Shadow” by Linda Nagata (War Stories: New Military Science Fiction)
  • “Icarus at Noon” by Eric Leif Davin (Galaxy’s Edge, May/June 2014)
  • “Soft Casualty” Michael Z. Williamson (Baen.com, April 2014)
  • “Palm Strike’s Last Case” by Charlie Jane Anders (The Magazine of Fantasy & Science Fiction, July/August 2014)
  • “Brood” by Stephen Gaskell (Extreme Planets)
  • “Stealing Arturo” by William Ledbetter (Baen.com, February 2014)
  • “Rules of Engagement” by Matthew Johnson (Asimov’s Science Fiction, April/May 2014)
  • “Ten Rules for Being an Intergalactic Smuggler (the Successful Kind)” by Holly Black (Monstrous Affections)
  • “War Dog” by Michael Barretta (War Stories: New Military Science Fiction)

Voting continues until August 31. Voters must register with Baen Ebooks (your information will not be shared.) You may also send a postcard or letter with the name of your favorite story from this volume and its author to Baen Books Year’s Best Award, P.O. Box 1188, Wake Forest, NC 27587.

The winner will be announced at Dragon*Con in Atlanta on Labor Day Weekend.

Fans Will Crown Year’s Best Military SF Story

cover years best military sfAfter Baen releases The Year’s Best Military SF and Space Opera on June 2, the publisher will invite readers to vote online for the work in the volume most deserving of the accolade “Year’s Best Military and Adventure Science Fiction Story.”

Edited by David Afsharirad, and with an introduction by David Drake, the inaugural book in this year’s best series will collect stories from the top magazine and online venues with a military and adventure science fiction theme.

Baen publisher Toni Weisskopf adds —

We’ll be keeping track of the voting at baen.com. The winner will be announced at the Baen Travelling Road Show at Dragoncon in Atlanta. (I should make it clear that Dragoncon is only hosting us, not sponsoring the contest, much as the Locus poll winners have been announced at various conventions over the years, or the Prometheus Award at Worldcon.) The Reader’s Choice story will earn its author an additional $500 and a nice plaque.

The book can be pre-ordered now from a wide array of sellers.