Fred Patten Anthology: Exploring New Places

Exploring New Places, edited by Fred Patten, is launching at Anthrocon 2018 in Pittsburgh, PA over the July 4th holiday weekend (July 5-8).  The book can be pre-ordered from FurPlanet Productions.  It will be for sale on the FurPlanet online catalogue afterwards.

Exploring New Places is an all-original anthology of 19 short stories and novelettes of anthropomorphic animals venturing into unfamiliar places, in their own city, on their own world, in space, or in a different dimension.  This anthology is designed to appeal to fans of science-fiction and fantasy.

Whether by the power of music to “send you right out of this world”, or a rabbit spaceship captain searching for the creators of her species; a galactic police agent called to a new planet to solve murders, or alien furries who enter a human university; a gorilla student wandering off in a museum, or two-tailed squirrels confronting interstellar explorers; these are stories for your imagination and entertainment.

Contents:

  • To Drive the Cold Winter Away, by Michael H. Payne
  • In Search of the Creators, by Alan Loewen
  • The Rocky Spires of Planet 227, by Mary E. Lowd
  • Defiant, by Joshua Carpman
  • Why Indeed, by Pepper Hume
  • Come to Todor!, by Fred Patten
  • You Are Our Lifeboat, by Dan Leinir Turthra Jensen
  • The Animal Game, by Vixyy Fox
  • Ashland’s Fury, by MikasiWolf
  • Legacy, by M. R. Anglin
  • Umbra’s Legion: Shamblers of Woe, by Adam Baker
  • Umbra’s Legion: Where Pride Planted, by Geoff Galt
  • Beyond Acacia Ridge, by Amy Fontaine
  • One Day in Hanoi, by Thomas “Faux” Steele
  • Welcome, Furries, by Cathy Smith
  • Back Then, by Frank LeRenard
  • Tortoise Who, by Mary E. Lowd
  • I Am the Jaguar, by Cairyn
  • The Promise of New Heffe, by Kary M. Jomb

Price:  $19.95.  401 pages.  Wraparound cover by Demicoeur.   ISBN 978-1-61450-421-4.

Oh, The Courtrooms You’ll See, The Judges You’ll Meet


ComicMix’s Glenn Hauman has launched a GoFundMe appeal to help defray the legal expenses incurred defending against Dr. Seuss Enterprises’ suit to stop his project Oh, The Places You’ll Boldly Go!

The book features the writing of David Gerrold and the art of Ty Templeton. Dr. Seuss Enterprises (DSE) filed suit in 2016 claiming the publication infringed their copyright and trademark on Dr. Seuss’ Oh the Places You’ll Go! A court ruling in May 2018 disposed of DSE’s trademark claims, but the copyright claims remain to be litigated. And legal help ain’t cheap! As Hauman told me in an email —

I know that you’ve heard, I know that you know,
About “Oh, The Places
You’ll Boldly Go!”
We think it’s fair use
(although maybe we’re biased)
Not just because our
arguments are the slyest.
But we’re fighting a
company with millions of bucks
And we’ve spent most of
ours, which truly just… stinks.

If we lose, then ALL
mashups may go through the thresher
And may be deemed
infringement. (But hey, no pressure.)
The fight’s now upon
us, can’t close the barn door
Lest our loss set a
precedent tough to ignore.
And fair use gets
wrecked in a Weehawken minute
This case is important,
so we have to win it.

And there are many more stanzas in this vein at the GoFundMe page — “Help us produce FAIR USE vs. Seuss!” – which makes it worth reading for its own sake.  The epic ends with this call:

If you care about mashups and value free speech,
If you think free expression’s a value to preach
Then reach in your wallets and give what you will
And help us pay for a quite large legal bill.

Be a copyright fighter! And fight for the right
To research, report, comment, criticize, cite!
Be the fifth factor in our fair use case!
Every dollar contributed buys breathing space!
(Heck, if only this doggerel just made you laugh
Consider donating a buck and a half.)

If you can’t spare some cash, then please spread the word
Get on social media and help us get heard.

Lawsuits are scary and hard to endure,
But if you help us out, then you’re part of the cure.
And for your help countering copyright cranks,
We offer our humble and most grateful thanks.

Science: Improbable, Mythical, Unexpected

Compiled by Carl Slaughter:

  • 10 things that happen in movies that are scientifically improbable

  • Space myths: Astronaut Chris Hadfield

  • Sex on Mars

From Business Insider: “Having sex and reproducing in space comes with serious scientific and ethical problems.”

Being on Mars wouldn’t be exactly like being on the International Space Station, which is where most of this information comes from. But Mars still only has about 38% of the gravity we experience on Earth.

We don’t know how these changes would affect reproductive cells, fertilization, embryonic development, the developing fetus, or growing children.

It’s possible that children born and raised on Mars might have an easier time adapting to the requirements of life there, since it would be the world they would grow up in. But what those adaptations would look like are anyone’s guess.

  • 21 minutes into this video, Michio Kaku explains how sci fi technology enabled Hawking to speak and write.

  • Big Bang Theory

The thesis of this video is that The Big Bang Theory uses reference to science for humor instead of using science itself.  The real humor is in poking fun at characters who make absurd use of science.

Gamer Roundup

Compiled by Carl Slaughter:

Dragon Quest

Dragon Quest XI launched in Japan almost a year ago, but it’s only here at E3 this month that a western release is finally playable. Same old story right? A long-delayed Japanese game takes an age to get through localization, and appears with stilted translations, cheap voiceovers and a sense that this new game is already old.

Wrong. DQXI subverts that. Well, a little. The US release will have voiced characters (the Japanese release had no voice actors), while also adding crucial upgrades like a dash button for your character, and a streamlined interface for smoothly getting your band of quirky allies in order.

Stranger Things

… We don’t have any specifics, but Telltale games tend to follow a fairly standard house style. You probably know what to expect if you’ve played their other games, but it’ll all be new if you haven’t. There will be some clicking, some puzzle solving, and maybe an occasional action sequence where you have to hit buttons really fast or with quick timing.

The Last of Us

The Last of Us has sold over 17 million copies since it was first released back in 2013.

Naughty Dog announced the landmark sales figure — which is current as of April — on Twitter in celebration of the game’s fifth anniversary. The Last of Us originally came out on June 14, 2013, for PlayStation 3 and was ported a year later to PlayStation 4 on July 29, 2014.

Fallout 76

The upcoming Fallout 76 has been officially confirmed as a multiplayer survival shooter, a radical departure from the formula set in Fallout 3 when Bethesda first took over the series. To pretty much no one’s surprise, some gamers have taken issue with that, and 6,000 of them have signed a petition demanding a single-player campaign.

“Keep the Lone Wanderer Wandering Alone” on Charge.org was launched on June 11 and received over 6,000 signatures in just one day. However, concern over the game’s direction began a week before when rumors about the game being a multiplayer title first leaked.

Ready Player One / Iron Giant

Game companies that fell from grace