Pixel Scroll 12/14/18 Good King Pixelslas Looked Out On The File Of Seven

(1) WRITING SPACE. In “Why I Write in Cafes”, Rachel Swirsky unpacks all of her reasons.

I’ve been writing a lot in cafes recently. Well, mostly one cafe, but I’ve dallied with others…

I always accomplish something, or prove I can’t.

Because I’m at the cafe with someone else, and we are there with a purpose, I always spend at least some time trying to write. Some days, nothing comes. More often, even if I feel creatively dry, I can scrape up something, whether it’s a bit of editing, a paragraph or two, or the beginning of a story (which I may never finish). On my own I can get depressed over those days when the writing doesn’twork, and it makes me avoidant for a while afterward. With a writing partner, there’s a set time to try again.

(2) BRING PLENTY OF NAPKINS. Scott Edelman will be at the microphone while you slurp down Thai Beef Noodle Soup with Stephen Kozeniewski in Episode 84 of the Eating the Fantastic podcast.

This time around you’ll sit in on my meal at Noodle Charm with horror writer Stephen Kozeniewski.

At least I think we ate at Noodle Charm. I’m not really sure. (Give a listen to the episode to find out the reason for my uncertainty.)

Kozeniewski is the author of such gonzo novels as Braineater Jones, Billy and the Cloneasaurus, and The Ghoul Archipelago. He’s also been part of the writers room for Silverwood: The Door, a 10-episode prose follow-up to Tony Valenzuela’s Black Box TV series Silverwood, which was released in weekly installments in both prose and audiobook formats.

We discussed how it took nearly 500 submissions before his first novel was finally accepted, why he has no interest in writing sequels, his advice for winning a Turkey Award for the worst possible opening to the worst possible science fiction or fantasy novel, why his output is split between horror and science fiction (but not mysteries), the reason Brian Keene was who he wanted to be when he grew up, why almost any story would be more interesting with zombies, when you should follow and when you should break the accepted rules of writing, where he falls on the fast vs. slow zombies debate, and much more.

(3) BROKE-DOWN ENGINE. NPR’s Mark Jenkins is frank: “‘Mortal Engines’ Internally Combusts”.

…That’s just a cursory account of Mortal Engines, which would have benefited from losing a few supporting characters, several flashbacks and at least one subplot. Yet the movie’s major weakness is not story, but characterization.

The only actor who holds the screen is Weaving, and even he suffers from a cardboard role and plywood dialogue. Hilmar, Natsworthy and Jihae are all as bland as their parts, lacking charm, swagger and humor. The disastrous absence of the last quality can partly be blamed on the script, which hazards a joke about every 45 minutes.

(4) CAUGHT UP INTHE WEB. Meanwhile, Chris Klimek writes at NPR that “‘Spider-Man: Into The Spider-Verse’ Is A Fun, Warm-Hearted Treat”.

It’s hard to fathom that the same Sony Pictures that, in 2012, decided the best way to expand the appeal of its live-action Spider-Man franchise was to start over with lesser movies, has now become smart enough to put its resources into a superb new — really new — Spider-Man cartoon. Maybe someone in a Culver City boardroom got bit by a radioactive MacArthur Fellow.

Whatever the reason, for a powerful corporation to relax its grip on an ancient specimen of blue-chip IP enough to let the creatives have some fun is a rare thing, and one that should not go unheralded. Marvel Comics weathered the ire of reactionary fandom back in 2011 when it introduced Miles Morales, a Spider-Man no less Amazing than that nerdy orphan Peter Parker, but for the fact he was the son of a Puerto Rican ER nurse and an African-American beat cop. Miles became the Spider-Man of the publisher’s “Ultimate” line, a spiral arm of the Marvel Universe that…

…you know what? Don’t worry about it. To cite the refrain of this graphically dazzling, generously imaginative, nakedly optimistic, mercilessly funny and inclusive-without-being-all-pious-about-it animated oydssey called Spider-Man: Into the Spider-Verse, “Anyone can wear the mask.”

(5) STELLAR POPPINS.The BBC’s Nicholas Barber finds many defects compared to the original, but gives 4 stars to Mary Poppins Returns.

Sensibly, Blunt doesn’t impersonate Andrews. Less sensibly, she impersonates Maggie Smith: her haughty, upper-crust Mary would be right at home in Downtown Abbey. But otherwise, Mary Poppins Returns is so similar to its predecessor as to be almost identical. There are no revelations, no unexpected locations, no hints at what Mary gets up to when she isn’t looking after the Banks children – although we’ll probably get a prequel set in nanny-training college in a few years’ time. The only significant difference is that the story has been moved on from 1910 to the 1930s, so it’s Mary Poppins: The Next Generation.

(6) BORDER TOWN DROPPED. “DC Cancels Hit Comic Book Series ‘Border Town’ After Abuse Claims”says The Hollywood Reporter.

The publisher is immediately ending the critically acclaimed series, amid accusations of sexual abuse by writer and co-creator Eric M. Esquivel.

DC Entertainmentimprint DC Vertigo has canceled comic book series Border Town effective immediately, with all orders for the unreleased issues 5 and 6 being canceled, The Hollywood Reporter has confirmed. Those issues will not be published, and all issues already released are also being made returnable, according to the publisher.

The publisher has not commented on the reasons for the title’s cancellation, but it coincides with the release of a statement by toy designer Cynthia Naugle in which she wrote about being “sexually, mentally, and emotionally abused” by an unnamed figure later identified on social media — and seemingly confirmed by Naugle via retweets — as Border Town writer and co-creator Eric M. Esquivel.

Since Naugle’s statement went live, both Border Town artist Ramon Villalobos and color artist Tamra Bonvillain released statements via Twitter on the subject, distancing themselves from the project.

(7) HUGO VOTING STRATEGY TRUE OR FALSE. Karl-Johan Norén warns, “The meme that one should not ‘dilute’ ones Hugo nomination power under EPH is going around again, and I wrote a quick refutation.”

…As a voter and nominator for the Hugos, it is in your best interest to nominate as many works as you find worthy as you can.

I will illustrate it using two cases. The first is that if every single nominator in a Hugo category nominates only a single work, EPH will default back to a simple first past the post selection with six finalists — exactly the system that we had before EPH, but with much less input! …

(8) THE POINTY THRONE. This cover for the March issue of Amazing Spider-Man resonates with a certain TV show you may have seen….

(9) BLACK SCI-FI DOCUMENTARY. Three excerpts from Terrence Francis’ 1992 documentary Black Sci-Fi, originally broadcast on BBC2 as part of the Birthrights series.

The documentary focuses on Black science fiction in literature, film and television and features interviews with Octavia Butler, Samuel R. Delany, Mike Sargent, Steven Barnes and Nichelle Nichols.

In this extract, Octavia Butler discusses how her interest in science fiction developed and the genre’s potential for exploring new ideas and ways of being.

In this section Samuel R. Delany, Mike Sargent and Steven Barnes discuss the stereotypical portrayal of black characters in science fiction literature and cinema, including the predictable fate of Paul Winfield in films like Damnation Alley, Star Trek II: The Wrath of Khan and The Terminator.

In this section, Nichelle Nichols discusses the significance of her character, Uhura, in Star Trek; Steven Barnes and Mike Sargent consider how attitudes towards race and skin colour might develop in the (far) future.

(10) VAULT OF THE BEAST. Robert Weinberg interviewed A.E. Van Vogt in 1980 – now posted at Sevagram.

Weinberg: How did you first get interested in science fiction, and in particular, how did you come to write a science fiction story?

Van Vogt: I first read science fiction in the old British Chum annual when I was about 12 years old. Chum was a British boy’s weekly which, at the end of the year was bound into a single huge book; and the following Christmas parents bought it as Christmas presents for male children. The science fiction in these stories was simple. Somebody built a spaceship in his tool shop (in his backyard) and when he left earth he took along all the neighborhood twelve-year-olds without the parents seeming to object.

Later, at age 14, I saw the November 1926 Amazing and promptly purchased it, read it avidly until Hugo Gernsbach lost control and it got awful under the next editor, T. O’Connor Sloane. So I had my background when I picked up the July, 1938 issue of Astounding and read “Who Goes There?” It was one of the great SF stories; and it stimulated me to send Campbell, the editor, a one paragraph outline of what later became “Vault of the Beast. “If he hadn’t answered, that would probably have been the end of my SF career. But I learned later he answered all query letters either favorably or with helpful advice. The helpful advice he gave me was to suggest that I write with a lot of atmosphere. To me that meant a lot of imagery, and verbs other than “to be” or “to have.”

(11) ANDERSON OBIT. Author Paul Dale Anderson (1944-2018) has died, the president of the Horror Writers Association Is reporting. Biographical details from hiswebsite —

Paul Dale Anderson has written more than 27 novels and hundreds of short stories, mostly in the horror, fantasy, science fiction, and suspense-thriller genres. Paul has also written contemporary romances, mysteries, and westerns. Paul is an Active Member of SFWA and HWA, and he was elected a Vice President and Trustee of Horror Writers Association in 1987.  Paul is also a member of International Thriller Writers, the Authors Guild, and MWA.

His wife, Gretta, predeceased him in 2012.

(12) TODAY IN HISTORY

  • December 14, 1984 – John Carpenter’s Starman premiered on this day.
  • December 14, 1984 – For better or worse – Dune debuted in theaters.
  • December 14, 2007 – Will Smith’s I Am Legend opened.

(13) TODAY’S BIRTHDAYS

[Compiled by Cat Eldridge.]

  • Born December 14, 1916 Shirley Jackson. First gained public attention for her short story “The Lottery, or, The Adventures of James Harris” but it was her The Haunting of Hill House novel which has been made her legendary as a horror novelist as it’s truly a chilling ghost story.  I see that’s she wrote quite a bit of genre short fiction —has anyone here read it? (Died 1965.)
  • Born December 14, 1920 Rosemary Sutcliff. English novelist whose best known for children’s books particularly her historical fiction which  involved retellings of myths and legends, Arthurian and otherwise. Digging into my memory, I remember reading The Chronicles of Robin Hood which was her first published novel and rather good; The Eagle of the Ninth is set in Roman Britain and was an equally fine read. (Died 1992.)
  • Born December 14, 1949 David A. Cherry, 69. Illustrator working mostly in the genre. Amazingly he has been nominated eleven times for Hugo Awards, and eighteen times for Chesley Awards with an astonishing eight wins! He is a past president of the Association of Science Fiction and Fantasy Artists.
  • Oh and he’s is the brother of the science fiction writer C. J. Cherryh (“Cherry” is the original spelling of the last name of the family) so you won’t be surprised that he’s painted cover art for some of her books as well as books for Robert Asprin, Andre Norton, Diane Duane, Lynn Abbey and Piers Anthony to name but a few of his contracts.
  • Born December 14, 1966Sarah Zettel, 52. Her first novel, Reclamation, was nominated for the Philip K. Dick Award in 1996, and in 1997 tied for the Locus Award for the Best First Novel. Writing under the alias of C. L. Anderson, her novel Bitter Angels won the 2010 Philip K. Dick award for best paperback original novel. If you’ve not read her, I’d recommend her YA American Fairy Trilogy as a good place to start. 
  • Born December 14, 1968 Kelley Armstrong, 50. Canadian writer, primarily of fantasy novels since the early party of the century. She has published thirty-one fantasy novels to date, thirteen in her Women of the Otherworld series, another five in her Cainsville series. I’m wracking my brain to think what I’ve read of hers as I know I’ve read something. Ahhhh I’m reasonably sure I listened to the Cainsville series and would recommend it wholeheartedly.

(14) SAVE THE PICKLE! Has your deli warned of a shortage? Chip Hitchcock says, “Famous fan stop Rein’s, near Hartford, had a problem a few years ago.” From NPR : “Scientists Are Fighting For The Stricken Pickle Against This Tricky Disease”.

With failed harvests, fewer growers are taking a chance on cucumbers. According to USDA records, pickling cucumber acreage declined nearly 25 percent between 2004 and 2015. Globally, downy mildew threatens fields as far flung as India, Israel, Mexico and China.

“This is the number one threat to the pickle industry,” says vegetable pathologist Lina Quesada-Ocampo of North Carolina State University. The growers, she says, lose money on failed crops and pricey fungicides. “It is a really bad double whammy.”

Fortunately for pickle lovers, vegetable breeder Michael Mazourek of Cornell University is close to releasing varieties that resist downy mildew. “It’s been one of our proudest David and Goliath stories,” he says. But his success hinges on funding at a time when public support of agricultural research is declining.

(15) HEVELIN PHOTOS SOUGHT. Bruce Hevelin is looking for photos of his father, James “Rusty” Hevelin. If you have any scanned in or in digital form, please send them to him at: <bruce911@sonic.net>

(16) WOODEN FRIED CHICKEN. Forget about making this one of your last-minute gift purchases – The Takeout says “KFC fried chicken-scented firelog sold out in hours ¯\_(?)_/’”:

Update, December 14: Oh, you actually were interested in that chicken-scented log, eh? Sorry for those who didn’t snatch theirs up early, as the logs reportedly sold out within hours yesterday.

Original story, December 13:

“Back in my day,” your grandpa begins wheezily, “If we wanted fried chicken-smellin’ fires, we had to throw the chicken on the flames ourselves.”

He’s right, friends, but that hardship ends today, as KFC introduces a firelog that smells like the Colonel’s 11-herbs-and-spices fried chicken, made in partnership with Enviro-Log.

(17) NOT SOLD OUT.This is still available. No wonder! It will cost a heck of a lot more than a log! The Houdini Seance at LA’s Magic Castle.

The séance is held for a private group of ten to twelve guests in our historic Houdini Séance Chamber. Decorated in the High Victorian style, it is now the home of many priceless pieces of Houdini memorabilia, including the only set of cuffs Houdini was unable to open.

…You will experience remarkable things you might not fully understand. Don’t feel alone. It’s that way for all of us.

Your party begins its experience with a four-course gourmet meal at 6:30 p.m. with bottomless red and white house wine during the dining portion of your evening — all created by your own private chef and served by your own private butler.

A medium will then join you who will open the veil between this world and the next. Your medium will begin with fascinating experiments in the power of the unseen and then, forming a magic circle, will summon the spirits and allow them to demonstrate their awesome ability to manifest in our physical world.

(18) THE SECRET IS NOT TO BANG THE ROCKS TOGETHER. BBC asks “What chance has Nasa of finding life on Mars?”

It could be easier to detect the signs of ancient life on Mars than it is on Earth, say scientists connected with Nasa’s next rover mission.

The six-wheeled robot is due to touch down on the Red Planet in 2021 with the specific aim of trying to identify evidence of past biology.

It will be searching for clues in rocks that are perhaps 3.9 billion years old.

Confirming life on Earth at that age is tough enough, but Mars may have better preservation, say the researchers.

It comes down to the dynamic processes on our home world that constantly churn and recycle rocks – processes that can erase life’s traces but which shut down on the Red Planet early in its history.

“We don’t believe, for example, that Mars had plate tectonics in the way Earth has had for most of its history,” said Ken Williford from Nasa’s Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL) in California.

“Most of Earth’s rock record has been destroyed by subduction under the ocean crust. But even the rock left at the surface is heated and squeezed in ways it might not have been on Mars.”

(19) BEFORE THE STORY WAS TRAPPED IN AMBER. BBC tells about “The Jurassic Park film that was never made”.

The structure is so ancient that it feels almost prehistoric. Some people take a trip to a remote island, they see some dinosaurs, and then the dinosaurs try to have them for lunch. It’s what happened in Jurassic Park in 1993, and by the time the first sequel came out in 1997, the screenplay was already poking fun at how formulaic it was. “‘Ooh, aah’, that’s how it always starts,” says Jeff Goldblum’s Dr Ian Malcolm in The Lost World: Jurassic Park. “Then later there’s running and screaming.” How right he was. But this self-knowledge didn’t stop the makers of Jurassic Park III (2001) and Jurassic World (2015) sticking to the formula, and it wasn’t until the second half of this year’s Jurassic World: Fallen Kingdom that the series found somewhere else to go.

How different things might have been. Back in 2004, John Sayles (the writer-director of Passion Fish and Lone Star) wrote a half-crazy half-brilliant screenplay for Jurassic Park 4 that took the story all over the planet, and which pioneered several radical ideas that are only just being incorporated into the franchise now. Steven Spielberg, the series’ producer and its original director was keen at first, and it’s easy to see why: Sayles’ rollicking script is sprinkled with quintessentially Spielberg-y moments. On the other hand, it’s also easy to see why Spielberg cooled off on the project. A movie about a globe-trotting A-Team of genetically modified, crime-busting Deinonychuses might have strayed just a little too far from the Jurassic Park films that audiences knew and loved.

(20) TITANS. The season-ending episode:

Titans 1×11 “Dick Grayson” Season 1 Episode 11 Promo (Season Finale) – Robin faces off against Batman when Dick takes a dark journey back to Gotham in the first season finale of Titans.

(21) YOU THOUGHT YOU HAD BAGGAGE PROBLEMS. “Southwest Airlines flight turns back after human heart discovery” – BBC has the story.

A US passenger plane travelling from Seattle to Dallas was forced to turn back hours into its flight because a human heart had been left on board.

Southwest Airlines says the organ was flown to Seattle from California, where it was to be processed at a hospital to have a valve recovered for future use.

But it was never unloaded and its absence was not noticed until the plane was almost half-way to Dallas.

The heart itself had not been intended for a specific patient.

(22) WHERE TO FIND YOUR DOOM, AND WHAT TO DRINK ON THE WAY. Another thing for Worldcon travelers to check out: “In Ireland, a taste of the underworld”

Oweynagat cave is a placeof both birth and death. An unimposing gash in the ancient misty hills of north-western Ireland, it is said to be the entrance to the underworld where fairies and demons lure mortals to their doom, and the sacred birthplace of a warrior queen. For thousands of years, the Irish have regarded Oweynagat as a site of awe-inspiring magic, weaving a rich tapestry of mythology around it.

…For millennia, Queen Medb has remained the most intoxicating thing to come out of the cave. However, just this year that changed with the creation of a beer made from wild yeast cultivated from the walls of Oweynagat. Called Underworld Savage Ale for the mythic place that it was conceived, this beer is the first of its kind, with a backstory strange enough to fit within the cave’s fantastic mythology

(23) FROM THE HISTORIC RECORDS. Rachel Swirsky discovered a reference to File 770 in a 1981 copy of Fandom Directory.  The zine was only three years old at the time.

(24) VIDEO OF THE DAY. “The Mother of All Demos Hosted by Douglas Englebart” on YouTube is a video (recorded by Stewart Brand) of the December 1968 demonstration where Douglas Englebart introduced the world to videoconferencing, hypertext, and the computer mouse.

[Thanks to Cat Eldridge, Chip Hitchcock, JJ, Martin Morse Wooster, John King Tarpinian, Mike Kennedy, Carl Slaughter, Rachel Swirsky, and Andrew Porter for some oft hese stories, Title credit belongs to File 770 contributing editor of the day John Winkleman.]

Pixel Scroll 11/30/18 And Remember: The Pixel In This Scroll Are Not For Eating

(1) KEEP YOUR HUGO VOTING ELIGIBILITY. The official Hugo Awards site reminds you: “Join Worldcon by December 31, 2018 to be Eligible to Nominate for 2019 Hugo Awards”.

The Hugo Awards are selected by a vote of the members of the World Science Fiction Convention (Worldcon) in a two-stage process. The first stage is nominating (which starts in early 2019) and the second stage is the final ballot that includes those works/people that received enough nominations in the first stage (which starts later in 2019). If you want to participate in the nominating stage and are not yet a member of either the 2018 or 2019 Worldcons, take note of the December 31, 2018 deadline for joining Worldcon in order to be eligible to nominate in 2019.

If you want to nominate works/people for the 2019 Hugo Awards, you must be a member of either the 2018 Worldcon (San José) or the 2019 Worldcon (Dublin) by the end of 2018.

(2) HOW MUCH SCIENCE IS IN YOUR FAVORITE SF? Gregory Benford’s quote from Loscon about “If you write sf honey, gotta get the science right” lit off several discussions on Twitter.

Silvia Moreno-Garcia started a list of famous sf that is not scientifically accurate. Thread begins here.

And responding to the report that Benford “also said that PSI powers to control the earth and earthquakes had already been done in the Fifties,” Annalee Flower Horne wrote two Twitter threads. First:

[T]here’s a whole conversation to be had here about how Science Fiction and Fantasy isn’t just one literary canon that everyone has to read before they can write SFF.

Thread starts here.

Second —

[The] notion that ideas and tropes can never be re-used in SF and that anyone trying must be new here would be funny if it weren’t such an insidious tool of exclusion.

Thread starts here.

And N. K. Jemisin had a general response –

(3) ROSE RETURNS ON AUDIO. Fansided reports “Billie Piper’s Doctor Who audio spinoff will finally give Rose Tyler some solo adventures”.

Fan favorite Billie Piper is headed back to the world of Doctor Who once more, but not the way you might think.

No, Rose Tyler won’t be running into Jodie Whittaker’s Thirteenth Doctor any time soon. (SIGH.) But she will be starring in her own new series of Big Finish audio adventures next year, focusing on Rose’s time in an alternate dimension following the heartbreaking and generally ugly cry-inducing events of season 2 finale “Doomsday”.

(4) BOOK OF DOUBT. Aidan Doyle is currently running a Kickstarter for Kickstarter for The Writer’s Book of Doubt . It contains essays and advice for writers on how to deal with self-doubt. It’s illustrated by Hugo and World Fantasy nominated artist Kathleen Jennings and includes a Map of Submissionland.

Why don’t I have any ideas?

Why haven’t I written anything? Why haven’t I written anything good? Why won’t anyone publish my stories? Why won’t anyone pay me for my stories?

The Writer’s Book of Doubt by Aidan Doyle is a book of comfort for writers. An acknowledgement that writing can be a difficult and lonely process. It includes essays and advice from a number of writers and will be illustrated by Hugo and World Fantasy nominated artist, Kathleen Jennings.

… The book includes guest essays from a range of writers giving advice on how to deal with doubt and providing examples of encouragement and hope. The essays are reprints, but many of them are revised and expanded.

Contents include —

  • Delilah S. Dawson – No Word is Ever Wasted
  • Malon Edwards – I am a Big Black Man Who Writes Science Fiction
  • Meg Elison – Revenge is 100 Dresses
  • Kate Elliott – The Space You Make For Your Art
  • Kameron Hurley – 10 Things I Learned From Failure
  • Matthew Kressel – Overcoming Self-Doubt as a Writer
  • R. F. Kuang – The Racial Rubber Stamp
  • Fonda Lee – The Great Green Monster
  • Rose Lemberg – Don’t Self-Reject
  • Likhain – Seeing Yourself in Stories
  • Jeannette Ng – Cultural Appropriation for the Worried Writer
  • A. Merc Rustad – The Necessity of Hope
  • Bogi Takács – How (Not) to Include Trans People as Background Characters
  • E. Catherine Tobler – Writing, Mostly
  • Isabel Yap – Whenever I’m in an Extended Period of Not-Writing I am Always Deeply, Deeply Mystified About How the Hell to Start Again
  • Plus a bonus illustration from
  • Tom Gauld – The Ghost of Future Book Sales

With 12 days to go, the appeal has brought in $2,805 – its original goal was $1,097.

(5) 451 AUCTION. How much did Hugh Hefner’s signed copy of Ray Bradbury’s Fahrenheit 451 go for? Live Auctioneers says —

(6) THE NOVAE OF NOVEMBER: Featured Futures look at the bright spots in this month’s short fiction from the prozines in Summation: November 2018.

The issues of Clarkesworld and F&SF were especially strong and Galaxy’s Edge had a couple of nice tales. I also began belated coverage of the resurrected Amazing‘s August “Fall” issue this November. On the other hand, in general, non-prozine news, Shimmer ceased publication and I noticed that the long-dormant SQ Mag had finally acknowledged its death in September. Speaking of death, this month’s wombat was at least three excellent stories in which the deaths of mothers and a sister played significant parts.

The tally for November was 79 stories of 482K words (plus five October stories of 19K in November’s first review of the weeklies) with thirteen noted and six of those recommended. In more general site news, I’ve decided on Featured Futures‘ 2019 coverage. The link to that is in the “News” section at the end of this post.

(7) TODAY’S VERY FANNISH BIRTHDAYS.

[Compiled by Cat Eldridge and JJ.]

  • Born November 30, 1893 – E. Everett Evans, Writer, Editor, Conrunner, and Member of First Fandom who started out with fan writing, but eventually became a published genre author as well. He helped to found the National Fantasy Fan Federation (N3F) and served as its president and editor of its publication. Food for Demons was a chapbook compilation of his fantasy tales, though he was generally not considered to be a good fiction writer. Fandom’s Big Heart Award, which was founded by Forrest J Ackerman in 1959, was named for him for its first 40 years. In 2018, Bob Tucker’s fanzine Le Zombie, of which he had co-edited two issues, won a Retro Hugo Award. (Died 1958.)
  • Born November 30, 1917 – Efrem Zimbalist Jr., Actor of Stage and Screen and Producer. Best known in genre, without doubt, as the voice of Alfred Pennyworth in Batman: The Animated Series and the animated films linked to it – unless you’re a big Babylon 5 fan, in which case you might remember him from four episodes where he played William Edgars. He also played character voices in the 1990s series Spider-Man as Doctor Octopus and Iron Man as Justin Hammer, and had a role in Beyond Witch Mountain. (Died 2014.)
  • Born November 30, 1919 – Dr. Milton A. Rothman, Nuclear Physicist, Writer, Teacher, and Member of First Fandom who co-founded the Philadelphia Science Fiction Society, organized the first Philcon science fiction convention in October 1936, and attended the first Worldcon in 1939. He published the fanzines Milty’s Mag and Plenum. An outspoken skeptic, his The Physicist’s Guide to Skepticism applied the laws of physics to paranormal and pseudoscientific claims to show why they are impossible. He chaired the Philadelphia Worldcons in both 1947 and 1953, and was Guest of Honor at the Philadelphia Worldcon in 1976. His complete science fiction works were published posthumously in 2004 in the collection Heavy Planet and Other Science Fiction Stories. (Died 2001.)
  • Born November 30, 1933 – Bill Ellern, 85, Engineer, Writer, Editor, Conrunner, and Member of First Fandom who is a 60-year member of the Los Angeles Science Fantasy Society and has also served on the committees for several Worldcons and other conventions. As an engineer at JPL, he worked on the Ranger moon probe. As an author, he received permission from E.E. Smith to extend the Lensman series of novels. In 2005, he was honored by LASFS for his service with the Evans-Freehafer Award.
  • Born November 30, 1937 – Ridley Scott, 81, Oscar-nominated Director and Producer. The Hugo and Saturn Award-winning The Martian is his most recent genre work of note, but he’s got a long and distinguished list that includes Hugo winners Blade Runner and Alien, Hannibal, the Clio-winning “1984” Apple video advert, Legend, Prometheus, Alien: Covenant, and a superb Robin Hood. Interestingly, he had a poem entitled “Blood Runner” published by the Science Fiction Poetry Association in its Star*Line magazine in 2011.
  • Born November 30, 1949 – Billy Drago, 69, Actor, Writer, and Producer known for playing villains, most especially John Bly, the antagonist in the first and best storyline of The Adventures of Brisco County, Jr. He also played the demon Barbas in the original Charmed series, and has appeared in many horror films, including True Blood, Vamp, Cyborg 2, Sci-Fighters, Demon Hunter, and The Hills Have Eyes. He also was in Tremors 4: The Legend Begins – a film I’m sure no one was asking for.
  • Born November 30, 1952 – Debra Doyle, 66, Writer, Filker, and Fan. Her novel Knight’s Wyrd, co-written wither her husband and collaborator James D. Macdonald, won a Mythopoeic Award for Children’s Literature. Most of their co-written works are fantasy, but their Mageworlds series also crosses into space opera territory. As filker Malkin Grey, she and Pergyn Wyndryder won a Pegasus Award for Best Historical Song. She is an instructor at the Viable Paradise Writer’s Workshop, and has been Guest of Honor at several conventions.
  • Born November 30, 1952 – Jill Eastlake, 66, IT Manager, Costumer, Conrunner, and Fan who is known for her elaborate and fantastical costume designs; her costume group won “Best in Show” at the 2004 Worldcon.  A member of fandom for more than 50 years, she belonged to her high school’s SF club, then became an early member of NESFA, the Boston-area fan club, and served as its president for 4 years. She has served on the committees for numerous Worldcons and regional conventions, co-chaired a Costume-Con, and chaired two Boskones. She was the Hugo Award ceremony coordinator for the 1992 Worldcon, and has run the Masquerade for numerous conventions. Her extensive contributions were honored when she was named a Fellow of NESFA in 1976, and in 2011 the International Costumer’s Guild presented her with their Lifetime Achievement Award. She and her fan husband Don (who is irrationally fond of running WSFS Business Meetings) were Fan Guests of Honor at Rivercon.
  • Born November 30, 1953 – Mandy Patinkin, 65, Actor and Producer who is well-known to genre fans for his portrayal of Inigo Montoya in The Princess Bride, which included several memorable and memeable lines, most famously “You Keep Using That Word, I Do Not Think It Means What You Think It Means”. His other genre credits a lead role in the film Alien Nation for which he received a Saturn nomination, Dick Tracy, The Adventures of Elmo in Grouchland, a main role in the Dead Like Me TV series, a guest part in an episode of Hercules, and voice roles in Castle in the Sky, Sonic the Hedgehog, The Wind Rises, and Smurfs: The Lost Village.
  • Born November 30, 1955 – Kevin Conroy, 63, Actor who is, without doubt, best known for voicing Batman on first Batman: The Animated Series, and then later myriad other Batman-inclusive undertakings. (Note that The New Batman Adventures have been folded into that series when it was released in DVD format and as video.) He reprised the role of an elder Bruce Wayne in Batman Beyond. Justice League Action, which just had its first season on the Cartoon Network, saw him again in the Batman role, with the other characters often noting his stoic personality.
  • Born November 30, 1957 – Martin Morse Wooster, 61, Journalist, Writer, Editor, Critic, and Member of First Filedom. He discovered fandom as a high-schooler in 1974, when he heard about “a big sci-fi con” in downtown Washington, and so attended Discon II. A year later, he discovered fanzines, and found that he liked writing book reviews and Letters of Comment (LOCs); he has been turning them out ever since. In 1975, he was one of 12 founders of the Potomac River Science Fiction Society, and still attends PRSFS meetings to discuss books. He has written several non-fiction books, on subjects such as education policy and how to do philanthropy well. He has been a File 770 contributor since 1978, and frequently writes reports of the conventions he attends.
  • Born November 30, 1965 – Ryan Murphy, 53, Writer, Director, and Producer who is responsible for those roles on the various iterations of American Horror Story, which have thus far included Murder House, Asylum, Coven, Freak Show, Hotel, Roanoke, Cult, and Apocalypse, and on the two-year Scream Queens anthology series.
  • Born November 30, 1985 – Kaley Cuoco, 33, Actor and Producer. Reversing my usual method of stating their past credits, I’m going to note that she will be Dr. Harleen Frances Quinzel in the forthcoming Harley Quinn series on the DC Universe streaming service. Yes, I’m excited, as the trailer looked great! She appeared as regular cast in the last season of the original Charmed series, and is a main cast member on the homage to geekdom The Big Bang Theory

(8) SCARS BANNED. In what The Sun disdains as a “snowflake campaign,” “Famous movie villains with scarred faces set to be banned by BFI to ‘remove stigma around disfigurement’”.

MOVIE villains with scarred faces have been banned by the British Film Institute in a bid to “remove the stigma around disfigurement”.

Films featuring baddies such as Freddy Krueger and Darth Vader will no longer get financial support from the taxpayer-funded body as part of a campaign called #IAmNotYourVillain.

…Ben Roberts, funding director at the BFI, said: “We are committing to not having negative representations depicted through scars or facial difference in films we fund.

“It’s astonishing to think that films have done this so often and for so long. The time has come for this to stop.

“We fully support Changing Faces’ I Am Not Your Villain campaign and urge the rest of the film industry to do the same.”

A spokesman for Changing Faces said: “Our campaign is calling on those in the film industry to stop using scars, burns or marks as shorthand for villainy.”

(9) HARRY POTTER WEDDING AT COSTCO. After connecting online, they had their first meet at Costco. Things clicked, now they’re married — “‘It was perfect’: This couple had a Harry Potter-themed wedding at Costco”. Today.com has the story.

The bride wore a deep scarlet dress, in honor of Harry Potter’s Gryffindor House colors, and she held a bouquet of paper flowers made with pages from the beloved J.K. Rowling novel. The groom wore a blue and bronze tie for his favored house of Ravenclaw.

(10) TONIGHT ON JEOPARDY! Andrew Porter has the latest sff reference from the game show:

In the category “Books with Animals,” the answer was: “The title characters in ‘Tailchaser’s Song’ is this kind of Animal.”

Wrong question: “What is a Dog?”

(11) ZOMBIE MUSICAL. NPR’s Scott Tobias is iffy when “Teens Sing Their Guts Out In The Scottish Zombie Christmas Musical ‘Anna And The Apocalypse'”.

A normal way for fans to appreciate Edgar Wright’s 2004 zombie comedy Shaun of the Dead is to watch it again and perhaps discover a few grace notes they missed the first or second or third time around. But there’s something to be said for considering it through the prism of slavish imitator like Anna and the Apocalypse, a Scottish genre mash-up that plays like a piece of fan art, only with a musical component added.

(12) LEARNING FROM THE CURSED CHILD. BBC quotes actress “Noma Dumezweni: ‘Hermione has taught me how to be angry'”.

I have learned a lot from playing the character of Hermione on stage in the last few years. Although generally calm and level headed, righteous and empathetic Hermione knows how to use anger effectively when it’s needed.

Hermione’s anger is a beautiful thing – she displays it most through her loyalty and love, especially when she’s in love and trying to understand that. She’s asking those she loves to do better. She holds them up to a high standard because she has faith they can reach that. Fiercely. And she’ll be there when they do.

(13) ROYAL DETECTIVE. The Hollywood Reporter brings word of a series rooted in India that will air on Disney Junior — “Disney Junior Orders Animated Mystery Series Inspired by Indian Cultures and Customs”.

Disney Junior has greenlighted an animated mystery-adventure series for preschoolers that is inspired by the cultures and customs of India.

Mira, Royal Detective will star 15-year-old newcomer Leela Ladnier in the title role, along with the voices of Freida Pinto, Hannah Simone, Kal Penn, Jameela Jamil, Utkarsh Ambudkar and Aasif Mandvi.

Set in the magical Indian-inspired land of Jalpur, the series follows the brave and resourceful Mira, a commoner who is appointed to the role of royal detective after solving a mystery that involves saving the kingdom’s young prince.

(14) SPACE BUD BEATS AIR BUD. Important news comes from FoodAndWine.com that Bud is ratcheting up its efforts to booze up space (“Budweiser Launches Third Space Experiment in Effort to Be the First Beer on Mars”).

In March 2017, when Budweiser proclaimed its intentions to be the first beer on Mars, the announcement could have easily been dismissed as just another marketing stunt, a forward-looking contrast to Bud Light’s medieval-set “Dilly Dilly” campaign, even. But despite the fact that, no, Budweiser will not be arriving on Mars anytime soon, Bud has continued to prove that, though the campaign does have a significant marketing angle, it is not simply a stunt.

This week, the beer brand has announced that it plans to conduct its third experiment on the International Space Station as part of a SpaceX launch scheduled for this coming Tuesday, December 4. Coincidentally enough, on that date exactly one year ago, Budweiser sent its first two Bud on Mars experiments to the ISS, also via a SpaceX launch. Those endeavors looked at how a microgravity environment affected barley seedlings, both in general and with regards to germination. Of course, as any beer expert can tell you, once barley is grown, you have to malt it before it can be used to brew beer, so this latest experiment takes the barley journey one step further.

[Thanks to John King Tarpinian, Cat Eldridge, Martin Morse Wooster, Olav Rokne, JJ, Chip Hitchcock, Mike Kennedy, Carl Slaughter, and Andrew Porter for some of these stories. Title credit belongs to File 770 contributing editor of the day Peer.]

Dublin 2019 Adds Special Hugo Award Category: Best Art Book

Dublin 2019, an Irish Worldcon, the 77th World Science Fiction Convention, (“Worldcon”) taking place in Dublin Ireland in August 2019, announced today that a special Hugo category for “Best Art Book” will be included in the 2019 Hugo Awards, and the Retrospective Hugo Awards for 1944.

The Hugo Awards are the leading awards for excellence in the field of science fiction and fantasy, and have been presented at Worldcons since 1953. They are voted on by members of each year’s Worldcon.

Art books formerly featured strongly in the Best Related Work Hugo Award category, and its predecessors, Best Related Book and Best Non-Fiction Book, and also in the former Hugo category Best Original Artwork. Finalists and winners included collections of works by significant figures in genre art, and annual anthologies of notable and award-winning art works.

Although fewer art books have appeared on the Hugo ballot in recent years, many genre art books of various types are published annually, and they continue to generate intense interest from both reviewers and the wider fan community. The Hugo Category Study committee is also considering Best Art Book as a potential permanent category.

“The Hugo Awards encourage and appreciate the creation of great SF&F genre work, whether in prose, dramatized or visual form,” said Vincent Docherty, WSFS Division Head for the convention. “Dublin 2019 is pleased to honour the ongoing contributions made by artists to the field of science fiction and fantasy in what will be the 80th anniversary of the first Worldcon – whose sole Guest of Honor was artist Frank R. Paul.”

An eligible work for this special Hugo award is any art book in the field of science fiction, fantasy, or fandom, appearing for the first time during the previous calendar year or which has been substantially modified during the previous calendar year, and which is not eligible in Best Graphic Story.

[From a press release.]

Correction: Elinor Busby Was the First Woman To Win A Hugo

Elinor Busby. Photo by Earl Kemp, Corflu, Las Vegas, April 2008.

Elinor Busby made history as the first woman Hugo winner when Cry of the Nameless, which she co-edited, topped the Best Fanzine category in 1960.

  • Cry of the Nameless ed. by F. M. Busby, Elinor Busby, Burnett Toskey and Wally Weber

I’ve corrected my obituary for Pat Lupoff to reflect that she was second, as co-editor of the Best Amateur Magazine winner in 1963. (The category title varied as the rules changed in the early years of the Hugo.)

  • Xero ed. by Richard A. Lupoff and Pat Lupoff

Evidently this wasn’t the first time I’ve made this mistake either – see the note at the end of “Dark Carnival, a Science Fiction Landmark” from 2013.

Four women won fan Hugos – all in the Best Fanzine / Amateur Magazine category – before a woman won in any other category.

The third woman to win was Juanita Coulson, in 1965, co-editor of the fanzine Yandro.

  • Yandro ed. by Robert Coulson and Juanita Coulson

The fourth woman was Felice Rolfe, in 1967, co-editor of the fanzine Niekas.

  • Niekas ed. by Edmund R. Meskys and Felice Rolfe

The first woman to win a Hugo in a fiction category was Anne McCaffrey, whose Weyr Search tied with Philip Jose Farmer’s Riders of the Purple Wage for Best Novella in 1968.

Best Editor Long Form and Short Form Hugo: Eligible Works from 2018

By JJ: To assist Hugo nominators, listed below are the editors of works published for the first time in 2018.

These credits have been accumulated from Acknowledgments sections and copyright pages in works, as well as other sources on the internet.

Feel free to add missing 2018-original works and the name of their editors in the comments, and I will get them included in the main post. Self-published works may or may not be added to the list at my discretion.

PLEASE DON’T ADD GUESSES.

If you are able to confirm credits from Acknowledgments sections, copyright pages, or by contacting authors and/or editors, then go ahead and add them in comments. If you have questions or corrections, please add those also.

Authors, Editors, and Publishers are welcome to post in comments here, or to send their lists to jjfile770 [at] gmail [dot] com.

Long Form Editors

3.3.11: Best Editor Long Form. The editor of at least four (4) novel-length works primarily devoted to science fiction and / or fantasy published in the previous calendar year that do not qualify as works under 3.3.10.

(Note that the Long Form Editors listed below may, or may not, be eligible — that is, have 4 qualifying works published in 2018)

John Joseph Adams

  • The City of Lost Fortunes by Bryan Camp, John Joseph Adams Books
  • Creatures of Want and Ruin by Molly Tanzer, John Joseph Adams Books
  • In the Night Wood by Dale Bailey, John Joseph Adams Books
  • The Robots of Gotham by Todd McAulty, John Joseph Adams Books
  • The Wild Dead by Carrie Vaughn, John Joseph Adams Books

Natasha Bardon

  • The Deathless by Peter Newman, Harper Voyager

Joshua A. Bilmes

  • In the Vanishers’ Palace by Aliette de Bodard, JABberwocky Literary Agency (novel, 48,151 words)

Rebecca Brewer

  • Before Mars by Emma Newman, Gollancz
  • The Mortal Word by Genevieve Cogman, Pan Macmillan/Ace Books (with Bella Pagan)

Emma Coode

  • Noumenon Infinity by Marina Lostetter, HarperVoyager

Mark Doten

  • Side Life by Steve Toutonghi, Soho Press

Carl Engle-Laird

  • Deep Roots by Ruthanna Emrys, Tor.com Publishing
  • State Tectonics by Malka Older, Tor.com Publishing

Bradley Englert

  • Adrift by Rob Boffard, Orbit Books (with Anna Jackson and James Long)

Moshe Feder

  • Skyward by Brandon Sanderson, Delacorte Press/Gollancz

Sheila Gilbert

  • Aliens Abroad by Gini Koch, DAW Books
  • Lady Henterman’s Wardrobe by Marshall Ryan Maresca, DAW Books
  • Night and Silence by Seanan McGuire, DAW Books
  • Outpost by W. Michael Gear, DAW Books
  • Tricks for Free by Seanan McGuire, DAW Books
  • The Way of the Shield by Marshall Ryan Maresca, DAW Books

Diana Gill

  • I Only Killed Him Once by Adam Christopher, Tor Books/Titan Books

Marcus Gipps

  • From Distant Stars by Sam Peters, Gollancz

Liz Gorinsky

  • The Calculating Stars by Mary Robinette Kowal, Tor Books
  • The Fated Sky by Mary Robinette Kowal, Tor Books
  • Ball Lightning by Cixin Liu, Tor Books

Ana Grilo

  • The Ninety-Ninth Bride by Catherine Faris King, Books Smugglers Publishing (with Thea James)

Anne Lesley Groell

  • Into the Fire by Elizabeth Moon, Orbit/Del Rey
  • Thin Air by Richard K. Morgan, Gollancz/Del Rey (with Gillian Redfearn)

Sarah Guan

  • There Before the Chaos by KB Wagers, Orbit Books
  • Afterwar by Lilith Saintcrow, Orbit Books
  • Empire of Sand by Tasha Suri, Orbit Books
  • Torn by Rowenna Miller, Orbit Books

Jen Gunnels

  • Medusa Uploaded by Emily Devenport, Tor Books (with Elinor Mavor)
  • Semiosis by Sue Burke, Tor Books/Harper Voyager

Lee Harris

  • Bedfellow, by Jeremy C. Shipp, Tor.com Publishing
  • Outbreak by Melissa F. Olson, Tor.com Publishing

Alison Hennessey

  • The 7½ Deaths of Evelyn Hardcastle by Stuart Turton, Raven Books (UK title: The Seven Deaths of Evelyn Hardcastle)

Katie Hoffman

  • Empire of Silence by Christopher Ruocchio, DAW Books

Tim Holman

  • Red Moon by Kim Stanley Robinson, Orbit Books

Brit Hvide

  • A Big Ship at the Edge of the Universe by Alex White, Orbit Books
  • Annex by Rich Larson, Orbit Books

Anna Jackson

  • 84K by Claire North, Orbit Books
  • Adrift by Rob Boffard, Orbit Books (with James Long and Bradley Englert)

Thea James

  • The Ninety-Ninth Bride by Catherine Faris King, Books Smugglers Publishing (with Ana Grilo)

Oliver Johnson

  • Record of a Spaceborn Few by Becky Chambers, Harper Voyager/Hodder & Stoughton (with Anne Perry)

Phil Jourdan

  • Quietus by Tristan Palmgren, Angry Robot
  • The Dreaming Stars by Tim Pratt, Angry Robot

Grace Kendall

  • Black Wings Beating by Alex London, Farrar, Straus and Giroux

Sally Kim

  • The Gone World by Tom Sweterlitsch, Putnam/Headline (with Mark Tavani)

Justin Landon

  • The Armored Saint by Myke Cole, Tor.com Publishing
  • The Queen of Crows by Myke Cole, Tor.com Publishing
  • Witchmark by C.L. Polk, Tor Books

Maggie Lehrman

  • Maresi by Maria Turtschaninoff, Amulet Books
  • Naondel by Maria Turtschaninoff, Amulet Books

Rebecca Lloyd

  • An Argumentation of Historians by Jodi Taylor, Accent Press
  • Dark Light by Jodi Taylor, Accent Press

Wendy Loggia

  • Bright We Burn by Kiersten White, Delacorte Press

James Long

  • Adrift by Rob Boffard, Orbit Books (with Anna Jackson and Bradley Englert)

Sam Matthews

  • The Synapse Sequence by Daniel Godfrey, Titan Books

Elinor Mavor

  • Medusa Uploaded by Emily Devenport, Tor Books (with Jen Gunnels)

Sean McDonald

  • The Mere Wife by Maria Dahvana Headley, Farrar, Straus & Giroux

Beth Meacham

  • If Tomorrow Comes by Nancy Kress, Tor Books
  • Memory’s Blade by Spencer Ellsworth, Tor.com Publishing
  • Terran Tomorrow by Nancy Kress, Tor Books

Joe Monti

  • The Long Sunset by Jack McDevitt, Saga Press
  • The Tangled Lands by Paolo Bacigalupi and Tobias S. Buckell, Saga Press

Christopher Morgan

  • Arabella the Traitor of Mars by David D. Levine, Tor Books
  • Gate Crashers by Patrick S. Tomlinson, Tor Books

Patrick Nielsen Hayden

  • The Consuming Fire by John Scalzi, Tor Books
  • Dark State by Charles Stross, Tor Books
  • Head On by John Scalzi, Tor Books

Teresa Nielsen Hayden

  • The Labyrinth Index by Charles Stross, Tor.com Publishing

Amber Oliver

  • A Study in Honor by Claire O’Dell, Harper Voyager

Jonathan Oliver

  • Europe at Dawn by Dave Hutchinson, Solaris
  • Revenant Gun by Yoon Ha Lee, Solaris

Bella Pagan

  • The Mortal Word by Genevieve Cogman, Pan Macmillan/Ace Books (with Rebecca Brewer)

Julian Pavia

  • Foundryside by Robert Jackson Bennett, Crown Publishing

Anne Perry

  • Record of a Spaceborn Few by Becky Chambers, Harper Voyager/Hodder & Stoughton (with Oliver Johnson)

Diana M. Pho

  • By Fire Above by Robin Bennis, Tor Books

Devi Pillai

  • A Memory Called Empire by Arkady Martine, Tor.com Publishing
  • The Stars Now Unclaimed by Drew Williams, Simon & Schuster

David Pomerico

  • Gunpowder Moon by David Pedreira, Harper Voyager

Gillian Redfearn

  • Elysium Fire by Alastair Reynolds, Orbit Books
  • Lies Sleeping by Ben Aaronovitch, Random Penguin
  • Thin Air by Richard K. Morgan, Gollancz/Del Rey (with Anne Lesley Groell)
  • A Veil of Spears by Bradley P. Beaulieu, Gollancz/DAW Books

Jill Roberts

  • The Freeze-Frame Revolution by Peter Watts, Tachyon

Rene Sears

  • Blood Orbit by K. R. Richardson, Pyr

Anne Sowards

  • Ascendant by Jack Campbell, Ace Books/Titan Books
  • Burn Bright by Patricia Briggs, Ace Books/Orbit Books
  • Lake Silence by Anne Bishop, Ace Books/Penguin
  • Magic Triumphs by Ilona Andrews, Ace Books
  • Marked by Benedict Jacka, Ace Books/Orbit Books
  • Mecha Samurai Empire by Peter Tieryas, Ace Books
  • Phoenix Unbound by Grace Draven, Ace Books
  • River of Bones by Taylor Anderson, Ace Books
  • Shadow’s Bane by Karen Chance, Berkley Books
  • Smoke and Iron by Rachel Caine, Berkley Books/Allison & Busby
  • Stars Uncharted by S.K. Dunstall, Ace Books

K.B. Spangler

  • Swordheart by T. Kingfisher, Argyll
  • The Wonder Engine by T. Kingfisher, Argyll

Mark Tavani

  • The Gone World by Tom Sweterlitsch, Putnam/Headline (with Sally Kim)

Cath Trechman

  • The Hidden World by Melinda M. Snodgrass, Titan Books

Rachel Winterbottom

  • One Way by S.J. Morden, Gollancz

Miriam Weinberg

  • Vengeful by V.E. Schwab, Tor Books/Titan Books

Navah Wolfe

  • European Travel for the Monstrous Gentlewoman by Theodora Goss, Saga Press
  • Imposter Syndrome by Mishell Baker, Saga Press
  • Mutiny at Vesta by R.E. Stearns, Saga Press
  • Serpent in the Heather by Kay Kenyon, Saga Press
  • Space Opera by Catherynne M. Valente, Saga Press

Short Form Editors

3.3.10: Best Editor Short Form. The editor of at least four (4) anthologies, collections or magazine issues (or their equivalent in other media) primarily devoted to science fiction and / or fantasy, at least one of which was published in the previous calendar year.

Rasha Abdulhadi (does not appear to have 4+ eligible works)

  • Strange Horizons Short Fiction (with Sheree Renée Thomas and Erin Roberts)
    • “Dying Lessons” by Troy L. Wiggins (short story)
    • “The People Who Sleep Beneath the Waves” by Malena Crawford (short story)
    • “Hide Me In The Shadow of Your Wings” by Christopher Caldwell (short story)
    • “Venus Witch’s Ring” by Inda Lauryn (short story)
    • “Strange Mercy” by Christopher Alonso (short story)
    • “Every Good-Bye Ain’t Gone” by Eden Royce (short story)

John Joseph Adams

  • The Best American Science Fiction and Fantasy 2018, Mariner Books (reprint anthology) (with N.K. Jemisin)
  • Lightspeed Magazine 2018 (with Wendy N. Wagner)
  • Nightmare Magazine 2018 (with Wendy N. Wagner)

David Afsharirad

  • The Year’s Best Military & Adventure SF 4, Baen (reprint anthology)

Jen R. Albert

  • PodCastle 2018, Escape Artists, Inc. (with Khaalidah Muhammad-Ali)

Scott H. Andrews

  • Beneath Ceaseless Skies 2018

Michele Barasso

Vajra Chandrasekera

  • Strange Horizons Short Fiction (with Catherine Krahe and Lila Garrott)
    • “Big Mother” by Anya Ow (short story)
    • “Refugee; or, a nine-item representative inventory of a better world” by Iona Sharma (short story)
    • “The Glow-in-the-Dark Girls” by Senaa Ahmad (short story)
    • “Obscura” by Yoon Ha Lee (short story)
    • “A Snow, A Flood, A Fire” by Jamie Berrout (short story)
    • “Her Beautiful Body” by Adrienne Celt (short story)
    • “On the Occasion of A Burial of Ernest Zach Ulrich” by Mary Kuryla (short story)
    • “Early Morning Service” by Irette Y. Patterson (short story)
    • “Of Warps and Wefts” by Innocent Chizaram Ilo (short story)
    • “A Very Large Number of Moons” by Kai Stewart (short story)
    • “Princess Mine” by Darby Harn (short story)
    • “Strange Waters” by Samantha Mills (short story)
    • “All of Us Told, All of It Real” by Evan Dicken (short story)
    • “Old Fighter Pilots” by Samuel Jensen (short story)
    • “The Right Way To Be Sad” by Shankar Gopalakrishnan (short story)
    • “Things That Happened While We Waited For Our Magical Grandmother to Die—No. 39” by Kuzhali Manickavel (short story)
    • “We Feed the Bears of Fire and Ice” by Octavia Cade (short story)
    • “Variations on a Theme from Turandot” by Ada Hoffman (short story)
    • “Salt Lines” by Ian Muneshwar (short story)
    • “Like Smoke, Like Light” by Yukimi Ogawa (short story)
    • “Quietly Gigantic” by K. C. Mead-Brewer (short story)
    • “The Metal Eater of Luminous Smoke” by Minsoo Kang (short story)
    • “The Athuran Interpreter’s Flight” by Eleanna Castroianni (short story)
    • “Chasing the Start” by Evan Marcroft (novelette)
    • “The Trees of My Youth Grew Tall” by Mimi Mondal (short story)
    • “Copy Cat” by Alex Shvartsman and K.A. Teryna (short story)
    • “Orphan Tsunami Heathens” by Tiera Greene (short story)
    • “What Man Knoweth” by Russell Nichols (novelette)
    • “Seedlings” by Audrey R. Hollis (short story)
    • “Mountaineering” by Leah Bobet (short story)
    • “Tamales in Space, and Other Phrases For the Beginning Speaker” by Gabriela Santiago (short story)

Neil Clarke

  • The Best Science Fiction of the Year: Volume 3, Night Shade Books (reprint anthology)
  • Clarkesworld Magazine 2018, Wyrm Publishing
  • Clarkesworld Year Nine, Wyrm Publishing (reprint anthology)
  • The Final Frontier, Night Shade Books (reprint anthology)
  • Forever Magazine 2018, Wyrm Publishing

Andy Cox

  • Interzone 2018, TTA Press

Ellen Datlow

  • The Best Horror of the Year: Volume Ten, Night Shade Books (reprint anthology)
  • The Best of the Best Horror of the Year, Night Shade Books (reprint anthology)
  • The Devil and the Deep: Horror Stories of the Sea, Night Shade Books (original anthology)
    • “Fodder’s Jig” by Lee Thomas (novelette)
    • “Haunt” by Siobhan Carroll a (novelette)
    • “He Sings of Salt and Wormwood” by Brian Hodge (novelette)
    • “A Moment Before Breaking” by A. C. Wise (novelette)
    • “A Ship of the South Wind” by Bradley Denton (novelette)
    • “Shit Happens” by Michael Marshall Smith (novelette)
    • “The Whalers Song” by Ray Cluley (novelette)
    • “Broken Record” by Stephen Graham Jones (short story)
    • “The Curious Allure of the Sea” by Christopher Golden (short story)
    • “Deadwater” by Simon Bestwick (short story)
    • “The Deep Sea Swell” by John Langan (short story)
    • “Saudade” by Steve Rasnic Tem (short story)
    • “Sister, Dearest Sister, Let Me Show to You the Sea” by Seanan McGuire (short story)
    • “The Tryal Attract” by Terry Dowling (short story)
    • “What My Mother Left Me” by Alyssa Wong (short story)
  • Tor.com Short Fiction
    • Gods, Monsters and the Lucky Peach by Kelly Robson, Tor.com (novella)
    • “Breakwater” by Simon Bestwick, Tor.com (novelette)
    • “The Ghoul Goes West” by Dale Bailey, Tor.com (novelette)
    • “Recoveries” by Susan Palwick, Tor.com (novelette)
    • “Triquetra” by Kirstyn McDermott, Tor.com (novelette)
    • “A.I. and the Trolley Problem” by Pat Cadigan, Tor.com (short story)
    • “The Guile” by Ian McDonald, Tor.com (short story)
    • “The Heart of Owl Abbas” by Kathleen Jennings, Tor.com (short story)
    • “Meat And Salt And Sparks” by Rich Larson, Tor.com (short story)
    • “Our King and His Court ” by Rich Larson, Tor.com (short story)
    • “Played Your Eyes” by Jonathan Carroll, Tor.com (short story)

S. B. Divya

  • Escape Pod 2018, Escape Artists, Inc. (with Mur Lafferty)

Gardner Dozois

  • The Book of Magic, Bantam/Harper Voyager (original anthology)
    • “The Biography of A Bouncing Boy Terror: Chapter Two: Jumping Jack in Love” by Ysabeau S Wilce (short fiction)
    • “Bloom” by Kate Elliott (short fiction)
    • “Community Service” by Megan Lindholm (short fiction)
    • “The Devil’s Whatever” by Andy Duncan (short fiction)
    • “Flint and Mirror” by John Crowley (short fiction)
    • “The Friends of Masquelayne The Incomparable” by Matthew Hughes (short fiction)
    • “The Governer” by Tim Powers (short fiction)
    • “Loft The Sorcerer” by Eleanor Arnason (short fiction)
    • “A Night at the Tarn House” by George R.R. Martin (short fiction)
    • “No Work of Mine” by Elizabeth Bear (short fiction)
    • “Song of Fire” by Rachel Pollack (short fiction)
    • “The Staff in the Stone” by Garth Nix (short fiction)
    • “Sungrazer” by Liz Williams (short fiction)
    • “Widow Maker” by Lavie Tidhar (short fiction)
    • “The Wolf and the Manticore” by Greg Van Eekhout (short fiction)
  • The Year’s Best Science Fiction: Thirty-Fifth Annual Collection, St. Martin’s Griffin (reprint anthology)

Carl Engle-Laird

  • Tor.com Short Fiction
    • The Descent of Monsters by JY Yang, Tor.com (novella)
    • “Loss of Signal” by S.B. Divya, Tor.com (short story)
    • Static Ruin by Corey J. White, Tor.com (novella)
    • Stone Mad by Elizabeth Bear, Tor.com (novella) (with Beth Meacham)
    • Void Black Shadow by Corey J. White, Tor.com
    • “The Word of Flesh and Soul” by Ruthanna Emrys, Tor.com (novelette)

Moshe Feder (does not appear to have 4+ eligible works)

  • Legion: Lies of the Beholder by Brandon Sanderson, Tor Books/Gollancz (novella)

C.C. Finlay

  • The Magazine of Fantasy & Science Fiction 2018, Spilogate, Inc.

Melissa Frain (does not appear to have 4+ eligible works)

  • Tor.com Short Fiction
    • “The Last Banquet of Temporal Confections” by Tina Connolly, Tor.com (novelette)

Shawn Garrett

  • Pseudopod 2018, Escape Artists, Inc. (with Alex Hofelich)

Lila Garrott

  • Strange Horizons Short Fiction (with Catherine Krahe and Vajra Chandrasekera)
    • “Big Mother” by Anya Ow (short story)
    • “Refugee; or, a nine-item representative inventory of a better world” by Iona Sharma (short story)
    • “The Glow-in-the-Dark Girls” by Senaa Ahmad (short story)
    • “Obscura” by Yoon Ha Lee (short story)
    • “A Snow, A Flood, A Fire” by Jamie Berrout (short story)
    • “Her Beautiful Body” by Adrienne Celt (short story)
    • “On the Occasion of A Burial of Ernest Zach Ulrich” by Mary Kuryla (short story)
    • “Early Morning Service” by Irette Y. Patterson (short story)
    • “Of Warps and Wefts” by Innocent Chizaram Ilo (short story)
    • “A Very Large Number of Moons” by Kai Stewart (short story)
    • “Princess Mine” by Darby Harn (short story)
    • “Strange Waters” by Samantha Mills (short story)
    • “All of Us Told, All of It Real” by Evan Dicken (short story)
    • “Old Fighter Pilots” by Samuel Jensen (short story)
    • “The Right Way To Be Sad” by Shankar Gopalakrishnan (short story)
    • “Things That Happened While We Waited For Our Magical Grandmother to Die—No. 39” by Kuzhali Manickavel (short story)
    • “We Feed the Bears of Fire and Ice” by Octavia Cade (short story)
    • “Variations on a Theme from Turandot” by Ada Hoffman (short story)
    • “Salt Lines” by Ian Muneshwar (short story)
    • “Like Smoke, Like Light” by Yukimi Ogawa (short story)
    • “Quietly Gigantic” by K. C. Mead-Brewer (short story)
    • “The Metal Eater of Luminous Smoke” by Minsoo Kang (short story)
    • “The Athuran Interpreter’s Flight” by Eleanna Castroianni (short story)
    • “Chasing the Start” by Evan Marcroft (novelette)
    • “The Trees of My Youth Grew Tall” by Mimi Mondal (short story)
    • “Copy Cat” by Alex Shvartsman and K.A. Teryna (short story)
    • “Orphan Tsunami Heathens” by Tiera Greene (short story)
    • “What Man Knoweth” by Russell Nichols (novelette)
    • “Seedlings” by Audrey R. Hollis (short story)
    • “Mountaineering” by Leah Bobet (short story)
    • “Tamales in Space, and Other Phrases For the Beginning Speaker” by Gabriela Santiago (short story)

Ana Grilo

  • Book Smugglers Short Fiction (with Thea James)
    • Accelerants by Lena Wilson (novella)
    • Between the Firmaments by JY Yang (novella)
    • “The Girl with the Frozen Heart” by Y. M. Pang (novelette)
    • A Glimmer of Silver by Juliet Kemp (novella)
    • Nussia by Michele Tracy Berger (novella)
    • “Running” by Itoro Udofia (novelette)
    • “When the Letter Comes” by Sara Fox (novelette)

Lee Harris

  • Tor.com Short Fiction
    • Alice Payne Arrives by Kate Heartfield, Tor.com Publishing (novella)
    • Artificial Condition by Martha Wells, Tor.com (novella)
    • The Atrocities by Jeremy C. Shipp, Tor.com (novella)
    • Beneath the Sugar Sky by Seanan McGuire, Tor.com (novella)
    • Binti: The Night Masquerade by Nnedi Okorafor, Tor.com (novella)
    • Exit Strategy by Martha Wells, Tor.com (novella)
    • The Expert System’s Brother by Adrian Tchaikovsky, Tor.com (novella)
    • Rogue Protocol by Martha Wells, Tor.com (novella)
    • Taste of Wrath by Matt Wallace, Tor.com (novella)

Edwina Harvey

  • Matters Arising from the Identification of the Body by Simon Petrie, Peggy Bright Books (novella)

Alex Hofelich

  • Pseudopod 2018, Escape Artists, Inc. (with Shawn Garrett)

Rich Horton

  • The Year’s Best Science Fiction & Fantasy 2018, Prime Books (reprint anthology)

Tom Hunter

  • 2001: An Odyssey in Words, NewCon Press (original anthology edited with Ian Whates)
    • “Before They Left” by Colin Greenland (short story)
    • “Child” by Adam Roberts (short story)
    • “Child of Ours” by Claire North (short story)
    • “Childhood’s Friend” by Rachel Pollack (short story)
    • “The Collectors” by Adrian Tchaikovsky (short story)
    • “Dancers” by Allen Stroud (short story)
    • “Distraction” by Gwyneth Jones (short story)
    • “Drawn from the Eye” by Jeff Noon (short story)
    • “Entropy War” by Yoon Ha Lee (short story)
    • “The Escape Hatch” by Matthew De Abaitua (short story)
    • “The Final Fable” by Ian Whates (short story)
    • “The Fugue” by Stephanie Holman (short story)
    • “Golgotha” by Dave Hutchinson (short story)
    • “I Saw Three Ships” by Phillip Mann (short story)
    • “Last Contact” by Becky Chambers (short story)
    • “Memories of a Table” by Chris Beckett (short story)
    • “The Monoliths of Mars” by Paul J. McAuley (short story)
    • “Murmuration” by Jane Rogers (short story)
    • “The Ontologist” by Liz Williams (short story)
    • “Ouroboros” by Ian R. MacLeod (short story)
    • “Providence” by Alastair Reynolds (short story)
    • “Roads of Silver, Paths of Gold” by Emmi Itäranta (short story)
    • “Takes from the White Hart” by Bruce Sterling (short story)
    • “Ten Landscapes of Nili Fossae” by Ian McDonald (short story)
    • “Waiting in the Sky” by Tom Hunter (short story)
    • “Would-Be A.I., Tell Us a Tale! #241: Sell ’em Back in Time! by Hali Hallison” by Ian Watson (short story)
    • “Your Death, Your Way, 100% Satisfaction Guaranteed!” by Emma Newman (short story)

Justina Ireland

  • Fiyah Magazine of Black Speculative Fiction 2018 (with Troy L. Wiggins and Brandon O’Brien)
    • “And Songs Don’t End” by Osahon Ize-Iyamu (short story)
    • “Bondye Bon” by Monique L. Desir (short story)
    • “The Epic of Sakina” by Shari Paul (novelette)
    • “Furious Girls” by Juliana Goodman (short story)
    • “The Other Side of Otto Mountain” by Ivy Spadille (novelette)
    • “The Percivals: The Bennett Benefit” by Eboni J. Dunbar (short story)
    • “Sister Rosetta Tharpe and Memphis Minnie Sing the Stumps Down Good” by LaShawn M. Wanak (novelette)
    • “The Sower” by Takim Williams (short story)
    • “Survival Lies” by Irette Y. Patterson (novelette)
    • “Teddy Bump” by Sheree Renée Thomas (short story)
    • “Valley Fieldwork” by Stefani Cox (short story)
    • “With These Hands: An Account of Uncommon Labor” by Lawana Holland-Moore (short story)
    • “Yard Dog” by Tade Thompson (short story)

Thea James

  • Book Smugglers 2018 (with Ana Grilo)
    • Accelerants by Lena Wilson (novella)
    • Between the Firmaments by JY Yang (novella)
    • “The Girl with the Frozen Heart” by Y. M. Pang (novelette)
    • A Glimmer of Silver by Juliet Kemp (novella)
    • Nussia by Michele Tracy Berger (novella)
    • “Running” by Itoro Udofia (novelette)
    • “When the Letter Comes” by Sara Fox (novelette)

N.K. Jemisin (does not appear to have 4+ eligible works)

  • The Best American Science Fiction and Fantasy 2018, Mariner Books (reprint anthology) (with series editor John Joseph Adams)

Stephen Jones

  • Best New Horror #28, PS Publishing (reprint anthology)

Cristina Jurado

  • The Apex Book of World SF 5, Apex Publications (mixed reprint and original anthology) (with Lavie Tidhar)
    • “Scenes from the Life of an Autocrat” by Basma Abdel Aziz
    • “Our Dead World” by Liliana Colanzi
    • “You Will See the Moon Rise” by Israel Alonso (translation of “Verás crecer la luna”)
    • “The Seventh” by Eliza Victoria

Marguerite Kenner

  • Cast of Wonders 2018, Escape Artists, Inc.

Stephen King (does not appear to have 4+ eligible works)

  • Flight or Fright, Hodder & Stoughton/Cemetery Dance (reprint anthology) (with Bev Vincent)

Catherine Krahe

  • Strange Horizons Short Fiction (with Lila Garrott and Vajra Chandrasekera)
    • “Big Mother” by Anya Ow (short story)
    • “Refugee; or, a nine-item representative inventory of a better world” by Iona Sharma (short story)
    • “The Glow-in-the-Dark Girls” by Senaa Ahmad (short story)
    • “Obscura” by Yoon Ha Lee (short story)
    • “A Snow, A Flood, A Fire” by Jamie Berrout (short story)
    • “Her Beautiful Body” by Adrienne Celt (short story)
    • “On the Occasion of A Burial of Ernest Zach Ulrich” by Mary Kuryla (short story)
    • “Early Morning Service” by Irette Y. Patterson (short story)
    • “Of Warps and Wefts” by Innocent Chizaram Ilo (short story)
    • “A Very Large Number of Moons” by Kai Stewart (short story)
    • “Princess Mine” by Darby Harn (short story)
    • “Strange Waters” by Samantha Mills (short story)
    • “All of Us Told, All of It Real” by Evan Dicken (short story)
    • “Old Fighter Pilots” by Samuel Jensen (short story)
    • “The Right Way To Be Sad” by Shankar Gopalakrishnan (short story)
    • “Things That Happened While We Waited For Our Magical Grandmother to Die—No. 39” by Kuzhali Manickavel (short story)
    • “We Feed the Bears of Fire and Ice” by Octavia Cade (short story)
    • “Variations on a Theme from Turandot” by Ada Hoffman (short story)
    • “Salt Lines” by Ian Muneshwar (short story)
    • “Like Smoke, Like Light” by Yukimi Ogawa (short story)
    • “Quietly Gigantic” by K. C. Mead-Brewer (short story)
    • “The Metal Eater of Luminous Smoke” by Minsoo Kang (short story)
    • “The Athuran Interpreter’s Flight” by Eleanna Castroianni (short story)
    • “Chasing the Start” by Evan Marcroft (novelette)
    • “The Trees of My Youth Grew Tall” by Mimi Mondal (short story)
    • “Copy Cat” by Alex Shvartsman and K.A. Teryna (short story)
    • “Orphan Tsunami Heathens” by Tiera Greene (short story)
    • “What Man Knoweth” by Russell Nichols (novelette)
    • “Seedlings” by Audrey R. Hollis (short story)
    • “Mountaineering” by Leah Bobet (short story)
    • “Tamales in Space, and Other Phrases For the Beginning Speaker” by Gabriela Santiago (short story)

Jonathan Laden

Mur Lafferty

  • Escape Pod 2018, Escape Artists, Inc. (with S. B. Divya)

Justin Landon

  • Tor.com Short Fiction
    • The Warrior Within by Angus Mcintyre, Tor.com (novella)
    • War Cry by Brian Mcclellan, Tor.com (novella)
    • “Worth Her Weight in Gold” by Sarah Gailey, Tor.com (short story)

S. Qiouyi Lu

  • Arsenika Short Fiction
    • “Mother?” by Cynthia So (short story)
    • “The Stories of Your Name” by J. M. Melican (short story)

George R. R. Martin

  • Wild Cards: Low Chicago, Tor/Harper Voyager (original anthology) (with Melinda M. Snodgrass)
    • “A Beautiful Facade” by Mary Anne Mohanraj (novelette)
    • “A Bit of Dinosaur” by Paul Cornell (novelette)
    • “Down the Rabbit Hole” by Kevin Andrew Murphy (novelette)
    • “A Long Night at the Palmer House” by John Jos. Miller (novella)
    • “Meathooks on Ice” by Saladin Ahmed (novelette)
    • “The Motherf*cking Apotheosis of Todd Motherf*cking Taszycki” by Christopher Rowe (novelette)
    • “The Sister in the Streets” by Melinda M. Snodgrass (novelette)
    • “Stripes” by Marko Kloos (novella)
  • Wild Cards: Texas Hold’em, Tor/Harper Voyager (original anthology) (with Melinda M. Snodgrass)
    • “Beats, Bugs, and Boys” by Diana Rowland
    • “Bubbles and the Band Trip” by Caroline Spector
    • “Drop City” by David Anthony Durham
    • “Dust and the Darkness” by Victor Milan
    • “Is Nobody Going to San Antone?” by Walton Simons
    • “Jade Blossom’s Brew” by William F. Wu
    • “The Secret Life of Rubberband” by Max Gladstone
  • Tor.com Short Fiction
    • “Evernight” by Victor Milán, Tor.com (novelette)
    • “Fitting In” by Max Gladstone, Tor.com (novelette)
    • The Flight of Morpho Girl by Caroline Spector and Bradley Denton, Tor.com (novella)

Beth Meacham

  • Tor.com Short Fiction
    • Stone Mad by Elizabeth Bear, Tor.com (novella) (with Carl Engle-Laird)

Melanie R. Meadors (does not appear to have 4+ eligible works)

  • Hath No Fury, Outland Entertainment (original anthology)
    • “The Book of Rowe” by Carol Berg (short fiction)
    • “Burning” by Elaine Cunningham (short fiction)
    • “Casting On” by Philippa Ballantine (short fiction)
    • “Craft” by Lian Hearn (short fiction)
    • “A Dance with Death” by Marc Turner (short fiction)
    • “Echoes of Stone” by Elizabeth Vaughan (short fiction)
    • “A Hero of Grünjord” by Lucy A. Snyder (short fiction)
    • “Last of the Red Riders” by Django Wexler (short fiction)
    • “The Mark of a Mountain Poppy” by Erin M. Evans (short fiction)
    • “Pax Egyptica” by Dana Cameron (short fiction)
    • “Reconciling Memory” by Gail Z. Martin (short fiction)
    • “Riding Ever Southward, in the Company of Bees” by Seanan McGuire (short fiction)
    • “Rise of the Bonecrushers” by Eloise J. Knapp (short fiction)
    • “The Scion” by S.R. Cambridge (short fiction)
    • “A Seed Planted” by Carina Bissett (short fiction)
    • “She Keeps Crawling Back” by Delilah S. Dawson (short fiction)
    • “She Tore” by Nisi Shawl (short fiction)
    • “Snakeskin: A Mutant Files Story” by William C. Dietz (short fiction)
    • “Some Enchanted Evening” by Anton Strout (short fiction)
    • “Trench Witch” by M.L. Brennan (short fiction)
    • “The Unlikely Turncoat: A Genrenauts Short Story” by Michael R. Underwood (short fiction)
    • “A Wasteland of My God’s Own Making” by Bradley P. Beaulieu (short fiction)

Rebecca Moesta (does not appear to have 4+ eligible works)

  • Fiction River: Wishes, WMG Publishing (original anthology)
    • “As Fast as Wishes Travel” by Dale Hartley Emery (short story)
    • “Blame It on the Ghosts” by Annie Reed (short story)
    • “Ellen Double Prime” by Alexandra Brandt (short story)
    • “Family, Fair and True” by Dayle A. Dermatis (short story)
    • “Granted” by Robert T. Jeschonek (short story)
    • “How I Became a Fairy Godmother” by Bonnie Elizabeth (short story)
    • “If Wishes Were Kisses” by Lesley L. Smith (short story)
    • “Movie Boy and Music Girl” by Ron Collins (short story)
    • “The Rock of Kansas” by Eric Kent Edstrom (short story)
    • “Starfish at Ebbtide” by Lisa Silverthorne (short story)
    • “True” by Leslie Claire Walker (short story)
    • “Turquoise Trail” by Diana Deverill (short story)
    • “Twin Wishes” by Jamie Ferguson (short story)
    • “Upon_a_Starship.pgm” by Brigid Collins (short story)
    • “What Alanna Wished, How, and Why” by Dave Raines (short story)
    • “A Winged Heart” by T. Thorn Coyle (short story)

David Thomas Moore

  • Creatures: The Legacy of Frankenstein, Abaddon Books (original anthology)
    • “Kaseem’s Way”, by Tade Thompson (short fiction)
    • “The New Woman”, by Rose Biggin (short fiction)
    • “Reculver”, by Paul Meloy (short fiction)
    • “Made Monstrous”, by Emma Newman (short fiction)
    • “Love Thee Better”, by Kaaron Warren (short fiction)
  • Dracula: Rise of the Beast, Abaddon Books (original anthology)
  • Not So Stories, Abaddon Books (original anthology)
  • The True History of the Strange Brigade, Abaddon Books (original anthology)

Khaalidah Muhammad-Ali

  • PodCastle 2018, Escape Artists, Inc. (with Jen R. Albert)

Ira Nayman (does not appear to have 4+ eligible works)

  • Amazing Stories Short Fiction
    • “Captain Future in Love” by Allen Steele (short story)
    • “Harry’s Toaster” by Lawrence Watt Evans (short story)
    • “Beyond Human Measure” by Dave Creek (short story)
    • “Flight of an Arrow” by Shirley Meier (short story)
    • “Sister Solveig and Mr. Denial” by Kameron Hurley (short story)
    • “Foster Earth” by Julie E. Czerneda (short story)
    • “Slipping Time” by Paul Levinson (short story)
    • “When Angels Come Knocking” by Drew Hayden Taylor (short story)

Brandon O’Brien

  • Fiyah Magazine of Black Speculative Fiction 2018 (with Justina Ireland and Troy L. Wiggins)
    • “And Songs Don’t End” by Osahon Ize-Iyamu (short story)
    • “Bondye Bon” by Monique L. Desir (short story)
    • “The Epic of Sakina” by Shari Paul (novelette)
    • “Furious Girls” by Juliana Goodman (short story)
    • “The Other Side of Otto Mountain” by Ivy Spadille (novelette)
    • “The Percivals: The Bennett Benefit” by Eboni J. Dunbar (short story)
    • “Sister Rosetta Tharpe and Memphis Minnie Sing the Stumps Down Good” by LaShawn M. Wanak (novelette)
    • “The Sower” by Takim Williams (short story)
    • “Survival Lies” by Irette Y. Patterson (novelette)
    • “Teddy Bump” by Sheree Renée Thomas (short story)
    • “Valley Fieldwork” by Stefani Cox (short story)
    • “With These Hands: An Account of Uncommon Labor” by Lawana Holland-Moore (short story)
    • “Yard Dog” by Tade Thompson (short story)

Marco Palmieri (does not appear to have 4+ eligible works)

  • Tor.com Short Fiction
    • “No Flight Without the Shatter” by Brooke Bolander, Tor.com (novelette)
    • “The Only Harmless Great Thing” by Brooke Bolander, Tor.com (novelette)

Dominik Parisien

  • Disabled People Destroy Science Fiction Fiction
    • “The House on the Moon” by William Alexander (short story)
    • “Birthday Girl” by Rachel Swirsky (short story)
    • “An Open Letter to the Family” by Jennifer Brozek (short story)
    • “Heavy Lifting” by A. T. Greenblatt (short story)
    • “The Frequency of Compassion” by A. Merc Rustad (short story)
    • “The Stars Above” by Katharine Duckett(short story)
    • “The Things I Miss the Most” by Nisi Shawl (short story)
    • “Abigail Dreams of Weather” by Stu West (short story)
    • “A House” by the Sea” by P. H. Lee (short story)
    • “Disconnect” by Fran Wilde (novelette)
    • “This Will Not Happen to You” by Marissa Lingen (short story)
  • Robots vs. Fairies (original anthology) (with Navah Wolfe)
    • “Adriftica” by Maria Dahvana Headley (novelette)
    • “All the Time We’ve Left to Spend” by Alyssa Wong (short story)
    • “The Blue Fairy’s Manifesto” by Annalee Newitz (short story)
    • “The Bookcase Expedition” by Jeffrey Ford (short story)
    • “Bread and Milk and Salt” by Sarah Gailey (short story)
    • “Build Me a Wonderland” by Seanan McGuire (short story)
    • “The Buried Giant” by Lavie Tidhar (short story)
    • “A Fall Counts Anywhere” by Catherynne M. Valente (novelette)
    • “Ironheart” by Jonathan Maberry (short story)
    • “Just Another Love Song” by Kat Howard (short story)
    • “Murmured Under the Moon” by Tim Pratt (short story)
    • “Ostentation of Peacocks” by Delilah S. Dawson [as Lila Bowen] (short story)
    • “Quality Time” by Ken Liu (novelette)
    • “Second to the Left, and Straight On” by Jim C. Hines (short story)
    • “Sound and Fury” by Mary Robinette Kowal (short story)
    • “Three Robots Experience Objects Left Behind from the Era of Humans for the First Time” by John Scalzi (short story)
    • “To a Cloven Pine” by Max Gladstone (short story)
    • “Work Shadow/Shadow Work” by Madeline Ashby (short story)

Diana M. Pho (does not appear to have 4+ eligible works)

  • Tor.com Short Fiction
    • The Barrow Will Send What It May by Margaret Killjoy, Tor.com (novella)
    • The Black God’s Drums by P. Djèli Clark, Tor.com (novella)
    • “Into the Gray” by Margaret Killjoy, Tor.com (short story)
    • “The Need for Air” by Lettie Prell, Tor.com (short story)

Trevor Quachri

  • Analog Science Fiction & Fact 2018, Dell Magazines

Julia Rios

  • Fireside Magazine 2018, Fireside Fiction Company

Erin Roberts (does not appear to have 4+ eligible works)

  • Strange Horizons Short Fiction (with Rasha Abdulhadi and Sheree Renée Thomas)
    • “Dying Lessons” by Troy L. Wiggins (short story)
    • “The People Who Sleep Beneath the Waves” by Malena Crawford (short story)
    • “Hide Me In The Shadow of Your Wings” by Christopher Caldwell (short story)
    • “Venus Witch’s Ring” by Inda Lauryn (short story)
    • “Strange Mercy” by Christopher Alonso (short story)
    • “Every Good-Bye Ain’t Gone” by Eden Royce (short story)

Jill Roberts (does not appear to have 4+ eligible works)

  • Apocalypse Nyx by Kameron Hurley, Tachyon (collection)

Kristine Kathryn Rusch

  • Fiction River: Justice, WMG Publishing (original anthology)
    • “The Ball Breaker’s Summer Club” by Valerie Brook
    • “Best Served… Salted” by Lauryn Christopher
    • “Bone” by T. Thorne Coyle
    • “The Darks of Their Eyes” by Robert T. Jeschonek
    • “Domus Justice” by Michèle Laframboise
    • “Grace” by Michael Kowal
    • “Mercy Find Me” by Diana Deverell
    • “My Honor to Kill You” by Dan C. Duval
    • “The Night Takes You” by Leslie Claire Walker
    • “Pariah” by Louisa Swann
    • “A Pearl into Darkness” by Lisa Silverthorne
    • “Spoils” by Eric Kent Edstrom
    • “The Supporters in Panama City” by Brigid Collins
    • “Uncle Philbert” by Dory Crowe
    • “A Vulture Waits” by Rob Vagle
  • Pulphouse Magazine 2018, WMG Publishing (with Dean Wesley Smith)

William Schafer

  • The Dinosaur Tourist by Caitlin R. Kiernan, Subterranean Press (reprint collection)
  • DJStories by David J Schow, Subterranean Press (reprint collection)
  • Father of Lies by K.J. Parker, Subterranean Press (reprint collection)
  • A Voice in the Night by Jack McDevitt, Subterranean Press (reprint collection)

William Schafer and Yanni Kuznia

  • Subterranean Press Short Fiction
    • Phoresis by Greg Egan, Subterranean Press (novella)
    • The Tea Master and the Detective by Aliette de Bodard, Subterranean Press (novella)

Jason Sizemore

  • Apex Magazine 2018, Apex Publications

Dean Wesley Smith

  • Pulphouse Magazine 2018, WMG Publishing (with Kristine Kathryn Rusch)

Rashida J. Smith

  • GigaNotoSaurus Short Fiction
    • “The Final Charge of Mr. Electrico” by Scott Edelman (short story)
    • “Through the Eye of the Needle” by A. J. Fitzwater (short story)
    • “Traces of Us” by Vanessa Fogg (short story)
    • “The Tale of the Ive-ojan-akhar’s Death” by Alex Jeffers (novelette)
    • “The Wait Is Longer Than You Think” by Adrian Simmons (novelette)
    • “Balloon Man” by Shiv Ramdas (novelette)
    • “The Singing Wind and the Golden Hour” by Nicole Feldringer (short story)
    • “Chrysalis in Sunlight” by Sarena Ulibarri (short story)
    • “The Day Beth Leather Shot the Moon, As Told by Rosemary Bonebreak” by Sarah McGill (short story)

Melinda M. Snodgrass

  • Wild Cards: Low Chicago, Tor/Harper Voyager (original anthology) (with George R.R. Martin)
    • “A Beautiful Facade” by Mary Anne Mohanraj (novelette)
    • “A Bit of Dinosaur” by Paul Cornell (novelette)
    • “Down the Rabbit Hole” by Kevin Andrew Murphy (novelette)
    • “A Long Night at the Palmer House” by John Jos. Miller (novella)
    • “Meathooks on Ice” by Saladin Ahmed (novelette)
    • “The Motherf*cking Apotheosis of Todd Motherf*cking Taszycki” by Christopher Rowe (novelette)
    • “The Sister in the Streets” by Melinda M. Snodgrass (novelette)
    • “Stripes” by Marko Kloos (novella)
  • Wild Cards: Texas Hold’em, Tor/Harper Voyager (original anthology) (with Melinda M. Snodgrass)
    • “Beats, Bugs, and Boys” by Diana Rowland
    • “Bubbles and the Band Trip” by Caroline Spector
    • “Drop City” by David Anthony Durham
    • “Dust and the Darkness” by Victor Milan
    • “Is Nobody Going to San Antone?” by Walton Simons
    • “Jade Blossom’s Brew” by William F. Wu
    • “The Secret Life of Rubberband” by Max Gladstone

Anne Sowards (does not appear to have 4+ eligible works)

  • Brief Cases by Jim Butcher, Ace Books/Orbit Books (collection)

David Steffen

  • Diabolical Plots Short Fiction
    • “9 Things Mainstream Media Got Wrong About the Ansaj Incident” by Willem Myra (short story)
    • “Artful Intelligence” by G.H. Finn (short story)
    • “Brooklyn Fantasia” by Marcy Arlin (short story)
    • “Crimson Hour” by Jesse Sprague (short story)
    • “The Efficacy of Tyromancy Over Reflective Scrying Methods in Divining Colleagues’ Coming Misfortunes, A Study by Cresivar Ibraxson, Associate Magus, Wintervale University” by Amanda Helms (short story)
    • “Giant Robot and the Infinite Sunset” by Derrick Boden (short story)
    • “Glass in Frozen Time” by M.K. Hutchins (short story)
    • “Graduation in the Time of Yog-Sothoth” by James Van Pelt (short story)
    • “Her February Face” by Christie Yant (short story)
    • “Jesus and Dave” by Jennifer Lee Rossman (short story)
    • “Medium Matters” by R.K. Duncan (short story)
    • “Six Hundred Universes of Jenny Zars” by Wendy Nikel (short story)
    • “Soft Clay” by Seth Chambers (short story)
    • “Tank!” by John Wiswell (short story)
    • “The Vegan Apocalypse: 50 Years Later” by Benjamin A. Friedman (short story)
    • “What Monsters Prowl Above the Waves” by Jo Miles (short story)
    • “Withholding Judgment Day” by Ryan Dull (short story)
  • Diabolical Plots Year Four (anthology which includes all of the above, plus: )
    • “The Coal Remembers What It Was” by Paul R. Hardy (short story)
    • “The Dictionary For Dreamers” by Cislyn Smith (short story)
    • “The Divided Island” by Rhys Hughes (short story)
    • “The Fisher in the Yellow Afternoon” by Michael Anthony Ashley (short story)
    • “For the Last Time, It’s Not a Ray Gun” by Anaea Lay (short story)
    • “The Hammer’s Prayer” by Benjamin C. Kinney (short story)
    • “Heaven For Everyone” by Aimee Ogden (short story)
    • “How Rigel Gained a Rabbi (Briefly)” by Benjamin Blattberg (short story)
    • “The Last Death” by Sahara Frost (short story)
    • “Local Senior Celebrates Milestone” by Matthew Claxton (short story)
    • “The Man Whose Left Arm Was a Cat” by Jennifer Lee Rossman (short story)
    • “The Memory Cookbook” by Aaron Fox-Lerner (short story)
    • “Pumpkin and Glass” by Sean R. Robinson (short story)
    • “Still Life With Grave Juice” by Jim Moss (short story)

Jonathan Strahan

  • The Best Science Fiction & Fantasy of the Year: Volume Twelve, Solaris (reprint anthology)
  • Infinity’s End, Solaris (original anthology)
    • “Death’s Door” by Alastair Reynolds (novelette)
    • “Foxy and Tiggs” by Justina Robson (short fiction)
    • “Intervention” by Kelly Robson (short fiction)
    • “Kindred” by Peter Watts (short fiction)
    • “Last Small Step” by Stephen Baxter (short fiction)
    • “Longing for Earth” by Linda Nagata (short fiction)
    • “Nothing Ever Happens on Oberon” by Paul J. McAuley (short fiction)
    • “Once on the Blue Moon” by Kristine Kathryn Rusch (short fiction)
    • “A Portrait of Salai” by Hannu Rajaniemi (short fiction)
    • “Prophet of the Roads” by Naomi Kritzer (short fiction)
    • “Swear Not by the Moon” by Seanan McGuire (short fiction)
    • “The Synchronist” by Fran Wilde (short fiction)
    • “Talking to Ghosts at the Edge of the World” by Lavie Tidhar (short fiction)
  • Tor.com Short Fiction
    • Black Helicopters by Caitlin R. Kiernan, Tor.com (novella)
    • The Million by Karl Schroeder, Tor.com (novella)
    • Time Was by Ian McDonald, Tor.com (novella)
    • “Black Friday” by Alex Irvine, Tor.com (short story)
    • “Grace’s Family” by James Patrick Kelly, Tor.com (novelette)
    • “The Nearest” by Greg Egan, Tor.com (novelette)
    • “Nine Last Days on Planet Earth” by Daryl Gregory, Tor.com (novelette)
    • “Yiwu” by Lavie Tidhar, Tor.com (short story)

Lynne M. Thomas and Michael Damian Thomas

  • Uncanny Magazine 2018

Sheree Renée Thomas

  • Apex Magazine, August 2018 (with Jason Sizemore)
    • “The Barnum Effect” by Celia Neri (short story)
    • “For Southern Girls When the Zodiac Ain’t Near Enough” by Eden Royce (short story)
    • “Gasping” by Brandon O’Brien (short story)
    • “Jewel of the Vashwa” by Jordan Kurella (short story)
    • “La Ciguapa, for the Reeds, for Herself” by J. M. Guzman (short story)
    • “Prism” by Stefanie Elrick (short story)
  • Strange Horizons Short Fiction (with Rasha Abdulhadi and Erin Roberts)
    • “Dying Lessons” by Troy L. Wiggins (short story)
    • “The People Who Sleep Beneath the Waves” by Malena Crawford (short story)
    • “Hide Me In The Shadow of Your Wings” by Christopher Caldwell (short story)
    • “Venus Witch’s Ring” by Inda Lauryn (short story)
    • “Strange Mercy” by Christopher Alonso (short story)
    • “Every Good-Bye Ain’t Gone” by Eden Royce (short story)

Lavie Tidhar

  • The Apex Book of World SF 5, Apex Publications (mixed reprint and original anthology) (with Cristina Jurado)
    • “Scenes from the Life of an Autocrat” by Basma Abdel Aziz
    • “Our Dead World” by Liliana Colanzi
    • “You Will See the Moon Rise” by Israel Alonso (translation of “Verás crecer la luna”)
    • “The Seventh” by Eliza Victoria

E. Catherine Tobler

  • Shimmer Short Fiction
    • “An Incomplete Catalogue of Miraculous Births, or Secrets of the Uterus Abscondita” by Rebecca Campbell (short story)
    • “Black Fanged Thing” by Sam Rebelein (short story)
    • “Bleeding from the Shadows” by David Rees-Thomas (short story)
    • “Faint Voices, Increasingly Desperate” by Anya Johanna DeNiro (short story)
    • “Gone to Earth” by Octavia Cade (short story)
    • “Held” by Ian O’Reilly (short story)
    • “If a bear…” by Kathrin Köhler(short story)
    • “The Imitation Sea” by Lora Gray (short story)
    • “Me, Waiting for Me, Hoping for Something More” by Dee Warrick (short story)
    • “Milkteeth” by Kristi DeMeester (short story)
    • “The Passenger” by Emily Lundgren (short story)
    • “Rapture” by Meg Elison (short story)
    • “They Have a Name for That” by Sara Beitia (short story)
    • “The Triumphant Ward of the Railroad and the Sea” by Sara Saab (short story)
    • “What the Skeleton Detective Tells You (while you picnic)” by Katherine Kendig (short story)
    • “You, in Flux” by Alexis A. Hunter (short story)

Ann VanderMeer

  • Tor.com Short Fiction
    • “The Kite Maker” by Brenda Peynado, Tor.com (short story)
    • “Under The Spinodal Curve” by Hanuš Seiner, Tor.com (short story)
    • “You Know How the Story Goes” by Thomas Olde Heuvelt, Tor.com (short story)
    • “Where Would You Be Now?” by Carrie Vaughn, Tor.com (novelette)

Bev Vincent (does not appear to have 4+ eligible works)

  • Flight or Fright, Hodder & Stoughton/Cemetery Dance (reprint anthology) (with Stephen King)

Wendy N. Wagner

  • Lightspeed Magazine 2018 (with John Joseph Adams)
  • Nightmare Magazine 2018 (with John Joseph Adams)

Ian Whates

  • 2001: An Odyssey in Words, NewCon Press (original anthology edited with Tom Hunter)
    • “Before They Left” by Colin Greenland (short story)
    • “Child” by Adam Roberts (short story)
    • “Child of Ours” by Claire North (short story)
    • “Childhood’s Friend” by Rachel Pollack (short story)
    • “The Collectors” by Adrian Tchaikovsky (short story)
    • “Dancers” by Allen Stroud (short story)
    • “Distraction” by Gwyneth Jones (short story)
    • “Drawn from the Eye” by Jeff Noon (short story)
    • “Entropy War” by Yoon Ha Lee (short story)
    • “The Escape Hatch” by Matthew De Abaitua (short story)
    • “The Final Fable” by Ian Whates (short story)
    • “The Fugue” by Stephanie Holman (short story)
    • “Golgotha” by Dave Hutchinson (short story)
    • “I Saw Three Ships” by Phillip Mann (short story)
    • “Last Contact” by Becky Chambers (short story)
    • “Memories of a Table” by Chris Beckett (short story)
    • “The Monoliths of Mars” by Paul J. McAuley (short story)
    • “Murmuration” by Jane Rogers (short story)
    • “The Ontologist” by Liz Williams (short story)
    • “Ouroboros” by Ian R. MacLeod (short story)
    • “Providence” by Alastair Reynolds (short story)
    • “Roads of Silver, Paths of Gold” by Emmi Itäranta (short story)
    • “Takes from the White Hart” by Bruce Sterling (short story)
    • “Ten Landscapes of Nili Fossae” by Ian McDonald (short story)
    • “Waiting in the Sky” by Tom Hunter (short story)
    • “Would-Be A.I., Tell Us a Tale! #241: Sell ’em Back in Time! by Hali Hallison” by Ian Watson (short story)
    • “Your Death, Your Way, 100% Satisfaction Guaranteed!” by Emma Newman (short story)
  • Steampunk International, NewCon Press (original anthology)
    • “The Athenian Dinner Party” by Derry O’Dowd (short fiction)
    • “Augustine” by J. S. Meresmaa (short fiction)
    • “The Cylinder Hat” by Anne Leinonen (short fiction)
    • “The Desert Spider” by Pedro Cipriano (short fiction)
    • “Heart of Stone” by Diana Pinguicha (short fiction)
    • “Reckless Engineering” by Jonathan Green (short fiction)
    • “Seasons of Wither” by George Mann (short fiction)
    • “Videri Quam Esse” by Anton Stark (short fiction)
    • “The Winged Man Isaac” by Magdalena Hai (short fiction)
  • Learning How to Drown by Cat Hellisen, NewCon Press (mixed original and reprint collection)
    • “Counter Curse” by Cat Hellisen, NewCon Press (short story)
    • “A Sun Bright Prison” by Cat Hellisen, NewCon Press (short story)
    • “Dreaming Monsters” by Cat Hellisen, NewCon Press (short story)
    • “This Is How We Burn” by Cat Hellisen, NewCon Press (short story)
  • NewCon Press Novellas
    • The Greatest Story Ever Told by Una McCormack (novella)
    • The Lake Boy by Adam Roberts (novella)
    • The Land of Somewhere Safe by Hal Duncan (novella)
    • The Martian Simulacra: A Sherlock Holmes Mystery by Eric Brown (novella)
    • Matryoshka by Ricardo Pinto (novella)
    • Phosphorus by Liz Williams (novella)

Brian J. White

  • Every River Runs to Salt by Rachael K. Jones, Fireside Fiction (novella)

Troy L. Wiggins

  • Fiyah Magazine of Black Speculative Fiction 2018 (with Justina Ireland and Brandon O’Brien)
    • “And Songs Don’t End” by Osahon Ize-Iyamu (short story)
    • “Bondye Bon” by Monique L. Desir (short story)
    • “The Epic of Sakina” by Shari Paul (novelette)
    • “Furious Girls” by Juliana Goodman (short story)
    • “The Other Side of Otto Mountain” by Ivy Spadille (novelette)
    • “The Percivals: The Bennett Benefit” by Eboni J. Dunbar (short story)
    • “Sister Rosetta Tharpe and Memphis Minnie Sing the Stumps Down Good” by LaShawn M. Wanak (novelette)
    • “The Sower” by Takim Williams (short story)
    • “Survival Lies” by Irette Y. Patterson (novelette)
    • “Teddy Bump” by Sheree Renée Thomas (short story)
    • “Valley Fieldwork” by Stefani Cox (short story)
    • “With These Hands: An Account of Uncommon Labor” by Lawana Holland-Moore (short story)
    • “Yard Dog” by Tade Thompson (short story)

Sheila Williams

  • Asimov’s Science Fiction 2018, Dell Magazines
    • 3-adica by Greg Egan (novella)
    • Bubble and Squeak by David Gerrold and Ctein (novella)
    • Bury Me in the Rainbow by Bill Johnson (novella)
    • Dix by Kristine Kathryn Rusch (novella)
    • Girl with a Curl by R. Garcia y Robertson (novella)
    • In the Lost City of Leng by Rudy Rucker and Paul Di Filippo (novella)
    • Joyride by Kristine Kathryn Rusch (novella)
    • The Rescue of Renegat by Kristine Kathryn Rusch (novella)
    • The Secret City by Rick Wilber (novella)
    • Starship Mountain by Allen M. Steele (novella)
    • The Wandering Warriors by Rick Wilber and Alan Smale (novella)
    • “Assassin in the Clouds” by Robert R. Chase (novelette)
    • “The Backward Lens of Compromise” by Octavia Cade (novelette)
    • “Barren Isle” by Allen M. Steele (novelette)
    • “Cost of Doing Business” by Nancy Kress (novelette)
    • “DENALI” by Robert Reed (novelette)
    • “Ephemera” by Ian R. MacLeod (novelette)
    • “The Gift” by Julie Novakova (novelette)
    • “The Huntsman and the Beast” by Carrie Vaughn (novelette)
    • “Liberating Alaska” by Harry Turtledove (novelette)
    • “Lieutenant Tightass” by Kristine Kathryn Rusch (novelette)
    • “Life from the Sky” by Sue Burke (novelette)
    • “Parallel Military Cultural Evolution in a Non-human Society” by Tom Purdom (novelette)
    • “Sea of Dreams” by Cixin Liu (novelette)
    • “Seven Months Out and Two to Go” by Rachel Swirsky and Trace Yulie (novelette)
    • “Solicited Discordance” by Matthew Hughes (novelette)
    • “Stormdiver” by Nick Wolven (novelette)
    • “Straconia” by Jack Skillingstead (novelette)
    • “A Threnody for Hazan” by Ray Nayler (novelette)
    • “True Jing” by Zack Be (novelette)
    • “Unter” by Michael Cassutt (novelette)
    • “Water and Diamond” by Derek Künsken (novelette)
    • “The Wrong Refrigerator” by Jean Marie Ward (novelette)
    • “Artisanal Trucking, LLC” by Mary Robinette Kowal (short story)
    • “Attachment Unavailable” by Leah Cypess (short story)
    • “Attack on Terminal: the Pilgrims’ Story” by James Gunn (short story)
    • “Because Reasons” by Alexandra Renwick (short story)
    • “Best Served Slow” by Leah Cypess (short story)
    • “The Billows of Sarto” by Sean Monaghan (short story)
    • “The Callisto Stakes” by Doug C. Souza (short story)
    • “Creative Nonfiction” by Paul Park (short story)
    • “Emojis” by Rudy Rucker (short story)
    • “The Equalizers” by Ian Creasey (short story)
    • “The Final Commandment: Trey’s Story” by James Gunn (short story)
    • “The Grays of Cestus V” by Erin Roberts (short story)
    • “In Event of Moon Disaster” by Rich Larson (short story)
    • “In the Sharing Place” by David Erik Nelson (short story)
    • “Incident at San Juan Bautista” by Ray Nayler (short story)
    • “Love Songs for the Very Awful” by Robert Reed (short story)
    • “A Mammoth, So-Called” by Marc Laidlaw (short story)
    • “Mother Tongues” by S. Qiouyi Lu (short story)
    • “Pregnancy as a Location in Space-time” by David Ebenbach (short story)
    • “Queen of the River: the Harbor Hope” by James Van Pelt (short story)
    • “R.U.R.-8?” by Suzanne Palmer (short story)
    • “Riverboats, Robots, and Ransom in the Regular Way” by Peter Wood (short story)
    • “Rules of Biology” by Dale Bailey (short story)
    • “The Seeds of Consciousness: 4107’s Story” by James Gunn (short story)
    • “Stones in the Water, Cottage on the Mountain” by Suzanne Palmer (short story)
    • “Survivors” by Sheila Finch (short story)
    • “Theories of Flight” by Linda Nagata (short story)
    • “Time Enough to Say Goodbye” by Sandra McDonald and Stephen D. Covey (short story)
    • “Unexpected Flowers” by Jane Lindskold (short story)
    • “The Waiting Room: the Pedia’s Story” by James Gunn (short story)
    • “What I Am” by William Ledbetter (short story)
    • “When the Rains Come Back” by Cadwell Turnbull (short story)
    • “The Witch of Osborne Park” by Stephanie Feldman (short story)

Navah Wolfe (does not appear to have 4+ eligible works)

  • Robots vs. Fairies (original anthology) (with Dominik Parisien)
    • “Adriftica” by Maria Dahvana Headley (novelette)
    • “All the Time We’ve Left to Spend” by Alyssa Wong (short story)
    • “The Blue Fairy’s Manifesto” by Annalee Newitz (short story)
    • “The Bookcase Expedition” by Jeffrey Ford (short story)
    • “Bread and Milk and Salt” by Sarah Gailey (short story)
    • “Build Me a Wonderland” by Seanan McGuire (short story)
    • “The Buried Giant” by Lavie Tidhar (short story)
    • “A Fall Counts Anywhere” by Catherynne M. Valente (novelette)
    • “Ironheart” by Jonathan Maberry (short story)
    • “Just Another Love Song” by Kat Howard (short story)
    • “Murmured Under the Moon” by Tim Pratt (short story)
    • “Ostentation of Peacocks” by Delilah S. Dawson [as Lila Bowen] (short story)
    • “Quality Time” by Ken Liu (novelette)
    • “Second to the Left, and Straight On” by Jim C. Hines (short story)
    • “Sound and Fury” by Mary Robinette Kowal (short story)
    • “Three Robots Experience Objects Left Behind from the Era of Humans for the First Time” by John Scalzi (short story)
    • “To a Cloven Pine” by Max Gladstone (short story)
    • “Work Shadow/Shadow Work” by Madeline Ashby (short story)

Jane Yolen

  • Nebula Awards Showcase 2018, Pyr (reprint anthology)

Pixel Scroll 9/13/18 A Pixel Without A Scroll Is Like Leslie Fish Without A Bicycle Card

(1) COMING DISTRACTIONS. Space.com presents a gallery of photos of Hurricane Florence taken from space.

With Hurricane Florence dominating this view from the International Space Station, Alexander Gerst warns the East Coast to get ready, “this is a no-kidding nightmare coming for you.” Click through this gallery to see the latest images of Hurricane Florence.

(2) SF CONCATENATION. The new issue of SF Concatenation is up “Science Fiction News & Recent Science Review for the Autumn 2018”. Jonathan Cowie outlines what’s in store for readers —

Most recently added (mid-September) is our autumnal edition of news and reviews.  As usual its news page has sections on film, books and publishing, TV, as well as the season’s forthcoming books listing of new titles (also fantasy and non-fiction) from the major SF/F imprints in the British Isles, many of which will soon be available elsewhere in the world.  (A great way to see what will be coming out and ideas for your Christmas shopping.)  And then there is the news page’s science consisting of short paragraphs on the season’s key, primary research papers that are cited so our scientist regulars can Google Scholar the papers for themseleves (and our non-scientist regulars can see that we don’t do fake news).  Plus there’s the news page’s science-and-SF-interface section where yesterday’s SF is becoming today’s fact.

Other content includes articles and convention reports. Here there is another in our series by scientists are also SF authors as to their science heroes born in the 20th century.

The issue delivers over 40,000 words of selected news. That selection includes not reporting most of the Hugo winners:

…We continue (from last year) to define the Hugo ‘principal categories’ as those that had over a thousand nominating in that category (down from two thousand as our definition in 2016 as the numbers involved in Hugo nominating have declined since 2016).  The 1,813 number nominating was down on last year’s number (2,464) (the second year of decline).  The 2,828, voting on the final shortlist was down on the 3,319 voting in 2017 which in turn was marginally up on the number voting in 2016 (3,130).
So not surprisingly, the principal Hugo categories (those categories with over one thousand nominating) were markedly fewer than last year. Indeed, for the first time in many years we are not counting the ‘Best Dramatic Presentation Short Form’ as principal category (it only saw 819 nominating ballots and just a paltry 87 nominating the programme that went on to win). The principal category Hugo wins this year therefore were:-

Best Novel: The Stone Sky by N. K. Jemisin (fantasy) which back in January (2018) we cited as one of the ‘best books’ of 2017. This is the third consecutive win for ‘best novel’ for Jemisin something that has never happened before in this category.
Best Novella: All Systems Red by Martha Wells
Best Dramatic Presentation – Long Form: Wonder Woman (Trailer here) which back in January (2018) we cited as one of the best SF/F/H films of 2017.

(3) THE MILITARY USES OF VENTRILOQUISM. [Item by Mike Kennedy.] Bluetooth earpieces have made people apparently talking to themselves normal—at least sort of. But at least one can spot the earpieces if you look carefully. A product in development for military use could change that, moving the mic and speaker inside the mouth (Smithsonian: “Military Invests in ‘Molar Mic’ That Can Route Calls Through Your Teeth”).

Communications devices have taken over our pockets and our wrists, but soon the gadgets may go even deeper. Patrick Tucker at Defense One reports that the Air Force has signed a $10 million deal with a California company to continue development of a communication device that is fitted to a users’ teeth.

Dubbed the “Molar Mic,” the gadget is being designed by San Mateo-based Sonitus Technologies  Officially called the ATAC system, the two-way communication system consists of a small microphone that clips to a users back teeth. This enables them to hear communications through their cranial bones which transmit the sound to the auditory nerve. Users also wear a low-profile transmitter loop around their neck that connects to the Molar Mic via near-field magnetic induction, a system similar to Bluetooth that can be encrypted and also passes through water. The loop then connects with with a phone, walkie-talkie or other communications device.

The device has seen field testing—albeit not in combat—with good results reported according to the contractor:

Tucker reports that airmen in Afghanistan tried it for 14 months while deployed, though not in active missions. Pararescuemen from the Air National Guard’s 131st Rescue Squadron based at Moffett Field in Mountain View, California, also tested the device in Houston last year during Hurricane Harvey. The team faced high water, noisy helicopters and other external noises that make traditional communication difficult.

“This guy is standing in neck-deep water, trying to hoist a civilian up into a helicopter above. He says, ’There is no way I would be able to communicate with the crew chief and the pilot if I was not wearing your product,” [Sonitus CEO Peter] Hadrovic tells Tucker.

Might you ever see a civilian walking around with a “molar mic”? Gizmodo weighs in on that question (“Weird Tooth Phone Wins Millions in Pentagon Funding”):

A spokesperson for Sonitus told Gizmodo the company won’t speculate about when the technology will be available for commercial, industrial, or consumer markets—and the company won’t scale beyond military use until it completes the contract the Department of Defense just awarded them.

So, we probably have at least a few years before civilians start lodging phones into their throats.

(4) FRESH COMPETITION. Deadline is determined not to be left behind: “Former Hero Complex Columnist Geoff Boucher Joins Deadline As Genre Editor”.

Veteran journalist Geoff Boucher, best known for launching the Hero Complex column in the Los Angeles Times that built a vast following, has joined Deadline in the newly created post of Genre Editor. He will be based in Los Angeles and specialize in breaking news, features and analysis of “Comic-Con culture.” His stomping ground will encompass superhero fare, science fiction, fantasy, horror, and animation, the hottest film and television sectors in today’s Hollywood.

(5) CONSPIRASKI. [Item by Mike Kennedy.] A conspiracy theory promoted by Russian media have it that a NASA astronaut deliberately damaged the docked Soyuz that was leaking air from the International Space Station. A joint NASA/Roscosmos statement reported in The Verge (“NASA is trying to squash conspiracy theories about the space station leak”) tries to quash that rumor… this despite earlier media reports that Roscosmos personnel are feeding those rumors through back channels.

Wild theories of sabotage still persist two weeks after a mysterious pressure leak occurred on the International Space Station, and the gossip has gotten so nonsensical that both NASA and Russia’s state space corporation, Roscosmos, are now trying to quell the rumors.

In a joint statement released today, NASA and Roscosmos claim that the US space agency is working closely with Russia to figure out the cause of the leak. The statement also notes that no information will be released until the Russian-led investigation is over, despite rampant speculation in the Russian press that the leak was possibly caused by one of NASA’s astronauts in space.

…the gossip over the leak seems to have only grown in the last couple of weeks. As first reported by Ars Technica, a story published in Russia’s Kommersant cited anonymous sources from Roscosmos, who claimed that investigators were looking into the possibility that the hole was caused by a NASA astronaut. The theory was that one of the three American crew members had gotten sick, so one of the astronauts caused the leak in order to force a quick evacuation to Earth.

(6) TODAY IN HISTORY

Setting aside his technical first appearance in 1981’s Donkey Kong, today is a fun anniversary to take note of for fans of the Super Mario video game franchise. The fat plumber who sports the iconic overalls and red cap debuted as a titular video game hero 33 years ago today, in Super Mario Bros. which was released in Japan on Sept. 13, 1985.

Not that anyone needs to be reminded, but when the game made its way over to North America and started selling here, it became one of the best-selling video games of all time. With some 40 million copies sold for the original NES.

(7) TODAY’S BIRTHDAYS

[Compiled by Cat Eldridge.]

  • Born September 13, 1894 – J.B. Priestley. Who apparently wrote SF but I’ll admit that even after reading his page at the Encyclopaedia of Science Fiction that I’ll be buggered if I can figure out precisely what that means. One of y’all will need to explain what sort of genre fiction he did.
  • Born September 13, 1916 – Roald Dahl. Writer, though how much of his work I’d consider genre is a good question, Witches certainly as well as Gremlins, James and the Giant Peach and Fantastic Mr Fox but what else are genre to your thinking? He would win the 1983 World Fantasy Award for Life Achievement, so I may be being overly fussy tonight.
  • Born September 13 — Bernard Pearson, 72. Discworld specialist. Would I could kid you? He wrote the Compleat Discworld Atlas with Ian Mitchell and Isobel Pearson and Terry Pratchett and Bernard Pearson and Reb Voyce; Also such works (and for sake of brevity I’m skipping co-authors though you can assume Pratchett was listed as being involved though how involved he was is a good question) as the Discworld Almanak: The Year of the PrawnDiscworld Diary: A Practical Manual for the Modern Witch and Miss Felicity Beedle’s The World of Poo.
  • Born September 13 – Bob Eggleton, 58. He has won the Hugo for Best Professional Artist an amazing eight times, he also won the Hugo for Best Related Book for his art book Greetings From Earth. He has also won the Chesley Award for Artistic Achievement. He was the guest of honor at Chicon  in 2000.
  • Born September 13 – Tom Holt, 57. Humorous fantasy such as Expecting Someone Taller and Who’s Afraid of Beowulf?  One of his latest works, The Good, the Bad and the Smug is roughly a take on Rumplestiltskin based economies where Evil goes for modern, hopefully appealing appearance.

(8) COMICS SECTION.

  • This Over the Hedge strip is not what Kirk had in mind when he asked for more power:

(9) DRIVERLESS MOTORCYCLE ON THE WAY. [Item by Mike Kennedy.] Don’t worry, this is probably not going to develop into the first Terminator. BMW has taken the wraps off a research project — said to be more than two years old — and has published video of a self-driving motorcycle (Mashable: “BMW’s riderless motorcycle can handle curves, obstacles”). In the video, the cycle is shown driving both with and without a rider along. What appears to be an early version has wide outrider wheels, but the current prototype looks pretty much lke a regular motorcycle with extra metal boxes attached that presumably contain the electronics.

This week BMW Motorrad — the motorcycle division of the German car company — showed a prototype driverless bike on a test track accelerating, navigating curves, and braking all on its own. In Munich, safety researchers have been using the autonomous motorcycle to test out features for its real motorcycles to handle dangerous situations.

(10) MEANWHILE, BACK AT THE UNCANNY SLUSHPILE. You can’t say they don’t know what they missed.

(11) ESCAPE POD OPENING FOR SUBMISSIONS. On September 16.

(12) ST. KOONTZ. Benedictine College English professor Stephen Mirarchi, reviewing Dean Koontz’s new novel The Forbidden Door, says that Koontz is an orthodox Catholic who is “a wildly successful writer who has infused his art with God’s grandeur.” National Review Online has the story: “The Transcendent Dean Koontz”.

… To take a wider view, Koontz is presenting in the series a large-scale defense of the ability to choose meaning and virtue. One of his recurring characters is an anxiety-prone latter-day Puritan, while another is an intellectually and physically domineering hulk straight out of a Max Weber tract. Koontz fairly and logically shows the necessary consequences of these characters’ thoughts and actions by creating storylines of such accessibility that the general reader can see how their ideologies contradict any coherent notion of the good life. The modern Puritan, for instance, moves nervously from scene to scene, constantly seeking perfection and never finding it, unjustly critiquing others while placating his own ego. The ideologies Koontz critiques inevitably lead to disaster — not just for the characters, but for the societies built on such chimeras.

Hawk, on the other hand, embraces the natural religion to which Koontz’s wide fan base responds with awe. She finds solace in the wonder of creation while calling out evil for its supernatural maliciousness, ever uniting reason with hope against secular hedonism. Koontz does “diversity” the right way, too: He features an autistic character in this series who is a compelling hero because he faces down his particular suffering by accepting grace. And as Flannery O’Connor and Léon Bloy before her have shockingly reminded us, the reception of grace usually hurts — badly.Speaking of the reception of grace, I am going to prognosticate: There is one mesmerizing scene in The Forbidden Door, an explicitly Catholic one, that many readers may wildly misinterpret….

(13) THOSE MISTY WATERCOLOR MEMORIES. Jason Heller intended to write an evocative, nostalgic tribute to the world of Piers Anthony – until he reread A Spell for Chameleon: “Revisiting the sad, misogynistic fantasy of Xanth” at AV Club.

I know other people who have read Anthony’s Xanth books. All of them did so in their youth—and like me, they drifted away from them long before graduating high school. There’s something inherently juvenile about the Xanth series, even though it wasn’t marketed as young adult, a distinction that didn’t exist as such back then. Even worse, as the series progressed it became increasingly reliant on really bad puns. That was more of a turnoff than any perceived lady hating, at least when I was a teenager and less attuned to such things. I do wonder how much of the books’ warped view of women trickled into my sensibility back then. Or other readers’ sensibility.

I grew up to be involved deeply in science fiction and fantasy, but it doesn’t take an insider to know that those genres have trouble with gender issues—both on the page and in real life, where sexual harassment at sci-fi conventions is an ongoing problem. Anthony’s books were huge in their day, and their influence runs deep; dozens of similarly humorous series, from Robert Lynn Asprin’s Myth Adventures to Alan Dean Foster’s Spellsinger, popped up in Xanth’s wake. I read and loved them, too, when I was a kid. But they don’t evoke an icky feeling the way Xanth does—a creepiness that retroactively corrodes any lingering nostalgia.

(14) LUNCH WAS SERVED. Can you guess “Who killed the largest birds that ever lived?” Bones show that humans lived beside “elephant birds” on Madagascar for millennia before wiping them out for food.

Prehistoric humans are under suspicion of wiping out the largest birds that ever lived after fossilised bones were discovered with telltale cut marks.

According to scientists, it’s evidence that the elephant birds of Madagascar were hunted and butchered for food.

The remains have been dated to about 10,000 years ago.

Until now, the first settlers were thought to have arrived on the island about 2,500 to 4,000 years ago.

“This does push back the date of human arrival by 6,000 years, at least,” says Dr James Hansford, a scientist at Zoological Society London, UK.

(15) WALLACE WINS. “Smarty pants: Robot trousers could keep the elderly mobile” — linings of legs fitted to act as supplementary muscles.

Johnathan Rossiter proudly displays his new trousers. Brightly coloured and fit for the running track, but packing more than just Lycra. They’ll be robotic.

“We are all going to get older and our mobility is going to reduce,” he says. “What we want to do is give people that extra bit of boost, to maintain their independence as long as possible.”

A team of British researchers thinks the future lies in wearable soft robotics. They’ve developed robotic muscles; air-filled bubbles of plastic that can raise a leg from a seated to a standing position.

(16) FLY ME TO THE MOON. [Item by Mike Kennedy.] SpaceX is up to something… the Moon. Or, at least they want to be. They’ve announced (via a tweet) that they have signed their first customer to take a trip around the Moon (The Verge: “SpaceX says it will send someone around the Moon on its future monster rocket”):

SpaceX has signed its first customer to fly on the company’s huge new rocket, the BFR, the company says. The passenger will fly on the monster ship around the Moon, though there are no details yet regarding when the trip will happen. SpaceX says it will announce who is flying — and why — on Monday, September 17th.

The BFR, or the Big Falcon Rocket, is the giant rocket that SpaceX is currently developing to send humans to the Moon and Mars. The BFR design, [presented] by CEO Elon Musk last year, consists of a combined rocket and spaceship, called the BFS for Big Falcon Spaceship. The main rocket will have 31 main Raptor engines and be capable of sending up 150 tons to low Earth orbit, according to that presentation.

(Yeah, yeah, BFR stands for “Big Falcon Rocket.” Wink, wink, nudge, nudge. Say no more, say no more.)

SpaceX had already announced (in early 2017) plans for two people to take such a trip; it’s not immediately not clear if this new announcement is one of those or yet a third person. The tweet does say that the name of the person as well as the reason for the trip will be announced Monday 17 September.

(17) MESSAGE FROM A CRYPTIC KRYPTONIAN. Erin Donnelly, in the Yahoo! Entertainment story “Henry Cavill Posts Complex Superman Vibe as Reports Claim He’s Leaving Superhero Role” says that Henry Cavill posted a video on Instagram wearing a “Krypton Lifting Team” and waving a Superman action figure around, leaving his 6.4 million followers wondering what this means.

View this post on Instagram

Today was exciting #Superman

A post shared by Henry Cavill (@henrycavill) on

(18) DAREDEVIL. Nextflix release the Daredevil Season 3 teaser trailer.

[Thanks to Mike Kennedy, Chip Hitchcock, Cat Eldridge, JJ, Daniel Dern, Martin Morse Wooster, John King Tarpinian, Carl Slaughter, and Andrew Porter for some of these stories. Title credit goes to File 770 contributing editor of the day Kip W.]

It’s Not Hard to Find the Real Numbers

Today I read an indie author telling his fans that creators inevitably have to deal with “haters.” Then I scrolled through his recent posts and discovered he had written another assuring everybody he is unimpressed by the 2018 Hugo Award winners — and that his views must be widely shared because just look at the mass exodus of Hugo voters.

It seemed bizarre that someone capable of pointing people to the publicly-available 2018 voting statistics (as he did) thinks no one will notice his made-up “10,000 voters” number, which he offered as the figure from which this year’s electorate has supposedly declined.

Here are the number of final ballots cast in the past seven years, from the official Hugo Awards website. (Links to PDF files.)

2012 Chicon 7 1,922
2013 LoneStarCon 3 1,848
2014 Loncon 3 3,587
2015 Sasquan 5,950
2016 MidAmeriCon 2 3,130
2017 Worldcon 75 3,319
2018 Worldcon 76 2,828

Of course, you’d expect participation to jump in 2014 because Loncon 3 broke a Worldcon membership record that had stood for 30 years, and it picked up a couple hundred Correia voters because that was the first year of Sad Puppies, (“Somewhere Puppies Are Smiling”).

The next year, 2015, the Sad and Rabid Puppies took over the ballot (“Re-Entering the Lists: The Slates Impact on the Final Hugo Ballot”). However, while there were even more Puppy voters than the first year, the final results show a huge influx of voters joined to oppose them.

The people who joined to vote for Vox Day’s slate in 2015 didn’t stick around. And the even larger group of fans who answered the firebell that year didn’t all stay after the crisis passed.

But consider this graph –

The number of 2018 voters is still over 50% higher than in 2012, the last pre-Puppy year. So this looks to me a lot more like a new, higher plateau than it does free-fall.

And I have to wonder if the fellow lecturing about “haters” owns a mirror.

Pixel Scroll 9/8/18 Space Zamboni!

(1) WHO TO LISTEN TO. Nicholas Whyte enthusiastically reviews four audio Doctor Who stories in “Jenny – the Doctor’s Daughter”.

Big Finish have scored a major coup by persuading Georgia Tennant to return to her brief role as Jenny, the Tenth Doctor’s cloned daughter, for more sfnal adventures across space and time, flanked by Sean Biggerstaff as the innocent but mysterious Noah, and both pursued by Siân Philips (who was Livia in I, Claudius forty years ago) as a vengeful cyborg, the Colt-5000. (Georgia Moffatt, as she then was, had a part in a Big Finish audio back in 2000, when she was only 16.)

 

(2) EVERMORE. Utah’s VR theme park Evermore opens today: “Evermore Park immersive experience from former Disney Imagineer invites you to enter fantasy world”.

Walt Disney Imagineers work diligently to create the most incredible experiences in the world. Sometimes, however, they take their immeasurable talents and create these experiences elsewhere. That’s the case for former Imagineer Josh Shipley.

According to his LinkedIn page, Shipley started with the Walt Disney Company in 1992 and became an Imagineer in 1996. He left Disney Imagineering in 2017 and began working on an immersive new experience park (located in Pleasant Grove, Utah) known as Evermore.

 

(3) ALL YOUR BASE. The Hugo Awards official site now has some very nice photos of the 2018 Hugo Award base created by Sara Felix and Vincent Villafranca, including closeups of the figures, inscriptions, and other details.

(4) STILL TIME TO HELP. A GoFundMe created to help Samanda Jeude is still open for donations. It’s received only a little over $1,000 so far. One of the incentives was a 1986 Hugo Award trophy.

“Helping The Helper -Electrical Eggs”

Science Fiction Fandom lost a long time friend and organizer in January, in the form of Donald (Dea) Cook. He left behind another well-known fan, his wife of over 30 years, Samanda Jeude.  Samanda is best known for establishing the organization Electrical Eggs, the first Disability Access organization in the Science Fiction community. Don was Sam’s sole career. She had polio as an infant, and that was complicated later in life by a couple of strokes. She now resides in a nursing home in Canton, Georgia. We helped to clear out the house to get it sold, and are now selling all of the contents to pay for Samanda’s ongoing care needs. How does any of this involve a Hugo, you might ask, and rightfully so!

Marcia Kelly Illingworth organized the appeal, and says the Hugo will stay in the fannish family, so to speak:

Update #2

The votes are in! The people have spoken! You have voted overwhelmingly to donate the Hugo to Fandom. I think I always knew that you would. Samanda thanks you, and I thank you!

We are leaving the fund open for a while longer for those who still wanted the opportunity to donate. Thank you again for all of your support.

Since donors have voted to donate the Hugo to fandom rather than have it be auctioned off to the highest bidder, that means less money raised for Samanda’s ongoing care. Given her service to fandom, it would be great to see further donations from fans.

(5) HIS PREFERRED WINNER. Nicholas Whyte has one thing in common with all Hugo voters – he thinks sometimes the wrong book loses — in this case, “Snow Crash, by Neal Stephenson”.

Second paragraph of third chapter:

But there are worse places to live. There are much worse places right here in this U-Stor-It. Only the big units like this one have their own doors. Most of them are accessed via a communal loading dock that leads to a maze of wide corrugated-steel hallways and freight elevators. These are slum housing, 5-by-10s and 10-by-10s where Yanoama tribespersons cook beans and parboil fistfuls of coca leaves over heaps of burning lottery tickets.

This popped to the top of one of my lists just at the moment that I have been reading some of the other award winners from 1994. Snow Crash was shortlisted for the Arthur C. Clarke Award (won by Jeff Noon’s Vurt) and the BSFA Award (won by Christopher Evans’ The Aztec Century); also on both of those shortlists was Ammonite by Nicola Griffith, which won the Tiptree. The Hugo for Best Novel was shared between A Fire On The Deep and Doomsday Book, the latter winning the Nebula as well; Snow Crash was on the Hugo long-list, but nowhere for the Nebula. (It did win two awards in French translation, and one in Spanish.)

This is surely one of those cases where the awards in general (and particularly across the Atlantic) failed to spot the classic in the making: Snow Crash now has more owners on LibraryThing than any two of the other books named above combined (which is why I read it; see below). I think it’s much the best of them.

(6) YOUR DIGITAL GOOD PLACE. Courtesy of io9, (“Google Chrome Has a Forking Clever Good Place Extension”) I learned about Google Chrome’s The Good Place extension:

Replace new tab page with a personalized dashboard that brings your very own version of The Good Place right to your desktop.

Calling all Good Place fans! Make The Good Place your Chrome home with an all-new tab page that features your favorite characters, quotes and photos from the show. Complete with weather updates, calendar reminders, and daily “inspiration” from Eleanor and the crew, you can become more productive and feel like you’re getting into The Good Place every single time you go online.

FEATURES:

-Replace curse words from your Chrome with the Obscenities Censor

-Search the web using your very own Janet

-Pry yourself away from the internet with the “Joy of Missing Out” built-in break reminders

-Replace “Thumbs up” and “Thumbs down” buttons on YouTube with “Good Place” and “Bad Place”

(7) TODAY IN HISTORY

  • September 8, 1966  — A little TV show, Star Trek, aired its first episode, “The Man Trap,” written by George Clayton Johnson.

And earlier this week The Hollywood Reporter reprinted the show creator’s article about his new series: “When Gene Roddenberry Explained ‘Star Trek’ in 1966”.

Just over two months after Star Trek first beamed up to audiences on NBC during the 8:30 p.m. hour on Sept. 8, 1966, creator Gene Roddenberry wrote a column explaining the scope of his ambitious space series — and why it aimed for much more “science” than “fiction.” His original column in The Hollywood Reporter, “Science Fiction Thing of Past,” is below: 

Imagine a space vessel, larger than any naval vessel known, crossing our galaxy at a velocity surpassing the speed of light. Fourteen decks, a crew of over 430 persons. A whole city afloat in space.

Science fiction? Absolutely not. Rather, real adventure in tomorrow’s space. Based upon the best scientific knowledge and estimates of what our astronauts of the future may face when they move out of our own solar system and into the vastness of our galaxy. Other worlds like ours? Other peoples? What?

Our starship, designed with the help of space experts, is the United Space Ship Enterprise. The place — NBC-TV, Thursday nights. In full color, this new action-adventure format boasts flesh and blood stars like talented William Shatner playing Ship’s Captain Kirk; love Grace Lee Whitney playing Yeoman Janice Rand; and Leonard Nimoy in an unusual new role as the half-alien Mister Spock. Plus talents such as DeForest Kelley, George Takei, Jimmy Doohan and Nichelle Nichols.

(8) TODAY’S BIRTHDAYS

[Compiled by Cat Eldridge.]

  • Born September 8 – John Boardman, 85. Editor, fanzine Knowable; his Diplomacy zine, Graustark turned fifty a few years ago. Active in civil rights as a student as Florida State University which got him expelled from his doctoral studies program there.
  • Born September 8 – Michael Hague, 70. Illustrator of his own work including The Book of Dragons, Michael Hague’s Magical World of Unicorns,  The Book of Fairies, The Book of Wizards and Michael Hague’s Read-to-Me Book of Fairy Tales; also interior and cover art for such genre works as The Hobbit, The Wizard of Oz and The Wind in The Willows. 
  • Born September 8 – Gordon Van Gelder, 54. Editor, The Magazine of Fantasy & Science Fiction, The New York Review of Science Fiction and a smattering of anthologies including Go Forth and Multiply and Welcome to the Greenhouse. Reviewer as well.
  • Born September 8 – Matt Ruff, 53. Author of quite a number of genre novels including Fool on The Hill, Lovecraft Country which was nominated for a World Fantasy Award, and Set This House in Order: A Romance of Souls which may or may not be genre fiction but never-the-less won a James Tiptree Jr. Award.

(9) COMICS SECTION.

  • Cutting-edge humor: Bizarro
  • Copernicus’ theory of SJW credentials: Free Range.
  • They’re not phoning home: Bliss

(10) GAP IN EXHIBIT. Holly Ordway, in “The Maker of the Maker of Middle-earth” at Christianity Today, reviews the Bodleian Tolkien exhibit and examines why it says little about Tolkien’s strong religious faith.

…There are many ways that Tolkien’s Christian faith could have been represented, even in the relatively limited space available. One item already on display was a 1914 letter to Edith. The display label transcribes, from Tolkien’s small and difficult-to-read handwriting, a paragraph about officer-training maneuvers on Port Meadow.

Immediately following this portion of the original letter is Tolkien’s comment that the next day “I got up at 7.40 and just reached church on time, and went to Communion.” Just one more sentence on an already existing display label would have given a glimpse of Tolkien’s faith in practice. As it is, nearly all visitors will miss this reference entirely; I very nearly did.

Other extracts from letters could have been shown, such as the 1956 letter in which Tolkien relates Frodo’s failure to give up the Ring to the petition in the Lord’s Prayer “lead us not into temptation, but deliver us from evil.” Or perhaps the 1944 letter in which Tolkien discusses modern healing miracles and describes the Resurrection as the “happy ending” of human history.

Several examples of his Elvish calligraphy were displayed; one could have been selected from the prayers that Tolkien translated into Elvish, such as the Lord’s Prayer. Both the 1956 letter and this translation show the way that Tolkien’s faith, and indeed specifically his prayer life, had an influence on his writing—exactly the kind of influence we would hope to see emphasized in an exhibit on an author.

…These references, if they had been included, need not have been emphasized, but for one who knows of Tolkien’s faith, the absence of any such small detail is striking.

Playing It Safe

Why might the Tolkien Estate and the Bodleian have chosen to downplay Tolkien’s faith? And why does it matter? …

(11) FUTURE FICTION AUTHOR. Listen to “Nexhuman, an interview with Francesco Verso” conducted by Filer Mlex at Yunchtime.

In this free-form interview, Francesco Verso, explores the topics of transhumanism, consumer culture, and the philosophical aspects of Nexhuman. He also discusses his work in the context of English language publications and the emergence of global voices in Science Fiction, including his own anthology, called Future Fiction, which was co-edited by Bill Campbell and published by Rosarium Press.

(12) NZ NATCON REPORT. SF Concatenation has posted a report on the New Zealand national sf convention by Lee Murray (with an assist from Simon Litten) — “Conclave III”. The convention was held the weekend of March 30-April 2, 2018 in Auckland.

Then we were on to Norman Cates’ WETA presentation to get the skinny on all the new techniques making our movie viewing epic. As is customary with Norman’s presentation, I could tell you about all the wonderful clips he showed us, but then I’d have to kill you, or Norman would, or WETA’s lawyers would have to engage a hitman. In any case, it was cool.

Next up, was the Other Voices panel, moderated by Stephen Litten, where we were joined by Matters Arising from the Identification of the Body author Simon Petrie and Indiana fantasy writer, Laura VanArendonk Baugh. It’s a lively discussion, with some great insights from my fellow panellists around the definition ‘other’ and the value of including marginalised and foreign-to-us voices on our reading lists. We discussed the vagaries of translation and the layering of culture that occurs when works are translated by a second voice. We touched on appropriation and the discourse surrounding Aboriginal and Maori mythologies. Panellists and audience members raised some seminal works from other cultures, including French, Italian, Japanese titles, which we all felt should be included on our must-read lists.

(13) UNKEPT ROBOTIC PROMISES. On Gizmodo, Matt Novak lists (and links) “99 Things That Robots Were Supposed to Be Doing by Now” (though many of the linked “predictions” aren’t really “by now”).

Below is a list of just some of the things people of the past said robots would do in the near future. Many of them are fun or weird, while others are downright scary. But they’re all still “futuristic.” For now.

  1. Robots were supposed to replace school teachers.
  2. Robots were supposed to be professional boxers.
  3. Robots were supposed to pay taxes.

[…]

  1. Robots were supposed to pull off their heads and become the sickest drum set you’ve ever seen.
  2. And by 2076, robots were supposed to run for president.

(14) WINTER IS COMING FOR AI, MAYBE. Popular Science looks at the idea that Artificial Intelligence may — once again — be overhyped, which could lead to a collapse in research/support (“Another AI winter could usher in a dark period for artificial intelligence”).

Artificial intelligence can take many forms. But it’s roughly defined as a computer system capable of tackling human tasks like sensory perception and decision-making. Since its earliest days, AI has fallen prey to cycles of extreme hype—and subsequent collapse. While recent technological advances may finally put an end to this boom-and-bust pattern, cheekily termed an “AI winter,” some scientists remain convinced winter is coming again.

The article goes on to discuss the first “winter” that occurred during the early Cold War when natural language translation proved to be a much more difficult task that anticipated and another beginning in the 70s/80s when the Lisp machine didn’t live up to its hype as an AI solution. Author Eleanor Cummins expresses concern that, among other things, self-driving cars are over-promised and may be under-delivered, then concludes that:

Much like actual seasonal shifts, AI winters are hard to predict. What’s more, the intensity [of] each event can vary widely. Excitement is necessary for emerging technologies to make inroads, but it’s clear the only way to prevent a blizzard is calculated silence—and a lot of hard work. As Facebook’s former AI director Yann LeCun told IEEE Spectrum, “AI has gone through a number of AI winters because people claimed things they couldn’t deliver.”

(15) AI PRIORITY. DARPA doesn’t seem worried by that weather forecast: “DARPA announces $2B investment in AI”.

At a symposium in Washington DC on Friday, DARPA announced plans to invest $2 billion in artificial intelligence research over the next five years.

In a program called “AI Next,” the agency now has over 20 programs currently in the works and will focus on “enhancing the security and resiliency of machine learning and AI technologies, reducing power, data, performance inefficiencies and [exploring] ‘explainability’” of these systems.

“Machines lack contextual reasoning capabilities, and their training must cover every eventuality, which is not only costly, but ultimately impossible,” said director Dr. Steven Walker. “We want to explore how machines can acquire human-like communication and reasoning capabilities, with the ability to recognize new situations and environments and adapt to them.”

(16) FOUNDATION ORDERED. Ars Technica says that, “Apple confirms TV series order of Asimov’s Foundation” for their nascent streaming service.

In April, we reported that Apple was working on developing a TV series based on Isaac Asimov’s highly influential Foundation series of science fiction novels. Today, Ars has confirmed not only that Foundation was in development, but it has now been given a full series order—meaning we’re definitely going to see it.

As previously reported, David Goyer (screenwriter for The Dark Knight and Batman Begins) and Josh Friedman (creator of the TV series Terminator: The Sarah Connor Chronicles and screenwriter for Steven Spielberg’s 2005 War of the Worlds film) will be the showrunners and executive producers. The series is being produced by Skydance Television, and Skydance CEO David Ellison will be an executive producer for the series (he is the son of famed Oracle executive Larry Ellison). Isaac Asimov’s daughter, Robyn Asimov, will also executive produce, along with Dana Goldberg and Marcy Ross.

(17) THE LIGHTS IN THE SKY ARE…UHH. NPR says this wouldn’t be news if anyone besides photographers had been paying attention: “Scientists Are Puzzled By Mysterious Lights In The Sky. They Call Them STEVE”.

There’s a light in the night sky over Canada that’s puzzling scientists. It looks like a white-purple ribbon. It’s very hot, and doesn’t last long. And it’s named STEVE.

STEVE: as in, Strong Thermal Emission Velocity Enhancement.

Naturally.

Scientists don’t actually know what’s causing the atmospheric phenomenon, which has been known to amateur photographers of the night sky for decades but only recently came to the attention of researchers.

But in research published this week in Geophysical Research Letters, they pin down what it definitely isn’t. It’s not an aurora….

(18) HYBRID HUMAN. Nature reports: “Mum’s a Neanderthal, Dad’s a Denisovan: First discovery of an ancient-human hybrid”

Genetic analysis uncovers a direct descendant of two different groups of early humans.

A female who died around 90,000 years ago was half Neanderthal and half Denisovan, according to genome analysis of a bone discovered in a Siberian cave. This is the first time scientists have identified an ancient individual whose parents belonged to distinct human groups….

(19) BEFORE MARVEL WAS A SURE THING. Looper has a roster of Marvel TV Shows You Completely Forgot About. Or in my case, never heard of to begin with….

[Thanks to John King Tarpinian, Cat Eldridge, JJ, Daniel Dern, Chip Hitchcock, SF Concatenation’s Jonathan Cowie, Martin Morse Wooster, Mike Kennedy, Carl Slaughter, and Andrew Porter for some of these stories. Title credit goes to File 770 contributing editor of the day Daniel Dern.]

Best Series Hugo: Eligible Series from 2018

By JJ: To assist Hugo nominators, listed below are the series believed to be eligible as of this writing for the 2019 Best Series Hugo next year *†.

Each series name is followed by the main author name(s) and the 2018-published work.

Feel free to add missing series and the name of the 2018-eligible work in the comments, and I will get them included in the main post.

I just ask that suggesters (1) first do a Find on author surname on this page, to check whether the series is already on the list, and (2) then make an effort to verify that a series does indeed have 3 volumes, that it has a 2018-published work, and that it has likely met the 240,000 word threshold; in the past I have spent a considerable amount of time trying to verify suggested series, only to discover that they had fewer than 3 volumes, or nothing published in the current year, or weren’t anything close to 240,000 words (e.g., children’s books). Self-published works may or may not be added to the list at my discretion.

Note that the 2017 Hugo Administrator ruled that nominations for a series and one of its subseries will not be combined. Therefore, when nominating a subseries work, think carefully under which series name it should be nominated. If the subseries does not yet meet the 3-volume, 240,000 word count threshold, then the main series name should be nominated. If the subseries does meet that threshold, then the subseries name should probably be nominated. This will ensure that another subseries in the same universe, or the main series itself, would still be eligible next year if this subseries is a finalist this year.

Note also that the 2017 Best Series Finalists were not technically finalists for the newly-established Hugo; they were finalists for a special one-time Hugo of the same name given by Worldcon 75. However, some of these series were ruled ineligible by the 2018 Hugo Administrator for not having added enough words since 2017 (prior finalists must have added at least 2 additional installments consisting of at least 240,000 words after they qualified for their last appearance on the final ballot), so it is probable that the 2019 Hugo Administrator will choose to rule them ineligible next year according to the rules for the category as well; bear that in mind when making your nominations.

  • Academy by Jack McDevitt, The Long Sunset
  • Adventures of Arabella Ashby by David D. Levine, Arabella, The Traitor of Mars
  • Age of Darkness by Stephen Aryan, Of Gods and Men (novella)
  • Alex Verus by Benedict Jacka, Marked
  • Aliens by Alex White, The Cold Forge
  • Alpennia by Heather Rose Jones, “Gifts Tell Truth” (novelette)
  • Alpha and Omega by Patricia Briggs, Burn Bright
  • Amaranthine Spectrum by Tom Toner, The Weight of the World and The Tropic of Eternity
  • Amaryllis by Carrie Vaughn, The Wild Dead (may not meet word count)
  • America Rising by William C. Dietz, Battle Hymn
  • Anuket City (Clocktaur Wars/Swordheart) by T. Kingfisher (Ursula Vernon), The Wonder Engine and Swordheart
  • Apt Universe by Adrian Tchaikovsky, For Love of Distant Shores (collection with 3 new novellas), The Scent of Tears (anthology)
  • Arcadia Project by Mishell Baker, Imposter Syndrome
  • Ars Numina by Ann Aguirre, The Wolf Lord
  • Assiti Shards (1632) by Eric Flint and a cast of thousands: by Paula Goodlett and Eric Flint and Gorg Huff, 1637: The Volga Rules
  • Bel Dame Apocrypha by Kameron Hurley, Apocalypse Nyx (collection)
  • Black Company by Glen Cook, Port Of Shadows
  • Book of the Black Earth by Jon Sprunk, Blade and Bone
  • Blood of Earth by Beth Cato, Roar of Sky
  • Bound Gods by Rachel Dunne, The Shattered Sun
  • Bryant & May by Christopher Fowler, Hall of Mirrors
  • Cainsville by Kelley Armstrong, Rough Justice (novella)
  • Celaena / Throne of Glass by Sarah J Maas, Kingdom of Ash
  • Centenal Cycle by Malka Older, State Tectonics
  • Chronicles of Elantra by Michelle Sagara, Cast in Deception
  • Chronicles of St. Mary’s by Jodi Taylor, An Argumentation of Historians
  • Claw by M. D. Lachlan, The Night Lies Bleeding
  • Cobra / Cobra Rebellion by Timothy Zahn, Cobra Traitor
  • Commonweal by Graydon Saunders, Under One Banner
  • Complete Tales of Jules de Grandin by Seabury Quinn, A Rival from the Grave
  • Confederation / Peacekeeper by Tanya Huff, The Privilege of Peace
  • Court of Thorns and Roses by Sarah J Maas, A Court of Frost and Starlight
  • *Craft Sequence by Max Gladstone, Ruin of Angels (probably ineligible due to being a finalist in 2017 and having insufficient new word count and/or volumes to requalify)
  • Custard Protocol by Gail Carriger, Competence
  • Dark Alchemy by Laura Bickle, Witch Creek
  • Dark Gifts by Vic James, Bright Ruin
  • Demon Cycle by Peter V. Brett, Barren (novella)
  • Devil’s West by Laura Anne Gilman, Red Waters Rising
  • Diving Universe by Kristine Kathryn Rusch, Searching for the Fleet, and novellas The Rescue of the Renegat, Lieutenant Tightass, and Dix
  • Doctor Who: by Russell T. Davies, Rose; by Jenny T Colgan, The Christmas Invasion; by Steven Moffat, The Day of the Doctor; by Paul Cornell, Twice Upon A Time
  • Dorina Basarab, Dhampir by Karen Chance, Shadow’s Bane
  • Dread Empire’s Fall / Praxis by Walter Jon Williams, The Accidental War
  • Earthsea by Ursula K. LeGuin, The Books of Earthsea: The Complete Illustrated Edition
  • Echoes of the Fall by Adrian Tchaikovsky, The Hyena and the Hawk
  • Eight Worlds by John Varley, Irontown Blues
  • Elemental Masters by Mercedes Lackey, The Bartered Brides
  • Ember in the Ashes by Sabaa Tahir, A Reaper at the Gates
  • Every Day by David Levithan, Someday
  • Extraordinary Adventures of the Athena Club by Theodora Goss, European Travel for the Monstrous Gentlewoman
  • Foreigner by C.J. Cherryh, Emergence
  • Forgotten Realms / Drizzt by R. A. Salvatore, Timeless
  • Fractured Europe by Dave Hutchinson, Europe at Dawn
  • Frontlines by Marko Kloos, Points of Impact
  • Gaia Chronicles by Naomi Foyle, Stained Light
  • Gates of the World by K.M. McKinley, The Brass God
  • Gods & Monsters / Rupert Wong by Cassandra Khaw, Food of the Gods and Rupert Wong and the Ends of the Earth (novella)
  • Godserfs by N.S. Dolkart, A Breach in the Heavens
  • Goredd / Seraphina by Rachel Hartman, Tess of the Road
  • Great Library by Rachel Caine, Smoke and Iron
  • Green Rider by Kristen Britain, The Dream Gatherer
  • Guild Hunter by Nalini Singh, Archangel’s Prophecy
  • *Haden Universe by John Scalzi, Head On (ineligible due to insufficient word count, per author’s statement)
  • Hail Bristol / Farian War by K. B. Wagers, There Before the Chaos (must be nominated under the main series, as the subseries has insufficient word count and/or volumes)
  • Halcyone Space by L.J. Cohen, A Star in the Void
  • Harry Potter / Fantastic Beasts by J.K. Rowling, The Crimes of Grindelwald (must be nominated under the main series, as the subseries has insufficient word count and/or volumes)
  • Hell Divers by Nicholas Sansbury Smith, Deliverance
  • Heroine Complex by Sarah Kuhn, Heroine’s Journey
  • Honorverse / Manticore Ascendant by David Weber, Uncompromising Honor, Timothy Zahn and Thomas Pope, A Call to Vengeance
  • Illuminae Files by Amie Kaufman and Jay Kristoff, Obsidio
  • Imperials by Melinda Snodgrass, The Hidden World
  • In Death by J.D. Robb, Dark in Death and Leverage in Death
  • *InCryptid by Seanan McGuire, Tricks for Free (ineligible due to being a finalist in 2018 and having insufficient new word count and/or volumes to requalify)
  • Innsmouth Legacy by Ruthanna Emrys, Deep Roots
  • Invisible Library by Genevieve Cogman, The Mortal Word
  • Iron Druid Chronicles by Kevin Hearne, Scourged
  • Ishmael Jones by Simon R. Green, Murder in the Dark
  • Jake Ross by Ben Bova, Power Failure
  • Jane Hawk by Dean Koontz, The Crooked Staircase
  • Jane Yellowrock by Faith Hunter, Dark Queen
  • Jerry Cornelius by Michael Moorcock, Pegging the President
  • Kate Daniels by Ilona Andrews (Ilona and Gordon Andrews), Magic Triumphs
  • Kitty Katt by Gini Koch, Aliens Abroad
  • Kylara Vatta / Vatta’s Peace by Elizabeth Moon, Into the Fire (must be nominated under the main series, as the subseries has insufficient word count and/or volumes)
  • *Lady Astronaut by Mary Robinette Kowal, The Calculating Stars and The Fated Sky (ineligible due to insufficient word count at 238,581 words)
  • Lady Helen by Alison Goodman, The Dark Days Deceit
  • Laundry Files by Charles Stross, The Labyrinth Index
  • Legends of the First Empire by Michael J. Sullivan, Age of War
  • *Legion by Brandon Sanderson, Lies of the Beholder (novella) (ineligible due to insufficient word count)
  • Liaden Universe by Sharon Lee and Steve Miller, Neogenesis
  • Lord of the Rings by J.R.R. Tolkien, The Fall of Gondolin
  • Machineries of Empire by Yoon Ha Lee, Revenant Gun
  • Magic ex Libris by Jim C. Hines, “Imprinted” (novelette)
  • Majestic-12 / MJ-12 by Michael J. Martinez, Endgame
  • Maradaine / Streets of Mardaine / Maradaine Elite by Marshall Ryan Maresca, Lady Henterman’s Wardrobe and The Way of the Shield (must be nominated under the main series, as the subseries have insufficient word counts and/or volumes)
  • Merchant Princes / Empire Games by Charles Stross, Dark State (must be nominated under the main series, as the subseries has insufficient word count and/or volumes)
  • Miriam Black by Chuck Wendig, The Raptor & The Wren
  • Miss Peregrine’s Peculiar Children by Ransom Riggs, A Map of Days
  • Monster Hunter International / Monster Hunter Memoirs by Larry Correia and John Ringo, Saints
  • Mortal Engines / Hungry City by Philip Reeve, Night Flights (collection)
  • Motherless Children by Glen Hirshberg, Nothing to Devour
  • *Murderbot Diaries by Martha Wells, Artificial Condition and Rogue Protocol (ineligible due to insufficient word count)
  • Nick Medea by Richard A. Knaak, Black City Dragon
  • Nightshades by Melissa F. Olson, Outbreak
  • Nightside by Simon R. Green, Night Fall (this novel ends both the Nightside and Secret History series)
  • October Daye by Seanan McGuire, Night and Silence and Suffer a Sea-Change (novella)
  • Olympus Bound by Jordanna Max Brodsky, Olympus Bound
  • Others by Anne Bishop, Lake Silence
  • PERN by Anne McCaffrey and Gigi McCaffrey, Dragon’s Code
  • Planetfall by Emma Newman, Before Mars
  • Point / Astreiant by Melissa Scott, Point of Sighs
  • Powder Mage / Gods of Blood and Powder by Brian McClellan, Wrath of Empire (must be nominated under the main series, as the subseries has insufficient word count and/ or volumes)
  • Railhead by Philip Reeve, Station Zero
  • Ray Electromatic by Adam Christopher, I Only Killed Him Once
  • Rebel of the Sands by Alwyn Hamilton, Hero at the Fall
  • Red Rising by Pierce Brown, Iron Gold
  • Revelation Space by Alastair Reynolds, Elysium Fire
  • *Rivers of London / Peter Grant by Ben Aaronovitch, Lies Sleeping (probably ineligible due to being a finalist in 2017 and having insufficient new word count and/or volumes to requalify)
  • Rowankind by Jacey Bedford, Rowankind
  • Saga of Recluce by L.E. Modesitt, Outcasts of Order 
  • Sandman Slim by Richard Kadrey, Hollywood Dead
  • Secret History by Simon R. Green, Night Fall (this novel ends both the Nightside and Secret History series)
  • Shadow by Lila Bowen (aka Delilah S. Dawson), Treason of Hawks
  • Shadow Campaigns by Django Wexler, The Infernal Battalion
  • Shannara by Terry Brooks, The Skaar Invasion
  • Sin du Jour by Matt Wallace, Taste of Wrath (novellas) (series contains 7 novellas and 1 novelette; author has verifed that it meets the word count)
  • Song of Ice and Fire by George R.R. Martin, Fire and Blood
  • Song of Shattered Sands by Bradley P. Beaulieu, A Veil of Spears
  • Star Trek: Discovery: by Dayton Ward, Drastic Measures; by James Swallow, Fear Itself; by Una McCormack, The Way to the Stars
  • Star Trek: The Next Generation by Dayton Ward, Available Light
  • Star Trek: The Original Series by David A. Goodman, The Autobiography of Mr. Spock
  • Star Trek: Prometheus by Bernd Perplies and Christian Humberg, The Root of All Rage and In the Heart of Chaos
  • Star Trek: Voyager by Kirsten Beyer, Architects of Infinity
  • Star Wars: by Jason Fry, The Last Jedi; by Daniel José Older, Last Shot; by E.K. Johnston, Queen’s Shadow; by Rae Carson, Solo: Most Wanted; by Mur Lafferty, Solo: A Star Wars Story
  • Star Wars: Thrawn by Timothy Zahn, Thrawn: Alliances
  • *Starfire (Tor.com) by Spencer Ellsworth, Memory’s Blade (ineligible due to insufficient word count)
  • Starfire (Baen) by David Weber, Steve White, Shirley Meier, and Charles E. Gannon, Oblivion
  • Sword of Truth / Nicci Chronicles by Terry Goodkind, Shroud of Eternity (must be nominated under the main series, as the subseries has insufficient word count and/ or volumes)
  • Tau Ceti Agenda by Travis S. Taylor, Bringers of Hell
  • Themis Files by Sylvain Neuvel, Only Human
  • Three Dark Crowns by Kendare Blake, Two Dark Reigns
  • Tortall Universe / Numair Chronicles by Tamora Pierce, Tempests and Slaughter (must be nominated under the main series, as the subseries has insufficient word count and/ or volumes)
  • Tufa by Alex Bledsoe, The Fairies of Sadieville
  • Valdemar by Mercedes Lackey, The Hills Have Spies
  • Uglies / Impostors by Scott Westerfeld, Impostors (must be nominated under the main series, as the subseries has insufficient word count and/or volumes)
  • Vampire Chronicles by Anne Rice, Blood Communion
  • Verity Fassbinder by Angela Slatter, Restoration
  • *Villains by V.E. Schwab, Vengeful (probably ineligible due to insufficient word count)
  • *Voidwitch Saga by Corey J. White, Static Ruin (ineligible due to insufficient word count)
  • *Vorkosigan Saga by Lois McMaster Bujold, The Flowers of Vashnoi (novella)(almost certainly ineligible due to being the winner of the Series award in 2017)
  • Warhammer 40K / The Horus Heresy by a cast of gazillions, Ruinstorm, Fulgrim, Ferrus Manus, Jaghatai Khan, Wolfsbane, and Slaves to Darkness
  • Wayfarers by Becky Chambers, Record of a Spaceborn Few
  • *Wayward Children by Seanan McGuire, Beneath the Sugar Sky (ineligible due to insufficient word count)
  • Web Shifters by Julie E. Czerneda, Search Image and The Only Thing to Fear (novella)
  • Wild Cards by George R.R. Martin and a cast of thousands, Texas Hold ‘Em; edited by Melinda Snodgrass, Low Chicago (anthology); by Bradley Denton and Caroline Spector, The Flight of Morpho Girl (novella)
  • The Wounded Kingdom by RJ Barker, King of Assassins
  • Xeelee Sequence by Stephen Baxter, Xeelee: Redemption
  • Xuya Universe by Aliette de Bodard, The Tea Master and the Detective (novella) (series consists of 25 short fiction works, including 3 novellas; author has verifed that it meets the word count)
  • Yesterday’s Kin by Nancy Kress, If Tomorrow Comes and Terran Tomorrow
  • Zeros by Scott Westerfied, Margo Lanagan, and Deborah Biancotti, Nexus

* no warranties are made about series eligibility (or lack thereof) based on word count


† no warranties are made about the presumed quality (or lack thereof) of listed series

Pixel Scroll 8/27/18 Pixelbot Murderscrolls

(1) ON THE GROUND AT WORLDCON 76. Raven Oak’s trip report about Worldcon 76 includes a fun photo of astronaut Kjell Lindgren posing with fans costumed (so I believe) as the GalaxyQuest alien crew members.

Kjell thanked me and said he was an astronaut because of science fiction authors like me. He read lots of sci-fi books as a kid, which made him dream of going into space. He signed the back of one of my coloring book pages, the one featuring Bay-zar from my sci-fi novella Class-M Exile.

Lots of good photos of hall costumes, too.

(2) RETRO HUGOS OF 1943. Chair Kevin Roche sent along a better photo of the Retro-Hugo award base he designed for Worldcon 76.

The block is solid cherry, in honor of the orchards once common in San Jose (cherries were still one of the top cash crops in the Valley of Heart’s Delight in the early 40s).  The backplane is a laser-etched image I created of our SJ Galactic Tower, which is itself an homage to the historic San Jose Electric Tower, erected in 1881 and making San Jose the first electrified downtown west of the Rockies (the historic tower, alas, collapsed in 1915. I have photos from 1910 showing buses driving under the tower where it stood over the intersection of Market and Santa Clara Streets.)

(3) CHILDHOOD’S BEGINNING. James Davis Nicoll gives his opinions about “SF Books That Did Not Belong in the Kids’ Section of the Library” at Tor.com. He’s talking about his childhood, however, not whatever the current situation may be.

How Norman Spinrad’s The Men in the Jungle, which features drugs, violence, and infanticide, made it into the children’s section, I don’t know. Is there anything by Spinrad that is child-friendly? That was indeed a traumatizing book to encounter when I was prepared for something more along the lines of Blast-off at Woomera. If I think about that Spinrad book now (even though I am older and somewhat hardened) I still feel queasy.

(4) CAMPAIGN TRAIL WOES. Congressional candidate Brianna Wu was quoted in the New York Times campaign coverage: “For Female Candidates, Harassment and Threats Come Every Day”.

A different kind of normalization happens at the other end of the spectrum, where the harassment is so vicious and constant that it overwhelms the ability to react.

As an independent video game developer in 2014, Brianna Wu was the subject of abuse during GamerGate, when women involved in gaming were targeted for harassment.

Now a Democrat running for Congress in Massachusetts, Ms. Wu, 41, said death and rape threats came so routinely that she had ceased to feel much in response. Even when people threw objects through her window. Even when they vandalized her husband’s car. Even when they emailed paparazzi-like photos of her in her own home.

“I often look at it and I’m like: ‘I know I should be feeling something right now. I know I should be feeling scared or angry or stressed.’ And it’s at a point where I can’t feel anything anymore,” Ms. Wu said. “It’s almost like fear is a muscle that is so overtaxed, it can just do nothing else in my body.”

Many said it was a point of principle not to be intimidated into silence. Others said their political ideals were simply more important.

“For good reason, there’s never any shortage of telling stories about women being harassed on the campaign trail,” Ms. Wu said. “But I cannot communicate to you strongly enough: Over all, this job is fun. This job is exhausting, but this job is amazing.”

(5) ANOTHER BORDER ISSUE. Some artists on their way to a Dungeons & Dragons concept push were stopped from entering the US because their Electronic System for Travel Authorization waiver was not accepted as they expected.

According to the government website about the ESTA program –

ESTA is an automated system that determines the eligibility of visitors to travel to the United States under the Visa Waiver Program (VWP). Authorization via ESTA does not determine whether a traveler is admissible to the United States. U.S. Customs and Border Protection officers determine admissibility upon travelers’ arrival. The ESTA application collects biographic information and answers to VWP eligibility questions.

(6) VOTING WISDOM. Brandon Sanderson delivers a brief conreport and some classy advice in “Worldcon Wrap-up and Dragon Awards”.

The Hugo Awards ceremony was a delight. We didn’t win the Best Series award, but to be honest, at only three books into the Stormlight series it might have been a little preemptive to give it any awards. We’ll see how things go as the series progresses. Many congrats to Lois McMaster Bujold (the winner), who is a favorite around the Dragonsteel offices. She’s a fantastic writer, well worthy of the award.

Oathbringer still has one shot at an award, the Dragon Award, given out at Dragon Con. This is a newer award, one I’m not as familiar with, but man…the award itself is gorgeous. (Seriously, you guys should go have a look at the thing.)

…As always, however, I strongly urge you to be a thoughtful voter when it comes to awards. Don’t vote for Oathbringer just because I wrote it—only do so if you think this book, in specific, deserves the award. And there are some other excellent nominees, so if you enjoyed one of those more, then vote for it!

(7) IT’S NOT LOOKING GOOD. P.N. Elrod hopes people can help, especially those who like Elrod’s Patreon and Facebook entertainment.

Crap. Having a blubbing panic meltdown. In a month my rent goes up by 63 bucks. At this point I don’t have even half the rent for September. I’m facing the ugly reality of eviction.

The complex offered to get me into a different apartment with slightly lower rent, but that means moving. (Bureaucracy Stuff.) I can’t afford that, either, and most of all, I do not have the strength or mobility to move again. I just don’t. I am sick. I am tired.

The ONLY thing I can think of at this point to prevent that is to increase subscriptions to my Patreon page. Right now, that income isn’t enough to cover my bills, so some go unpaid until and unless I sell books from my library.

(8) VOX FEATURES JEMISIN. N.K. Jemisin guested on the latest episode of Vox’s podcast The Ezra Klein Show. You can access it at “N.K. Jemisin recommends stories from fellow groundbreaking sci-fi authors” — which lists two recommendations from her:

While Jemisin finds it hard to recommend books, she does offer up two recommendations from fellow award-winning female science fiction authors.

1) The Murderbot Diaries series by Martha Wells
Jemisin is “a giant fan” of Martha Wells’s Murderbot series, an “adorable little set of almost old-school science fiction.” The titular Murderbot is a rogue cyborg who works tirelessly to protect humans from themselves, though it would rather be watching soap operas. The latest novella in the series, Exit Strategy, will be released on October 2.

2) Unexpected Stories by Octavia Butler
Groundbreaking science fiction author Octavia Butler died in 2006, but two of her stories were found posthumously and published as an e-book. One of the stories in the volume, “Childfinder,” was commissioned by writer Harlan Ellison to be included in a never-published anthology.

The podcast is available direct from Apple iTunes as well as many other sources.

(9) BALL OBIT. K.C. Ball died of a fatal heart attack on August 26 reports the SFWA Blog: “In Memoriam: K.C. Ball”.

…Ball attended the Clarion West Writers Workshop in 2010 and Launch Pad in 2011.  She served as the publisher and editor of 10Flash Quarterly, an on-line flash fiction magazine.  She also won the Speculative Literature Foundation Older Writer Award….

Cat Rambo’s tribute is here.

And now she’s gone, fallen to another heart attack, and she never really got the chance to “break out” the way many writers do, which is through hard work, and soldiering on through rejection, and most of all playing the long game. If you want to read some of her kick-ass work, here’s the collection I edited, Snapshots from a Black Hole and Other Oddities.

I’m so sorry not to able to hear your voice any more, K.C. I hope your journey continues on, and that it’s as marvelous as you were.

(10) TODAY’S BIRTHDAYS

  • Born August 27 – Frank Kelly Freas, who won many Best Professional Artist Hugos, and drew Mad Magazine covers once upon a time.

[compiled by Cat Eldridge]

  • Born August 27, 1929 – Ira Levin. Author of many novels including The Stepford Wives and Rosemary’s Baby which of course became films.
  • Born August 27 – Paul Reubens, 66. Genre work includes GothamBatman:The Brave and the Bold, Tron: Uprising Star Wars Rebels and Buffy the Vampire Slayer. Is Pee-wee’s Playhouse genre?
  • Born August 27 – Alex PenaVega 30. Spy Kids film franchise and apparently a Spy Kids tv series as well, also The Tomorrow People, Sin City: A Dame To Live For and The Clockwork Girl, an animated film where love conquers all differences.

(11) COMICS SECTION.

(12) COLSON WHITEHEAD HONORED. “Writers with ties to Brooklyn named NYS author and poet” – the Brooklyn Eagle has the story.

Two renowned writers with Brooklyn ties have been appointed as the state’s official author and poet by Gov. Andrew Cuomo.

Colson Whitehead, Brooklyn resident for more than a dozen years, has been named New York’s 12th state author.

Alicia Ostriker, born in Brooklyn, has been named New York’s 11th state poet. Cuomo said the award recognizes their work “and the impact it has had on the people of New York and beyond.”

During their two-year terms the state laureates promote and encourage fiction writing and poetry throughout New York by giving public readings and talks.

(13) GATEKEEPING. I haven’t spent much time covering its peregrinations here, but in Camestros Felapton’s view, “’Comicsgate’ is the crappiest ‘gate’”.

The main focus of the campaign has actually been crowd-funding for comics by a rightwing creator, not all of whom use the term “Comicsgate” (Vox Day, for example, has been a bit more equivocal about the term because he thinks all these people should be joining his petty empire). So we have a ‘campaign’ that is just a collaboration of outrage marketing techniques following the standard Scrappy-Doo model: be as loud and as obnoxious as possible and then when people react, claim to be being persecuted.

(14) RAH IN CONTEXT. Charles Stross has a whole rant about what RAH was actually about, versus what his emulators seem to think he was about: “Dread of Heinleinism”.

…But here’s the thing: as often as not, when you pick up a Heinlein tribute novel by a male boomer author, you’re getting a classic example of the second artist effect.

Heinlein, when he wasn’t cranking out 50K word short tie-in novels for the Boy Scouts of America, was actually trying to write about topics for which he (as a straight white male Californian who grew up from 1907-1930) had no developed vocabulary because such things simply weren’t talked about in Polite Society. Unlike most of his peers, he at least tried to look outside the box he grew up in. (A naturist and member of the Free Love movement in the 1920s, he hung out with Thelemites back when they were beyond the pale, and was considered too politically subversive to be called up for active duty in the US Navy during WW2.) But when he tried to look too far outside his zone of enculturation, Heinlein often got things horribly wrong. Writing before second-wave feminism (never mind third- or fourth-), he ended up producing Podkayne of Mars. Trying to examine the systemic racism of mid-20th century US society without being plugged into the internal dialog of the civil rights movement resulted in the execrable Farnham’s Freehold. But at least he was trying to engage, unlike many of his contemporaries (the cohort of authors fostered by John W. Campbell, SF editor extraordinaire and all-around horrible bigot). And sometimes he nailed his targets: “The Moon is a Harsh Mistress” as an attack on colonialism, for example (alas, it has mostly been claimed by the libertarian right), “Starship Troopers” with its slyly embedded messages that racial integration is the future and women are allowed to be starship captains (think how subversive this was in the mid-to-late 1950s when he was writing it).

(15) ROCKET MAN. In the wake of yesterday’s report that 10% of Hugo novel winners are named Robert, and someone else’s observation that being named Robinson helped, too, Soon Lee composed this filk:

So here’s to you Robert Robinson
Hugo loves you more than you will know,
Wo wo wo
Awards you heaps Robert Robinson
Rockets coming out your ears all day
Hey hey hey, hey hey hey

Then Cath could only exorcise the earworm by finishing the verse –

Hide your rockets in the hiding place where no cat ever goes
Put them on your bookcase with your cupcakes
It’s a little secret just the Robinsons’ affair
Most of all you’ve got to hide it from the pups

Sitting in the green room on a Sunday afternoon
Feasting from the finalists’ cheese plate
Laugh about it, shout about it
When Hugo’s got to choose
There’s no way that you can lose

Where have you gone, John Picacio
A Worldcon turns its lonely eyes to you
Wu wu wu
What’s that you say, Robert Robinson?
Diversity shall never go away

(16) SUBTRACTION. Robert/Rob/Bob may be a statistically lucky name for a Hugo nominee, however, the odds won’t soon be improving in the astronaut program. Ars Technica has the info that, “For the first time in 50 years, a NASA astronaut candidate has resigned” — one of a class of 12:

A little more than a year ago, NASA introduced its newest class of 12 astronaut candidates. These talented men and women were chosen from a deep pool of 18,300 applicants, and after two years of training they were to join the space agency’s corps for possible assignment on missions to the International Space Station, lunar orbit, or possibly the surface of the Moon.

However, one of those 12 astronauts, Robb Kulin, will not be among them. On Monday, NASA spokeswoman Brandi Dean confirmed to Ars that Kulin had resigned his employment at NASA, effective August 31, “for personal reasons.”

(17) NAUGHTY GOOGLE. Fingerpointing: “Google is irresponsible claims Fortnite’s chief in bug row”. “Bug row” – there’s the Queen’s English for you.

The leader of the firm behind the hit game Fortnite has accused Google of being “irresponsible” in the way it revealed a flaw affecting the Android version of the title.

On Friday, Google made public that hackers could hijack the game’s installation software to load malware.

The installer is needed because Epic Games has bypassed Google’s app store to avoid giving it a cut of sales.

Epic’s chief executive said Google should have delayed sharing the news.

(18) BAD LUCK AND TROUBLE. Beyond the Sky trailer (2018). The movie is coming to theaters this September.

Chris Norton has been hearing about alien abductions his entire life but, in his gut, he knows they are not real. Setting out to disprove the alien abduction phenomenon once and for all, he attends a UFO convention to meet alleged abductees and reveal the truth behind their experiences. It is only when he meets Emily, who claims to have been abducted every seven years on her birthday, that Chris realizes there may be more to these claims than meets the eye. With Emily’s 28th birthday only days away, Chris helps her to uncover the truth as they come face to face with the reality that we are not alone.

CAST: Ryan Carnes, Jordan Hinson, Peter Stormare, Dee Wallace, Martin Sensmeier, Don Stark

 

(19) AN INTERPLANETARY ROMANCE. The restored 1910 Italian silent film Matrimonio interplanetario (“Marriage on the Moon”) is now online. Its antique delights include a very strange space launch facility that looks suspiciously like a samovar or maybe an espresso machine.

[Thanks to Chris Barkley, JJ, John King Tarpinian, Karl-Johan Norén , Cat Eldridge, Martin Morse Wooster, Mike Kennedy, Chip Hitchcock, Carl Slaughter, and Andrew Porter for some of these stories. Title credit goes to File 770 contributing editor of the day Camestros Felapton.]