2017 Sir Julius Vogel Awards

The winners of the 2017 Sir Julius Vogel Awards were announced June 4 at Lexicon in Taupo, New Zealand. The awards recognize excellence in science fiction, fantasy and horror by New Zealanders.

The winners were chosen by a vote of the members of SFFANZ, the Science Fiction and Fantasy Association of New Zealand Inc., and of the national convention, Lexicon 2017.

Professional Award Nominees

Best Novel

  • Into the Mist by Lee Murray (Cohesion Press)

Best Youth Novel

  • Light in My Dark by Jean Gilbert and William Dresden (Rogue House Publishing)

Best Novella / Novelette

  • The Convergence of Fairy Tales by Octavia Cade (Book Smugglers)

Best Short Story

  • “Splintr” by A.J. Fitzwater, published in At the Edge (Paper Road Press)

Best Collected Work

  • At the Edge, Edited by Dan Rabarts and Lee Murray (Paper Road Press)

Best Professional Artwork

  • Cover artwork for At the Edge, Emma Weakley (Paper Road Press)

Best Professional Production / Publication

  • That Kind of Planet, Emma Weakley (Random Static)

Best Dramatic Presentation

  • This Papier Mache Boulder is Actually Really Heavy, Andrew Beszant and Christian Nicholson (Little Hero Productions)

Fan Award Nominees

Best Fan Production/ Publication

  • Summer Star Trek: Mirror, Mirror, Enterprise Entertainment

Best Fan Writing

  • Octavia Cade, For Food and Horror Column Series (Book Smugglers)

Best Fan Artist

  • Keith Smith, Contributions to Novazine

Special Award Nominees

Best New Talent

  • Eileen Mueller

Services To Science Fiction, Fantasy And Horror

  • Lee Murray

Services To Fandom

  • Lynelle Howell

The supporting statements for the Special Award winners can be read at the SFFANZ  website.

[Thanks to JJ for the story.]

2017 Sir Julius Vogel Award Finalists

The nominees for the 2017 Sir Julius Vogel Award have been announced.  The awards recognize excellence in science fiction, fantasy and horror by New Zealanders.

The winners will be decided by a vote of the members of SFFANZ, the Science Fiction and Fantasy Association of New Zealand Inc., and of the national convention, Lexicon 2017.

Professional Award Nominees

Best Novel

  • Innocents by Sarah Fayermann (FeedARead.com Publishing)
  • Den of Wolves by Juliet Marillier (Pan MacMillan Australia)
  • Into the Mist by Lee Murray (Cohesion Press)
  • Daybreak Rising (Embers of Redemption, vol 1) by Kiran Oliver (CreateSpace Independent Publishing)
  • Night’s Fall by Richard Parry (Mondegreen)

Best Youth Novel

  • Stranded Starship (You Say Which Way) by Kevin Berry (Fairytale Factory)
  • The Ghosts of Moonlight Creek by Sue Copsey (CreateSpace Independent Publishing)
  • Battlesaurus: Clash of Empires by Brian Falkner (MacMillan)
  • Light in My Dark by Jean Gilbert and William Dresden (Rogue House Publishing)

Best Novella / Novelette

  • The Convergence of Fairy Tales by Octavia Cade (Book Smugglers)
  • Babylon’s Song by Woelf Dietrich, published in Interspecies (Kosa Press)
  • The Sleeper’s Dance – A Novella by Mouse Diver-Dudfield (Pouakai Books)
  • Spindle by Dan Rabarts, published in Andromeda Spaceways Inflight Magazine issue 63
  • Tipuna Tapu by Dan Rabarts (Clan Destine Press)

Best Short Story

  • “Narco” by Michelle Child, published in At the Edge (Paper Road Press)
  • “Splintr” by A.J. Fitzwater, published in At the Edge (Paper Road Press)
  • “Wakers” by Sean Monaghan, published in Asimov’s Science Fiction, August 2016
  • “Call of the Sea” by Eileen Mueller, published in At the Edge (Paper Road Press)
  • “BlindSight” by A.J. Ponder, published in At the Edge (Paper Road Press)
  • “London’s Crawling” by Emma Pullar, published in Dark Minds Charity Collection (Bloodhound Books)

Best Collected Work

  • At the Edge, Edited by Dan Rabarts and Lee Murray (Paper Road Press)
  • Everything is Fine, Grant Stone (Racket House)

Best Professional Artwork

  • Cover artwork for Write Off Line 2016: Everyone’s a Winner by Kodi Murray (Rogue House Publishing)
  • Cover artwork for Beyond the Stars by Kodi Murray (Tauranga Writers Publishing)
  • Cover artwork for Chameleon Moon, by Laya Rose
  • Midnight Star, Laya Rose
  • Cover artwork for That Kind of Planet, Emma Weakley (Random Static)
  • Cover artwork for At the Edge, Emma Weakley (Paper Road Press)

Best Professional Production / Publication

  • That Kind of Planet, Emma Weakley (Random Static)

Best Dramatic Presentation

  • This Papier Mache Boulder is Actually Really Heavy, Andrew Beszant and Christian Nicholson (Little Hero Productions)
  • Chronesthesia, Directed by Hayden J. Weal, collaborator Simeon Duncombe
  • AFK: the webseries, episode 12, “ZERG”, Directed by Peter Haynes (Epically Casual Productions)

Fan Award Nominees

Best Fan Production/ Publication

  • Novazine, Edited by Jacqui Smith
  • Phoenixine, Edited by John and Lynelle Howell
  • Summer Star Trek: Mirror, Mirror, Enterprise Entertainment

Best Fan Writing

  • Alex Lindsay for SITREP, Published in Phoenxine
  • Jacqui Smith, For contributions to Novazine
  • Octavia Cade, For Food and Horror Column Series (Book Smugglers)

Best Fan Artist

  • Keith Smith, Contributions to Novazine

Special Award Nominees

Best New Talent

  • Eileen Mueller
  • Richard Parry
  • Laya Rose
  • Darian Smith

Services To Science Fiction, Fantasy And Horror

  • Lee Murray

Services To Fandom

  • Jan Butterworth
  • Lynelle Howell

The lengthy supporting statements for the Special Award nominees can be read at the SFFANZ  website.

[Thanks to JJ for the story.]

 

2016 Sir Julius Vogel Award Nominees

SFFANZ logoThe 2016 Sir Julius Vogel Awards shortlist has been announced. These awards recognize excellence in science fiction, fantasy and horror by New Zealanders.

The winners will be decided by a vote of the members of SFFANZ, the Science Fiction and Fantasy Association of New Zealand Inc., and of the national convention, AuContraire 2016.

Professional Award Nominees

Best Novel

  • Ardus by Jean Gilbert (Rogue House Publishing)
  • Mariah’s Dream by Grace Bridges (Splashdown Books)
  • Vestiges of Flames by Lyn McConchie (Lethe Press USA)
  • Currents of Change by Darian Smith (Wooden Tiger Press)
  • Shards of Ice by Catherine Mede (Flying Kiwi Press)
  • Sun Touched by J.C. Hart (Etherhart Press)

Best Youth Novel

  • The Caretaker of Imagination by Z. R. Southcombe (Self Published)
  • Dragons Realm (You Say Which Way) by Eileen Mueller (Fairytale Factory)
  • Brave’s Journey by Jan Goldie (IFWG Publishing Australia )
  • Lucy’s Story: The End of the World by Z. R. Southcombe (Self Published)
  • Deadline Delivery by Peter Friend (Fairytale Factory)

Best Novella / Novelette

  • Pocket Wife by I. K. Paterson-Harkness (in Shortcuts – Track 1, Paper Road Press)
  • The Way the Sky Curves by J. C. Hart (Etherhart Press)
  • The Molenstraat Music Festival by Sean Monaghan (Asimov’s, September 2015 issue)
  • The Last by Grant Stone (in Shortcuts – Track 1, Paper Road Press)
  • The Ghost of Matter by Octavia Cade (in Shortcuts – Track 1, Paper Road Press)
  • Burn (Maiden, Mother, Crone, bk 1) by J. C. Hart (Etherhart Press)
  • Bree’s Dinosaur by A. C. Buchanan (in Shortcuts – Track 1, Paper Road Press)

Best Short Story

  • “The Thief’s Tale” by Lee Murray (Volume 1 of The Refuge Collection, Steve Dillon, ed.)
  • “Pride” by Jean Gilbert (In Contact Light, Timothy Zahn (ed.), Silence in the Library LLC)
  • “Floodgate” by Dan Rabarts (In Mammoth book of Dieselpunk, Burning Press)
  • “The Shelver” by Piper Mejia (In SpecFicNZ Shorts)
  • “The Harpsicord Elf” by Sean Monoghan (In Capricious Issue 2)
  • “Drag Marks” by Darian Smith (In Shifting Worlds, Wooden Tiger Press)

Best Collected Work

  • Shifting Worlds: a collection of short stories by Darian Smith (Wooden Tiger Press)
  • Shortcuts: Track 1, edited by Marie Hodgkinson (Paper Road Press)
  • The Survivors: Heroic Edition by V. L. Dreyer (Cheeky Kea Creations)
  • Write Off Line 2015: The Earth We Knew, Jean Gilbert (author)/Chad Dick (ed) (Rogue House Publishing)
  • SpecFicNZ Shorts (SpecFicNZ)
  • Beyond the Veil: A collection of Science Fiction and Fantasy edited by Lauren Haddock/Jessica Harvey

Best Professional Artwork

  • Cover of The Earth We Knew: A Collection of Science Fiction and Fantasy by Kodi Murray
  • Cover for Shortcuts – Track 1 by K.C. Bailey
  • Cover for Pisces of Fate by Henry Christian-Sloane
  • Cover for Miss Lionheart and the Laboratory of Death by Imojen Faith Hancock

Best Professional Production/Publication

  • “Ahead of her time and lost in time: on feminism, gender, and bisexuality” by AJ Fitzwater (In Letters to Tiptree, Twelfth Planet Press)
  • The Face of Oblivion, A LARP written by Catherine Pegg
  • White Cloud Worlds Anthology 3, Paul Tobin (ed), published by Weta Workshop

Fan Award Nominees

Best Fan Production/ Publication

  • Phoenixine, John & Lynelle Howell

Best Fan Writing

  • John Toon (Available in Phoenixine)
  • June Young (Available in Phoenixine)
  • Terri Doyle (Available in Novazine)

Special Award Nominees

Best New Talent

  • Jean Gilbert
  • Octavia Cade
  • Y. K. Willemse
  • Eileen Mueller

Services To Science Fiction, Fantasy And Horror

  • Marie Hodgkinson

While a student at the University of Otago Marie set up Semaphore Publications and for three years produced a quarterly magazine of genre short fiction and an annual year’s best compilation. These magazines were an interesting and exciting source of previously unknown genre authors living within New Zealand, some of which are now well established in the local consciousness.

Since graduating, Marie has established Paper Road Press and continued to publish and promote NZ speculative fiction. In its turn Paper Road Press has promoted new, unknown authorial talent with collections of shorter length fiction as well as novels.

Through these publishing efforts Marie has expanded the breadth and depth of New Zealand’s science fiction and fantasy landscape and for that that Marie should be honoured.

[Thanks to JJ for the story.]

Pixel Scroll 3/13/16 We’re Off To See The Pixel, The Wonderful Pixel Of Scroll

(1) DAYLIGHT STEALING TIME. Disney’s Alice Through The Looking Glass trailer investigates a time crime.

(2) TAKING INVENTORY. Bill Roper had some insights about being a convention dealer while doing “That Taxes Thing”.

One of the distressing things about doing the taxes for Dodeka is seeing:

– How many different titles we carry.

– And how many of them appear to have sold one or fewer copies in 2015.

Some of these are the result of having bought out Juanita’s inventory when she retired and having acquired various CDs that had been sitting in her inventory for too long. A few of them are the result of my own ordering errors.

The problem is that the boxes are large and heavy and the table is very full. But if you don’t take the CDs out to the cons with you, you can’t sell them…

Filk is an extremely regional business. And given that we’re in the eighth-or-so year of a sucky economy, I certainly understand people’s reluctance to take a flyer on something that they aren’t familiar with.

(3) BATMOBILE REPLICA MAKER LOSES. The U.S. Supreme Court declined to review a Ninth Circuit decision in favor of DC Comics, which had sued Mark Towle over his unlicensed replicas of the 1966 and 1989 Batmobiles, sold for about $90,000 each. So DC wins.

According to Robot 6:

Towle argued that the U.S. Copyright Act doesn’t protect “useful articles,” defined as objects that have “an intrinsic utilitarian function” (for example, clothing, household appliances or, in this case, automobile functions); in short, that the Batmobile’s design is merely functional.

However, a federal judge didn’t buy that argument… Towle appealed that decision, but the Ninth Circuit Court of Appeals wasn’t any more sympathetic, finding in September that, “the Batmobile is almost always bat-like in appearance, with a bat-themed front end, bat wings extending from the top or back of the car, exaggerated fenders, a curved windshield, and bat emblems on the vehicle. This bat-like appearance has been a consistent theme throughout the comic books, television series, and motion picture, even though the precise nature of the bat-like characteristics have changed from time to time.”

In his petition to the high court, Towle insisted that the U.S. Copyright Office states outright that automobiles aren’t copyrightable, and that the Ninth Circuit simply created an arbitrary exception. He also argued that there have been “dozens” of Batmobiles in DC comic books over the decades that “vary dramatically in appearance and style” — so much so that the vehicle doesn’t have the “consistent, widely-identifiable, physical attributes” required to be considered a “character.”

(4) SFL SURVIVOR. Andrew Liptak retells “The Adventures of the LA Science Fantasy Society” at Kirkus Reviews.

When he [Forry Ackerman] set off on his own, he founded the Los Angeles Science Fantasy Society. While every other Science Fiction League chapter closed—as well as many of the other fan groups—the LASFS survives to the present day, the longest running science fiction club in the world.

In the coming decades, the club became an important focal point for the growing science-fiction community. It counted some of the genre’s biggest writers as its members: when Ray Bradbury’s family moved from Arizona to Los Angles, the young storyteller quickly found the group. “A turning point in his life came in early September 1937,” Sam Moskowitz recounted in his early history Seekers of Tomorrow: Masters of Modern Science Fiction, “when poring through the books and magazines in Shep’s Shop, a Los Angeles book store that catered to science-fiction readers, he received an invitation from a member to visit the Los Angeles Chapter of the Science Fiction League.” Through the league, Bradbury quickly got his start as a writer, publishing “Hollerbochen’s Dilemma” in the club’s fanzine, Imagination!

LASFS is not quite the lone survivor of the Science Fiction League – there is also the Philadelphia Science Fiction SocietyFancyclopedia 3 has more SFL history.

(5) ON WINGS OF STONE. You must keep an eye on these winged predators. BBC tells “How to survive a Weeping Angels attack!”

The Weeping Angels are scary. Really scary. They possess a natural and unique defence mechanism: they’re quantum locked. This means that they can only move when no other living creature is looking at them. These lonely assassins also have the ability to send other beings into the past, feeding on the potential time energy of what would have been the rest of their victims’ lives.

But how do you survive a Weeping Angel attack? Well, here’s our guaranteed, foolproof 4-step guide…

(6) TOP DRAWER. Peter Capaldi proves to have a flair for sketching his predecessors as Doctor Who.

(7) COINAGE. A horrible, fannish pun in March 12’s Brevity cartoon.

(8) MARIE WILLIAMS OBIT. New Zealand fan Marie Williams died of cancer February 27. She was a member of the board of Science Fiction and Fantasy Association of New Zealand (SFFANZ), and their announcement said, “She was a valued member and we will miss her thoughtful insights and interesting comments.”

(9) TOMLINSON OBIT. E-mail pioneer Ray Tomlinson died March 5 at the age of 74. The New York Times report gave a brief history of his development.

In the late 1960s and early 1970s, Mr. Tomlinson was working at the research and development company Bolt, Beranek & Newman on projects for ARPANET, a forerunner of the Internet created for the Defense Department. At the time, the company had developed a messaging program, called SNDMSG, that allowed multiple users of a time-share computer to send messages to one another.

But it was a closed messaging system, limited to users of a single computer.

Mr. Tomlinson, filching codes from a file-transfer program he had created called CYPNET, modified SNDMSG so that messages could be sent from one host computer to another throughout the ARPANET system.

To do this, he needed a symbol to separate a user name from a destination address. And so the plump little @ sign came into use, chosen because it did not appear in user names and did not have any meaning in the TENEX paging program used on time-sharing computers.

The BBC’s Dave Lee wrote “Ray Tomlinson’s e-mail is flawed, but never bettered”.

He is widely regarded as the inventor of email, and is credited with putting the now iconic “@” sign in the addresses of the revolutionary system.

He could never have imagined the multitude of ways email would come to be used, abused and confused.

Just think – right now, someone, somewhere is writing an email she should probably reconsider. Count to 10, my friend. Sleep on it.

Another is sending an email containing brutal, heartbreaking words that, really, should be said in person… if only he had the nerve.

And of course, a Nigerian prince is considering how best to ask for my help in spending his fortune.

Chip Hitchcock says, “AFAICT, nobody saw person-to-person email coming; computers were for talking to central data, as in ‘A Logic Named Joe’ or even The Shockwave Rider. The closest I can think of to discussing the effects of mass cheap point-to-point communication is the side comment on cell-phone etiquette in the opening scene of Tunnel in the Sky. Can anyone provide another example?”

(10) TODAY IN HISTORY

  • March 13, 1981 – Joe Dante’s The Howling premieres in North America.

(11) TODAY’S BIRTHDAY BOY

  • Born March 13, 1911 – L. Ron Hubbard

(12) HUGO NOMINATORS: NEVER GIVE UP, NEVER SURRENDER. Spacefaring, Extradimensional Happy Kittens reappears after a five-month hiatus, because it’s “Hugo Season!”

The annual SFF self-loathing theme weeks are here again — I feel (as I feel every year) like a total loser for not having read enough new science fiction and fantasy to make informed nominations for the Hugo award. I haven’t read Seveneves, haven’t seen Ant-Man, haven’t had the time for Jessica Jones, haven’t waded through a lot of short fiction.

Damn damn damn.

Then again, you’re always going to feel that way, no matter what. And it’s not football (which means “soccer”, in case you’re American), so whining doesn’t help.

(13) BINARY BEAUTY. “Google’s AI Is Now Reigning Go Champion of the World”. Motherboard has the story.

On Saturday afternoon in Seoul, AlphaGo, the Go-playing artificial intelligence created by Google’s DeepMind, beat 18-time Go world champion Lee Sedol for its third straight win in a five game series.

The win was a historic one for artificial intelligence research, a field where AI’s mastery of this 2,500 year old game was long considered a holy grail of sorts for AI researchers. This win was particularly notable because the match included situations called ko fights which hadn’t arisen in the previous two games. Prior to AlphaGo’s win, other Go experts had speculated that ko situations could prove to be stumbling blocks for the DeepMind program as they had been in the past for other Go computer programs.

“When you watch really great Go players play, it is like a thing of beauty,” said Google co-founder Sergey Brin, himself a self-proclaimed adamant Go player in grad school, after the match. “So I’m very excited that we’ve been able to instill that level of beauty inside a computer. I’m really honored to be here in the company of Lee Sedol, such an incredible player, as well as the DeepMind team who’ve been working so hard on the beauty of a computer.”

(14) PC OR BS? Ethan Mills of Examined Worlds asks “Has Political Correctness Run Amok? Does It Even Exist?”

… I’m tempted to call this “A Prolegomena to Any Future Discourse about Political Correctness.”….

  1. Is political correctness a cut-and-dried free speech issue?  Why is it that many examples of the “political correctness has run amok” narrative involve cases where one group exercises its freedom to speak against ideas or to decide what speech they want to support in their space?  Is this really a threat to free speech in general if it’s limited to a particular space?  Is there a right to tell people what speech to support in their space? Does political correctness threaten free speech in a more fundamental way by making people feel uncomfortable to say certain things at all?  How do we decide what counts as a threat to free speech in general?  Are there some things that just shouldn’t be said in certain contexts?  Should all speech be allowed in all contexts?  If not, how do we decide when it’s permissible to limit speech?  Is there a difference between limiting speech and simply asking people not to say certain things?
  2. What is the difference between political correctness and politeness or basic respect?  Is there a difference?  What happens if what one person calls political correctness another person calls being polite, civil, or respecting the humanity of others?  How do we settle these disputes?  Is it possible that this whole issue is really just based on the feeling that people don’t like being told what to say?  Is it possible or desirable to change that feeling and thus shift the whole narrative on this issue?

(15) PI TIME. Are you getting into MIT? Then expect notification from BB-8. “MIT parodies ‘Star Wars’ for ‘decision day’ announcement”.

The video ultimately reveals that “decision day” for the class of 2020 will take place on March 14, which is also known as “Pi Day”, as 3.14 represents the first 3 digits of pi.

Hopeful applicants will be able to learn whether or not they’ve been accepted to MIT by logging onto the admissions website starting at 6:28 p.m. on Pi Day. This time represents another reference to pi as 6.28 is known as “Tau” or two times pi.

 

[Thanks to John King Tarpinian, Andrew Porter, and JJ for some of these stories. Title credit goes to File 770 contributing editor of the day Hampus Eckerman.]

2015 Sir Julius Vogel Award Nominees

Sir Julius Vogel AwardThe 2015 Sir Julius Vogel Awards shortlist has been released. The awards are given annually by The Science Fiction and Fantasy Association of New Zealand (SFFANZ) to recognize excellence in science fiction and fantasy by New Zealanders and New Zealand residents.

Professional Award Nominees

Best Novel

  • Dreamer’s Pool, Juliet Marillier – Pan MacMillan
  • The Sovereign Hand, Paul Gilbert – Steam Press
  • Engines of Empathy, Paul Mannering – Paper Road Press
  • The Caves of Kirym, Derrin Attwood – Worldly Books
  • The Seventh Friend, Tim Stead
  • Onyx Javelin, Steve Wheeler – HarperCollins, Australia

Best Youth Novel

  • The Caller: Shadowfell, Juliet Marillier – Pan Macmillan
  • Tantamount, Thomas J. Radford – Tyche Books
  • Wee Mac, Linda Dawley – Little Red Hen Community Press
  • Donnel’s Promise, Anna Mackenzie – Longacre Press
  • Watched, Tihema Baker – Huia Press

Best Novella

  • A Mer-Tale, Jan Goldie – Published in Conclave: A Collection of Science Fiction and Fantasy by Leapy Sheep
  • Trading Rosemary, Octavia Cade – Masque Books
  • Ranpasatusan, Shelley Chappell
  • Peach and Araxi, Celine Murray – Published in Conclave: A Collection of Science Fiction and Fantasy by Leapy Sheep
  • The Last Homely Housekeeper, Rolf Luchs
  • In the Spirit, J. C. Hart

Best Short Story

  • “Inside Ferndale” by Lee Murray, SQ Mag, Issue 12, January 2014
  • “The Watch Serpent” by Eileen Mueller, Disquiet, Creativa
  • “Chiaroscuro” by Charlotte Kleft, Disquiet, Creativa
  • “Water” by Lee Pletzers, Disquiet, Creativa
  • “Santa’s Sack” by Simon Fogarty in The Best of Twisty Christmas Tales, Phantom Feather Press

Best Collected Work

  • Lost In The Museum, Phoenix Writers Group, Makaro Press
  • Corpus Delecti, William Cook – James Ward Kirk Publishing
  • Dreams of Thanatos, William Cook – King Billy Publications
  • The Best of Twisty Christmas Tales, A. J. Ponder, E. Mueller and P. Friend (eds) – Phantom Feather Press
  • Write Off Line 2014: They Came In From The Dark, Lauren Haddock and Jessica Harvey (eds) – Tauranga Writers Publishing
  • Beyond The Briar, Shelley Chappell

Best Professional Artwork

  • Cover for Lost In The Museum, Geoff Popham
  • Cover for The Best of Twisty Christmas Tales, Geoff Popham

Best Professional Production/Publication

  • The Hobbit: The Desolation of Smaug, Chronicles: Cloaks and Daggers, Daniel Falconer, Weta Workshop
  • The Hobbit: The Desolation of Smaug, Chronicles: Unleashing the Dragon, Daniel Falconer, Weta Workshop
  • Cosplay New Zealand, Sylvie Kirkman
  • Weta Digital: 20 Years of Imagination On Screen, Clare Burgess with Brian Sibley with the support of Weta Workshop
  • Weta Workshop: Celebrating 20 Years of Creativity, Luke Hawker with the support of Weta Workshop

Best Dramatic Presentation

  • What We Do In The Shadows, Directed by Jemaine Clement and Taika Waititi, Produced by Chelsea Winstanley and Taika Waititi (c) Shadow Pictures 2014
  • The Hobbit: The Battle of the Five Armies, Directed by Sir Peter Jackson
  • Housebound, Directed by Gerald Johnstone

Fan Award Nominees

Best Fan Production / Publication

  • Novazine, Jacqui Smith
  • Phoenixine, John & Lynelle Howell

Best Fan Artwork

  • Keith Smith — for contributions in Novazine
  • Matt Cowens — for “Gorgth Goes Shopping”, Au Contraire 2013 convention book, (carried over from 2014)

Best Fan Writing

  • Rebecca Fisher
  • Jacqui Smith

Best New Talent

  • Tihema Baker
  • Tim Stead
  • A.J. Fitzwater
  • Shelley Chappell
  • William Cook
  • Paul Gilbert

Services To Science Fiction, Fantasy and Horror

  • Eileen Mueller
  • Hugh Cook

2013 Sir Julius Vogel Award Nominees Wanted

SFFANZ, the Science Fiction and Fantasy Association of New Zealand, will be taking nominations for the Sir Julius Vogel Awards for 2013 through March 31. Anybody may nominate —

There is no requirement for the nominator to be of age, of sound mind, or even be a New Zealander, however, the nominator does need to be living. SFFANZ may be liberal minded as to who may nominate, but it is not so licentious as to allow zombies to have their halfpennith-worth.

The inspirational Sir Julius Vogel was a 19th-century Prime Minister of New Zealand. His novel Anno Domini 2000 – A Woman’s Destiny, published in 1889, is the earliest known sf novel by a New Zealander.

Professional nominations can be for novels, short stories, art and others. Fan nominations can be for fanzine, writing, art, Services to Fandom, Services to Science Fiction, etc.

Eligible nominees are works by a New Zealander, or a New Zealand resident, created in 2012. The New Zealander may be someone living out of the country. Published works need to have appeared in New Zealand first.

A detailed nomination FAQ can be found here. SFFANZ maintains a list of eligible professional works here. (I never heard of The Almighty Johnsons before!)

Voting for the awards will take place at the 2013 National SF Convention Au Contraire.

[Thanks To David Klaus for the story.]