Loscon 46 Adds Karl B. Kofoed as Artist GoH

Art by Karl B. Kofoed: “Starliner”

Karl B. Kofoed will be Artist Guest of Honor for Loscon 46, to be held Thanksgiving Weekend (Nov. 29-Dec. 1) at the Marriott Los Angeles Airport Hotel.

Artists, authors, scientists, and fans from around the world will gather for parties, cosplay, and panel around the convention’s theme  “Where Science Fiction Meets Fantasy”.

“Karl Kofoed is probably best known for his Galactic Geographic series that ran in Heavy Metal for many years, and his astonishing planet and starscapes that have adorned numerous book and magazine covers. Karl says this will be his first trip to Los Angeles in 60 years.” Matthew B. Tepper, Loscon 46 Chair said of the Pennsylvania-based artist.

Kofoed steps in for the original invitee who cannot make it for personal reasons.

Loscon’s guest of honor slate also includes award-winning speculative fiction writer Howard Waldrop (The Ugly ChickensNight of the Cooters) and Edie Stern, a fan celebrated for her work at fanac.org, a Fan-history archive as well as other fan community activities around the world.

Hosted by the Los Angeles Science Fantasy Society, the world’s oldest continuously active science fiction and fantasy club (founded 1934), the 46th Loscon this family-friendly gathering includes program with diverse participants such as Steven Barnes, Harry Turtledove, Tananarive Due, Maya Kaathryn Bohnhoff, Tim Powers, and Larry Niven.

Loscon is hosted at the recently redesigned Los Angeles Airport Marriott, located on Century Boulevard near Los Angeles International Airport. Weekend memberships and room reservations are available at discounted rates before the convention. 

For updates, follow Loscon on Facebook, Twitter, and Instagram, and search for #Loscon.

Happy 99th Birthday Bob Madle

1930’s Fan Bob Madle and the slightly younger Fan Curt Phillips; May 1, 2019.

Bob Madle, turns 99 today. A founder of First Fandom, Bob attended the 1936 event in Philadelphia considered by some the first sf convention, went to the first Worldcon in 1939, co-founded the Philadelphia SF Society, was a finalist for the 1956 Best Feature Writer Hugo, won TAFF in 1957, and was Suncon’s (1977) Fan GoH.

By Curt Phillips: I visited Bob at his home two weeks ago just before Corflu 37, which was held in Rockville, MD this year.  Bob is doing very well, and in spite of some health issues over the past couple of years is active, sharp as a tack, and still loving science fiction and fandom as much as ever.  He’s still selling rare science fiction books and magazines too and during my visit I parted with a few hard earned dollars to buy some Wonder Stories and some other magazines that I’d been looking for, but the best part of my visit was to simply sit in Bob’s enormous pulp warehouse and talk about early science fiction with him.  He’s known everybody in science fiction and fandom over the decades and has fascinating stories to tell.  I only had a few hours to visit, but I could have stayed for days. 

First Fandom founder, WWII veteran, science fiction’s master bookseller; Robert A. “Bob” Madle. He was there at Fandom’s beginnings and he’s with us still.

BSFS and Balticon Volunteers
at Work

Fans form a human chain inside the Baltimore Science Fiction Society Building to move out of storage equipment needed to run Balticon, the Maryland Regional Science Fiction and Fantasy Convention.

The 53rd annual Balticon will be held May 24-27 at the Renaissance Baltimore Harborplace Hotel in Baltimore.

The Comet Science Fiction Channel provided t-shirts as a reward for the volunteer’s efforts.

[Thanks to Dale Arnold for the story.]

Corflu FIAWOL Report

Corflu 36 FIAWOL (Rockville, Maryland, May 1-4, 2019)

“They toiled over their crude mimeographs, turning out their magazines.  These magazines have long since crumbled into dust, but who amongst us can ever forget the names?  Grue and Hyphen; Amazing and Astounding; Galaxy and Quandry and The Magazine of Fantasy and Science FictionStartling, Confidential, Infinity, Dimensions—these names will never die!”

                                                                     Robert Bloch, “A Way of Life” (1956)

By Martin Morse Wooster: One of the advantages of living in Washington is that eventually all the branches of fandom you’re interested in will come to you.  I’ve been to three previous Corflus—two held in the Washington suburbs in 1986 and 1994, and the one held in Annapolis, Maryland in 2002.  I always am happy to go to conventions I can get to on the bus, so when I heard Corflu was coming to the Maryland suburbs, I signed up.  I had a good time.

Michael Dobson, with Curt Phillips as second-in-command, organized Corflu 36.  Phillips, among other things, ran a very well stocked con suite, including three kinds of orange marmalade for breakfast.

Members got quite a lot of stuff.  Dobson edited a 163-page fanthology of members’ writings, which is also available on Efanzines.  Some mossbacks grumbled that Dobson used CreateSpace as his publisher, but I thought the book was well done.  Also included in the members’ packet was Thy Life’s A Miracle:  Selected Writings of Randy Byers, a 135-page anthology edited by Luke McGuff.

But that wasn’t all!  We also got a framed print by Dan Steffan, in a limited edition of 90, which showed a nude Japanese woman with creatures on her back that resembled those of British artist Arthur Thomson.  It was a very handsome piece of art, and I will put it on my shelf next to the Star Wars thingie I got at Nationals Park.

The attendance was around 55, with half a dozen fans from the United Kingdom, Murray and Mary-Ellen Moore from Canada, and 10-12 fans from the West Coast.  You could spot the Californians because they were most of the attendees at the wine tasting organized by Spike.

Younger fans allergic to grey hair would not have enjoyed themselves.  Four of the fans attending—Greg Benford, Jim Benford, Steve Stiles, and Ted White—began their fan activity before 1960.  Most attendees began to be fans in the 1970s and 1980s.  No one surveyed became a fan after 1990.

I spent much of the time in the con suite listening to stories about 20th century fan legends.  I heard about the Scottish fan who, after losing a feud with everyone else in his club, dropped out only to appear in the pages of a tabloid completely nude except for a hand coyly placed over his manhood.  The headline of the piece about the fan was ‘IT’S ORGYTASTIC.”

“Do you mean this guy discovered orgy fandom?” I asked.

“No, it was more like orgy con-dom,” said my source, who added that the fan liked showing up at the orgies he organized in a gorilla suit, because women liked sitting on his lap and stroking his fur.

But the story too good to check was whether two Arab sheiks offered to buy Baltimore fan Lee Smoire at Discon II in 1974 for two camels.  This claim would be absurd and ridiculous about any other fan than Lee Smoire, who stories cluster around like gaudy barnacles.  I cite it to add to Lee Smoire’s legend[1].

The first day of Corflu had the opening ceremony, where a sacred box is unearthed that included a crusty bottle of correction fluid or “corflu.”  The convention chooses a guest of honor by pulling a name from the box, but you can opt out of the honor with a $20 donation.  The winner was Jim Benford, who got all the donation money, which he reportedly spent at the fanzine auction on Saturday.  His other prize was a pillow, designed by Alison Scott, which says “Dave Kyle Says You Can’t Sit Here” and has the badge of the Science Fiction League of the 1930s.

Saturday’s program included three panels and I went to two.  A panel on archives featured Non-Stop Press publisher Luis Ortiz, who has just published an anthology of fanzine writings from 1930-1960, Michael Dobson, University of Maryland (Baltimore County) archivist Susan Graham, and Joe Siclari, head of fanac.org.

Susan Graham said that her library bought the fanzine collection of Walter Coslet in 1973 and subsequently acquired the fanzines of Peggy Rae Sapienza, who was graduated from the school.  These fanzines included many of Sapienza’s first husband, Bob Pavlat, a famed collector.  They’ve also gotten some Frank Kelly Freas art and some papers, including manuscripts by Isaac Asimov, Roger Zelazny, and Lawrence Watt-Evans.  They’re still organizing their zines, but their website https://lib.guides.umbc.edu/fanzines has a finding aid and essays on feminist fanzines of the 1970s, fanzines’ role in society, and the Atlanta Science-Fiction Organization fanzine Cosmag.

Fanac.org scanned 2,000 pages of fanzines at Corflu.  Siclari said that he had gotten research requests from unexpected places.  They helped out the recent documentary on Ursula K. Le Guin, for example.  And when the family of fan H.F. Koenig asked for copies of Koenig’s fanzines, they donated a copy of the family genealogy to Fanac.org.

There are also reports of what happened to Harry Warner, Jr.’s fanzine collection.  It is apparently in one piece and is being stored at Heritage Auctions in Dallas.  No one knows what Heritage plans to do with Warner’s collection.

The second panel was on Void, which included the zine’s editors, Greg Benford, Jim Benford, and Ted White, and Luis Ortiz, who is working on an anthology of pieces from the zine.  Void began in 1955, with teenage fans Greg and Jim Benford as editors.  When the Benford brothers moved from Germany to Dallas, Tom Reamy became an editor.

The Benfords put out 13 issues of Void between 1955-58.  But Jim Benford decided to give up fanac for college.  Another catalyst for change was when Kent Moomaw, a columnist for the zine, killed himself on his 18th birthday rather than be drafted.  In 1958 America was at peace, so there was about a 20 percent chance he would be drafted.

Void then moved its headquarters to New York City, and continued with editors including Greg Benford, Ted White, Pete Graham, and Terry Carr.  It lasted another 14 issues through 1962 with a final issue published in 1967.

Both Greg Benford and Ted White said that writing for Void inspired their professional careers.  Greg Benford said that his fan writing prepared him to win a contest sponsored by Fantasy and Science Fiction that launched his career as a novelist.

“All of our fanac was fun because of the challenges we met,” White said.  “I thought Terry (Carr) was a better writer than me, and it was a daily challenge to write to his level.”

Void even had a song, with the music being whatever you’d like.  Here is the first verse.

“We are the Void boys
We make a lot of noise!
We sing songs of fandom
Hitting out at random
Because we are all co-editors of Void.”

Saturday night had two panels.  “Just a Minac,” organized by Sandra Bond, was the fannish version of the British game show “Just a Minute.”  The idea is that the contestants—John D. Berry, Rich Coad, Rob Jackson, and Nigel Rowe—would give one-minute speeches, delivered “without hesitation, repetition, or deviation”—on topics such as “The Nine Billion Names of God” or “My Favorite Beer.”  This was not as easy as its sounds, and I thought it was agreeably silly.  Nigel Rowe seemed the most creative contestant to me, but Rich Coad was the winner.

“The Time Chunnel” was a play by Andy Hooper that described two worlds, one where sf dominated and one where fandom ruled.  In the fannish world, mimeos were much better but leaf blowers didn’t work.  It had plenty of in jokes about fanzines, but also weird popular culture references; if you are excited by references to comedian Durward Kirby, best known as a host of Candid Camera in the early 1960s, “The Time Chunnel” is a play for you.  I didn’t think it worked.  

Since the FAAN Awards have already been covered, I’ll skip them, but I should write about Jim Benford’s guest of honor speech, which was very good.

If Greg Benford’s day job was as a physicist at the University of California (Irvine), his brother worked in technology.  He said that fanzine writing prepared him to write proposals.  “I had the best proposals,” Benford said, saying that fan writing ensured his proposals were better organized than other physicists with less writing experience.

Jim Benford has spent most of his career developing particle beams and other energy weapons.  But three years ago he was given a ten-year contract by billionaire Yuri Milner to design starships.  He now works on solar sails that could guide a future mission to Proxima Centauri.

The problem with solar sails, Jim Benford said, was “The Fearless Fosdick problem.”  Li’l Abner fans will recall that Fearless Fosdick valiantly fought the bad guys until they blasted him full of holes.  How do you create a solar sail that wouldn’t tear apart?  Benford showed how a spherical shape would produce the best outcome.

He said that if someone in 1959 told him that 60 years in the future “I’d be talking to a bunch of fans about starships, I’d be a very happy man.”

Next year’s Corflu will be run by John Purcell in College Station, Texas, in a date to be determined.



[1] The best story I know about Lee Smoire is that, after John Lennon was assassinated in 1980, Yoko Ono asked for a moment of silence to honor him.  Smoire was escorting people around the Baltimore Convention Center and when the designated minute occurred spent the time shouting, “DON’T YOU KNOW YOU’RE SUPPOSED TO BE QUIET?”

After Smoire left Baltimore for Perth, Australia, packed panels at the next two Disclaves told stories about her.

Classics of Science Fiction at Spikecon

By John Hertz:  Spikecon, 4-7 July 2019, will combine two general-interest s-f conventions, Westercon LXXII (West Coast Science Fantasy Conference – oh, all right, it’s been in Colorado and Texas) and the 13th NASFiC (North America Science Fiction Convention, held when the World Science Fiction Convention is overseas), and two special-interest ones, 1632 Minicon and Manticon 2019.  There’s a big tent for us!  Or maybe a geodesic dome. Or a Dyson sphere.

The con is named in honor of the Golden Spike, the last spike driven to join the Central Pacific and Union Pacific creating the Transcontinental Railroad on 10 May 1869, just forty miles from the con site.

We’ll do three Classics of SF discussions, one story each.  Come to as many as you like.  You’ll be welcome to join in.

I’m still with A classic is an artwork that survives its time; after the currents which might have sustained it have changed, it remains, and is seen as worthwhile in itself.  If you have a better definition, bring it.

Here are our three.  I think each is interesting in a different way.  Each may be more interesting now than when originally published.

Kuttner & Moore, “Mimsy Were the Borogoves” (1943)

The authors each said, after they married, anything under their names or their various pseudonyms was by both.  Decades later, Tim Powers is known for explaining the real – i.e. SF – reason for something in history; here’s the real – i.e. SF – reason for something in fantasy; yet even that’s hardly the greatest element.  The title alludes to Lewis Carroll’s Through the Looking-Glass (1871), as we – maybe – eventually understand.

Heinlein, Rocket Ship “Galileo” (1947)

We’ve also come to the golden anniversary of the Glorious 20th, when humankind first set foot on the Moon.  Decades earlier came this speculation.  It isn’t, incidentally, a rocket ship built in a back yard; and as A.J. Budrys used to demand, it answers “Why are they telling us this?”  Nor are these pioneers the first – nor yet the second.

Hoyle, October the First Is Too Late (1966)

This first-rate astronomer – he was knighted six years later – also wrote SF.  In both fields he was famously willing to propose speculations far from others’.  In science one may someday be proved right or wrong; fiction doesn’t work that way.  We might say of this story It’s about time.  Only maybe it isn’t.  Maybe time isn’t.

Nebula Mass Autographing 5/18 Open to Public

SFWA’s Nebula Conference Mass Autographing – open to the public – will be held during the 2019 Nebula Conference on Saturday, May 18 from 1:00 p.m. — 3:00 p.m. in the Warner Center Marriott Woodland Hills Grand Ballroom (21850 W Oxnard St, Woodland Hills, CA 91367).

Over 100 authors will participate —

  • John Joseph Adams
  • Michael Anderle
  • Marie Andreas
  • Liz Argall
  • Barbara Barnett
  • Gregory Benford
  • TJ Berry
  • Laura Blackwell
  • Brooke Bolander
  • Joseph Brassey
  • Jonathan Brazee
  • Rhett C. Bruno
  • Rob Buckman
  • Michael Cassutt
  • Mike Chen
  • Curtis C. Chen
  • Gwendolyn Clare
  • P. Djèlí Clark
  • Neil Clarke
  • Tina Connolly
  • John Peyton Cooke
  • Dan Cray
  • S.B. Divya
  • Cory Doctorow
  • Meghan Ciana Doidge
  • A.K. DuBoff
  • Andy Duncan
  • Scott Edelman
  • Eva L. Elasigue
  • Meg Elison
  • Isaac R. Fellman
  • Sheila Finch
  • Susan Forest
  • Richard Fox
  • Laura Frankos
  • Sarah Gailey
  • William Gibson
  • Laura Anne Gilman
  • Rebecca Gomez Farrell
  • W. L. Goodwater
  • T. Greenblatt
  • Sally Wiener Grotta
  • J. Hackwith
  • Joe Haldeman
  • Rachel Hartman
  • Erin M. Hartshorn
  • Kate Heartfield
  • Alyc Helms
  • Barbara E. Hill
  • José Pablo Iriarte
  • Xia Jia
  • L.S. Johnson
  • James Patrick Kelly
  • Jeffe Kennedy
  • Scott King
  • Mary Robinette Kowal
  • R.F. Kuang
  • Derek Künsken
  • David D. Levine
  • Henry Lien
  • Jenn Lyons
  • Terry Madden
  • PJ Manney
  • Lee Martindale
  • Alastair Mayer
  • Sam J. Miller
  • Mary Anne Mohanraj
  • Tina LeCount Myers
  • Larry Niven
  • Karen Osborne
  • Chrome Oxide
  • Douglas Phillips
  • Palmer Pickering
  • Sarah Pinsker
  • C.L. Polk
  • Daniel Potter
  • Lettie Prell
  • Cat Rambo
  • Rebecca Roanhorse
  • Kelly Robson
  • Lawrence M. Schoen
  • Caitlin Seal
  • Peng Shepherd
  • Elsa Sjunneson-Henry
  • Dave Smeds
  • Rosemary Claire Smith
  • Melinda M. Snodgrass
  • Caitlin Starling
  • Shanna Swendson
  • Rachel Swirsky
  • Christine Taylor-Butler
  • Lauren C. Teffeau
  • R J Theodore
  • Natalia Theodoridou
  • Harry Turtledove
  • Nicole Valentine
  • Greg van Eekhout
  • R.R. Virdi
  • Juliette Wade
  • E.D. Walker
  • Wren Wallis
  • M. Darusha Wehm
  • Yudhanjaya Wijeratne
  • Fran Wilde
  • Connie Willis
  • Gwendolyn Womack
  • William F. Wu
  • Christie Yant
  • Caroline M. Yoachim
  • Joe Zieja

And more!

2019 Windy City Pulp and Paper Convention

Fascinating sff magazine history will be on the program and many great collectibles available to buy at the 2019 Windy City Pulp and Paper Convention in Lombard, IL from April 12-14.

On the first night of the con, Hugo nominee Alec Nevala-Lee will speak about “John W. Campbell & Astounding,” the Pulp Factory Awards will be presented, and a major auction will be held.

The Friday night auction consists of 230 lots of material from the estate of famed collector Robert Weinberg, while the Saturday night auction begins with 100 lots from the estate of Glenn Lord, literary executor for the Robert E. Howard estate, followed by 56 lots from a few other consignors. And more lots will be added to the Saturday night auction at the convention, to include material consigned there by convention attendees.

Among the highlights in this year’s auctions are:

  • The first issue of the legendary pulp, Weird Tales
  • A fine copy of the December 1932 issue of Weird Tales, featuring the first appearance of Robert E. Howard’s immortal barbarian, Conan
  • “The Case Against the Comics” by Gabriel Lynn, an extremely scarce 32 page pamphlet published in 1944 by The Catechetical Guild, advocating the censorship of comics, predating Wertham’s “Seduction of the Innocent” (note that an 8 page version was also published, but this is the full version)
  • H.P. Lovecraft’s “The Shunned House”, printed in 1928 by The Recluse Press but never bound by them, which Glenn Lord later had professionally bound
  • Two of famed SF editor Ray Palmer’s bound copies of the legendary fanzines, Science Fiction Digest and Fantasy Magazine, later signed and inscribed by Julius Schwartz to Bob Weinberg
  • Correspondence from SF author Philip K. Dick, signed by him, with great content regarding his “The Man in the High Castle”
  • A complete bound set of the legendary fanzine, The Fantasy Fan, edited by Charles D. Hornig

The complete auction catalog can be downloaded here.

Friday through Sunday, the dealer room will be buzzing, with roughly 100 dealers from the U.S., Canada and the U.K. displaying pulps, vintage paperbacks, science fiction, fantasy and mystery hardcovers, golden and silver age comics, original illustration art, and movie memorabilia.

Acclaimed artist and pulp enthusiast Mark Wheatley willhave an extensive gallery show. In the spotlight will be his illustrations for Swords Against the Moon Men, part of the new “Wild Adventures of Edgar Rice Burroughs” series published by Edgar Rice Burroughs, Inc.

The inked originals will be framed and presented along with high quality, full size Giclée prints of the digital paintings, offering a unique chance to see the entire set of illustrations for the book in one place. This is made possible because a single collector purchased all the art for the book and is allowing it to be displayed for the public.

The show also will feature artwork from the pulp Planet Stories, pulp and paperback art with a Chicago connection, and a unique display of original photographs featuring pulp authors, artists and publishers.

And Sunday morning will see the new Director of Publishing for Edgar Rice Burroughs, Inc., Christopher Paul Carey, leading a panel on the exciting things planned from ERB, Inc., followed by “New Pulp Sunday,” programming devoted to the vibrant and colorful world of New Pulp organized by Ron Fortier of Airship 27 Productions.

Photos of 2019 LA Vintage Paperback Show

Lots of well-known writers and artists came and signed at last Sunday’s LA Vintage Paperback Show. Robert Kerr shot these photos (below) of some of the participants.

Tonopah in 2021 Westercon Bid

Will Kevin Standlee realize his dream to bring Westercon to Tonopah?

Fresh off hosting the 2018 Worldcon, San Francisco Science Fiction Conventions, Inc. has filed a bid to host the 2021 West Coast Science Fantasy Conference (Westercon 74) in Tonopah, Nevada. With Kevin Standlee as the bid chair, and Bruce Farr as treasurer, they propose to hold the con from July 2-5 at the Tonopah Convention Center and nearby hotels.

In case there are any doubts that they mean business, they reassure everyone:

Tonopah is a serious bid. While the town itself is somewhat smaller than the typical Westercon site, the town has expressed its enthusiasm for hosting us, and we think it has the right mix of facilities to accommodate a small but entertaining and affordable Westercon.

We have filed our bid with Westercon 72 (SpikeCon) in Layton, Utah. You can read our complete filing here.

With site selection voting to take place less than three months from now at SpikeCon (Westercon 72), Tonopah isn’t selling “pre-supporting” memberships — but donations are welcomed.

The bid’s web site is here. Not only is there a wealth of detail about the facilities and local attractions, you’ll find your time repaid by the amusing fanwriting. For example, the myriad transportation options include horse rental (price quoted!), or for those driving, an attractive alternative route:

The primary access to Tonopah is by highways US-95 and US-6; however, there are interesting alternative routes and side trips along the way

From Las Vegas and points south: US-95 north, or take the alternative route via US-93 and the Extraterrestrial Highway and stop by the Little A’Le’Inn. (Convention not responsible for alien abductions or misadventures at Area 51.)

2019 LA Vintage Paperback Collectors Show & Sale on 3/24

Get ready! The Los Angeles Vintage Paperback Collectors Show takes place Sunday March 24 at the Glendale Civic Auditorium (1401 Verdugo Rd.) from 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. Admission is $5.

Each year there are great finds reported by folks who attend the show.  This year, you could be the person telling the story.

There will be over 80 dealer tables. Dealers at the show have been spending the year looking in those other places and are bringing their findings to this show to offer them out.

Get off the internet. Garage sale later. Come to the Paperback Show. It’s an amazing event that happens once a year.

More than 50 authors who will sign their books for free, among them William F. Nolan who has been attending almost as long as the show has existed, with over 30 years of appearances.

Here is the full guest signing schedule.

  •       Peter Atkins ………………………….11am-12pm
  •       Laura Lee Bahr ………………………..10-11am
  •       Ann Bannon ……………………………10-11am
  •       Steven Barnes …………………………2-3pm
  •       Peter Beagle ………………………….10-11am
  •       Gregory Benford ……………………….2-3pm
  •       Paul Bishop …………………………..10-11am
  •       James Blaylock ……………………..Unable to attend
  •       Jason V Brock …………………………11am-12pm
  •       Mary Burgess ………………………….2-3pm
  •       Tracy L. Carbone ………………………12-1pm
  •       Kim Cooper ……………………………2-3pm
  •       John DeChancie  ……………………….1-2pm
  •       Ashley Dioses  ………………………..11am-12pm
  •       L. J. Dopp  …………………………..1-2pm
  •       Kelly Dunn ……………………………2-3pm
  •       Joel Eisenberg ………………………..2-3pm
  •       Dennis Etchison  ………………………1-2pm
  •       Christa Faust  ………………………..2-3pm
  •       Laura Freas …………………………..10-11am
  •       Ray Garton ……………………………1-2pm
  •       Mel Gilden  …………………………..11am-12pm
  •       Tony Gleeson  …………………………1-2pm
  •       Donald Glut  ………………………….1-2pm
  •       Scott Tracy Griffin  …………………..10-11am
  •       Barbara Hambly  ……………………….11am-12pm
  •       Denise Hamilton  ………………………1-2pm
  •       Odie Hawkins  …………………………2-3pm
  •       Gar Anthony Haywood ……………………1-2pm
  •       Stephen Jared …………………………10-11am
  •       Bruce Kimmel  …………………………11am-12pm
  •       Tim Kirk  …………………………….10-11am
  •       Michael Kurland  ………………………12-1pm
  •       Terrill Lee Lankford  ………………….2-3pm
  •       Richard Lupoff  ……………………….12-1pm
  •       Michael Mallory  ………………………12-1pm
  •       R.C. Matheson …………………………11am-12pm
  •       Daniel Keys Moran ……………………..12-1pm
  •       Lisa Morton  ………………………….1-2pm
  •       Larry Niven …………………………..2-3pm
  •       William F. Nolan  ……………………..11am-1pm
  •       Charles Nuetzel  ………………………1-2pm
  •       K. A. Opperman…………………………11:00am
  •       Gary Phillips  ………………………..2-3pm
  •       Felice Picano  ………………………..1-2pm
  •       Richard & Wendy Pini …………………..10am-12pm
  •       David Pollock …………………………12-1pm
  •       Tim Powers  …………………………..11am-1pm
  •       E.F. Robertson ………………………..12-1pm
  •       Art Scott …………………………….12-1pm
  •       Duane Swierczynski……………………..10-11am
  •       Harry Turtledove  ……………………..1-2pm
  •       Stephen Woodworth  …………………….2-3pm
  •       Marc Scott Zicree………………………12-1pm

This year’s show could not have happened without the continuing dedication and energy of Tom Lesser and Rose Idlet, and also John King Tarpinian, Jim Pepper, Lisa Kingsley, and Bob Speray.