Pixel Scroll 12/12/20 The Self-Pixeling Scroll

Self-Pixeling Scroll

By JJ: Today it’s a Do-It-Yourself Scroll. Please post in comments links to items which you feel would be of interest to Filers.

40 thoughts on “Pixel Scroll 12/12/20 The Self-Pixeling Scroll

  1. CBR.com reports that Disney and African entertainment company Kugali plan to collaborate on an animated science fiction show named Iwájú, which will be aired on Disney+:

    Disney revealed Iwájú and offered potential audiences a first look at concept art, showcasing an afrofuturism-inspired world as well as the series’ characters. While further details concerning those characters or the upcoming show’s plot were not provided, Disney did state that Iwájú will be available for streaming in 2022.

  2. Eight years ago, Alex Cox as a student at the University of Colorado at Boulder did a film version of Harry Harrison’s Bill the Galactic Hero. It was released two years later. It is supposedly available on DVD but I couldn’t find it on Amazon.

    Just watched episode five of Picard in which the murder count was quite high.

  3. “An unidentified clothing brand recently made headlines after one of its representatives reached out to an American author for endorsement. However, Ursula K Le Guin, who they approached had passed away two years ago. A screenshot of the letter which was shared on social media has elicited amused responses from netizens. ”

    https://flip.it/SlpZDN

  4. So apparently I share a birthday (12/12) with Karl Edward Wagner? Or am I confused? Some sources are showing 12/12 and others are showing 12/04.

  5. Joe H. asks So apparently I share a birthday (12/12) with Karl Edward Wagner? Or am I confused? Some sources are showing 12/12 and others are showing 12/04.

    His tombstone says the former, so we’ll assume that it’s accurate. ISFDB alludes to inaccurate sources for his birthdate happening early on.

  6. lurkertype says Are they going to pay the creators properly?

    Unlike the matter of Alan Dean Foster where Disney is attempting to break the law, they’re dealing with standard contract law here. If a writer doesn’t like the contract Disney offers, they don’t agree to work for them. It’s that simple.

  7. Today is Ginjer Buchanan’s birthday!

    Her role as editor at Ace/Roc resulted in a lot of the early (and later) SFF books I read, and I have real gratitude for her 30 years of work there.

  8. Today is also the birthday of Toni Weisskopf, Baen Books Editor, who is the Editors Guest of Honor at Discon III. This her fourteenth year as Editor in Chief of Baen Books.

  9. This is a long clip below–ten minutes–and it isn’t until five minutes in that you get to the reason I post it here. I found it all funny, but this link is set to take you straight to the part you really want to see. Trust me on that.

    The premise is that the writers make up bad jokes, then think up “kick ass” popsicle-stick based graphics to redeem them. As you’ll notice if you watch from the start instead of jumping to the payoff, the graphics get progressively more elaborate as the jokes get progressively more mediocre, until we have this:

    https://youtube.com/exPAh0wAqA8

  10. More Philip K. Dick ebooks on sale: Lies Inc, an expansion of The Unteleported Man, is $1.99 at the usual places.

  11. I have a theory that when Alec Guinness called George Lucas Paul, he was accessing an alternate reality (he’s a Jedi after all).

    “I have been offered a movie (20th Cent. Fox) which I may accept, if they come up with proper money. London and N. Africa, starting in mid-March. Science fiction—which gives me pause—but it is to be directed by Paul [sic] Lucas who did American Graffiti, which makes me feel I should. Big part. Fairy-tale rubbish but could be interesting perhaps.”

    The existence of a George Lucas & Paul Lucas implies the existence of a John Lucas & a Ringo Lucas. I wonder what their versions of Star Wars would have been like?

  12. @Soon Lee:
    You are on to something! John Meredyth Lucas was director / writer / producer of several Star Trek TOS episodes.

  13. Experimenter Publishing released its anthology on the future of policing – No Police = Know Future yesterday.
    Edited by James Beamon, the anthology features stories intended to explore alternative means for policing and showcase the genre’s thought-experiment roots.

    Read more about it here; available on Amazon in print and electronic editions.

  14. I’m listening right now to Seanan McGuire’s Indexing series which is made even better by being narrated by Mary Robinette Kowal who’s one of my favorite narrators. I’m hoping that she does more in this series. After these stories, I’m going to listen her to Sparrow Hill tales.

  15. Bill McKibben wrote such a thoughtful review of Kim Stanley Robinson’s “Ministry of the Future,” in the Dec 17th New York Review of Books. link He reflects on the moral hazard of caring less about our own planet (by creating interstellar myths) and that the only catastrophe we can’t survive is extinction. Anybody else enjoy this article?

    Meanwhile, happy New Moon, Total Eclipse, Solstice, and planetary conjunction! I can hear the shuffling of tarot decks everywhere.

  16. Parts of the F&SF web site have been down for days. There is a forum database error and the contact us doesn’t work. Also, the latest blog entry is July 2012, although the covers look up to date.

  17. Soon Lee asks,”The existence of a George Lucas & Paul Lucas implies the existence of a John Lucas & a Ringo Lucas. I wonder what their versions of Star Wars would have been like?”

    We all live in a yellow Millennium Falcon

  18. Soon Lee: John Lucas’ version of Star Wars would be like Doctor Who – because it would have been filmed by a Quarry, man.

  19. Soon Lee: The existence of a George Lucas & Paul Lucas implies the existence of a John Lucas & a Ringo Lucas. I wonder what their versions of Star Wars would have been like?”

    Baby, You Can Drive My Death Star

  20. @James Davis Nicoll: That bears a reasonable resemblance to the novel I read and enjoyed. I do want to add one thing:

    Interestingly for a book of this era, not only is there a surprising amount of sympathy for the Naqsan perspective (Mundomar is reportedly Anderson’s take on the Israel-Palestine conflict), but there is also sympathy for the civilization-dooming barbarians. They aren’t a faceless ravening horde; they’re just a bunch of desperate people led by someone who has put a lot of thought into how best to save as many of his people as he can.

    That’s fairly common for Anderson. He was quite good at creating sympathetic antagonists and protagonists aware of the harms their choices caused.

  21. John A Arkansawyer says That’s fairly common for Anderson. He was quite good at creating sympathetic antagonists and protagonists aware of the harms their choices caused.

    Indeed there is. My favorite novel by him, Orion Shall Rise, is made ever so rich by his ability to do this. I so wish this had been done as an audiobook.

    Now listening to Seanan McGuire’s Indexing
    Now reading Poul Anderson’s The Queen of Air and Darkness

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