NYRSF Readings on 4/6/2010

Three YA authors headline the next New York Review of SF reading.

Barry Lyga, who helped develop the “Free Comic Book Day” industry-wide promotion, launched his career as a YA author in 2006 with The Astonishing Adventures of Fanboy and Goth Girl.

Marie Rutkoski’s first YA novel was The Cabinet of Wonders. Her new book, The Celestial Globe, is due out on April 10.

Robin Wasserman has written a science fictional YA series about the difficult “post-human” life of a teen accident victim who is given an artificial body to save her life.

Carol Cooper, the curator for the evening, is a Clarion graduate and spent two decades reviewing music, books and film for The Village Voice.

The full press release appears after the jump.

[Thanks to Jim Freund for the story.]

For immediate release
Contact: Jim Freund
jfreund@hourwolf.com
718-395-7458

            The New York Review of Science Fiction Readings
                                                              presents

                                      Barry Lyga
                                   Marie Rutkoski
                                 Robin Wasserman
                                             Carol Cooper — Guest Curator

     Tuesday, April 6th — Doors open 6:30 PM
     SoHo Gallery for Digital Art
     138 Sullivan Street  (directions and links below)
     $5 suggested donationFor all the years we have offered readings, several of which have been themed, this is only the second time we’ll be specifically targeting the writers as YA novelists.  Carol Cooper has booked a trio of the most interesting writers we’ve ever featured.


Barry Lyga
graduated from Yale with a degree in English, then worked in the comic book industry for ten years. He wrote comics for part of that time, but also was responsible for spearheading and developing “Free Comic Book Day”, the comics’ only industry-wide promotion. During those years, he was a spokesperson for the industry in general, quoted in countless newspaper and magazine articles. In 2006 he launched his career as a YA author with ” The Astonishing Adventures of Fanboy and Goth Girl” and has gone on to publish a diverse range of teen-oriented novels, including the sequel to his debut, titled “Goth Girl Rising”.

Marie Rutkoski earned a degree in English from the University of Iowa followed by a six-month stay in Prague, and then went on to get her  PhD from Harvard in 2006.  She then spent that summer furiously writing her first YA novel *The Cabinet of Wonders* a gloriously steam-punky science fantasy about a girl named Petra Kronos and the dangerous secret behind her father’s astronomical clock.

Robin Wasserman is responsible for the SF-nal YA series spearheaded by “Skinned,”  a book about the difficult “post-human” life of a teen accident victim who is given  an artificial body to save her life. Robin was raised in suburban Philadelphia and got a degree in the History of Science.  Before she became a published novelist she used to edit children’s books about which she says: “This is why I now know more about DragonBall Z, Pokémon, Scooby-Doo, and BIONICLE than anyone over the age of ten should know.”


Carol Cooper went to Wesleyan University and while there also attended the Clarion Writer’s Workshop for Fantasy and Science Fiction. She wrote a novel for her Master’s thesis, then spent the next two decades reviewing music, books and film for the Village Voice and many other national and international publications. She also worked as a talent scout for three different labels in the ’80s and ’90s: as East Coast Director of Black Music A&R for A&M Records,  as National Director of Black Music A&R at CBS/Sony, and as VP of A&R for the English Language division of Soho Sounds/RMM.


The New York Review of Science Fiction Reading Series is celebrating its 20th season of providing performances from some of the best writers in science fiction, fantasy, speculative fiction, etc. The series usually takes place the first Tuesday of every month, but maintains flexibility in time and place, so be sure to stay in touch through the mailing list and the Web.

Admission is by a $5 donation. If circumstances make this a hardship, let us know and we will accommodate you.

Jim Freund is Producer and Executive Curator of The New York Review of Science Fiction Readings. He has been involved in producing radio programs of and about literary sf/f since 1967. His long-running live radio program, “Hour of the Wolf,” broadcasts and streams every Saturday morning from 5:00 to 7:00. Past shows are available “‘on-demand” for about 6 months after broadcast. (Check http://hourwolf.com for details.)

The SoHo Gallery for Digital Art  (www.sohodigart.com)  is dedicated to re-establishing SoHo as an international center for the development of new artistic forms, concepts and ideas.  A screens-instead-of-canvases approach allows a wide selection of art from around the world which would otherwise never make it to the City.  The SGDA is availible for private gatherings and events of all kinds.  For bookings call (800) 420-5590 or visit http://sohogallerynyc.com .

WHEN:
Tuesday, 4/6/10
Doors open at 6:30 — event begins at 7

WHERE:
The SoHo Gallery for Digital Art
138 Sullivan Street  (between Houston & Prince St.)

http://maps.google.com/maps?q=138+Sullivan+St.+New+York+NY+10012 

HOW:
By Subway
6, C, E to Spring St.; A, B D or F to West 4th; 1 train to Houston St; or R, W to Prince St.

There are many convenient bus lines that come within a couple of blocks of the gallery.  Use the link above for an interactive transit map.

LINKS:
http://hourwolf.com/nyrsf
http://nyrsf.com


Coming up:
5/4: Paul Witcover presents
6/1: Gala!


The New York Review of Science Fiction magazine is celebrating its 21st year!
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