2020 Dagger Awards Longlists

The Crime Writers’ Association (CWA) of the United Kingdom today announced the longlist for the 2020 Dagger Awards.

The Daggers were first given in 1955, but for the first five years CWA called its top honor the Crossed Red Herring Award.

The award’s shortlist will come out this summer, and the winners will be revealed at a ceremony on October 22.

GOLD DAGGER

This award is for the best crime novel by an author of any nationality.

  • Claire Askew: What You Pay For (Hodder & Stoughton)
  • Gary Bell: Beyond Reasonable Doubt (Raven Books)
  • Lou Berney: November Road (Harper Fiction)
  • MW Craven: Black Summer (Constable)
  • John Fairfax: Forced Confessions (Little, Brown)
  • Lucy Foley: The Guest List (Harper Fiction)
  • Elly Griffiths: The Lantern Men (Quercus Fiction)
  • Chris Hammer: Silver (Wildfire)
  • Mick Herron: Joe Country (John Murray)
  • SG MacLean: The Bear Pit (Quercus Fiction)
  • Patrick McGuinness: Throw Me to the Wolves (Jonathan Cape)
  • Abir Mukherjee: Death in the East (Harvill Secker)
  • Alex North: The Whisper Man (Michael Joseph)
  • Scott Phillips: That Left Turn at Albuquerque (Soho Crime)
  • Michael Robotham: Good Girl, Bad Girl (Sphere)
  • Tim Weaver: No One Home (Michael Joseph)

IAN FLEMING STEEL DAGGER

Eligible books in this category are thrillers set in any period and include, but are not limited to, spy fiction, psychological thrillers and action/adventure stories.

  • Lou Berney: November Road (Harper Fiction)
  • Tom Chatfield: This is Gomorrah (Hodder & Stoughton)
  • Karen Cleveland: Keep You Close (Bantam Press)
  • AA Dhand: One Way Out (Bantam Press)
  • Eva Dolan: Between Two Evils (Raven Books)
  • Helen Fields: Perfect Kill (Avon)
  • Oliver Harris: A Shadow Intelligence (Little, Brown)
  • Peter Heller: The River (Weidenfeld & Nicolson)
  • Greg Iles: Cemetery Road (Harper Fiction)
  • David Koepp: Cold Storage (HQ)
  • Adrian McKinty: The Chain (Orion Fiction)
  • Alex North: The Whisper Man (Michael Joseph)
  • Andrew Taylor: The King’s Evil (Harper Fiction)

JOHN CREASEY (NEW BLOOD) DAGGER

This award is for the best crime novel by a first-time author of any nationality.

  • Steph Cha: Your House Will Pay (Faber & Faber)
  • Sherryl Clark: Trust Me, I’m Dead (Verve Books)
  • Samantha Downing: My Lovely Wife (Michael Joseph)
  • Philippa East: Little White Lies (HQ)
  • Andrew James Greig: Whirligig (Fledgling Press)
  • AS Hatch: This Dark Little Place (Serpent’s Tail)
  • James Von Leyden: A Death in the Medina (Constable)
  • Deborah Masson: Hold Your Tongue (Corgi)
  • Owen Matthews: Black Sun (Bantam Press)
  • Felicity McLean: The Van Apfel Girls Are Gone (Point Blank)
  • Robin Morgan-Bentley: The Wreckage (Trapeze)
  • Trevor Wood: The Man on the Street (Quercus Fiction)

SAPERE BOOKS HISTORICAL DAGGER

This award is for the best historical crime novel, set in any period up to 50 years prior to the year in which the award will be made.

  • Alis Hawkins: In Two Minds (The Dome Press)
  • Philip Kerr: Metropolis (Quercus Fiction)
  • SG MacLean: The Bear Pit (Quercus Fiction)
  • Abir Mukherjee: Death in the East (Harvill Secker)
  • SW Perry: The Serpent’s Mark (Corvus)
  • Alex Reeve: The Anarchists’ Club (Raven Books)
  • Gareth Rubin: Liberation Square (Michael Joseph)
  • SD Sykes: The Bone Fire (Hodder & Stoughton)
  • Andrew Taylor: The King’s Evil (Harper Collins)
  • Lynne Truss: The Man That Got Away (Raven Books)
  • Nicola Upson: Sorry for the Dead (Faber & Faber)
  • Ovidia Yu: The Paper Bark Tree Mystery (Constable)

CRIME FICTION IN TRANSLATION DAGGER

This award is for a crime novel not originally written in English and which has been translated into English for UK publication.

  • Edoardo Albinati: The Catholic School, translated by Anthony Shugaar (Picador)
  • Marion Brunet: Summer of Reckoning, translated by Katherine Gregor (Bitter Lemon Press)
  • Hannelore Cayre: The Godmother, translated by Stephanie Smee (Old Street Publishing)
  • K Ferrari: Like Flies from Afar, translated by Adrian Nathan West (Canongate Books)
  • Jorge Galán: November, translated by Jason Wilson (Constable)
  • Johana Gustawsson: Blood Song, translated by David Warriner (Orenda Books)
  • Jørn Lier Horst: The Cabin, translated by Anne Bruce (Michael Joseph)
  • Sergio Olguin: The Fragility of Bodies, translated by Miranda France (Bitter Lemon Press)
  • Leonardo Padura: Grab a Snake by the Tail, translated by Peter Bush (Bitter Lemon Press)
  • Antti Tuomainen: Little Siberia, translated by David Hackston (Orenda Books)

SHORT STORY DAGGER

This award is for any crime short story first published in the UK in English in a publication that pays for contributions, or broadcast in the UK in return for payment.

  • Fiona Cummins: Dead Weight in Exit Wounds, edited by Paul B Kane and Marie O’Regan (Titan Books)
  • Jeffery Deaver: Connecting the Dots in Invisible Blood, edited by Maxim Jakubowski (Titan Books)
  • Jeffery Deaver: The Bully in Exit Wounds, edited by Paul B Kane and Marie O’Regan (Titan Books)
  • Paul Finch: The New Lad in Exit Wounds, edited by Paul B Kane and Marie O’Regan (Titan Books)
  • Christopher Fowler: The Washing in Invisible Blood, edited by Maxim Jakubowski (Titan Books)
  • Christopher Fowler: Bryant and May and The Devil’s Triangle in Bryant and May: England’s Finest (Doubleday)
  • Lauren Henderson: #Me Too in Invisible Blood, edited by Maxim Jakubowski (Titan Books)
  • Louise Jensen: The Recipe in Exit Wounds, edited by Paul B Kane and Marie O’Regan (Titan Books)
  • Dean Koontz: Kittens in Exit Wounds, edited by Paul B Kane and Marie O’Regan (Titan Books)
  • Syd Moore: Easily Made in 12 Strange Days of Christmas (Point Blank Press)

ALCS GOLD DAGGER FOR NON-FICTION

This award is for any non-fiction work on a crime-related theme by an author of any nationality.

  • Casey Cep: Furious Hours (William Heinemann)
  • Julia Ebner: Going Dark: The Secret Social Lives of Extremists (Bloomsbury Publishing)
  • Peter Everett: Corrupt Bodies (Icon Books)
  • Caroline Goode: Honour: Achieving Justice for Banaz Mahmod (Oneworld Publications)
  • Joanna Jolly: Red River Girl (Virago)
  • Jodi Kantor & Megan Twohey: She Said (Bloomsbury Circus)
  • Sean O’Connor: The Fatal Passion of Alma Rattenbury (Simon & Schuster)
  • Adam Sisman: The Professor and the Parson: A Story of Desire, Deceit and Defrocking (Profile Books)
  • Susannah Stapleton: The Adventures of Maud West, Lady Detective (Picador)
  • Fred Vermorel: Dead Fashion Girl: A Situationist Detective Story (Strange Attractor Press)

DAGGER IN THE LIBRARY

The Dagger in the Library is a prize for a body of work by an established crime writer who has long been popular with borrowers from libraries, and who has supported libraries and their users.

  • Benjamin Black
  • Christopher Brookmyre
  • Jane Casey
  • Paul Finch
  • Alex Gray
  • Mick Herron
  • Quintin Jardine
  • Lisa Jewell
  • Erin Kelly
  • Adrian McKinty
  • Denise Mina
  • James Oswald

DEBUT DAGGER

A competition for the opening of a crime novel and synopsis, chosen by judges: bestselling author Leigh Russell, editor Stephanie Glencross (of Gregory and Company), Editorial Director at Bonnier Zaffre Katherine Armstrong and director of literary agency A.M. Heath and Co. Oli Munson.

  • Barbara Austin: Lowlands
  • Anna Caig: The Spae-Wife
  • Loraine Fowlow: Undercut
  • Leanne Fry: Whipstick
  • Kim Hays: Pesticide
  • Jack Kapica: Blogger’s End
  • Nicholas Morrish: Emergency Drill
  • Josephine Moulds: Revolution Never Lies
  • Michael Munro: Bitter Lake
  • Karen Taylor: Grim Fairy Tale
  • Jane Wing: Dark Pastimes
  • Sarah Yarwood-Lovett: A Generation of Vipers

PUBLISHERS’ DAGGER

This prestigious Dagger is awarded annually to the Best Crime and Mystery Publisher of the Year.

  • Allison & Busby
  • Bitter Lemon
  • Harvill Secker
  • Head of Zeus
  • HQ
  • Michael Joseph
  • Orenda
  • Orion
  • Pushkin Vertigo
  • Raven
  • Severn House
  • Sphere

DIAMOND DAGGER

Awarded every year to an author whose crime-writing career has been marked by sustained excellence, and who has made a significant contribution to the genre. Votes from CWA members go forward to be deliberated on by an independent panel. This year’s recipient is —

MARTIN EDWARDS

Another Pair of Crime Fiction Awards

2019 CWA Dagger Awards: British Crime Writers’ Association (CWA) announced the winners of the 2019 CWA Dagger Awards in London, England, on October 24.

CWA Gold Dagger:

  • The Puppet Show, by M.W. Craven: (Constable)

CWA John Creasey (New Blood):

  • Scrublands, by Chris Hammer (Wildfire)

CWA ALCS Gold Dagger for Non-fiction:

  • The Spy and the Traitor: The Greatest Espionage Story of the Cold War, by Ben Macintyre (Viking)

CWA Ian Fleming Steel Dagger:

  • To the Lions, by Holly Watt (Bloomsbury)

CWA Sapere Books Historical Dagger:

  • Destroying Angel, by S.G. MacLean: (Quercus)

CWA International Dagger:

  • A Long Night in Paris, by Dov Alfon; translated by Daniella Zamir (Maclehose Press)

CWA Short Story Dagger:

  •  “The Dummies’ Guide to Serial Killing,” by Danuta Reah (from The Dummies’ Guide to Serial Killing and Other Fantastic Female Fables, by Danuta Reah [aka Danuta Kot]; Fantastic)

Highly commended

  • “I Detest Mozart,” by Teresa Solana (from The First Prehistoric Serial Killer and Other Stories, by Teresa Solana; Bitter Lemon Press)

Dagger in the Library:

  • Kate Ellis

Debut Dagger
(for the opening of a crime novel by an uncontracted writer):

  • Wake, by Shelley Burr

Highly commended

  • Hardways, by Catherine Hendricks

Diamond Dagger Recipient

  • Robert Goddard

For a career of sustained excellence and a significant contribution to the genre

Best Crime and Mystery Publisher

  • No Exit Press

STRAND CRITICS AWARD. The Strand Magazine announced the winners of its 2019 Strand Critics Awards on July 11.

Best Mystery Novel

(Tie)

  • Transcription by Kate Atkinson (Little, Brown and Company)
  • Sunburn by Laura Lippman (HarperCollins)

Best Debut Novel

  • The Chalk Man by C.J. Tudor  (Crown)

Lifetime Achievement Awards

  • Heather Graham
  • Donna Leon

Publisher of the Year

  • Dominique Raccah of Sourcebooks

Pixel Scroll 5/15/19 These Groots Are Made For Walking, Ent That’s Just What They’ll Do

(1) HOGWASH, POPPYCOCK & BALONEY. George R.R. Martin quashed a current rumor in his post “Idiocy on the Internet”.

…All of a sudden this crazy story about my finishing THE WINDS OF WINTER and A DREAM OF SPRING years ago is popping up everywhere. No, I am not going to provide links. I don’t want to reward purveyors of misinformation with hits.

I will, however, say for the record — no, THE WINDS OF WINTER and A DREAM OF SPRING are not finished. DREAM is not even begun; I am not going to start writing volume seven until I finish volume six

It seems absurd to me that I need to state this. The world is round, the Earth revolves around the sun, water is wet… do I need to say that too? It boggles me that anyone would believe this story, even for an instant. It makes not a whit of sense. Why would I sit for years on completed novels? Why would my publishers — not just here in the US, but all around the world — ever consent to this? They make millions and millions of dollars every time a new Ice & Fire book comes out, as do I. Delaying makes no sense. Why would HBO want the books delayed? The books help create interest in the show, just as the show creates interest in the books.

So… no, the books are not done. HBO did not ask me to delay them. Nor did David & Dan. There is no “deal” to hold back on the books. I assure you, HBO and David & Dan would both have been thrilled and delighted if THE WINDS OF WINTER had been delivered and published four or five years ago… and NO ONE would have been more delighted than me.

(2) BUT THIS STORY IS TRUE. Martin confirmed a different report quoting his opinion of two characters created by Tolkien and Rowling:

At the Q&A following the premiere of the new TOLKIEN film in Los Angeles last week, I did indeed say that Gandalf could kick Dumbledore’s ass.

Gandalf COULD kick Dumbledore’s ass. I mean, duh. He’s a maia, folks. Next best thing to a demigod. Gandalf dies and come back. Dumbledore dies and stays dead.

But if it will calm down all the Potterites out there, let me say that Gandalf could kick Melisandre’s ass too.

(3) HORRORMENTARY. The new drama Years and Years, which follows a British family over the next 15 years began Tuesday night on BBC1 in the UK, and will be screened on HBO in the US later in the year. BBC contemplates: “How the near future became our greatest horror”.

…But if [J.G.] Ballard’s thinking was subversive at the time, now we’re beset by the nearest of ‘near future’ narratives. They are intent on imagining not what will become of us in thousands of millennia, or even in a few decades’ time – à la dystopian works like Blade Runner and Soylent Green, previously understood as ‘near future’ – but in as little as the next few years. In doing so, these near-near-future stories create realities that feel immediately recognisable to us, but invariably with a pretty unpleasant twist or three. In literature, these have gone hand in hand with the rise of the ‘mundane science fiction’ movement – which began in the mid-noughties and was built on “not wanting to imagine shiny, hard futures [but give a] sense of sliding from one version of our present into something slightly alienated”, says Roger Luckhurst, a professor in Modern and Contemporary Literature at London’s Birkbeck College and an expert in science fiction.

And, at the moment, such stories are particularly prevalent on the small-screen….

(4) BLACK MIRROR. The show returns to Netflix on June 5:

(5) BEAUMONT REMEMBERED. Pulpfest’s Mike Chomko profiles “THE TWILIGHT ZONE’S Magic Man — Charles Beaumont”, who died too soon —

…At the height of his writing career, Beaumont began to suffer from a mysterious ailment. “By 1964, he could no longer write. Meetings with producers turned disastrous. His speech became slower, more deliberate. His concentration worsened. . . . after a battery of tests at UCLA, Beaumont was diagnosed as having Alzheimer’s Disease; he faced premature senility, aging, and an early death.” He died on February 21, 1967 at the age of thirty-eight.

(6) STORIES REBORN. Paula Guran’s anthology Mythic Journeys: Retold Myths and Legends was released yesterday by Night Shade Books.

The Native American trickster Coyote . . . the snake-haired Greek Gorgon Medusa, whose gaze turned men to stone . . . Kaggen, creator of the San peoples of Africa . . . the Holy Grail of Arthurian legend . . . Freyja, the Norse goddess of love and beauty . . . Ys, the mythical sunken city once built on the coast of France . . . Ragnarok, the myth of a world destroyed and reborn . . . Jason and the Argonauts, sailing in search of the Golden Fleece . . .

Myths and legends are the oldest of stories, part of our collective consciousness, and the source from which all fiction flows. Full of magic, supernatural powers, monsters, heroes, epic journeys, strange worlds, and vast imagination, they are fantasies so compelling we want to believe them true.

(7) FRIEDMAN OBIT. “Stanton Friedman, famed UFO researcher, dead at 84”CBC has the story.

A nuclear physicist by training, Friedman had devoted his life to researching and investigating UFOs since the late 1960s.

He was credited with bringing the 1947 Roswell Incident — the famous incident that gave rise to theories about UFOs and a U.S. military coverup — back into the mainstream conversation.

(8) TODAY IN HISTORY.

Apparently a big day in the history of B-movies.

  • May 15, 1953 Phantom From Space premiered in theaters.
  • May 15, 1959Invisible Invaders debuted in movie houses.
  • May 15, 1969 Witchfinder General, starring Vincent Price, screened for the first time.

(9) TODAY’S BIRTHDAYS.

[Compiled by Cat Eldridge.]

  • Born May 15, 1856 L. Frank Baum. I adore The Wizard of Oz film and I’m betting you know that it only covers about half of the novel which is a splendid read indeed. I’ll confess that I never read the numerous latter volumes in the Oz series, nor have I read anything by him. What’s the rest of his fiction like? (Died 1919.)
  • Born May 15, 1877 William Bowen. His most notable work was The Old Tobacco Shop, a fantasy novel that was one runner-up for the inaugural Newbery Medal in 1922. He also had a long running children’s series with a young girl named Merrimeg whom a narrator told her adventures with all sorts of folkloric beings. (Died 1937.)
  • Born May 15, 1926 Anthony Shaffer. His genre screenplays were the Hitchcock’s Frenzy and Robin Hardy’s The Wicker Man. Though definitely not genre, he wrote the screenplays for a number of most excellent mysteries including Death on the NileMurder on the Orient Express and Sleuth. (Died 2001.)
  • Born May 15, 1955 Lee Horsley, 64. A performer who’s spent a lot of his career in genre undertakings starting with The Sword and the Sorcerer (and its 2010 sequel Tales of an Ancient Empire), horror films Nightmare ManThe Corpse Had a Familiar Face and Dismembered and even a bit of SF in Showdown at Area 51. Not sure where The Face of Fear falls has a it has a cop with psychic powers and a serial killer. 
  • Born May 15, 1960 Rob Bowman, 59. Producer of such series as Alien Nation, M.A.N.T.I.S.Quantum LeapNext Generation, and The X-Files. He has directed these films: The X-Files, Reign of Fire and Elektra. He directed one or several episodes of far too many genres series to list here.  
  • Born May 15, 1966 Greg Wise, 53. I’m including him solely as he’s in Tristram Shandy: A Cock and Bull Story. It is a film-within-a-film, featuring Steve Coogan and Rob Brydon playing themselves as egotistical actors during the making of a screen adaptation of Laurence Sterne’s 18th century metafictional novel Tristram Shandy. Not genre (possibly) but damn fun. 

(10) VIRGIN GALACTIC. The company’s press release, “Sir Richard Branson Announces Virgin Galactic Move to Spaceport America this Summer, as Company Readies for Commercial Service”, does not state when service will commence.

At a press conference [on May 10] at the New Mexico State Capitol Building in Santa Fe, hosted by New Mexico Governor Michelle Lujan Grisham, Virgin Founder Sir Richard Branson announced that Virgin Galactic’s development and testing program had advanced sufficiently to move the spaceline staff and space vehicles from Mojave, California to their commercial operations headquarters at Spaceport America, New Mexico. The move, which involves more than 100 staff, will commence immediately and continue through the summer, to minimise schooling disruption for families.

Virgin Galactic partnered with New Mexico in an agreement which saw the state complete construction of Spaceport America, the world’s first, purpose-built commercial spaceport, and Virgin Galactic committing to center its commercial spaceflight activities at the facilities once its vehicles and operations were ready for service.

(11) ZUBRIN’S CASE. The Space Review hosts Jeff Foust’s coverage of Robert Zubrin’s new book The Case for Space: How the Revolution in Spaceflight Opens Up a Future of Limitless Possibility.

…The second part of the book tackles the question of why humanity should move out in the universe. The reasons are familiar ones, from scientific discoveries to new technologies to the survival of humanity itself. For example, Zubrin reiterates a belief, dating back to his The Case for Mars book more than 20 years ago, that a human settlement on Mars will require ingenuity to survive, stimulating new technologies from robotics to fusion power that might not be developed on Earth.

Zubrin offers a comprehensive plan, one rich in technical detail—perhaps too rich at times, with some passages filled with equations describing chemical processes needed to extract resources on Mars or other worlds or discussing the physics of advanced propulsion technologies. But it seems a little fanciful to talk about concepts for interstellar travel like antimatter and magnetic sails when we find it so difficult today simply to get to low Earth orbit reliably and inexpensively.

(12) DAGGERS. The longlists for the The Crime Writers Association Dagger Awards have been posted.

Lavie Tidhar’s “Bag Man”, in The Outcast Hours anthology, edited by Mahvesh Murad and Jared Shurin, is one of the works longlisted for the CWA Short Story Dagger Award.

(13) REBELS WITH A CAUSE. Marie Kondo really struck a nerve.The Independent had no trouble finding people who have no plans to winnow their book stacks: “Going against the decluttering craze: the book hoarers who defy Marie Kondo”. For one example —  

Jane Green, bestselling author who traded England for New England

I’ve run out of space. Books are starting to get stacked up on the floor, underneath tables, underneath chairs, on top of tables. They’re everywhere. With no more room on the bookshelves, I’ve been eyeing this gorgeous French armoire that takes up an entire wall. That wall is just perfect for shelves and would make the room warmer. I know, however, that my husband really likes the armoire. He sees: storage, storage, storage. I see: books, books, books. We’ll see who wins. 

For years, I couldn’t get rid of anything. I have had to learn to manage the flow. Paperbacks I tend not to keep unless I love them and know I’m going to reread them. Hardcovers are really hard for me to get rid of. They all signify a time in my life. They all have stories around the stories. I will sometimes just stand there and look at my books and remember.

(14) ANOTHER BRICK IN THE PAYWALL. Digiday elaborates on a trend that has made it more challenging for me to research Scroll items at sites that think I should pay for their material (the noive!): “Incognito no more: Publishers close loopholes as paywall blockers emerge”.

Subscription publishers have tightened their paywalls, plugging leaks and reducing the number of articles readers access before subscribing. But as reader revenue becomes more of a focus, more sophisticated ways of dodging paying have emerged.

There have always been a number of low-tech ways to circumvent cookie-based metered paywalls, where the same content is freely available in some but not all cases. For instance deleting cookies, using multiple browsers and copying the URL are go-to methods, and are near impossible to mitigate against. However, over the last 18 months, publishers have started plugging these gaps.

In February, The New York Times started tightening its paywall so readers couldn’t access paywalled content by switching their device to incognito mode. A New York Times spokesperson said it’s too early to glean the impacts of these tests.

(15) MORE INFORMATION ABOUT THE NOMMOS. The announcement of the 2019 Nommo Awards shortlist was followed by a press release with additional details:

The 2019 Nommo Awards for Speculative Fiction by Africans announce the shortlists for the Nommo Awards in all four categories – novel, novella, short story and comics/graphic novels.

The roughly 170 members of the African Speculative Fiction Society (ASFS) nominated works for the Awards long list and short lists.  They will now have a three-month period to read the works and vote for the winners of the Awards. 

The short-listed works must be speculative fiction created by Africans and published in calendar year 2018. The winners of the Ilube Nommo Award and the Comic/Graphic Novel award receive UD$ 1000.00.  The winners of the novella and short story awards receive US$ 500.00.  The ASFS thanks its patron Tom Ilube, CBE for his generosity.

The ASFS was founded in 2015. The creation of the Nommo Awards was announced at the Ake Festival in Abeokuta in November 2016.  The winners will be announced at the Ake Festival in Lagos Nigeria in November.

(16) DOES WHATEVER A SPIDER CAN. BBC:“Spider Uses Web As Slingshot To Ensnare Prey, Scientists Find”.

This high-velocity maneuver is a nightmare if you’re a fly.

There’s a type of spider that can slowly stretch its web taut and then release it, causing the web to catapult forward and ensnare unsuspecting prey in its strands.

Triangle-weaver spiders use their own web the way humans might use a slingshot or a crossbow. Scientists from the University of Akron say this is a process called “power amplification,” and they published their research in Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences this week.

(17) WWW. Cute name: “Wood wide web: Trees’ social networks are mapped”.

Research has shown that beneath every forest and wood there is a complex underground web of roots, fungi and bacteria helping to connect trees and plants to one another.

This subterranean social network, nearly 500 million years old, has become known as the “wood wide web”.

Now, an international study has produced the first global map of the “mycorrhizal fungi networks” dominating this secretive world.

Details appear in Nature journal.

Using machine-learning, researchers from the Crowther Lab at ETH Zurich, Switzerland, and Stanford University in the US used the database of the Global Forest Initiative, which covers 1.2 million forest tree plots with 28,000 species, from more than 70 countries.

(18) ANCIENT PUNCH. “Chang’e-4: Chinese rover ‘confirms’ Moon crater theory” says the BBC.

The Chinese Chang’e-4 rover may have confirmed a longstanding idea about the origin of a vast crater on the Moon’s far side.

The rover’s landing site lies within a vast impact depression created by an asteroid strike billions of years ago.

Now, mission scientists have found evidence that impact was so powerful it punched through the Moon’s crust and into the layer below called the mantle.

Chang’e-4 has identified what appear to be mantle rocks on the surface.

It’s something the rover was sent to the far side to find out.

Chunlai Li, from the Chinese Academy of Sciences in Beijing, and colleagues have presented their findings in the journal Nature.

(19) GAME OF PYTHONS. Funny or Die shows why “Cersei isn’t the only hard-nosed negotiator Tyrion’s ever faced.”

[Thanks to John King Tarpinian, Chip Hitchcock, Martin Morse Wooster, JJ, Cat Eldridge, Mike Kennedy, Carl Slaughter, and Andrew Porter for some of these stories. Title credit goes to File 770 contributing editors of the day Daniel Dern and OGH.]