Pixel Scroll 10/31/21 I Tell Everyone to Pixel But Everybody Else Scrolls And Dies. O The Embarrassment!

The title may be longer than today’s Scroll!

(1) MERRILL’S TRICK. The Paris Review reaches deep in its bag for this 1982 interview with James Merrill:  “The Art of Poetry No. 31”.

INTERVIEWER

The Ouija board, now. I gather you use a homemade one, but that doesn’t exactly help me to imagine it or its workings. An overturned teacup is your pointer?

 MERRILL

Yes. The commercial boards come with a funny see-through planchette on legs. I find them too cramped. Besides, it’s so easy to make your own—just write out the alphabet, and the numbers, and your yes and no (punctuation marks too, if you’re going all out) on a big sheet of cardboard. Or use brown paper—it travels better. On our Grand Tour, whenever we felt lonely in the hotel room, David and I could just unfold our instant company. He puts his right hand lightly on the cup, I put my left, leaving the right free to transcribe, and away we go. We get, oh, five hundred to six hundred words an hour. Better than gasoline.

(2) VANDERMEER’S TREAT. Jeff VanderMeer celebrates the holiday with “A Short List Of Mistakes Starting With ‘Owl’: A Halloween Story”.

1.

He had a lesson plan for the semester, but I had given him a novel featuring owls that I thought particularly fine and that, as his superior, I had made a strong case for to the exclusion of all else….

(3) VERSE FOR TODAY. A Halloween Poetry link courtesy of the Paris Review: “History”.

(4) KEEP UP WITH YOUR HUGO READING. The Hugos There podcast discusses the 2021 Best Novelette finalists with Cora Buhlert, Sarah Elkins, Olav Rokne of the Hugo Book Club Blog, Juan Sanmiguel and Ivor Watkins. The audio is here. The video is here –

(5) JUST BECAUSE IT’S JUNE. Tawana Watson considers “The Poetic Power of Nostalgia” at SPECPO, the official blog of the Science Fiction and Fantasy Poetry Association.

…A poet I have found that inspired nostalgia and the subsequent emotional reaction within myself is David C. Kopaska-Merkel with his poem “June Lockhart’s Recurring Nightmare” appearing in Asimov’s Science Fiction Magazine. The first thing that grabbed my attention was the name within the poem, June Lockhart. June Lockhart is an actress that appeared in many television shows that I watched while growing up. Seeing just the name, June Lockhart, brought me back to Saturday morning, sitting on the floor in front of the television with my brother, eating Count Chocula cereal watching Lost in Space, one of June Lockhart’s popular television shows. On the title alone, I wanted to dive into the poem to see what the poet, Kopaska-Merkel, was writing about. The second thing that grabbed my attention was the vivid visuals of the scenery within the poem….

(6) ZOOMING WITH BLACKFORD. SPECPO also presents “An Interview with Jenny Blackford”, 2021 Rhysling Award winner, conducted by Lauren Frosto.

LRF: Can you tell me a little about the poem that won the Rhysling for the Long Form Category, “Eleven Exhibits in a Better Natural History Museum, London.” 

JB: It came about because of my husband. My other muse, Felix [Jenny’s cat], is not sufficient as a muse, though he is my “mews”. A couple of years back, my husband Russell and I were in London on our way to the World Science Fiction Convention in Dublin, and our activity for the day was visiting the Natural History Museum, London, which is a wonder of the world. Because it was a public holiday, we were standing in the sun in a line that just snaked around and around going nowhere for hours and we started talking about what we were going to see when we finally got inside. My husband said something like, well there might be an emerald the size of a whale, and it went from there. Since he threw up some possibilities and I elaborated, he gets 10% of my sales for this. You’ve got to reward your muse.

(7) MEDIA BIRTHDAY.

2000 – Twenty-one years ago, Gen¹³ premiered. If you’re scratching your head for not remembering this film, relax as it wasn’t one of the major films that year. It was based on the Gen¹³ series that was published by WildStorm Productions, a subsidiary of DC Comics. WildStorm Productions was founded by Jim Lee, currently the Publisher and Chief Creative Officer of DC Comics. 

It was directed by Kevin Altieri, and produced by Jim Lee, Karen Kolus and John Nee. The screenplay by Kevin Altieri and Karen Kolus from a story by Jim Lee, Brandon Choi and J. Scott Campbell, the latter better known for his own Danger Girl series. The Gen¹³ series was by the trio who wrote the story.

Voice cast was Alicia Witt, John de Lancie, E.G. Daily, Flea, Cloris Leachman, Lauren Lane and Mark Hamill. 

It apparently is not available in the United States because The Mouse considers it an advertisement for DC Comics and won’t release it here. It is available in Europe. That being said, audience reviewers at Rotten Tomatoes currently give it a rather excellent eighty four percent rating.

(8) TODAY’S BIRTHDAYS.

[Compiled by Cat Eldridge.]

  • Born October 31, 1923 Arthur W. Saha. A member of the Futurians and First Fandom who was an editor at Wollheim’s DAW Books, including editing the annual World’s Best SF from 1972 to 1990 and Year’s Best Fantasy Stories from 1975 to 1988. And he’s credited with coming up with the term “Trekkie” in 1967. (Died 1999.)
  • Born October 31, 1936 Michael Landon. Tony Rivers inI Was a Teenage Werewolf. (That film made two million on an eighty thousand dollar budget. Nice.) That and lead as Jonathan Smith in Highway to Heaven are, I think, his only genre roles. (Died 1991.)
  • Born October 31, 1946 Stephen Rea, 75. Actor who’s had a long genre history starting with the horror films of Cry of the BansheeThe Company of Wolves (from the Angela Carter short story)and The Doctor and the Devils. He’d later show up Interview with the VampireThe MusketeerFeardotComV for VendettaUnderworld: AwakeningWerewolf: The Beast Among Us and Ruby Strangelove Young Witch. He has the role of Alexander Pope in the most excellent Counterpart series.
  • Born October 31, 1958 Ian Briggs, 63. He wrote two Seventh Doctor stories, “Dragonfire” and “The Curse of Fenric”, the former of which of which introduced Ace as the Doctor’s Companion. (The latter is one on my frequent rewatch list.) He novelized both for Target Books. He would write a Seventh Doctor story, “The Celestial Harmony Engine” for the Short Trips: Defining Patterns anthology. 
  • Born October 31, 1959 Neal Stephenson, 62. Some years back, Longfellow Books had a genre book group. One of the staff who was a member of that group (as was I) took extreme dislike to The Diamond Age: Or, A Young Lady’s Illustrated Primer. I don’t remember now why but it made me re-read that and Snow Crash. My favorite novel by him by far is The Rise and Fall of D.O.D.O. which he did with Nicole Galland and I’ve got the sequel, The Master of Revels, done with her as well, on the to-be-listened-to list. 
  • Born October 31, 1961 Peter Jackson, 60. I’m going to confess that I watched and liked the first of the Lord of The Rings film but got no further than that. I was never fond of The Two Towers as a novel so it wasn’t something I wanted to see as a film, and I like The Hobbit just fine as a novel thank you much. Now the Adventures of Tintin is quite excellent indeed. The Fellowship of The Ring won the Hugo for Best Dramatic Presentation at  ConJosé, The Two Towers likewise at Torcon 3 and, no surprise, The Return of The King did so at Noreascon 4.
  • Born October 31, 1979 Erica Cerra, 42. Best known as Deputy Jo Lupo on Eureka, certainly one of the best SF series ever done. She had a brief recurring role as Maya in Battlestar Galactica, plus the artificial intelligence A.L.I.E. and her creator Becca in The 100. Her most recent genre role was a recurring one as Duma on Supernatural. She also showed up in Blade: Trinity as the goth Vixen Wannabe, and in Percy Jackson & the Olympians: The Lightning Thief in the plum role of Hera.
  • Born October 31, 1993 Letitia Wright, 28. She co-starred in Black Panther playing Shuri, King T’Challa’s sister and princess of Wakanda.  (Yes, she is in both Avengers films.) Before that, she was Anahson in “Face the Raven”, a Twelfth Doctor story, and was in the Black Mirror’s “Black Museum” episode. She has a recurring role as Renie in Humans, a Channel 4 SF series. It is based off Äkta människor (Real Humans), a Swedish series. 

(9) COMICS SECTION.

  • Tom the Dancing Bug visits Counter-Earth.
  • The Far Side has a horrifying sight at baggage claim.
  • Six Chix has a mildly amusing mashup.
  • Blondie finds lots of familiar faces at the door on Halloween.
  • Grant Snider’s Incidental Comics features “Spooky Stories.”

(10) PRESENT AT THE CREATION. Pioneering women horror artists receive their due in the Saturday Evening Post’s “The Women Who Built the Horror Genre”.

…[Margaret] Brundage is just one of a number of women creators who helped develop the horror genre. June Tarpé Mills was another pioneer, but she had to drop her first name when signing her work in order to create a masculine sounding pen name. Best known for creating the early female action hero Miss Fury (who some argue is the first female superhero), she also created “The Purple Zombie,” one of the earliest ongoing horror characters in comics. Mills’s horror resume also includes “The Vampire” and “The Ivy Menace,” two horror tales that appeared during the late 1930s, well before horror comics gained widespread popularity. “The Vampire” even included a twist ending—an uncommon device for comics at the time, but which became a staple of EC horror comics by the 1950s and in cinema decades later….

(11) THE MEANING OF IT ALL. [Item by Joel Zakem.] The Scroll has run a few pieces on Zukerberg’s Meta, so you might be interested that in Hebrew, Meta can apparently be translated as “she is dead.” The Forward elaborates in “Meta means ‘is dead’ in Hebrew. Discuss.”

…On Thursday, Mark Zuckerberg unveiled the new name for Facebook to mark its transition to what he calls “the metaverse.” The name, which is, perhaps unsurprisingly, Meta, doesn’t translate well. Unless that’s the point.

While the word, now applied to such narratively self-aware works as “Adaptation” and “Deadpool,” derives from the Greek prefix meaning “after” or beyond,” and indicates something that transcends the word it latches onto (think metaphysics), in Hebrew the word “Meta” is the feminine form of “is dead.” Don’t just take my word for it!…

(12) THE FIRST THING WE SHOULD SAY. [Item by JeffWarner.] When Scotty shouted “There Be Whales” this became genre: “Are We on the Verge of Chatting with Whales?” in Hakai Magazine. (“Dolphins as practice for First Contact” is my go-to panel topic.) We should probably apologize…

“I don’t know much about whales. I have never seen a whale in my life,” says Michael Bronstein. The Israeli computer scientist, teaching at Imperial College London, England, might not seem the ideal candidate for a project involving the communication of sperm whales. But his skills as an expert in machine learning could be key to an ambitious endeavor that officially started in March 2020: an interdisciplinary group of scientists wants to use artificial intelligence (AI) to decode the language of these marine mammals. If Project CETI (for Cetacean Translation Initiative) succeeds, it would be the first time that we actually understand what animals are chatting about—and maybe we could even have a conversation with them….

(13) WHAT MUSIC THEY MAKE. In the Washington Post, Alexandra Petri has suggestions for your Halloween music playlist. “The 50 best Halloween songs for your party playlist”. There’s a reason this is on the bottom of her list:

50. “The Wobblin’ Goblin,” by Rosemary Clooney: I am only sorry that by virtue of mentioning this song for this list, I may have made people aware of this song who previously weren’t. Your life may be going well; it may be going poorly; one thing I will guarantee is that hearing “The Wobblin’ Goblin” will make it worse. I hesitate to throw around phrases like “a crime against all reason and civilization,” but this song has no redeeming characteristics whatsoever yet still immediately gets stuck in your head. The universe it sets up makes no sense, one in which goblins are riding around on broomsticks but also responsive to air-traffic control, and buying an airplane is a logical solution to having a broken broom. Why wouldn’t the goblin just buy another broom that wasn’t broken? Was this sponsored by Big Air Travel?

[Thanks to Andrew Porter, Michael Toman, Cat Eldridge, Joel Zakem, JeffWarner, Cora Buhlert, Daniel Dern, Mike Kennedy, Martin Morse Wooster, JJ, and John King Tarpinian for some of these stories. Title credit belongs to File 770 contributing editor of the day Rob Thornton.]

48 thoughts on “Pixel Scroll 10/31/21 I Tell Everyone to Pixel But Everybody Else Scrolls And Dies. O The Embarrassment!

  1. Andrew (not Werdna) says I need to catch up on Stephenson – I’m a few (thick) books behind.

    If you’ve not yet encountered it, the The Rise and Fall of D.O.D.O is that rare Stephenson novel that actually has a sense of both fun and humor to it. I’m hoping the sequel has that too.

  2. 12
    While I agree an apology from us is a solid start, I wonder if we can collectively handle the consequences of a conversation with any other species of Earth. I mean, some people can countenance anything, but for millions of people stricken by the current extinction rate and climate change and global consumer society…I’m not sure there’s good news.

    There’s an old Mark Geston story, The Allies, that comes to mind. Probably dogs would vouch for us and try to buck up our spirits, but whales, elephants, beavers, ants, spiders, buffalo, waterfowl, raptors, hell, fish, birds, insects, mammals, trees. Maybe rats, roaches, corn, and poison ivy would put in a good word, game respecting game and all.

  3. Fifth?

    8) I did like Jackson’s Mortal Engines adaptation; shame we’ll never get another. And I liked his King Kong rather more than it probably deserves.

  4. Whew! I managed to finish my Hugo reading and voting. I set too high an expectation of what I could/would want to do and it really interfered with my reading of current stuff.

    Still, as usual, it’s always worthwhile as I find all sorts of things I missed the previous year that I’m glad to have a chance to catch up on.

    One of the pleasant surprises for me this year was the Long Form DP finalist “Palm Springs.” The trailers hadn’t sold me on it last year but I ended up liking it a lot.

  5. Lorien Gray: One of the pleasant surprises for me this year was the Long Form DP finalist “Palm Springs.” The trailers hadn’t sold me on it last year but I ended up liking it a lot.

    Ditto! And I’m not at all a fan of superhero movies, but since The Old Guard was given to us for free, I watched it – and I really, really liked it (and it moved way up my ballot). Huge props to the filmmakers and distributor for letting us have it for free. I hope this is something more film directors/distributors will give us in the future.

  6. @JJ: Yes, I liked The Old Guard more than I expected too. I hope more studios let us have screeners in the future.

    Sadly, I liked Birds of Prey less than expected but that wasn’t Margot Robbie’s fault as I thought her performance was good. But the composition of the stunt scenes was a problem. I don’t know whether to blame the DP, the director or the stunt choreographer.

  7. Brown Robin on October 31, 2021 at 6:40 pm said:

    12) While I agree an apology from us is a solid start, I wonder if we can collectively handle the consequences of a conversation with any other species of Earth.

    Every time I read an article about Cetacean communication I’m reminded of a old SF short story positing all the world’s sea creatures turn against the human race and sabotage all forms of shipping. Land-based activities are safe, but without oil tankers or fishing things get unpleasant (especially in Japan) relatively quickly.

    A sincere apology is where we start. Answering their question “Why did you kill…?” will be much tougher.

    CodStalk!

  8. Happy birthday to Stephen Rea. Is it genre adjacent that he played Niels Bohr, opposite Daniel Craig as Heisenberg, in the film version of “Copenhagen”? Good movie, despite Rea’s lack of resemblance of Bohr.

    (12) As to talking to whales, a running joke/theme in Suzette Haden Elgin’s The Judas Rose is the government’s efforts to force communication with whales. The whales decline.

  9. Meredith moment: R F Kuang’s The Burning God Is 99p on amazon.co.uk – a few days after I bought it.

    I seem to remember some buzz about She Who Became the Sun by Shelly Parker-Chan and that’s 99p, too.

    Katherine Addison’s The Witness for the Dead is there (bought!)

    A bunch of other stuff including The Illustrated Gormenghast, Alistair Reynolds Revenger (got it in an earlier deal) and Paul McAuley’s War of the Maps (likewise).

  10. Paul King on November 1, 2021 at 1:32 am said:
    Meredith moment: R F Kuang’s The Burning God Is 99p on amazon.co.uk – a few days after I bought it.

    I seem to remember some buzz about She Who Became the Sun by Shelly Parker-Chan and that’s 99p, too.

    Katherine Addison’s The Witness for the Dead is there (bought!)

    A bunch of other stuff including The Illustrated Gormenghast, Alistair Reynolds Revenger (got it in an earlier deal) and Paul McAuley’s War of the Maps (likewise).

    I checked out the Kuang book and I see that it is titled on Amazon as “The Burning God: Tik Tok showed me this award-winning historical fantasy trilogy”. What is that about? Kind of puts me off purchasing.

    Strong recommend from me for War of the Maps.

  11. it is titled on Amazon as “The Burning God: Tik Tok showed me this award-winning historical fantasy trilogy”

    A fair few books on Amazon use subtitles for heavy-handed category marketing — either they want you to know they’re the OMG laugh-out-loud feelgood romance of the year or that they’re full of heartstopping twists that you won’t see coming, usually.

  12. I hate those heavy-handed marketing subtitles. It makes me significantly less likely to take a chance on a book by an author I don’t know.

  13. (7) If I understand the Wikipedia article correctly, the “Gen13” film went into production with Disney before DC Comics bought WildStorm, thus explaining why the film wasn’t made for Warner Bros. in the first place.

  14. I checked out the Kuang book and I see that it is titled on Amazon as “The Burning God: Tik Tok showed me this award-winning historical fantasy trilogy”. What is that about? Kind of puts me off purchasing.

    I just check the Amazon listing and was not presented with such a subtitle.

  15. It looks like the Tik Tok subtitle is on the amazon.co.uk versions in particular. Which is still weird.

  16. Joshua K. says If I understand the Wikipedia article correctly, the “Gen13” film went into production with Disney before DC Comics bought WildStorm, thus explaining why the film wasn’t made for Warner Bros. in the first place.

    Correct. And now The Mouse, and we know how well He plays with others, refuses to make it available for viewing here and possibly anywhere else. Nasty creature that Mouse is.

  17. When I was in elementary school in the 1960’s we had sheet music for this and the Wobblin Goblin on the Broken Broom and the teachers had the class sing it. I always wanted to find it after I grew up and never could find it. Thank you as it might not be great music, but I have for years missed it for some reason…

  18. The Wobblin’ Goblin has been played regularly by Dr. Demento for many years (and in fact was in the show he released for streaming last Saturday).

    I was surprised at the WaPo’s writer’s limitations in what she viewed as “Halloween Music”.

  19. @Cat Eldridge

    Just finished Master of the Revels and it has the same quitky humour as the first book and reading it is a breeze. However, while in the first one a lot of stuff happend in this one there are just like 3 adventures that are being told. The overall plot hardly advances, which is probbaly the curse of the 2nd book in a series (I dont know if this is meant for being a triology or longer).
    Overall a 4/5 for me for that reason. But its a light, breezy read and if you liked the first one, there is a high chance that you like this one as well 🙂
    (I was hesitant as well, because I dont know how much Stephgenson was in the 1st. Having read the 2nd I assume he did plotting and characters – imho his absolute strength- and Gallant did most of the writing. But thats just a theory of course 🙂

    I scrolled this pixel FIVE TIMES and all I got was this lousy scroll title

  20. John Lorentz: She could have replaced several of her inappropriate choices (Zombie by the Cranberries? Really…) just with songs about ghosts, several of which are fairly mainstream in their genres. Ghost Riders in the Sky? If somehow you don’t like Johnny Cash, I can think of versions from everyone from Fred Penner to Christopher Lee. The Long Black Veil (Which, sure, the Chieftains aren’t mainstream unless you’re into folk at all, but the album broke out of its category to be a minor pop hit as well, and the song featured Mick Jagger.)?

  21. @ Leonora Rose

    BTW, Long Black Veil is actually a US country song written in 1959 and it was first performed by Lefty Frizzell. This startled me because the first time I heard it was on Nick Cave’s covers album Kicking Against The Pricks and it definitely had a Child ballad feel to it.

  22. The Amazon adding descriptions to names a tad ridiculous sometimes. Sometimes? I mean pretty much always

    The Obelisk Gate: The Broken Earth, Book 2, WINNER OF THE HUGO AWARD (Broken Earth Trilogy)

  23. She walks these files in a long, black scroll
    Visits my pixel when “please notify me” tolls

  24. @rob_matic it’s not even the only book they’ve put that subtitle on.

    And I think it’s rather silly. The Burning God is the concluding part of a trilogy. Anybody who starts with it will probably be disappointed, anybody who’s read the previous books doesn’t need that heavy-handed marketing,

  25. But I also assume that’s something being done by Amazon, not the publisher or the author, so a bit different than all of the self-published books with titles like “Shadow Nights : An Exciting Urban Harem Fantasy”, where the keywords are part of the actual title.

  26. Alexandra Petri led me to this Halloween playlist of great old Halloween songs, most of which were new to me, including songs by Cab Calloway and Louis Armstrong,

    It;s on You Tube as “Hallow’s Eve: A Vintage Music Playlist’

  27. John Lorentz: She could have replaced several of her inappropriate choices (Zombie by the Cranberries? Really…) just with songs about ghosts, several of which are fairly mainstream in their genres.

    I thought the strangest choice was “Day-O” (which is actually “The Banana Boat Song”) by Harry Belafonte, simply because it was used in Beetlejuice. (A song should at least have references to some Halloween-ish icons or events to be a Halloween song.)

  28. rob_matic: I checked out the Kuang book and I see that it is titled on Amazon as “The Burning God: Tik Tok showed me this award-winning historical fantasy trilogy”. What is that about? Kind of puts me off purchasing.

    All three of Kuang’s books in that series have that subtitle on Amazon UK. That sort of ham-handed marketing attempt just makes me roll my eyes. If that’s the audience they’re going for, then I know the book isn’t for me. 🙄

  29. peer: I dont know how much Stephgenson was in the 1st. Having read the 2nd I assume he did plotting and characters – imho his absolute strength- and Gallant did most of the writing.

    That was my exact perception of D.O.D.O. – that Stephenson had done the outline, and Galland did the actual writing, because the writing was much tighter than Stephenson’s recent excesses *cough*Seveneves*cough*.

    But I’m not planning on reading any more in that series, because the first one had some plot holes and it became apparent to me that they’re just setting it up as a franchise for endless sequels.

  30. At least the author is aware that Zombie is horrifically inappropriate for Halloween beyond the title, which is more than I can say for Zach Snyder, who used it on the soundtrack of his recent zombie film.

  31. JJ on November 1, 2021 at 7:19 pm said:

    All three of Kuang’s books in that series have that subtitle on Amazon UK. That sort of ham-handed marketing attempt just makes me roll my eyes. If that’s the audience they’re going for, then I know the book isn’t for me. ?

    Yeah, rightly or wrongly, I tend to assume that kind of marketing has a negative correlation with quality.

  32. Having just had to go through and manually download a bunch of ebooks due to a kindle fail, I can attest that many, many books have some sort of marketing spiel tagged onto the end of their titles, and it has absolutely nothing whatsoever to do with the book or its quality or, for that matter, the appropriateness of the tagline to the book.

    The sum total of their use is that they’ll generally tell you whether whateveritis has won or been nominated for an award, but even then, booktok might win the marketingbrain battle. (And “: A Novel” is popular to the point of absurdity. Did you… have nothing else to say about this book than its length? Really?)

  33. Meredith: “: A Novel” is popular to the point of absurdity. Did you… have nothing else to say about this book than its length? Really?

    That one always baffles me, too. Are they afraid people are going to mis-take the book as being non-fiction? Do they think adding “: A Novel” makes the book look more “literary” and important? If they think that label is needed, shouldn’t they re-visit the synopsis and re-write it so that it does a better job making clear what the book is?

  34. @JJ

    I’ve been assuming that the ones with that tag were caught up in the overall everything-must-have-a-tagline rush, but without having won or been nominated for an award or getting a lot of attention elsewhere in big-name reviews, booktok, booktube, etc, to have something more interesting to say.

    I don’t know if even the award ones (which were the first ones to start turning up) work for marketing for the average reader. They just make the titles harder to scan through at a glance for me. I won’t judge the book, because I’ve read plenty of perfectly good books which have since had them inflicted upon them, but I do judge whoever decided to add the dratted things a little bit.

  35. “: A Novel” is popular to the point of absurdity.

    I’m reminded of Damon Knight’s Humpty Dumpty: An Oval.

  36. John A Arkansawyer: This is where I presumed the habit started: When a lit-fic writer names their novel “A Field Guide to Western Butterflies” (or whatnot) it’s probably good to append “: A novel”

    When it appears after a title like “An Elegant Capo” or “Sunlight Glowing on Sundry Things” (IE, the sort of lit-fic title that screams “I am Lit-Fic!”) and certainly after a title like “Death on Nicollet Mall” or “The Dragons of the Night War of John Scalzi” where not only the fictional nature of the book, but the genre is obvious, it seems, let’s say, redundant and a bit absurd.

  37. Yes, it would certainly make sense there, but that isn’t a use-case that applies to any of the titles I’ve seen it appended to. I doubt it would have stood out to me much if the reason was that clearly sprung from the title!

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