Pixel Scroll 5/8/19 Only The True Pixel Denies His Scrollability!

(1) KAY Q&A. “A Collision of History and Memory: Guy Gavriel Kay Discusses His New Novel A Brightness Long Ago at the B&N Sci-Fi & Fantasy Blog.

In a letter you wrote that was attached by the publisher to advance copies of A Brightness Long Ago, you note that we are psychologically and neurologically programmed to internalize the memories from our teens until our mid-twenties more intensely than any other time of life, a fact that is an underpinning to this book. Do you care to expand on that thought?
There’s a wry aspect to this, as my psychoanalyst brother (to whom this book is dedicated) mentioned this to me 15 or so years ago! When I started writing this novel, using as one of the point of view characters—a man looking back on events form his twenties that loom large for him—that conversation came back from my memory! I asked my brother and he sent some scholarship on the subject.

(2) WATCHMEN TEASER. Time is running out – but for what?

Tick tock. Watchmen debuts this fall on HBO. From Damon Lindelof, Watchmen is a modern-day reimagining of Alan Moore’s groundbreaking graphic novel about masked vigilantes.

(3) NEW RUSS PROFILE. Gwyneth Jones, winner of two World Fantasy Awards, the Arthur C. Clarke Award, and the SFRA Pilgrim award for lifetime achievement in SF criticism, will have a new book out in July — Joanna Russ (University of Illinois Press).

Experimental, strange, and unabashedly feminist, Joanna Russ’s groundbreaking science fiction grew out of a belief that the genre was ideal for expressing radical thought. Her essays and criticism, meanwhile, helped shape the field and still exercise a powerful influence in both SF and feminist literary studies.

Award-winning author and critic Gwyneth Jones offers a new appraisal of Russ’s work and ideas. After years working in male-dominated SF, Russ emerged in the late 1960s with Alyx, the uber-capable can-do heroine at the heart of Picnic on Paradise and other popular stories and books. Soon, Russ’s fearless embrace of gender politics and life as an out lesbian made her a target for male outrage while feminist classics like The Female Man and The Two of Them took SF in innovative new directions. Jones also delves into Russ’s longtime work as a critic of figures as diverse as Lovecraft and Cather, her foundational place in feminist fandom, important essays like “Amor Vincit Foeminam,” and her career in academia.

(4) ORIGINAL QUESTIONS. The Powell’s City of Books site scored an interview with Ted Chiang about his new collection — “Powell’s Q&A: Ted Chiang, Author of ‘Exhalation'”

What do you care about more than most people around you?
In the context of speculative fiction, I think I’m atypically interested in the question of how do the characters in a story understand their universe. I’ve heard some people say that they don’t care about the plausibility of an invented world as long as the characters are believable. To me these aren’t easily separated. When reading a story I often find myself thinking, Why has no one in this world ever wondered such-and-such? Why has no one ever asked this question, or attempted this experiment? 

(5) ALL ALPHABETS ARE OFF. R.S. Benedict, who’s made several quality appearances in F&SF, has a new podcast, Rite Gud, talking about writing issues. The first episode is: “This Garbage Brought to You By the Letters S-E-O: How Google Is Ruining Writing”.

If you’ve been on the internet for a while, you may have heard about SEO, or “Search Engine Optimization.” But do you know what SEO really is — and the effect it has on writing? While some SEO tips are good — like citing your sources with added external links! — others make writing stilted and awkward. (For example, have you noticed how many times “SEO” has appeared in this paragraph?)

We all want to be seen. One of the most important ways is via Google, is it worth it if it makes your writing stiff? And do you have any other options? Or are we all stuck on the same hamster wheel, using the same techniques to try to rise above the din?

(5b) TOP OF THE POLL. Congratulations to Michael A. Burstein, who has been re-elected to the Brookline (MA) Board of Library Trustees for a sixth term. He notes, “Although the race was uncontested, the unofficial results indicate that I came in first among the four of us running this year, for which I thank everyone who voted for me.”

(6) RUSCH KICKSTARTER. Kristine Kathryn Rusch’s Kickstarter appeal for The Diving Universe funded the first day, now they’re raising money to meet the stretch goal. JJ got me reading these, so I had to chip in —

…Two years ago, I realized that before I could write the next book about Boss, though, I needed to figure out what happened in the past, long before any of my current characters were born. 

So…I started what I thought was a short story. It became a 260,000 word adventure novel called The Renegat, because I can’t do world-building without telling a story.

…Everyone who backs this Kickstarter at the $5 and above will receive an ebook of The Renegat

The Kickstarter also gave me an excuse to assemble two books of extras—unfinished side trails, some from The Renegat, and many from earlier books, along with some essays about the entire project.

Of course, backers at the higher levels will get the hardcovers of the series as we complete them. And there are some other fun things here as well. You can get some of the lectures I’ve done for WMG Publishing about writing, or you can join the monthly Ask Kris Anything sessions. Those are live webinars, and you can ask questions about Diving to your heart’s content.

If we make our $5,000 stretch goal, every backer will get a copy of the novella, “Escaping Amnthra,” which is a side story that couldn’t fit into the novel. (“Escape” stands alone as well.)

(7) ROMANCE AWARDS. An array of Romance Writers of America awards have been announced. The award recipients will be recognized at the 2019 RWA Conference in New York.

2019 RWA Award Recipients

  • RWA Lifetime Achievement Award: Cherry Adair
  • RWA Emma Merritt Service Award: Dee Davis
  • RWA Service Awards: Courtney Milan, Gina Fluharty, Barbara Wallace
  • RWA Vivian Stephens Industry Award: Mark Coker, Founder & CEO, Smashwords
  • RWA Cathie Linz Librarian of the Year: Stephen Ammidown, Manuscript & Outreach Archivist, Browne Popular Culture Library, Bowling Green State University
  • RWA Steffie Walker Bookseller of the Year: Michelle Mioff-Haring, Owner, Cupboard Maker Books
  • RWA Veritas Award:Meet The Women Who Are Building A Better Romance Industry” by Bim Adewunmi

Hey – I actually used the pop culture library at BGSU when I went there eons ago!

(8) ANCIENT CLONE. The Arthur C. Clarke Center for the Human Imagination hosts “Neanderthal Among Us? Science Meets Fiction: A Discussion of the Motion Picture William” on May 13 at UCSD from 5:30-8:30 p.m. RSVP Required – full details here.

Join the UC San Diego Stem Cell Program, the Center for Academic Research and Training in Anthropogeny, OnePlace, and the Arthur C. Clarke Center for Human Imagination for a free screening of the film William, which tells the story of what happens when two scientists clone a Neanderthal from ancient DNA and raise him in today’s world. Following the film, a panel will explore the scientific and ethical questions the film raises.

About the Film William

Star academics Doctors Julian Reed and Barbara Sullivan, fall in love with each other and with the idea of cloning a Neanderthal from ancient DNA. Against the express directive of University administrators they follow through on this audacious idea. The result is William: the first Neanderthal to walk the earth for some 35,000 years. William tries his best to fit into the world around him. But his distinctive physical features and his unique way of thinking–his “otherness”–set him apart and provoke fear. William’s story is powerful and unique, but his struggle to find love and assert his own identity in a hostile world is universal–and timeless.

(9) TWO SCOOPS OF ALASDAIR STUART. Alasdair Stuart’s latest column for Fox Spirit, “Not The Fox News: Don’t Be Nelson”, talks about how emotional engagement, especially when so many major story cycles are starting to end, is both a good thing and to be encouraged.

About once a decade, everything lines up. A half dozen major cultural juggernauts all come into land at about the same time and some poor soul is paid to write the ‘GEEK CULTURE IS OVER. WE SHALL NEVER SEE ITS LIKE AGAIN’ piece. Hey if the check clears and the piece doesn’t hurt anyone, go with God. We’re in one of those times now. Game of Thrones has under half its super short final season to go. Avengers Endgame is all over theaters everywhere and the ninth core Star Wars movie has been confirmed as the end of the Skywalker saga. If this was a concert, we’d officially be into the ‘Freebird’, ‘Hotel California’, ‘Thrift Shop’, ‘Single Ladies’ phase of the night.

These are emotional times….

Stuart has also joined the Ditch Diggers team with a new monthly column. The first one takes a look at the massive ructions in podcasting at the moment and the lessons writers can take from that. “Welcome to the Montage, Now Stare at a Test Tube”

…So let’s break this down. First off, Luminary is a new podcast streaming platform that launched a few months ago with a ton of exclusive titles and a ton of money, very little of which they seem to have spent on a public relations department. The idea is that they are ‘the Netflix of podcasts’, which presumably doesn’t mean:

‘We’re sustained by the physical library system that no one expected to live this long and it takes two years for us to get the new season of Brooklyn Nine-Nine’.

Instead, the idea is that Luminary will feature forty or so podcasts which are only available through it’s app, most of which are fronted by celebrities.

How you feel about this really depends on how you feel about ‘famous person has some thoughts’ style shows.

(10) COHEN OBIT. The SFWA Blog announced that scientist Jack Cohen (1933-2019) died May 6.

Cohen primarily worked in the field of reproductive biology….  

As a science fiction fan, Cohen found himself advising many authors, including Anne McCaffrey, Larry Niven, David Gerrold, Jerry Pournelle, and Harry Harrison.  He teamed with Ian Stewart and Terry Pratchett wrote four volumes in the Science of Discworld series, the first of which earned the three authors a Hugo Nomination for Best Related Book.

(11) TODAY’S BIRTHDAYS.

[Compiled by Cat Eldridge.]

  • Born May 8, 1937 Thomas Pynchon, 82. Ok I’m confused. I’ve not read him so I’m not at all sure which of his novels can be considered genre. Would y’all first enlighten to which are such, and second what I should now read. ISFDB certainly doesn’t help by listing pretty much everything of his as genre including Mason & Dixon which though post-modernist isn’t genre.
  • Born May 8, 1938 Jean Giraud. Better to y’all as Moebius. He contributed storyboards and concept designs to myriad science fiction and fantasy films including Alien, The Fifth Element, The Abyss and the original Tron film. He also collaborated with avant-garde filmmaker Alejandro Jodorowsky for an unproduced adaptation of Dune. Oh, I would’ve loved to have seen that!  And no, I’m not forgetting his work on both Heavy Metal and Marvel Comics, but I’ll let you detail those endeavours. (Died 2012.)
  • Born May 8, 1940 Peter Benchley. He’s known for writing Jaws and he co-wrote the film script with Carl Gottlieb. His novel Beast is genre and was adapted into a film, as was White Shark, which has absolutely nothing to do with sharks. Another novel, The Island, was also turned into a film and it’s at least genre adjacent. (Died 2006.)
  • Born May 8, 1947 Susan Casper. Editor and author, married to Gardner Dozois until her death.  Her fiction is first collected in Slow Dancing through Time which includes one collaboration with Dozois and one with Jack M Dann. Rainbow: The Complete Short Fiction of Susan Casper which was edited just after her death by her husband is as its title states a complete collection of her short fiction. She was co-editor with him of the Ripper! and Jack the Ripper anthologies. (Died 2017.)
  • Born May 8, 1954 Stephen Furst. The saddest part of doing these Birthdays is discovering how many folks have died that I reasonably expected were still living. He died of complications from diabetes at a far too young age. You know most likely Centauri diplomatic attaché Vir Cotto on Babylon 5, a decent being way over his head in a job he was ill prepared for. He also directed three low-budget movies for the Sci Fi Channel: Dragon Storm, Path of Destruction, and Basilisk: The Serpent King; he additionally co-starred in the last two films. And he produced Atomic Shark which aired during Sharknado Week on Syfy. (Died 2017)
  • Born May 8, 1963 Michel Gondry, 56. French director, screenwriter, and producer of such genre as Eternal Sunshine of the Spotless Mind  (love that film), The Green Hornet (on the other hand, I deleted this from my .mov files after watching fifteen minutes of it) and The Science of Sleep (which I had not heard but sounds interesting.) 
  • Born May 8, 1981 Stephen Amell, 38. He’s known for portraying Oliver Queen / Green Arrow In Arrowverse. Ok I have a confession. I can either read or watch series like these. I did watch the first few seasons of the Arrow and Flash series. How the Hell does anybody keep up with these and set aside a reasonable amount of time to do any reading?  Seriously the amount of genre on tv has exploded. I’m watching Star Trek, Young Justice and Doom Patrol which is quite enough, thank you.

(12) COMICS SECTION.

  • Brevity crams several horrendous puns into this one-frame, LOTR-inspired cartoon.

(13) SPOILERS ASSEMBLE! The putative Endgame spoiler ban has been lifted by the Russo brothers, and Yahoo! Entertainment has a roundup of special tweets from the cast: “‘Avengers: Endgame’ cast reveals treasure trove of behind the scenes footage as spoiler ban lifts”.

The cast of Avengers: Endgame have had to sit on a ton of spoilers for years, with much of the filming on the Marvel mega-blockbuster dating all the way back to 2017.

Directing duo Joe and Anthony Russo have now lifted the ban on discussing spoilers from the film, so many of the cast members have been unveiling some of their illicit behind-the-scenes pictures and videos.

There are, of course, Avengers: Endgame spoilers ahead…

(14) ATWOOD. Tyler Cowen had Margaret Atwood on his Conversations With Tyler podcast: “Margaret Atwood on Canada, Writing, and Invention”. Atwood discusses Hag-Seed, her take on The Tempest, at the 10 minute mark.  She explains why she started writing The Handmaid’s Tale in West Berlin in 1984, and her love of H.G. Wells’s The Island of Dr. Moreau.  Audience questions coming in at the 55-minute mark about her Handmaid’s Tale sequel The Testaments, coming in September, why she likes the YouTube video “At Last, They’ve Made A Handmaid’s Tale for men,” and how readers figured out Offred’s last name.

(15) THIS IS YOUR BRAIN ON POKÉMON. Ars Technica reports players have unexpected anatomical development: “Pokémon characters have their own pea-sized region in brain, study finds”.

…It’s well known that human beings are remarkably adept at visually recognizing faces, words, numbers, places, colors, and so forth thanks to a constellation of regions—small clusters of neurons about the size of a pea—in the temporal lobe, located just behind the ears. Those regions show up in the same place in most people, despite differences in age, sex, or race. There’s even a so-called “Jennifer Aniston neuron,” (aka the “grandmother cell“) discovered by a UCLA neuroscientist in 2005, whose primary purpose seems to be to recognize images of the famous actress. Similar neurons have also been found for other celebrities like Bill Clinton, Julia Roberts, Halle Berry, and Kobe Bryant.

“This is quite remarkable, and it’s still an open mystery in neuroscience why these regions appear exactly where they do in the brain,” said co-author Jesse Gomez, a postdoc at the University of California, Berkeley, who conducted the experiments while a grad student at Stanford University. One way to answer this question, and determine which of several competing theories is correct, is to study people who, as children, had a unique experience with a new type of visual stimulus. If those people were shown to have developed a new brain region dedicated to recognizing that new object class, that would offer useful insight into how the brain organizes itself.

The catch: it would take many hours of laboratory practice with any new visual stimulus for there to be any measurable effect. But “I realized that the 1990s had already done it for me,” said Gomez. “I grew up playing Pokémon. The game rewards kids for individuating between hundreds of similar-looking Pokémon.” The game is also played primarily during childhood, a “critical window” period where the brain is especially plastic and responsive to experience. He reasoned it might be possible that passionate Pokémon players like his childhood self would have developed a new brain region in response to that experience. So he applied for a seed grant to test that hypothesis.

(16) BDP PLAYOFFS. Time is out of joint in Camestros Felapton’s review post, “Hugo 2019 Best Dramatic Long etc Round-up”.

…Bless its mega-crossover heart but Avengers: Infinity War is not a serious contender for the best science-fiction film of 2018. It is a notable bit of film making but it’s rather like what ends up on your plate when you* visit a really nice buffet — lots of tasty things but not a carefully constructed dining experience. I get why it’s here instead of Thor: Ragnarok but Thor 3 was a better contender as a sci-fi movie.

That leaves a face-off between Black Panther and Spider-Man. Both are visual treats. Spider-verse pulls off the remarkable feat of creating yet another reboot of Spider-Man as a film character in a way that makes me genuinely excited (doubly remarkable as the MCU version of Spidey was pretty good too)….

(17) HUGO REVIEWS, Here are links to three more sets of 2019 Hugo nominee reviews.

Steve J. Wright’s Best Novella Hugo Finalist reviews are online:

Bonnie McDaniel has completed her Best Novel Hugo Reviews at Red Headed Femme.

Peter Enyeart has posted a set of “2019 Hugo picks: Short stories” at Stormsewer.

(18) RISK. “Think Women Aren’t Big Risk Takers? These Chinese Girls Buck The Stereotype”NPR has the story.

Many studies have found that women aren’t as willing as men to take risks. And so they may shy away from riskier investments or career choices, missing out on the rewards that can come from taking big chances.

The perennial question: Why? Is it nature or nurture?

…Elaine Liu, an economist at the University of Houston, …and co-author Sharon Xuejing Zuo at Fudan University in Shanghai found that young girls from the Mosuo community in China, one of the few societies in the world run by women, were bigger risk-takers than boys from the same community. But after the Mosuo girls spent years in schools with boys and girls who came from patriarchal communities, the trend reversed: Older Mosuo girls took fewer chances.

(19) THE HOLE TRUTH AND NOTHING BUT. BBC reports a “Missing part of Stonehenge returned 60 years on”.

A missing piece of Stonehenge has been returned to the site 60 years after it was taken.

A metre-long core from inside the prehistoric stone was removed during archaeological excavations in 1958.

No-one knew where it was until Robert Phillips, 89, who was involved in those works, decided to return part of it.

English Heritage, which looks after Stonehenge, hopes the sample might now help establish where the stones originally came from.

In 1958 archaeologists raised an entire fallen trilithon – a set of three large stones consisting of two that would have stood upright, with the third placed horizontally across the top.

During the works, cracks were found in one of the vertical stones and in order to reinforce it, cores were drilled through the stone and metal rods inserted.

The repairs were masked by small plugs cut from sarsen fragments found during excavations.

(20) BEST FOOT FORWARD. I’m telling you, this reminds me of a John Sladek story: “Botswana gives leaders stools made from elephant feet”.

Stools made from elephant feet have been presented to three African leaders by their host in Botswana during a meeting on the future of the mammals.

President Mokgweetsi Masisi handed over the gifts, covered in a blue patterned cloth, to his counterparts from Namibia, Zambia and Zimbabwe.

The countries, along with South Africa, are calling for the ban on the sale of ivory to be lifted.

They argue that money from the trade can be used for conservation projects.

Elephant poaching is a big issue across Africa and some estimates say 30,000 are killed every year. There are thought to be 450,000 left.

(21) ROCK OF AGES. In Air & Space Magazine’s article “Claimed Signs of Life in a Martian Meteorite” the tagline seems an understatement — “Like other previous claims, this one may not hold up.” Another scientist has claimed that a meteorite that originated on Mars contains signs of life. You may recall such a claim previously made based on analysis of ALH84001 (ALH stands for Allan Hills in Antarctica, where the rock was found) with the announcement made in 1996. The evidence was eventually judged inconclusive by most scientists.

Now a new paper by Ildikó Gyollai from the Research Centre for Astronomy and Earth Sciences in Budapest, Hungary, and colleagues, claims that there might be clues to Martian life in another Allan Hills meteorite, this time ALH77005. They base their conclusions on morphological and geochemical indicators—including the presence of organic material—which lead them to speculate on the past presence of iron bacteria in this Martian rock. […]

[Thanks to Standback, JJ, Cat Eldridge, Michael Toman, Jim Meadows, John King Tarpinian, Chip Hitchcock, Mike Kennedy, Carl Slaughter, and Andrew Porter for some of these stories. Title credit goes to File 770 contributor of the day Kip Williams.]

48 thoughts on “Pixel Scroll 5/8/19 Only The True Pixel Denies His Scrollability!

  1. Michael A. Burstein has a rare unnumbered Scroll item – 5b perhaps?

    (10) Pynchon’s The Crying of Lot 49 is genre adjacent and clearly influenced Matt Ruff’s Sewer, Gas and Electric

  2. 11) Peter Benchley died at the age of 65. He was the son of Nathaniel Benchley.

    Nathaniel Benchley died at the age of 66. His writings include several children’s books with a fantastic theme. He was the son of Robert Benchley.

    Robert Benchley died at the age of 56. He was an author of hundreds of essays, some of which were quite zany. He was also an actor who appeared in many short films, some of which were also odd.

    Interesting heritage there, but I am concerned about that lifespan problem.

  3. Andrew: Whoops! (Missed my chance to pretend it was another intentional double-fifth reference.)

  4. (10) COHEN OBIT: Cohen and Stewart, in addition to helping Pratchett with the Science of Discworld books, did a couple of SF novels on their own, which I recommend: Wheelers and Heaven. Heaven, in particular, has some great alien-building. (That’s a thing, right? Like world-building, but with aliens?)

  5. @10: Cohen was a fascinating speaker, very frank about the mistakes he and his line-of-thought had made and about how much was still to learn and gifted with the ability to make hard ideas clear. He will be missed.

    @Xtifr: I’ve never heard it called alien building (I’m not sure I’ve heard any compact term for it), but it’s definitely a thing.

  6. (11) Pynchon:

    Gravity’s Rainbow has a major plot driver that is basically a psychic power, with a deliberately ridiculous pseudo-scientific explanation. It also has another mystery thing that sounds like it’s going to be science-fictional, but turns out just to be a very elaborate murder scheme.

    Contra Andrew, I don’t think I would call The Crying of Lot 49 “genre-adjacent” unless you’re willing to put that label on basically anything that has a long-lived secret society in it.

    Vineland has a large community of ghosts living in California, which no one thinks is unusual.

    I’m not sure why calling Mason & Dixon “postmodernist” would mean it can’t have genre elements. It’s written as a tall tale rather than in any common SF style, but… it has a major character who is a near-omnipotent robot duck.

  7. (6) JJ got me reading these

    My work here is done! 😀

    I am eagerly anticipating digging into more than 200,000 words of new Diving Universe stories.

    Also, Mega Meredith Moment: for those who would like to be able to immerse themselves in the entire works of the Diving Universe and/or the Retrieval Artist universe, there are backer options which include all of the books in the series in e-book form for a bargain price. I absolutely love both series, and highly recommend them to people who like space adventure.

  8. 15) Or to say it another way. If people play Pokemon, they will also remember the Pokemons they encounter in the game.

    “Remarkable”.

  9. (4) Hooray for a positive gamer role model.

    (5) I’ve been running a disjointed stream-of-consciousness blog for quite some time and I get truly weird and serendipitous hits from all over the world, and even from something called the “Unknown Region.” Often I’ll have bots converge on a years-old post for mysterious reasons that can only relate to SEO sorcery. Once in a while I’ll chase down an IP and discover a webpage consisting of nothing but buzzwords, like some kind of SEO flytrap. The internet is a bizarre place.

    (15) As someone who just wrote a thing about digitized people using favorite songs as a secondary form of ID, this article appeals to me.

    On the unfortunate fate of the Benchleys … looming mortality was a prime consideration in my decision to get off my butt and finally finish writing novels relatively late in life. Just do it, and to hell with the SEO.

  10. 11). Gravity’s Rainbow also has the occult as real, the appearance of angels during a bombing raid, psychic warfare….

    Against The. Day has a major strand about the boy heroes patrolling the world in their airship (did they have a talking dog, or am I getting mixed up with Up?), a society at the center of the earth, a mythical city.

    And I remember thinking V had genre elements, but the only one that now comes to mind is the incidental appearance of an automaton.

    Didn’t Crying Of Lot 49 also make a big deal out of the scientific concept of entropy, both as information theory and the literalization of Maxwell’s Demon? (I wonder if Moorcock was influenced by this?)

    If you’re going to read just one of these, Gravity’s Rainbow is very much my favourite.

  11. WILLIAM. Gee. all you need to do is go to the beach, and you’ll see lots of people who resemble Neanderthals.

    And Pynchon’s V gave us alligators in the sewers.

  12. I have to agree with Cat about TV superhero shows. It’s just too much! I’ve pared down my watching to Supergirl and The Flash, but I don’t think I’ve understood what’s going on in The Flash for several weeks. The character of Nora is especially annoying.

  13. @Robert: Well, a lot of modern humans–including you and me –have Neanderthal ancestry. This is part of the hominin family tree looking more like a braid than like a branching structure these days, I think.

  14. 16) I enjoyed Black Panther quite a bit–it’s at least as good and as deep as Captain America: The Winter Soldier, which was remarkable–but I just don’t think there’s a question about which is the better movie between it and Spiderman: Into the Spider-Verse, which is not as heavy but amazing in its lightness.

    (I also think My Neighbor Totorro is a greater movie than Nausicaä of the Valley of the Wind. If nothing else, I’m consistent.)

    The other three movies I haven’t seen. I can’t take horror. But I’m fond enough of The Coup to be rooting for Boots Riley anyway, and the reviews I’ve read back me up.

  15. @Eli:

    Contra Andrew, I don’t think I would call The Crying of Lot 49 “genre-adjacent” unless you’re willing to put that label on basically anything that has a long-lived secret society in it.

    Long-lived secret societies tend to move a book into the realm of “Secret History” which reads like SF to me (at least sometimes).

  16. Andrew: Long-lived secret societies tend to move a book into the realm of “Secret History” which reads like SF to me

    I get where you’re coming from and I realize it’s all nitpicking anyway, but… to me, secret history in the genre sense normally requires that the secret part have some significance, like it’s the real explanation for such-and-such real event, or it influenced the direction of etc. Lot 49 is to some degree about the idea of that, and the desire for the secret thing to be meaningful, but ultimately it comes to a different conclusion. But I haven’t read it in a long time so maybe I’m misremembering.

  17. 11) If I remember correctly, the supplementary materials from my DVD of The Abyss say Moebius’ concept art went unused. The quote my brain is feeding me is “beautiful examples of what we didn’t want”.

    11bis) It is eerie how many B5 actors have died young(ish).

  18. May 8th is the birthday of Saul Bass. Created distinctive title sequences for movies and also designed some noteworthy movie posters. Won an Oscar for his short Why Man Creates. I consider part 5. A Parable: to be genre. Or you can watch the whole thing here.

    Scroll that Pixel Music, Fan Boy

  19. For anyone who’s looking for more viewpoints on the Hugo finalists, I normally do award reviews, too, at least for the major fiction categories. Am down to the Hugo novel finalists at this point. Please see at the website.

  20. Hampus Eckerman: The Plague Marmot — that’s what you get when you keep them in the tank too long.

  21. “The Plague Marmot — that’s what you get when you keep them in the tank too long.”

  22. Patrick Morris Miller says If I remember correctly, the supplementary materials from my DVD of The Abyss say Moebius’ concept art went unused. The quote my brain is feeding me is “beautiful examples of what we didn’t want”.

    Could well be. It takes long enough to do these Birthday notes without double checking some of the claims made on the pages I use to compile them. I just tried to see if that could verified on the web and it can’t be.

  23. Hampus Eckerman on May 9, 2019 at 7:04 am said:

    Beware the Heckscape of The Plague Marmot.

    I can’t say I was ever likely to eat raw marmot but the warning is still a public service.

  24. I’ve always wanted to open a hotel in Los Angeles called Chateau Marmot.

    A quick non-google search shows that an Airbnb in Washington has already taken that joke.

  25. Eli: Lot 49 is to some degree about the idea of that, and the desire for the secret thing to be meaningful, but ultimately it comes to a different conclusion.

    Hm. As I remember the conclusion, there–isn’t one, exactly; we are left waiting with Oedipa Maas to find out (maybe she and we will find out) if the whole thread of mysterious events is coincidence, meaningful, or a deliberate con-game created by an egomaniac. But we never do find out, really–which is why I always taught Crying of Lot 49 as MAYBE magical realism, maybe not . . . hence “genre adjacent” sounds fine to me. If Pynchon’s only connection to sf/f were this book, I’d probably say “sort of, maybe; it depends on how you read it.” Which, come to think, is kind of appropriate for a discussion of this particular book, too!

  26. The thing brings me the most hope about HBO’s “Watchmen” series is that Zack Snyder isn’t attached in any way, shape or form.

  27. Steve Green says of The Watchman trailer: Well, that looks like a whole heap of shite.

    I like books, I likes video series. I almost never watch series made from books. My only exception to the rule are series like Doom Patrol and Swamp Thing where it’s very obvious the folks involved are really grokking the source material.

  28. I was once going to give an award for best treatment of insects in a science fiction or fantasy work, but they said I couldn’t call it the Locust Award.
    (have been sick since Norwescon and it’s now 9181)

  29. @Eli:

    I get where you’re coming from and I realize it’s all nitpicking anyway, but… to me, secret history in the genre sense normally requires that the secret part have some significance, like it’s the real explanation for such-and-such real event, or it influenced the direction of etc. Lot 49 is to some degree about the idea of that, and the desire for the secret thing to be meaningful, but ultimately it comes to a different conclusion. But I haven’t read it in a long time so maybe I’m misremembering.

    I see what you mean, too. Perhaps I was reading it through SF glasses (with the “protocols of SF reading” http://www.sfcenter.ku.edu/protocol.htm) and saw what I expected to see (I first heard of “The Crying of Lot 49” in “Star Trek Lives,” I think).

    @Mary Francis:

    But we never do find out, really–which is why I always taught Crying of Lot 49 as MAYBE magical realism, maybe not . . . hence “genre adjacent” sounds fine to me. If Pynchon’s only connection to sf/f were this book, I’d probably say “sort of, maybe; it depends on how you read it.” Which, come to think, is kind of appropriate for a discussion of this particular book, too!

    Thanks for this insight.

  30. @Edward L. Green: They don’t need Snyder to ruin it because they’ve already got Lindelof.

  31. @Andrew: I think “reading it through SF glasses” is a good description of an effect that Pynchon deliberately produces. The Tristero Complex, or the S-Gerät, or V., may not actually have any supernatural or science-fictional qualities, but he writes about them as if any minute now you might find out that they do.

  32. @Andrew and @Eli, “reading through SF glasses” is a good term; that’s what makes CJ Cherryh’s The Paladin a fantasy novel, when more properly it probably should be classified as a Ruritanian.novel. (It’s an excellent story, by the way; I do recommend it. And it’s a stand-alone novel.)

  33. @ Cassy B

    Agreed on Cherryh’s The Paladin, it’s one of my favorite re-reads.

  34. Meredith Moment: The ebook version of Snow White Learns Witchcraft: Stories and Poems by Theodora Goss (is it a novella at 226 pages?) is available for $0.99 from Amazon.

  35. Eli: I think “reading it through SF glasses” is a good description of an effect that Pynchon deliberately produces. The Tristero Complex, or the S-Gerät, or V., may not actually have any supernatural or science-fictional qualities, but he writes about them as if any minute now you might find out that they do.

    And I think that that is a brilliant description of Pynchon’s writing! (Both what you and Andrew have to say.)

  36. Cat Eldridge on May 9, 2019 at 4:32 pm said:

    I like books, I likes video series. I almost never watch series made from books. My only exception to the rule are series like Doom Patrol and Swamp Thing where it’s very obvious the folks involved are really grokking the source material.

    Sometimes a video series can end up being good because it doesn’t try to stick too closely to the original book: the TV series version of The Dead Zone was a good example of this. It didn’t follow the plot of the book so much as leave it looming ominously in the background, while it explored other possible implications of the ideas behind the book. The result was pretty entertaining.

    I’m sort of hoping Watchmen will do something similar. Mostly, I admit, because I can’t imagine any other way it will be worth watching. 🙂

  37. The preview makes it look like they want to tell Miller’s The Dark Knight with Watchmen characters. As if Watchmen had been bitten by a radioactive Dark Knight.

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