Pixel Scroll 9/10/21 It Was A Pixel Scroll Of Rare Device

(1) EATING THE FANTASTIC. Scott Edelman offers listeners a chance to feast on Indian food with Veronica Schanoes in episode 153 of his Eating the Fantastic podcast.

Veronica Schanoes

Award-winning writer Veronica Schanoes and I shared Indian food though there were hundreds of miles between us — hers from Brooklyn, New York’s Masala Grill, me from Hagerstown, Maryland’s Sitar of India.

Veronica Schanoes has published fiction in the magazines Lady Churchill’s Rosebud WristletSybil’s Garage, and Fantasy; the anthologies The Doll CollectionQueen Victoria’s Book of Spells: An Anthology of Gaslamp FantasyThe Mammoth Book of Cthulhu: New Lovecraftian Fiction; and online at Strange Horizons and Tor.com. Her novella “Burning Girls” was nominated for the Nebula Award and the World Fantasy Award, and won the Shirley Jackson Award for Best Novella in 2013. Her first scholarly monograph, Fairy Tales, Myth, and Psychoanalytic Theory: Feminism and Re-telling the Tale, was published by Ashgate in 2014. Her collection Burning Girls and Other Stories was published earlier this year.

We discussed what it’s been like trying to write her first novel during a pandemic, why she can only read Jane Yolen’s intro to her new collection half a page at a time, how she makes sure her fairy tale-inspired fiction works even for those who don’t catch the allusions, the joy which comes from putting the right words in the right order, how Kelly Link convinced her she should take herself seriously as a writer, whether research inspires stories or stories inspire research (and how writers make sure they don’t force readers to suffer for that research), the way fairy tales take place “outside of historical space-time,” the importance of Joe Strummer and the Clash, and much more.

(2) MODERN THOUGHT. S.E. Lindberg interviews pulp scholar and sword-and-sorcery author and editor Jason Ray Carney at Black Gate. “Sublime, Cruel Beauty: An Interview with Jason Ray Carney”.

What is this concept of Modernity, and why did it haunt/inspire you to write a thesis on it?

Modernity is one of those concepts with a rich intellectual history, and people spill a lot of ink over it, but it is not very complicated (in my opinion): sometimes around the 1780s, the world changed. Feudalism gave way to democracy. New technologies upset how human economies and cities were organized. Religious belief waned and changed. We stopped believing (for the most part) in the supernatural. Let me cite Max Weber again: with modernity, the world became “disenchanted.” This, of course, is only part of the story. Though this story is myopic in its Eurocentrism, it is not less valid for its narrow purview. The story of modernization outside of Europe can be told, but it will be different, with maze-like branching conversations that posit multiple “modernities.” Anyway, modernity really intrigues me.

(3) VINDICATION. In “confirmation”, former Hugo Awards administrator David Bratman tells how he once found himself at loggerheads with Locus’ Charles N. Brown.  

When I was administrator for the Hugo Awards in 1996, one of the Best Novel finalists* was Remake by Connie Willis. By that time, SF novels were tending very long, but Remake was short. Though published as a standalone volume, it made a small one.

Charles Brown of Locus,** the newsletter of the SF field, insisted to me that Remake was under 40 thousand words and thus, by Hugo rules (which were shared in this respect by most other awards in the field), it fell in the Novella category, not Novel. And indeed, in the Locus awards it was put in the Novella category, which it won (not surprisingly, being one of the longest in the category as well as being by Connie Willis)….

The rest of the analysis is at the link.

(4) FICTION IN TRANSLATION. Jennifer Croft argues “Why translators should be named on book covers” in The Guardian.

“Translators are like ninjas. If you notice them, they’re no good.” This quote, attributed to Israeli author Etgar Keret, proliferates in memes, and who doesn’t love a pithy quote involving ninjas? Yet this idea – that a literary translator might make, at any moment, a surprise attack, and that at every moment we are deceiving the reader as part of an elaborate mercenary plot – is among the most toxic in world literature.

The reality of the international circulation of texts is that in their new contexts, it is up to their translators to choose every word they will contain. When you read Nobel laureate Olga Tokarczuk’s Flights in English, the words are all mine. Translators aren’t like ninjas, but words are human, which means that they’re unique and have no direct equivalents. You can see this in English: “cool” is not identical to “chilly”, although it’s similar. “Frosty” has other connotations, other usages; so does “frigid”. Selecting one of these options on its own doesn’t make sense; it must be weighed in the balance of the sentence, the paragraph, the whole, and it is the translator who is responsible, from start to finish, for building a flourishing lexical community that is both self-contained and in profound relation with its model….

(5) MARTIN ON MALTIN. [Item by Martin Morse Wooster.] I listened to this 2018 podcast Leonard and Jessie Maltin did with Floyd Norman, a pioneering Black animator and cartoonist (Maltin on Movies: Floyd Norman).

Norman started working for Walt Disney in the mid-1950s, and remembers being at Disneyland during its opening week (but not opening day, a legendary disaster). He recalls what it was like producing feature-length animation before computers and how everyone involved in animated film “worked like Marines” until the job was done, although Walt Disney insisted everyone leave the studio at 9 to spend some time with their families. People who remember the “string of pearls” sequence in Mary Poppins should realize that was a sequence that stressed out the animators.

Norman talked about how he was hired and quit Disney several times, and was involved in developing the stories for PIxar’s Toy Story 2 and Monsters Inc.  He also self-published his own books of cartoons, including one entirely devoted to making fun of Disney CEO Michael Eisner, who Norman thinks a major egotist.  Norman says Eisner didn’t mind the criticism, “as long as the book was about him.”

This may be too DIsney-centric for some but I enjoyed this episode.

(6) CHECK IT OUT. The New Yorker’s Daniel A. Gross analyzes “The Surprisingly Big Business of Library E-books”.

The sudden shift to e-books had enormous practical and financial implications, not only for OverDrive but for public libraries across the country. Libraries can buy print books in bulk from any seller that they choose, and, thanks to a legal principle called the first-sale doctrine, they have the right to lend those books to any number of readers free of charge. But the first-sale doctrine does not apply to digital content. For the most part, publishers do not sell their e-books or audiobooks to libraries—they sell digital distribution rights to third-party venders, such as OverDrive, and people like Steve Potash sell lending rights to libraries. These rights often have an expiration date, and they make library e-books “a lot more expensive, in general, than print books,” Michelle Jeske, who oversees Denver’s public-library system, told me. Digital content gives publishers more power over prices, because it allows them to treat libraries differently than they treat other kinds of buyers. Last year, the Denver Public Library increased its digital checkouts by more than sixty per cent, to 2.3 million, and spent about a third of its collections budget on digital content, up from twenty per cent the year before….

(7) UP ALL NIGHT. It so happens the only time I ever watched Adult Swim was sitting in a hospital waiting room after driving someone to ER — but that’s not a knock, what I saw was pretty amusing. The New York Times celebrated the program block’s 20th anniversary with an oral history: “Adult Swim: How an Animation Experiment Conquered Late-Night TV”.

By all accounts, it was a minor miracle that Adult Swim ever made it off the drawing board 20 years ago. Money was next to nonexistent. The editor of Cartoon Network’s first original series worked from a closet. A celebrity guest on that series, unaware of the weirdness he had signed up for, walked out mid-taping.

In retrospect, it seems right that one of modern TV’s most consistent generators of bizarro humor — and cult followings — had origins that were, themselves, pretty freewheeling.

WILLIS The idea for “Aqua Teen Hunger Force” started with a [expletive] fast food restaurant that tried to use all the scraps of meat they weren’t allowed by the F.D.A. to put into a hamburger, wadded together. We saw Meatwad as this poor, neglected creature — I think his line in his first script was like [in Meatwad voice], “Please, God, kill me.” I did the voice, and I can’t tell you how many times people said, “I don’t understand what he’s saying; you need to recast him.” But we stuck to our guns. I always thought of it like Willie Nelson, who sings real quietly, and so everyone is on the edge of their seat trying to listen to what he’s saying. As a result, you’re more into it. At least, that was my excuse! [Laughs.]

(8) LIFE OF LEWIS. A trailer dropped for the C.S. Lewis biopic titled The Most Reluctant Convert: The Untold Story Of C.S. Lewis that arrives in theaters November 3.

(9) TIME HAS BEEN BROKEN. So they tell us. The new season of Star Trek: Picard premieres February 2022 on Paramount+.

(10) BUCKS AND BUCK ROGERS. Think of it as the military-industrial-entertainment complex: “The making of an Enterprise: How NASA, the Smithsonian and the aerospace industry helped create Star Trek” in The Space Review.

…At the end of WWII, 60–70% of the American aerospace industry was based in Southern California. The good climate and open land that helped draw aviation to the region also helped lure the motion picture industry. When Roddenberry began developing Star Trek, 15 of the 25 largest aerospace companies were located in the greater Los Angeles area. Many were situated close to Paramount’s Desilu Studios where the series was made.

Roddenberry drew upon the most current spaceflight technology then available to incorporate into Star Trek. He read, wrote, phoned and even dumpster-dived to get material for his new series.

A direct example of how the aerospace industry influenced Star Trek appears in the episode “The Trouble With Tribbles.” In this episode furry little creatures that “coo” and have a tremendous desire for eating and breeding overrun the Federation’s K-7 space station.

The principal elements of the K-7 as it is shown in the episode first appeared in a report done by Douglas Aircraft. The 1959 study outlined the operational requirements of an extendable orbiting space station. Constructed on Earth then launched atop a “Saturn-type missile,” the station was designed to automatically unfold in space into a donut-shape with a conical reentry vehicle at its center.[3]

Richard Datin, a model maker who helped build the original production model Enterprise, described how the K-7 design materialized. “I was told upon viewing the original model, and maybe by Roddenberry, that he obtained it [the Douglas space station model] from Douglas Aircraft whose main office was in nearby Santa Monica. Apparently, Gene had a following from people in the space industry, particularly Caltech in Pasadena.”

(11) MICHAEL K. WILLIAMS (1966-2021). Actor Michael K. Williams died September 6 at the age of 54 reports the New York Times.  While famous for his work in cop and crime series including The Wire and Boardwalk Empire, sff fans knew him as the lead in Lovecraft Country, and saw him in the 2014 RoboCop remake, The Purge: Anarchy (2014), and Ghostbusters (2016).

(12) MEDIA BIRTHDAY.

  • 1977 – Forty-four years ago this evening on CBS, Space Academy, a Filmation children’s series, first aired. (Jason of Star Command would come out of it.) It was created by Allen Ducovny who previously only done such animated shows as The New Adventures of Superman and Aquaman. The program starred Jonathan Harris in the lead role; co-starring were Pamelyn Ferdin, Ric Carrott, Maggie Cooper, Brian Tochi, Ty Henderson, and Eric Greene. There was a cute robot as well named Peepo. Would I kid you?  It would last for just fifteen half-hour episodes. 

(13) TODAY’S BIRTHDAYS.

[Compiled by Cat Eldridge.]

  • Born September 10, 1914 — Robert Wise. Film director, producer, and editor. Among his accomplishments are directing The Curse of The Cat PeopleThe Day the Earth Stood StillThe HauntingThe Andromeda Strain and Star Trek: The Motion Picture. Though not at all genre, he also directed West Side Story and edited Citizen Kane,  two exemplary accomplishments indeed. (Died 2005.)
  • Born September 10, 1937 — Spencer Milligan, 84. He’s best known for playing Rick Marshall, the father of Will and Holly Marshall, on the first two seasons of Land of the Lost. (He left because he didn’t get a cut of the merch sales.) Genre wise, he’d previously been in Woody Allen’s Sleeper as Jeb Hrmthmg, and later appeared in an episode of The Bionic Woman. That’s it.
  • Born September 10, 1952 — Gerry Conway, 69. He’s  known for co-creating  the Punisher (with artists John Romita Sr. and Ross Andru) as well as the first Ms. Marvel and scripting the death of the character Gwen Stacy during his run on The Amazing Spider-Man. He shares the story credit for Conan the Destroyer with Roy Thomas. At DC, he created a number of characters including Firestorm, Count Vertigo and Killer Croc. Not genre at all, but he wrote a lot of scripts for Law and Order: Criminal Intent, one of my favorite series.
  • Born September 10, 1953 — Stuart Milligan, 68. He first shows up as Walters on the Sean Connery-led Outland and a few years later we see him as a Police Sergeant on Sky Captain and the World of Tomorrow. He’ll play Richard Nixon in Doctor Who for two Eleventh Doctor stories, “The Impossible Astronuat” and “Day of The Moon”. His latest genre role is in Wonder Woman 1984 as the U.S. President.
  • Born September 10, 1953 — Pat Cadigan, 68. Tea from an Empty Cup and Dervish is Digital are both amazing works. And I’m fascinated that she has co-written with Paul Dini, creator of Batman: The Animated Series, a DCU novel called Harley Quinn: Mad Love. Her only Hugo win was at LoneStarCon 3 for the “The Girl-Thing Who Went Out for Sushi” novelette.  Her latest work is the novelization of the first-draft Alien 3 screenplay by William Gibson. She’s well stocked at the usual suspects. 
  • Born September 10, 1955 — Victoria Strauss, 66. Author of the Burning Land two novel series, and she should be praised unto high for being founder along with AC Crispin of the Committee on Writing Scams. She maintains the Writer Beware website and blog. 
  • Born September 10, 1959 — Nancy A. Collins, 62. Author of the Sonja Blue vampire novels, some of the best of that genre I’ve ever had the pleasure to read. She had a long run on Swamp Thing from issues 110 to 138, and it is generally considered a very good period in that narrative.  She also wrote  Vampirella, the Forrest J Ackerman and Trina Robbins creation, for awhile. 
  • Born September 10, 1968 — Guy Ritchie, 53. Director of Sherlock Holmes and its sequel Sherlock Holmes: A Game of Shadows, both of each I rather liked, and the live-action Aladdin. He did also directed / wrote / produced the rebooted The Man from U.N.C.L.E. which got rather nice reviews to my surprise as well as King Arthur: Legend of the Sword which apparently is quite excellent as audience reviewers at Rotten Tomatoes give it a seventy percent rating. 

(14) FRIENDLY NEIGHBORHOOD RECORD-SETTER. The Hollywood Reporter knows it’s worth a headline when “First Spider-Man Comic Book Sets Record for Biggest Sale Ever”.

The sale of Amazing Fantasy no. 15, featuring the first appearance of Spider-Man, has set the record for the most expensive comic ever sold.

The comic sold Thursday for $3.6 million as part of Heritage Auction’s Signature Comics & Comic Art auction being held Sept. 8 to 12.

The senses-shattering sale beat out the previous record, Action Comics no. 1, published in 1938 and featuring the first appearance of Superman, which sold privately for $3.25 million earlier this year.

(15) A SLEIGHLOAD TO ADD TO YOUR MT. TBR. SF² Concatenation has posted its list of “Forthcoming SF books in the run-up to Christmas UK SF book releases September – 31st December 2021” from the major UK imprints (available/or on order elsewhere from specialist bookshops). This is an advance posting (6th September) of the ‘forthcoming books’ sections’ of SF² Concatenation’s autumnal news page whose full edition will be posted September 15. 

With just 90, or thereabouts, shopping days to Christmas, time to see what SF will be published. The SF² Concatenation seasonal news page’s forthcoming books listings are an amalgamation of the titles in the catalogues sent by major UK publishers. 

As they these titles already in the catalogues, they can be ordered, or advance-ordered, now either from the publisher directly or – if you are outside the UK – from specialist SF bookshops and their related retail websites.

The books are listed alphabetically by author.

(16) SPEAKER FOR THE READ. The next episode of Essence of Wonder with Gadi Evron is “You’re Not Ender Wiggins, and That’s Okay – A Show on Strategy, Leadership, and Modern Conflict by Way of Scifi.” Streams Saturday, September 11 at 3:00 p.m. Eastern via YouTube, Facebook Live, and Twitch.

Steven Leonard, Max Brooks, Major General Mick Ryan, and Jon Klug, join us to discuss strategy, leadership, and modern conflict from the perspective of science fiction.

One of the chapters in the book is called “You’re Not Ender Wiggins, and That’s Okay” (by Will Meddings). Be still, my heart.

(17) HUGE NEWS. A T-Rex might have made a nice snack for one of these: “Researchers Identify Dinosaur Species 5 Times Larger Than the T-Rex: ‘This Is Very Exciting’”Yahoo! News has the story.

Researchers have discovered a new species of dinosaur that loomed over Tyrannosaurus Rex.

The Calgary Herald reports that University of Calgary scientists helped identify the massive new species named Ulughbegasaurus, which roamed the earth as an apex predator 90 million years ago.

Researchers were able to identify the new species — which was five times bigger than the fearsome T-Rex — through the dinosaur’s fossilized jaw, which was likely first found by a Russian paleontologist during a dig in the 1980s.

…The researchers found that the dinosaur was between 7.5 to eight meters (24 to 26 feet) in length and likely weighed over 1,000 kilograms (2,204 lbs). At the time Ulughbegasaurus roamed the earth, the T-Rex wasn’t fully evolved and was much smaller in comparison, weighing less than 200 kilograms (440 lbs).

Comparing the two species, Zelenitsky said Ulughbegasaurus “was like a grizzly bear” if T-Rex had been a coyote….

(18) CUBE ROOTS. The New York Times shares scientists’ curiosity about a relic that lends itself to alternate history: “Did Nazis Produce These Uranium Cubes? Researchers Look for an Answer.”

The failure of Nazi Germany’s nuclear program is well established in the historical record. What is less documented is how a handful of uranium cubes, possibly produced by the Nazis, ended up at laboratories in the United States.

Scientists at the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory and the University of Maryland are working to determine whether three uranium cubes they have in their possession were produced by Germany’s failed nuclear program during World War II.

The answer could lead to more questions, such as whether the Nazis might have had enough uranium to create a critical reaction. And, if the Nazis had been successful in building an atomic bomb, what would that have meant for the war?

Researchers at the laboratory believe they may know the origins of the cubes by the end of October. For the moment, the main evidence is anecdotal, in the form of stories passed down from other scientists, according to Jon Schwantes, the project’s principal investigator.

The lab does not have scientific evidence or documentation that would confirm that Nazi Germany produced the black cubes, which measure about two inches on each side. The Nazis produced 1,000 to 1,200 cubes, about half of which were confiscated by the Allied forces, he said.

“The whereabouts of most all of those cubes is unknown today,” Dr. Schwantes said, adding that “most likely those cubes were folded into our weapons stockpile.”…

(19) THE TRUTH MAY BE OUT THERE, IT’S NOT HERE. Samantha Bee of Full Frontal shares“Sam Bee’s Not-Solved Mysteriez: UFOs” on YouTube.

Sam once again dons her trench coat to take one small step for man and one giant leap for a late night television host with an “Unsolved Mysteries” obsession. That’s right…she’s trying to figure out WTF is up with UFOs!

[Thanks to Mike Kennedy, Andrew Porter, Martin Morse Wooster, JJ, Cora Buhlert, SF Concatenation’s Jonathan Cowie, Michael Toman, John King Tarpinian, and Cat Eldridge for some of these stories. Title credit belongs to contributing editor of the day Jayn.]

38 thoughts on “Pixel Scroll 9/10/21 It Was A Pixel Scroll Of Rare Device

  1. (13) I remember watching Sleeper and wondering why that one guy looked so familiar – and then realizing it was Rick Marshall!

  2. Andrew (not Werdna) says I remember watching Sleeper and wondering why that one guy looked so familiar – and then realizing it was Rick Marshall!

    I pride myself at finding the obscure in Birthdays. The Scroll tomorrow night will have a Birthday which will feature an actor that had one truly memorable role as their first gig than stopped acting a decade later.

  3. 3) Yes, I remember similar discussions with Mr. Brown regarding the Hugos some of the years I was the administrator. He was always right (at least, according to him), no matter what the rules said…

    I still miss him.

  4. 17) This article doesn’t make a lot of sense. I checked the link and there wasn’t any ore information. They are saying an Ulughbegasaurus was 7.5 to 8 meters long and weighed 1000 kilograms and then said it is 5 times the size of a T-rex. Now a T-Rex runs at about 12 meters in length and weighs between 6 and 8 metric tons. It then comments that an ancestor of TRex extant at the time Ulughbegasaurus lived weighed only 200 kilograms.

    Whatever ancestor of T Rex alive at that time wasn’t a T Rex. And the normal size of T Rex is much larger. So either the fossil they found is a juvenile and they are extrapolating a much larger size (though they don’t mention it) or they are comparing in size to an ancestor, which is like comparing a donkey to an eohippus and claiming that it is much larger than a Clydesdale.

  5. (11). While not Fantasy or SF, Michael K. Williams also played Leonard Fine in the Sundance TV series “Hap and Leonard,” based on characters created by Joe R. Lansdale (who has certainly written a lot within the genre).

  6. Pierre E. Pettinger, Jr.: which is like comparing a donkey to an eohippus and claiming that it is much larger than a Clydesdale.

    Well, I think you’ve nailed what’s going on here. Another day at the dino click factory.

  7. So Veronica Schanoes was published, among other places, in tor.com

    How? I’ve been looking, on and off, for well over a year at tor.com, and the submissions page for fiction has not changed:
    “Tor.com Original Short Fiction Submissions Guidelines

    As of January 7, Tor.com is closed to unsolicited short fiction submissions on an indefinite basis. Please check here for more information. Our readers and editors will respond to each story that has been submitted to us. If you have questions about the status of your story, or wish to withdraw your story from our consideration to submit it elsewhere, please email [email protected]

    Tordotcom Publishing Novella Submissions

    Tordotcom Publishing submissions are currently closed.”

    The latter seems to be from 2019, but the former, short fiction, appears in a post from 2015. I’ve tried emailing tor, and gotten no answer from anyone.

    Perhaps someone here can find an answer as to whether they’re ever going to reopen to short fiction or novellas.

  8. I was briefly very interested in the dinosaur story. Having been disappointed there, I believe I will return to my comfort reading, currently a cozy mystery featuring witches and cats. Oh, and a magical library. It won’t be on anyone’s nomination lists, but right now, it’s hitting the spot.

  9. mark asks Perhaps someone here can find an answer as to whether they’re ever going to reopen to short fiction or novellas.

    They’re pretty clear on the their website that they won’t be looking for fiction submissions until next year at the earliest. I doubt anyone here is going to know anything more.

  10. Lis Carey says I was briefly very interested in the dinosaur story. Having been disappointed there, I believe I will return to my comfort reading, currently a cozy mystery featuring witches and cats. Oh, and a magical library. It won’t be on anyone’s nomination lists, but right now, it’s hitting the spot.

    Oh details please! It sounds fascinating!

    My Audible list includes Sofie Kelly’s Curiousity Thrilled The Cat which has a Librarian and felines that are more than mere felines.

  11. I just read “Petty Treasons”, by Victoria Goddard. It’s a kind of comfort read (novella or novelette by length). Chronologically, it comes before “The Hands of the Emperor”, but she writes that you should read it after, not before, because it explains some things.

  12. (17) A much better write-up is here, which makes it clear that Ulughbegasaurus was much larger than the early tyrannosaur, Timurlengia, that shared its environment. It was not larger than T. Rex.

  13. @Cat Eldridge–

    Oh details please! It sounds fascinating!

    Unfamiliar Magic (The Familiar Cafe), by Bonnie Elizabeth Jade runs a cat cafe in Waverton, Kentucky. Except, Waverton is a witch town–a large percentage of the residents are witches. Along with all the normal amenities, Waverton has a specialty library that specializes in books and resources for witches, breeders of familiars (who can be of any species, but Jade has a cat familiar and her “Cat Cafe” is a familiar cafe, offering familiar cats who have lost their witches, and witches seeking new familiars, to connect.

    Jade is friendly with Trinity, who is the senior library assistant, and Natalie, manager of the local hotel, and they’re having their weekly “long break” when a police officer walks in for coffee, and is immediately called away by a call. Mason, Jade’s familiar, howls, which is not normal, and subsequently tells Jade that he saw a spirit, a very disturbed spirit, so most likely a murder victim.

    The murder victim is the librarian, Eric Boyd, Trinity’s boss, with whom she has recently argued more seriously than usual. (Everybody argued with Eric. Good librarian, not a popular person.)

    That’s the setup. The story, of course, gets more complicated from there. Mason, some of the familiars resident at the cafe, and a couple of others play significant roles. I like the cats, and Jade, and her friends, including her staff. A very pleasant comfort read.

    My Audible list includes Sofie Kelly’s Curiousity Thrilled The Cat which has a Librarian and felines that are more than mere felines.

    I read that one! And enjoyed it.

  14. (13) TODAY’S BIRTHDAYS. Happy Birthday, Victoria Strauss! The “Way of Ârata” duology (The Burning Land and The Awakened City; not a trilogy) is great! The “Stone” duology’s quite good, too, but “Way of Ârata” is my favorite.

    I’m pretty sure I sang Strauss’s praises on this day in history last year, too. I’m like a broken record. 😉

  15. JoelZakem said

    Michael K. Williams also played Leonard Fine in the Sundance TV series “Hap and Leonard,” based on characters created by Joe R. Lansdale

    Ok, now I know who he is. Crud.

  16. (4) The vexing thing is that very, very few people are truly in a position to judge just how good a translation truly is.

  17. (5) For anyone who’s interested, I highly recommend the Making of Frozen 2 series available on Disney+ for a fascinating look at how intensely dedicated to their projects and their craft these people are.

  18. 16) Having thought about it, I’d say not being Ender Wiggins is more than just “OK”. Probably well over into “pretty great” for most people.

  19. Perhaps Charles N. Brown did not wish to be confused with the protagonist of an old Coasters song. I don’t know if anyone did a filk on that basis, but “Who wins the Hugo every single year?” scans.

  20. 4) That all seems eminently reasonable! I’m actually more likely to pick up a book if I know it’s a translation; I’m interested in other countries’ literature but my time to go seeking out works on that basis is somewhat limited.

    6) Maybe if we have enough of these articles about how much of a nightmare ebooks can be for us to lend, someone will do something about it? I feel like I’ve seen a number of “Ebooks cost libraries more!” articles in the last year… and yet given how few people still know that, it’s clearly not enough.

    18) “Copenhagen” was somewhat based around discussing that premise. They both were and weren’t that far off– but they’d have needed to discover it much earlier for it to have ended the war in their favor. And Heisenberg wasn’t especially favored by the Nazi high command; he was fairly hampered by having trouble getting them to give him enough material. By all accounts the German nuclear scientists were shocked, when captured, that they’d been beaten to it by the Americans. (In any case, the Germans had such powerful chemical weapons that the American command structure whisked a bunch of war criminal scientists into America after the war hoping they’d learn to do this– which didn’t work out so well– so Germany did have weapons that might have changed the course of the war if they’d actually used them.)

  21. 13) Gerry Conway also wrote two SF novels, although I think he used the name, Gerard F. Conway. They were Mindship and The Midnight Dancers. I read both of them back in the day. Mindship was pretty good.

  22. (14) I wonder if anyone ever did a Spider-Man story based on the fact that he revealed his secret identity to that bad guy he was carrying.

  23. Meredith moment: Poul and Karen Anderson’s delightful The Unicorn Trade is available from the usual suspects for a buck ninety nine. It’s dedicated to John and Bjo Trimble.

  24. (18) The Germans were shocked to learn the Allies had beaten them to the atomic bomb; the Allies were shocked to discover how far behind the German A-bomb effort was. While the Manhattan Project was racing to assemble the first three atomic bombs, the German team was racing to build their first nuclear reactor, a milestone the Manhattan Project had reached two years earlier. And the German reactor wouldn’t even have worked, because of several errors in Heisenberg’s understanding of the physics and the poor quality of their atomic data.

    ETA: A great reference is Jeremy Bernstein’s Hitler’s Uranium Club, an edited and annotated version of the Farm Hall recordings of Heisenberg and his group while they were interned in England.

  25. @Rob Thornton – That’s a BUNCH of Poul Anderson on sale, isn’t it? I am in that happy situation of having his entire bibliography ahead of me unread, and a nice stockpile of B&N gift cards that need to get dented. Where do you suggest I should start? (I did already yoink myself a copy of The Unicorn Trade, though what with it having dual author credits, I have no idea how indicative it is of Anderson’s solo work.)

  26. @ Nicole J. LeBoeuf-Little

    I would go with:

    The Merman’s Children, War of the Gods, Hrolf Kraki’s Saga, and Operation Chaos/Luna.

    The list is heavy on the fantasy side, but that’s what I know.

  27. I would add Orion Shall Rise which is SF and a damn fine story. I keep hoping that’ll get done as an audio narrative some day as it’s perfect for that medium.

    Now listening to Dick Francis’ Enquiry

  28. 8) THE MOST RELUCTANT CONVERT started off in Washington, but I didn’t see it. Filers interested in Max McLean’s work might see my review of MARTIN LUTHER ON TRIAL, which McLean co-wrote and which I reviewed here in 2018.

  29. Huh. I wrote a long comment last night, posted it, then hit the “Edit” button for a couple of very minor changes. But it doesn’t seem to have re-posted after those changes.

    Did I forget to hit “Save” again, perhaps? It was just before prepping for bed, so I was in a bit of a rush, so maybe. Dang, it was a great comment, too.

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