Pixel Scroll 7/1/21 Scrolling By 40 Specially Trained Ecuadorian Mountain Pixels

(1) KGB IN TIMES TO COME. Fantastic Fiction at KGB reading series hosts Ellen Datlow and Matthew Kressel present Nancy Kress and Kim Stanley Robinson in a YouTube livestream event on Wednesday, July 21 at 7 p.m. EDT. Link to follow. 

  • Nancy Kress

Nancy Kress is the multiple-award winner of science fiction and the occasional fantasy.  Her most recent works are the stand-alone novella Sea Change, about the genetic engineering of crops, and the space-opera The Eleventh Gate. Based in Seattle with, Nancy divides her time between writing and trying to train a very stubborn Chihuahua puppy.

  • Kim Stanley Robinson

Kim Stanley Robinson is a multi-award winner of science fiction probably best known for his Mars trilogy. His most recent novels are Red Moon and The Ministry for the Future. He lives in Davis, California.

(2) JEMISIN’S STATEMENT. Following publication of the Vox article “How Twitter Can Ruin A Life”, based on an interview with Isabel Fall, author of “I Sexually Identify as an Attack Helicopter,” some of N. K. Jemisin’s tweets about the topic from 2020 (see the Wikipedia) have been criticized. Today Jemisin posted an explanatory “Statement on Isabel Fall comments” at her blog.

… The reporter also reached out to me while researching this article, because there’s been a lot of internet chatter about my involvement. I shared what I could with her (off the record), and since she let me know that she was in direct contact with Ms. Fall, I took the opportunity to send a private apology at that time. I had hesitated to do so publicly before this because I didn’t know if it would just bring more unwanted attention to Ms. Fall — but since we’re talking about all of this again, now seems like a good time….

Jemisin recaps in some detail what she was trying to say and what went wrong, followed by this short summary:

…I am deeply sorry that I contributed to Ms. Fall’s distress, and that I was not as thoughtful as I should have been in my response. Let me also apologize specifically to my trans and NB readers, some of whom caught flak because I RTed them, and others who may have been hurt or confused by what I said. I just should’ve done a better job of it.

By now I hope it’s clear that I never wanted to hurt Ms. Fall and was trying to offer support…. 

(3) ALIEN COMING TO TV. Vanity Fair interviews the showrunner: “New ‘Alien’ TV Series Will Be Class Warfare With Xenomorphs”.

…Now a new FX TV series based on the franchise is in the works from Fargo showrunner Noah Hawley—who says it’s about time for the facehuggers and xenomorphs to sink their claws into the white-collar executives who have been responsible for sending so many employees to their doom. 

In a conversation about the symbolism of season four of Fargo, Hawley also offered an update on the Alien series, as well as his new novel, Anthem. The show, however, will have to wait a little while, since the crush of new productions after the pandemic has consumed all of Hollywood’s resources. How appropriate….

Vanity Fair: What’s next for you? Is there a season five in the works for Fargo?

Noah Hawley: Yeah, I think so. I don’t have it yet. I have pieces that will have to survive. They’re not connected. I think it would be good to create an ending, and deliberately come to something, knowing it’s the last one and see how one might wrap up this anthology. What’s next for me, it looks like, is [an] Alien series for FX, taking on that franchise and those amazing films by Ridley Scott and James Cameron and David Fincher. Those are great monster movies, but they’re not just monster movies. They’re about humanity trapped between our primordial, parasitic past and our artificial intelligence future—and they’re both trying to kill us. Here you have human beings and they can’t go forward and they can’t go back. So I find that really interesting.

(4) SPEED READING. Cat Rambo will be part of the July 2 First Friday Quick Read Zoom event. It’s free – register at the link.

Join us for a lunchtime tasting menu of science fiction, fantasy, and horror stories written by women and non-binary authors. We’ll feature 6 authors who will each have 8 minutes to tempt and tantalizing you with their reading. Our readings are like Forrest Gump’s box of chocolates – you never know what you’ll get!

(5) RADIO PLAY WINS KURD LAßWITZ AWARD. The radio play jury of Kurd Laßwitz Award has finished voting reports award trustee Udo Klotz. The winner is Der zweite Schlaf by Heinz Sommer.

  • Best German SF Radio Play First Broadcast In 2020

 (6) SFF AFTER MAO. There is a new book on Chinese sff in the 70s and 80s that readers might be interested in: Hua Li’s Chinese Science Fiction during the Post-Mao Cultural Thaw, from University of Toronto Press.

The late 1970s to the mid-1980s, a period commonly referred to as the post-Mao cultural thaw, was a key transitional phase in the evolution of Chinese science fiction. This period served as a bridge between science-popularization science fiction of the 1950s and 1960s and New Wave Chinese science fiction from the 1990s into the twenty-first century. Chinese Science Fiction during the Post-Mao Cultural Thaw surveys the field of Chinese science fiction and its multimedia practice, analysing and assessing science fiction works by well-known writers such as Ye Yonglie, Zheng Wenguang, Tong Enzheng, and Xiao Jianheng, as well as the often-overlooked tech–science fiction writers of the post-Mao thaw.

Exploring the socio-political and cultural dynamics of science-related Chinese literature during this period, Hua Li combines close readings of original Chinese literary texts with literary analysis informed by scholarship on science fiction as a genre, Chinese literary history, and media studies. Li argues that this science fiction of the post-Mao thaw began its rise as a type of government-backed literature, yet it often stirred up controversy and received pushback as a contentious and boundary-breaking genre. Topically structured and interdisciplinary in scope, Chinese Science Fiction during the Post-Mao Cultural Thaw will appeal to both scholars and fans of science fiction.

(7) TIME LIMIT. A trailer has dropped for the fourth and final installment of the Rebuild of EvangelionEvangelion: 3.0+1.01 Thrice Upon A Time.

The fourth and final installment of the Rebuild of Evangelion. Misato and her anti-Nerv group Wille arrive in Paris, a city now red from core-ization. Crew from the flagship Wunder land on a containment tower. They only have 720 seconds to restore the city. When a horde of Nerv Evas appear, Mari’s improved Eva Unit 8 must intercept. Meanwhile, Shinji, Asuka, and Rei wander around Japan.

(8) MARS IN CULTURE. “Exploring the Red Planet through History and Culture” with Nick Smith (past President of LASFS) will be hosted by the Pasadena Museum of History. This free virtual presentation* will be available for viewing Thursday, July 22 through Sunday, July 25. Sign up for email notification here.

The planet Mars has long been connected to humankind through religions, literature, and science. Join Nick Smith, guest curator of PMH’s 2018 exhibition Dreaming the Universe, to explore our fascination with Earth’s neighboring planet, and discover some of the many ways Mars is part of our culture. 

This free virtual presentation* will be available for viewing Thursday, July 22 through Sunday, July 25. An email with the link to the presentation will be sent to all of our email subscribers on Thursday, July 22.

*Pre-recorded presentation from Spring ArtNight 2021.

(9) RESOURCES FOR HORROR FICTION SCHOLARSHIP. The University of Pittsburgh library system announced the acquisition of the papers of Linda Addison, Kathe Koja, and the archives of the Horror Writers Association: “University of Pittsburgh Library System Acquires Additional Archives for its Horror Studies Collection”/

…The ULS has acquired the papers of Linda D. Addison, the most decorated horror poet today with a total of six Bram Stoker literary awards. Addison became the first African American writer to win a Stoker in 2001 for her collection, Consumed, Reduced to Beautiful Grey Ashes and has also received the Lifetime Achievement (2018) and Mentor of the Year (2016) Awards from the Horror Writers Association as well as the title Grand Master from the Science Fiction and Fantasy Poetry Association (2020). Her poetry explores themes of race, gender, loss, struggle, hope, and the resiliency of humanity through a lyrical style that employs both traditional horror tropes of the supernatural as well as stark realism. Her archive will include drafts and manuscripts of her poetry as well as ephemera such as convention programs and awards which help demonstrate her impact on the genre. On her hopes that her archive will inspire others, she says:

“Having my writing journey from journals, through edits to final versions, become part of the University of Pittsburgh Horror Studies Collection is a dream, I never imagined, come true! To think that others, studying my process, could find value and inspiration will allow my work to safely exist past the length of my life, is an incredible blessing.”

The ULS has also acquired the papers of Kathe Koja, who is a true iconoclast whose works push boundaries, expand our conceptions of horror, and prove that horror is indeed a true literary genre. Her first novel, The Cipher (1991), won both a Bram Stoker Award and Locus Award and solidified her impact as a force within new horror. She employs a striking and unique prose style to explore themes of alienation and social isolation as well as transcendence, often through art. Her collection will include drafts, manuscripts, and notes from her novels and short stories. On her decision to establish her archive at the University of Pittsburgh, Koja said:

“A book is its writing as well as its words: the thoughts and notes and drafts and edits (and edits, and edits) that comprise the final text. To have all that making made available for scholars, readers, and fans of horror literature is a real boon, and I’m beyond delighted that my own horror novels will now be available this way.”

Lastly, the ULS has acquired the archives of the Horror Writers Association (HWA), the premiere professional organization for writers working in the genre.  This collection, established by current HWA President John Palisano with support from former President Lisa Morton, documents the history of the organization through its newsletters, convention booklets and programs, and other published materials. Collectively, these materials illustrate the work of the HWA, as well as the community it has built. The HWA has been the main space for writers working within the genre to collect and collaborate since the late 1980s and has issued the Bram Stoker literary awards since 1987 at yearly conventions, such as the World Horror Convention and, since 2016, StokerCon.

(10) HUGO NOMINEE IS PLEASED. Best Professional Artist Hugo finalist Maurizio Manzieri tweeted –

(11) MEMORY LANE.

2003 – Eighteen years ago, Iain M. Banks’ only non-fiction book was published. It was Raw Spirit: In Search of The Perfect Dram. Of course he published it as Iain Banks as only his SF was under published under Iain M. Banks. It was his tour of the small whisky distilleries of Scotland in the small red sports coupe that he’d bought with the advance from the publisher who’d underwrote the entire affair on the word of Banks that it was a Great Idea. And being Banks about the Iraq War as well.  As he says in his introduction, “After doing extensive research, I can definitely tell you that single malt whiskies are good to drink”.  If you want to know more about this book, we reviewed it here at Green Man Review. And yes, it is available from the usual suspects. 

(12) TODAY’S BIRTHDAYS.

[Compiled by Cat Eldridge.]

  • Born July 1, 1891 — Otis Adelbert Kline. Early pulp writer and and literary agent whose great claim to fame was a possibly apocryphal feud with fellow author Edgar Rice Burroughs, in which he supposedly raised the latter’s anger by producing close imitations of Burroughs’s Mars novels. Wollheim and Moskowitz believed in it having happened, Lupoff did not. (Died 1945.)
  • Born July 1, 1934 — Jean  Marsh, 87. She was married to Jon Pertwee but it was before either involved in Dr. Who. She first appeared alongside The First Doctor in “The Crusade” as Lady Joanna, the sister of Richard I (The Lionheart). She returned later that year as companion Sara Kingdom in “The Daleks’ Master Plan”. And she’d return yet again during the time of the Seventh Doctor in “Battlefield” as Morgana Le Fay. She’s also in Unearthly Stranger Dark PlacesReturn to OzWillow as Queen Bavmorda and The Changeling. (CE)
  • Born July 1, 1935 — David Prowse. The physical embodiment of Darth Vader in the original Star Wars trilogy. Ok, it’s been  a very long time since I saw Casino Royale but what was Frankenstein’s Creation doing there, the character he played in his first ever role? That he played that role in The Horror of Frankenstein and Frankenstein and the Monster from Hell, Hammer Films a few later surprises me not. He shows up in Gilliam’s Jabberwocky according to IMDB as Red Herring and Black Knights (and no I’ve no idea what that means). Finally he’s the executioner in The People That Time Forgot, a film that’s very loosely based off of several Burroughs novels. (Died 2020.)
  • Born July 1, 1952 — Dan Aykroyd, 69. Though best known as Dr. Raymond Stantz in the original Ghostbusters films (which he wrote with Harold Ramis), he actually shows up a year earlier in his first genre role in Twilight Zone: The Movie as Passenger / Ambulance Driver. He’s reprising his role in the recent Ghostbusters 2020
  • Celebrated July 1, 1955 — Robbie the Robot. On this date in 1955, Robby the Robot was born. Or more properly constructed. Or so claims the studio, Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer, that would release Forbidden Planet, where he had his first screen appearance, on March 3, 1956 when the movie had its US premiere. He would go on to be in a number of  series including Lost in Space twice plus on The Addams FamilyThe Man from U.N.C.L.E. twice,  Twilight Zone (five appearances , mostly as toys) and Holmes & Yo-Yo to name but a few of his other  appearances. His latest appearance was on The Big Bang Theory with other movie props in “The Misinterpretation Agitation” episode. He had a memorable appearance on The New Adventures of Wonder Woman where he was the Master of Ceremonies at one of our SF Cons!  
  • Born July 1, 1962 — Andre Braugher, 59. He’s the voice of Darkseid in Superman/Batman: Apocalypse which is why he makes the Birthday list. If there’s ever proof that a great voice actor can make an animated role, this is it. It’s also a superb film. His other major genre role is as General George W. Mancheck in The Andromeda Strain series that originally aired on A&E. 
  • Born July 1, 1964 — Charles Coleman Finlay, 57. The Traitor to the Crown series is his best known work. His first story, “Footnotes”, was published in The Magazine of Fantasy and Science Fiction where many of his stories have since been published. Six years the editor of The Magazine of Fantasy and Science Fiction, ending in February of this year.
  • Born July 1, 1981 — Genevieve Valentine, 40. Author of the superb  Persona novel and also she scripted a Catwoman series, working with artists Garry Brown and David Messina. Her first novel, Mechanique: A tale of the Circus Tresaulti, won the Crawford Award for a first fantasy novel. She scripted a run of Xena: Warrior Princess, and scripted Batman & Robin Eternal as well. 

(13) COMICS SECTION.

(14) HUGOS FROM THE HAGUE. Fanac.org now hosts a video of the ConFiction (1990) Worldcon Hugo Ceremony.  

This video, captured with a hand held camera, covers the Hugo Awards, as well as the Campbell Award for New Writers, and the fannish Big Heart and First Fandom awards. Many awards were accepted by designees for the recipients, and we see Anne McCaffrey and Jack Chalker among those accepting for others. There’s a bit of humor from Dave Langford, and appearances by the American Ambassador to the Netherlands, C. Howard Wilkins. The World Science Fiction Society Banner, first hung at NyCon II in 1956, makes its appearance, and the video ends with the traditional view of all the recipients on stage. The video was recorded by John Cramer, provided by Tom Whitmore and used with the permission of Kees van Toorn, Chairman of ConFiction.

(15) SHAT TRADES SMACK. Shat gets into trouble by being a host on Russian propaganda network RT.“Star Trek Icon William Shatner Spars With Journalists About His New Show on Kremlin TV” says The Daily Beast.

Star Trek star William Shatner has taken to Twitter to trade blows with journalists who called him out for hosting a new show on the Kremlin’s notorious state-funded network, RT.

Earlier this week, the 90-year-old Canadian actor—known for taking on the legendary role Captain James Kirk in the Star Trek saga—announced he would be hosting a new general talk show on the American branch of RT called “I Don’t Understand,” where he’ll be posing questions to guests on a variety topics. The show is set to debut later this month.

Alexey Kovalev, an investigative editor for Meduza—one of the most popular independent Russian-language news outlets—had some choice words for Shatner on his work with the network.

“Quick reminder about [RT’s] views and editorial policies @WilliamShatner is now endorsing (whether he wants to or not),” he tweeted on Thursday, linking to a thread that ends with “Don’t go on RT, unless you are okay with sharing a mic with some of the most vile racist degenerates out there. It’s not a legitimate media platform. It has no redeeming qualities. And if no other platform will have you, then you really shouldn’t have *any* platform.”

Those comments seem to have hit a nerve with Shatner, who wrote back, “Perhaps instead of rebuking me with facts that have zero influence on my show, a better use of your time would be to move? It seems that you being in Moscow means you are directly supporting the very regime you are berating me about. #hypocrite.”…

(16) POE’S SCIENCE REPORTING. Daniel Engber reviews John Tesch’s Poe biography The Reason for the Darkness of the Night: Edgar Allan Poe and the Forging of American Science in “Edgar Allan Poe’s Other Obsession” at The Atlantic.

…By 1840, Poe was working at a men’s magazine, where he launched a feature called “A Chapter on Science and Art,” consisting of the sorts of squibs on innovation later found in Popular Mechanics. (“A gentleman of Liverpool announces that he has invented a new engine,” one entry started.) With this column, Tresch suggests, “Poe made himself one of America’s first science reporters.” He also made himself one of America’s first popular skeptics—a puzzle master and a debunker, in the vein of Martin Gardner. Poe wrote a column on riddles and enigmas, and he made a gleeful habit of exposing pseudoscience quacks….

(17) RAILGUN R.I.P. The idea got a lot of media attention, however, they’re going another direction: “Navy ditches futuristic railgun, eyes hypersonic missiles” reports the AP.

The U.S. Navy pulled the plug, for now, on a futuristic weapon that fires projectiles at up to seven times the speed of sound using electricity.

The Navy spent more than a decade developing the electromagnetic railgun and once considered putting them on the stealthy new Zumwalt-class destroyers built at Maine’s Bath Iron Works.

But the Defense Department is turning its attention to hypersonic missiles to keep up with China and Russia, and the Navy cut funding for railgun research from its latest budget proposal.

“The railgun is, for the moment, dead,” said Matthew Caris, a defense analyst at Avascent Group, a consulting firm.

(18) PUNCH, BROTHERS, PUNCH WITH CARE. At the link, another fabulous Middle-Earth transit map, from 2018 – “One does not simply walk into Mordor” by artist Christian Tate.

Middle Earth map commissioned for Empire Magazine plotting the journeys of Tolkien’s key characters through Peter Jackson’s six films of The Hobbit and Lord of the Rings trilogies.

(19) A REALLY SHORT HOBBIT. Brenton Dickieson introduces readers to “The First Animated Hobbit, and Other Notes of Tolkienish Nonsense” at A Pilgrim in Narnia. The film runs about 11 minutes.

…Rembrandt Films had purchased film rights to produce a film by 1967, but a Hollywood feature-length deal fell apart. According to the Wikipedia page, the film was produced cheaply and quickly–Mythmoot lore places it at 7-10 days–and premiered on the last day that the contract, paying people to see the film. Having fulfilled the contract, they were able to return rights to Tolkien, opening possibilities for future adaptations, including the 1977 animation (which I call “the cute Hobbit” in my mind), and the trilogy epic of the fairy tale in the early 2010s by Peter Jackson, which some may have heard about….

(20) VIDEO OF THE DAY. The HISHE series says this is “How Godzilla vs Kong Should Have Ended”.

[Thanks to Mike Kennedy, Andrew Porter, Martin Morse Wooster, Shao Ping, N., Tom Becker, Daniel Dern, JJ, Michael Toman, John King Tarpinian, and Cat Eldridge for some of these stories. Title credit belongs to contributing editor of the day Jon Meltzer.]

Kurd Laßwitz Preis 2021 Winners

The winners of the 2021 Kurd Laßwitz Preis for German-language science fiction have been announced.

For 40 years, the authors, translators, editors, publishers, graphic artists and journalists working professionally in SF genre in Germany, Austria and Switzerland have been voting on the best new releases from the previous year.

The award ceremony will be at the 12th Penta-Con, taking place in Dresden the first week of November.

Award Trustee Udo Klotz reports that the point tally was based on 421 nominations from 66 voters, as well as the 241 reviews and comments from the pre-selection committee. The resulting 72 nominations were sent to over 230 voters, of whom 92 took part, submitting a total of 1,164 votes (up to five nominations can be rated 5-4-3-2-1 points per category).

In the translation category, a jury of ten translators and editors acted, while in the radio play category, the jurors (radio play directors, radio play authors and radio play experts) are still working and their choice will be announced later.

NOTE: The table was prepared by the Award Trustee, and has a few formatting errors I don’t know how to fix.

BEST GERMAN SF-NOVEL FIRST PUBLISHED IN 2020

68 people voted in this category

Award winnerPoints
Andreas Eschbach, Eines Menschen Flügel  Lübbe118
Nominees
2Tom Hillenbrand, Qube (Aus der Welt der Hologrammatica, vol. 2) Kiepenheuer & Witsch109
3Gabriele Behrend, Salzgras & Lavendel  p.machinery88
4Uwe Post, E-Tot  Polarise78
5Michael Marrak, Anima ex Machina (2nd novel of Kanon series) Edition Mono / Monochrom74
6Zoë Beck, Paradise City  Suhrkamp70
7Heribert Kurth, Unter den Sternen von Tha  p.machinery63
8Marc-Uwe Kling, QualityLand 2.0  Ullstein54
9Christoph Dittert, Fallender Stern  Piper48
10Sameena Jehanzeb, Was Preema nicht weiß  self published36
11No award – I consider none of the nominations in this category to be worthy of an award0

BESTE GERMAN SF-STORY FIRST PUBLISHED IN 2020

64 people voted in this category

Award winnerPoints
Angela and Karlheinz Steinmüller, Marslandschaften in: René Moreau, Olaf Kemmler and Heinz Wipperfürth (ed.): Exodus 41, Exodus Selbstverlag and in: Angela and Karlheinz Steinmüller: Marslandschaften, Memoranda101
NomineesPoints
2Heidrun Jänchen, Mietnomaden in: René Moreau and Hans Jürgen Kugler (ed.): Der grüne Planet – Zukunft im Klimawandel, Hirnkost87 
3Christian Endres, Der Klang sich lichtenden Nebels in: René Moreau and Hans Jürgen Kugler (ed.): Der grüne Planet – Zukunft im Klimawandel, Hirnkost80 
4Gabriele Behrend, Meerwasser in: Sylvana Freiberg and Ralf Zacharias (ed.): Unsere Freunde von ? Eridani, Begedia68 
5Uwe Post, Terra Halbpension in: Sylvana Freiberg and Ralf Zacharias (ed.): Unsere Freunde von ? Eridani, Begedia54 
6Hans Jürgen Kugler, Die Insulaner in: René Moreau and Hans Jürgen Kugler (ed.): Pandemie – Geschichten zur Zeitenwende, Hirnkost52 
7Michael Marrak, Insomnia in: Michael Marrak: Das Haus Lazarus, Memoranda50 
8Kai Focke, Gastropoda galactica in: Ellen Norten (ed.): Das Alien tanzt Walzer, p.machinery46 
[TIE for 8] Frank Lauenroth, Delter in: Sylvana Freiberg and Ralf Zacharias (ed.): Unsere Freunde von ? Eridani, Begedia46 
10Thorsten Küper, Unsere Freunde von ? Eridani in: Sylvana Freiberg and Ralf Zacharias (ed.): Unsere Freunde von ? Eridani, Begedia39 
11Carsten Schmitt, Wagners Stimme in: Klaus N. Frick (ed.): Wie künstlich ist Intelligenz?, Plan938 
12Galax Acheronian, Verloren auf Firr’Dars  in: Galax Acheronian (ed.): Hyper Orbis, Verlag für Moderne Phantastik30 
[TIE FOR 12] Axel Kruse, Grassoden in: Peggy Weber-Gehrke (ed.): 2101 – Was aus uns wurde, Verlag für Moderne Phantastik30 
14Christian Künne, Friedensfahrt in: Peggy Weber-Gehrke (ed.): Rebellion in Sirius City, Verlag für Moderne Phantastik11 
15No award – I consider none of the nominations in this category to be worthy of an award0 

BEST NON-GERMAN SF WORK TRANSLATED FIRST TIME IN 2020

56 people voted in this category

Award winnerPoints
Simon Stålenhag, Tales from the Loop (Ur Varselklotet)  Fischer Tor67
NomineesPoints
2Stephen Baxter, Artefakt (Destroyer) (Sternenpforte, Band 1)Heyne64 
[TIE FOR 2] Tade Thompson, Rosewater (Rosewater) (Wormwood, Band 1)Golkonda64 
4William Gibson, Agency (Agency) (Jackpot, Band 2)Klett-Cotta Tropen62 
5Basma Abdel Aziz, Das Tor (???????)  Heyne58 
6Zack Jordan, Last Human – Allein gegen die Galaxis (The Last Human)  Heyne48 
7Jodi Taylor, Miss Maxwells chaotischer Zeitkompass (Symphony of Echoes)
(Die Chroniken von St. Mary’s, vol. 2)Blanvalet
45 
8Baoshu, Großes steht bevor (???in: Ken Liu (ed.): Zerbrochene Sterne, Heyne41 
9Samanta Schweblin, Hundert Augen (Kentukis)  Suhrkamp35 
10Agustina Bazterrica, Wie die Schweine (Cadáver exquisito)  Suhrkamp34 
11David Wellington, Die letzte Astronautin (The Last Astronaut)  Piper33 
12James S.A. Corey [= Daniel Abraham & Ty Franck]Tiamats Zorn (Tiamat’s Wrath)
(The Expanse, vol. 8)Heyne
25 
13Christopher Paolini, Infinitum – Die Ewigkeit der Sterne (To Sleep in a Sea of Stars)  Knaur23 
14Dennis E. Taylor, Die Singularitätsfalle (The Singularity Trap)  Heyne14 
15John Marrs, The Passengers – Du entscheidest über Leben and Tod (The Passengers)  Heyne9 
16No award – I consider none of the nominations in this category to be worthy of an award0 

BEST TRANSLATION OF SF INTO GERMAN, FIRST PUBLISHED IN 2020

Eleven nominated translations out of twelve were selected in consultation with the pre-selection committee (one was published in 2019 and rejected) and were provided to the translation jury (ten translators and proofreaders) as comparable excerpts of original and translated text.

Award winnerPoints
Susanne Gerold  for the translation of
N.K. Jemisin, Die große Stille (The Broken Earth) [3 volumes] Knaur
76
NomineesPoints
2Eva Kemper  for the translation of
Katie Hale, Mein Name ist Monster (My Name is Monster)  S.Fischer
69 
[TIE FOR 3] Jürgen Langowski  for the translation of
Zack Jordan, Last Human – Allein gegen die Galaxis (The Last Human)  Heyne
69 
[TIE FOR 3] Jakob Schmidt  for the translation of 
Tade Thompson, Rosewater (Rosewater) (Wormwood, Band 1)Golkonda
69 
5Henning Ahrens  for the translation of
Kira Jane Buxton, Hollow Kingdom – Das Jahr der Krähe (Hollow Kingdom)  Fischer Tor
67 
6Pia Biundo  for the translation of
Vlad Hernández, Nemesis (Nemesis) in: René Moreau and Hans Jürgen Kugler (ed.)Pandemie – Geschichten zur Zeitenwende  Hirnkost
60 
7Larissa Bender  for the translation of
Basma Abdel Aziz, Das Tor (???????)  Heyne
58 
8Jakob Schmidt for the new translation of
Frank Herbert, Die Kinder des Wüstenplaneten (Children of Dune) (Der Wüstenplanet, Band 3)Heyne
56 
9Pia Biundo  for the translation of
Vlad Hernández, Lebensstationen eines Idealisten (13 instantes de un paradigma) in: c’t 25/2020  Heise
55 
[TIE FOR 9] Stefan Pluschkat  for the translation of
Simon Stålenhag, Tales from the Loop (Ur Varselklotet)  Fischer Tor
55 
11Oliver Hoffmann  for the translation of
Tanya Huff, Im Dienst der Föderation (Valor’s Choice) (Confederation of Valor, Band 1)Plan9
34 
12No award – I consider none of the nominations in this category to be worthy of an award0 

BEST SF ART (COVER, ILLUSTRATION) RELATED TO A GERMAN EDITION IN 2020

80 people voted in this category

Award winnerPoints
Meike Schultchen  for the cover of  
René Moreau and Michael Vogt (ed.): Cozmic 2  Atlantis
142
Nominees
2Dirk Berger  for the cover of René Moreau, Olaf Kemmler and Heinz Wipperfürth (ed.): Exodus 40  Exodus Selbstverlag140 
3Jan Hoffmann  for the cover of Klaus Bollhöfener (ed.): phantastisch! 79  Atlantis132 
4Uli Bendick for the cover and inside illustrations of
René Moreau and Hans Jürgen Kugler (ed.): Der grüne Planet – Zukunft im Klimawandel 
Hirnkost
130 
5Michael Vogt  for the cover of  
René Moreau and Hans Jürgen Kugler (ed.): Pandemie – Geschichten zur Zeitenwende 
Hirnkost
95 
6Arndt Drechsler  for the cover of Galax Acheronian (ed.): Hyper Orbis  Verlag für Moderne Phantastik92 
7Lothar Bauer  for the cover of Michael K. Iwoleit and Michael Haitel (ed.): Nova 29  p.machinery91 
8Lothar Bauer  for the cover of Ellen Norten (ed.): Das Alien tanzt Walzer  p.machinery67 
9No award – I consider none of the nominations in this category to be worthy of an award10 

BEST GERMAN SF RADIO PLAY FIRST BROADCASTED IN 2020

In consultation with the radio play jury, three were selected from six nominations for five radio plays and provided to the radio play jury (radio play authors, directors and radio play experts). The evaluation is still ongoing.

Cassandra Rising by Martin Heindel
Director: Martin Heindel,Composer: Ralf Haarmann, Production: WDR
Heaven Line – Traumstadt wird zur Todesfalle by Bodo Traber
Director: Bodo Traber, Dramaturgy: Natalie Szallies, Production: WDR
Der zweite Schlaf by Heinz Sommer based on the novel of Robert Harris
Director: Leonhard Koppelmann, Production: HR

SPECIAL ACHIEVEMENT AWARD FOR ACTUAL SF ACTIVITIES IN 2020

76 people voted in this category

Award winnerPoints
Hans Frey
for the first two volumes of his history of German Science Fiction, Fortschritt and Fiasko and Aufbruch in den Abgrund
211
Nominees
2René Moreau and Hans Jürgen Kugler
for the edition of Der grüne Planet – Zukunft im Klimawandel and Pandemie – Geschichten zur Zeitenwende
178 
3Torben Kuhlmann
for the illustrated book Einstein – Die fantastische Reise einer Maus durch Raum and Zeit
102 
4No award – I consider none of the nominations in this category to be worthy of an award30 

SPECIAL ACHIEVEMENT AWARD 2020 FOR LONG TERM ACTIVITIES

81 people voted in this category

Award winnerPoints
Freundeskreis Science Fiction Leipzig e.V.
for continuous organisation of ElsterCons, even during pandemic times
156
Nominees
2Hardy Kettlitz
for Memoranda Verlag
154 
3Science Fiction Club Deutschland e.V.
for promoting SF literature for 65 years
137 
4Dieter von Reeken
for his services to classic German SF and the history of German SF
115 
5Jörg Weigand
for his tireless support also of young authors
103 
6Rico Gehrke and Peggy Weber-Gehrke
for supporting the SF short story through the anthologies in their Verlag für Moderne Phantastik
84 
7Ralf Peter Krämer
for 50 years of engagement in the fandom from Stanislaw-Lem-Klub till Penta-Con
74 
8Christina Hacker and the Team of PRFZ club magazine SOL
for their unpaid work full of energy and enthusiasm on the occasion of the 100th edition
72 
9No award – I consider none of the nominations in this category to be worthy of an award10 

For more information about the award, see the links to WikipediaISFDB and the KLP Homepage.

Kurd Laßwitz Preis 2021 Finalists

The finalists for the 2021 Kurd Laßwitz Preis were announced on March 30. The award, named after German author Kurd Laßwitz, is given to works written in or translated into the German language and published during the previous year.

The German language editions of Stephen Baxter’s World Engines: Destroyer, James S. A. Corey’s Tiamat’s Wrath, William Gibson’s Agency, Christopher Paolini’s To Sleep in a Sea of Stars, Simon Stålenhag’s Tales from the Loop, and Tade Thompson’s Rosewater are some of the finalists for Best Foreign Novel.

And in the Best Translation category, the translators of  N.K. Jemisin’s Broken Earth Trilogy, Simon Stålenhag’s Tales from the Loop, and Tade Thompson’s Rosewater are among the nominees.

Voting is open until May 31. The award ceremony will take place during PentaCon 12 on the first weekend in November in Dresden.

Best German language novel first published in 2020

  • Zoë Beck: Paradise City (Suhrkamp)
  • Gabriele Behrend: Salzgras & Lavendel (p.machinery)
  • Christoph Dittert: Fallender Stern (Piper)
  • Andreas Eschbach: Eines Menschen Flügel (Lübbe)
  • Tom Hillenbrand: Qube (Aus der Welt der Hologrammatica 2) (Tor)
  • Sameena Jehanzeb: Was Preema nicht weiß
  • Marc-Uwe Kling: QualityLand 2.0 (Ullstein)
  • Heribert Kurth: Unter den Sternen von Tha (p.machinery)
  • Michael Marrak: Anima ex Machina (2. Novellenroman des Kanon-Zyklus) (Edition Mono/Monochrom)
  • Uwe Post: E-Tot (Polarize)

Best German language short fiction first published in 2020:

  • Galax Acheronian: “Verloren auf Firr’Dars” in Hyper Orbis (Verlag für Moderne Phantastik)
  • Gabriele Behrend: “Meerwasser” in Unsere Freunde von ? Eridani (Begedia)
  • Christian Endres: “Der Klang sich lichtenden Nebels” in Der grüne Planet – Zukunft im Klimawandel (Hirnkost)
  • Kai Focke: “Gastropoda galactica” in Das Alien tanzt Walzer (p.machinery)
  • Heidrun Jänchen: “Mietnomaden” in Der grüne Planet – Zukunft im Klimawandel (Hirnkost)
  • Axel Kruse: “Grassoden in “2101 – Was aus uns wurde (Verlag für Moderne Phantastik)
  • Hans Jürgen Kugler: “Die Insulaner” in Der grüne Planet – Zukunft im Klimawandel (Hirnkost)
  • Christian Künne: “Friedensfahrt” in Rebellion in Sirius City (Verlag für Moderne Phantastik)
  • Thorsten Küper: “Unsere Freunde von ? Eridani” in Unsere Freunde von ? Eridani (Begedia)
  • Frank Lauenroth: “Delter” in Unsere Freunde von ? Eridani (Begedia)
  • Michael Marrak: “Insomnia” in Das Haus Lazarus (Memoranda)
  • Uwe Post: “Terra Halbpension” in Unsere Freunde von ? Eridani (Begedia)
  • Carsten Schmitt: “Wagners Stimme” in Wie künstlich ist Intelligenz? (Plan9)
  • Angela und Karlheinz Steinmüller: “Marslandschaften” in Exodus 41 und in Marslandschaften (Memoranda)

Best foreign novel first published in German in 2020:

  • Basma Abdel Aziz: Das Tor (Heyne)
  • Baoshu: Großes steht bevor in Zerbrochene Sterne (Heyne)
  • Stephen Baxter: Artefakt (Sternenpforte 1) (Heyne)
  • Agustina Bazterrica: Wie die Schweine (Suhrkamp)
  • James S. A. Corey: Tiamats Zorn (The Expanse 8) (Heyne)
  • William Gibson: Agency (Jackpot 2) (Tropen)
  • Zack Jordan: Last Human – Allein gegen die Galaxis (Heyne)
  • John Marrs: The Passengers – Du entscheidest über Leben und Tod (Heyne)
  • Christopher Paolini: Infinitum – Die Ewigkeit der Sterne (Knaur)
  • Samanta Schweblin: Hundert Augen (Suhrkamp)
  • Simon Stålenhag: Tales from the Loop (Tor)
  • Dennis E. Taylor: Die Singularitätsfalle (Heyne)
  • Jodi Taylor: Miss Maxwells chaotischer Zeitkompass (Die Chroniken von St. Mary’s 2) (Blanvalet)
  • Tade Thompson: Rosewater (Wormwood 1) (Golkonda)
  • David Wellington: Die letzte Astronautin (Piper)

Best translation into German first published in 2020

  • Henning Ahrens for the translation of Kira Jane Buxton’s Hollow Kingdom – Das Jahr der Krähe (Tor)
  • Larissa Bender for the translation of Basma Abdel Aziz’ Das Tor (Heyne)
  • Pia Biundo for the translation of Vlad Hernández’ Nemesis in Pandemie – Geschichten zur Zeitenwende (Hirnkost)
  • Biundo for the translation of Vlad Hernández’ Lebensstationen eines Idealisten in c’t 25/2020 (heise)
  • Susanne Gerold for the translation of N.K. Jemisin’s Die große Stille (3 Bände) (Knaur)
  • Oliver Hoffmann for the translation of Tanya Huff’s Im Dienst der Föderation (Confederation of Valor 1) (Plan9)
  • Eva Kemper for the translation of Katie Hale’s Mein Name ist Monster (Fischer)
  • Jürgen Langowski for the translation of Zack Jordan’s Last Human – Allein gegen die Galaxis (Heyne)
  • Stefan Pluschkat for the translation of Simon Stålenhag’s Tales from the Loop (Ur Varselklotet) (Tor)
  • Jakob Schmidt for the new translaton of Frank Herbert’s Die Kinder des Wüstenplaneten” (Der Wüstenplanet 3) (Heyne)
  • Jakob Schmidt for the translation of Tade Thompson’s Rosewater” (Wormwood 1) (Golkonda)

Best cover art first published in 2020

  • Lothar Bauer for the cover of Nova 29 (p.machinery)
  • Lothar Bauer for the cover of Das Alien tanzt Walzer (p.machinery)
  • Uli Bendick for the cover and interior illustrations of Der grüne Planet – Zukunft im Klimawandel (Hirnkost)
  • Dirk Berger for the cover of Exodus 40
  • Arndt Drechsler for the cover of Hyper Orbis (Verlag für Moderne Phantastik)
  • Jan Hoffmann for the cover of phantastisch! 79 (Atlantis)
  • Meike Schultchen for the cover of Cozmic 2 (Atlantis)
  • Michael Vogt for the cover of Pandemie – Geschichten zur Zeitenwende (Hirnkost)

Best German language audio drama first broadcast in 2020:

  • “Cassandra Rising” by Martin Heindel (Director: Martin Heindel, Composition: Ralf Haarmann, Production: WDR)
  • “Heaven Line – Traumstadt wird zur Todesfalle” by Bodo Traber (Director: Bodo Traber, Dramaturgy: Natalie Szallies, Production: WDR)
  • “Der zweite Schlaf” von Heinz Sommer nach dem Roman von Robert Harris (Director: Leonhard Koppelmann, Production: HR)

Special award for one-time outstanding achievements in SF in 2020

  • Hans Frey for his non-fiction books on the history of German science fiction, Fortschritt und Fiasko and Aufbruch in den Abgrund
  • Torben Kuhlmann for his illustrated book Einstein – Die fantastische Reise einer Maus durch Raum und Zeit
  • René Moreau and Hans Jürgen Kugler for the Publication of the SF anthologies Der grüne Planet – Zukunft im Klimawandel and Pandemie – Geschichten zur Zeitenwende

Special award for longterm outstanding achievements in SF in 2020

  • Freundeskreis Science Fiction Leipzig e.V. for the continuous organization of the ElsterCon, even in times of a pandemic
  • Rico Gehrke und Peggy Weber-Gehrke for supporting the SF short story through the anthologies in their publishing house for modern fantasy
  • Christina Hacker and the team of the PRFZ member magazine ” SOL “for their unpaid work full of energy and enthusiasm on the occasion of the 100th edition
  • Hardy Kettlitt for his Memoranda Verlag
  • Ralf Peter Krämer for 50 years of involvement in fandom from Stanislaw Lem Club to the Penta-Con
  • Dieter von Reeken for his services to the classic German SF and the history of the German-speaking SF
  • Science Fiction Club Deutschland e.V. for the promotion of SF literature for 65 years
  • Jörg Weigand for his tireless support, including young authors

Pixel Scroll 6/19/20 Hey, Mister! You Missed A Pixel!

(1) FAN HISTORY PROJECT SPOTLIGHT. File 770 is late to pass on the great news, but last October Fanac.org’s Joe Siclari told everyone on his list “that we have received a request from the Library of Congress to archive our site.”

…From the letter: “The Library of Congress preserves important cultural artifacts and provides enduring access to them…The Library will make this collection available to researchers at Library facilities and by special arrangement.” They may later make it publicly available as well. We’ve all seen the loss of many websites that showcase the hard work and outstanding accomplishments of fans and historians in our field. This archiving request from the Library of Congress will ensure that the work we’ve been doing with your help will be available, even after the current class of fan historians has bit the dust. Color us ecstatic. We’ll let you know when the process has completed.

The Library of Congress gives an overview of its web archiving program here.

The Library of Congress Web Archive manages, preserves, and provides access to archived web content selected by subject experts from across the Library, so that it will be available for researchers today and in the future. Websites are ephemeral and often considered at-risk born-digital content. New websites form constantly, URLs change, content changes, and websites sometimes disappear entirely. Websites document current events, organizations, public reactions, government information, and cultural and scholarly information on a wide variety of topics. Materials that used to appear in print are increasingly published online.

(2) COMPLETING THE SET. The 2020 Kurd Laßwitz Preis  (German SF Award) winners now have all been named following this late selection:

Best German language audio drama first broadcast in 2019

  • Unser Leben in den Wäldern by Marie Darrieussecq and Gerrit Booms, WDR

(3) D&D GETTING ANOTHER LOOK. From io9: “Dungeons & Dragons Team Announces New Plans to Address Race and Inclusivity in the Game”.

….in a new blog post on the official D&D website the development studio detailed what it has been doing to tackle the game’s own history of racist stereotyping, and what will be done going forward to ensure the game tastefully represents its fantasy world.

“Throughout the 50-year history of D&D, some of the peoples in the game—orcs and drow being two of the prime examples—have been characterized as monstrous and evil, using descriptions that are painfully reminiscent of how real-world ethnic groups have been and continue to be denigrated,” the new statement reads in part. “That’s just not right, and it’s not something we believe in. Despite our conscious efforts to the contrary, we have allowed some of those old descriptions to reappear in the game. We recognize that to live our values, we have to do an even better job in handling these issues. If we make mistakes, our priority is to make things right.”

Going forward, D&D will be making those things right with a six-point plan. Outside of the game itself, these include the use of sensitivity readers on upcoming and current Dungeons & Dragons sourcebooks as part of the creative process, and a commitment to “proactively seeking new, diverse talent to join our staff and our pool of freelance writers and artists,” a move already made for products set to release in the next year, but a policy being maintained going forward.

…From an editorial standpoint, the D&D team will also go back through material as it is being prepared for reprints, and update them to modify and remove any racially insensitive material. The adventures Tomb of Annihilation and The Curse of Strahd were cited as particular examples, with Curse of Strahd being called out specifically for its use of Romani sterotypes in the background of the Vistani, a nomadic group of travelers that primarily resided in Barovia before the death of Count Strahd von Zarovich. In the editorial process for Strahd’s reprint, as well as two upcoming products, Wizards worked with a Romani consultant to present the Vistani without using reductive tropes.

But some of the points delve into the game itself—for example, the aforementioned ongoing exploration and re-examination of Drow and Orcish cultures in the game’s fiction, beings that were long described as beastly and villainous by nature while also being approximations of non-white cultures….

(4) FATE OF LIBRARIES. Publishers Weekly warns “Changes Loom as Public Libraries Begin to Reopen”.

…But whenever that happens, the public libraries that will emerge from this historic pause will be changed from the ones that closed their doors in March, librarians tell PW, both in the short term, and into the future.

The most pressing issue facing libraries, of course, is how to reopen safely, for both library staff and the public. For most libraries, that means services like curbside pickup or limits on patron visits to start. It means ensuring library workers have appropriate personal protective equipment, and reconfiguring the library space: less furniture, distance between computer stations, more hand sanitizer stations, spit guards, and plexiglass dividers. It means contactless checkout, new cleaning procedures, and 72-hour materials quarantines.

It also means enormous pressure on library staff, including new rules to enforce, such as physical distancing and wearing masks. None of it will be easy. And all of it will be done under the threat of job cuts, a potential second wave of Covid-19 infections, immense budget pressure, and worsening political dysfunction….

(5) NO SMOKING. During last autumn’s round of California wildfires, a Washington Post writer accompanied a salesman for treating houses with fire retardant on a visit to Dean Koontz’ estate. “California will never stop burning”.

…Thirty miles southwest of the 46 Fire, Dean Koontz, the mega­selling novelist, was standing outside his enormous new home the morning after Halloween.

“We had friends who wouldn’t move to California because of earthquakes.”

Like other Californians, he has stood on a roof with a garden hose and a stance of defiance.

“They moved to the Gulf Coast and got hit by a hurricane.”

It costs a fortune to insure some homes in California. This is why Koontz invited Moseley and his team for a consultation about a defensive sprinkler system and his SPF3000 spray. Local authorities have challenged the effectiveness and safety of the product, but Moseley has testimonials from grateful clients and documentation of test results.

He also has his on-the-go demonstration. On Koontz’s front stoop, Moseley blowtorches one end of a piece of wood. It ignites, burns, starts to disintegrate. Then he torches the other side, which has been treated with SPF3000. It blackens but does not ignite. Then Moseley scrapes the charred veneer with a car key to reveal intact wood underneath….

“Impressive,” Koontz says. His Tuscan-style villa is in a gated community near Irvine. This is a place of Bentleys and catering trucks, and an air of invincibility. Koontz knows that nothing is invincible. If he were younger, maybe he’d move to a place that wasn’t quaking and conflagrating so much. Arizona, perhaps. But he loves it here.

“None of us live forever,” he says. “And you have to weigh the quality of life with the risk.”

(6) ZAFÓN OBIT. “Carlos Ruiz Zafón, author of The Shadow of the Wind, dies aged 55”The Guardian marked the passing of this best-selling Spanish-language author.

….Born in Barcelona, Ruiz Zafón worked in advertising before he made his debut as an author in 1993 with young adult novel The Prince of Mist. In 2001, he published The Shadow of the Wind, which followed a boy called Daniel who is taken to the Cemetery of Lost Books in Barcelona and becomes fascinated by the author Julian Carax and the shadowy figure trying to eradicate every last copy of Carax’s books. The novel was translated into English by Lucia Graves in 2004, and became an international hit. “If you thought the true gothic novel died with the 19th century, this will change your mind,” said Stephen King in a review. “Shadow is the real deal, a novel full of cheesy splendour and creaking trapdoors, a novel where even the subplots have subplots.”

Ruiz Zafón, who moved to Los Angeles in the 1990s, and divided his time between Spain and the US, has said that while he had written “pretty successful” young adult novels for 10 years, with The Shadow of the Wind he “wanted to create something very special”.

“So what I did was take what for me is very important, which is take all the great ambition in all those 19th-century novels, but try to reconstruct those big novels – the Tolstoy, the Dickens, the Wilkie Collins – but try to reconstruct all of that with all the narrative elements that the 20th century has given us, from the grammar of cinema, from multimedia, from general fiction, from everything that is out there, to create a much more intense reading experience for the readers,” he said.

He followed the bestseller up with three more novels in the series, The Angel’s Game, The Prisoner of Heaven and The Labyrinth of Spirits. Completing the tetralogy, he told Spanish press in 2016 that he had “the feeling of the job done”….

(7) TODAY IN HISTORY.

June 19, 1964 The Twilight Zone finale aired. 

“A swimming pool not unlike any other pool, a structure built of tile and cement and money, a backyard toy for the affluent.” — Rod Serling in his opening narration to this episode.

The Twilight Zone series finale: “The Bewitchin’ Pool” was the thirty-sixth episode of the fifth and final season. Earl Hamner, Jr., got the idea for this episode while living in the San Fernando Valley region and witnessing an alarming divorce rate and the effect it had on children. The episode was one of the first shows on television to really address the problem of divorce and bad parenting, and in part it represents wish fulfillment for children in such situations.  It was directed by Joseph M. Newman from the script by Earl Hamner, Jr. 

It had an unusually large cast: Mary Badham as Sport Sharewood, June Foray as Sport Sharewood (voice, outdoor scenes), Kim Hector as Witt,  Dee Hartford as Gloria Sharewood, Jeffrey Byron as Jeb Sharewood, Georgia Simmons as Aunt T and Tod Andrews as Gil Sharewood. 

(8) TODAY’S BIRTHDAYS.

[Compiled by Cat Eldridge and John Hertz.]

  • Born June 19, 1824 – Henri Hildibrand.  Wood engraver for Hetzel, who did so much good and bad for Verne; those editions were lavishly illustrated, anyhow.  This cover for Twenty Thousand Leagues Under the Sea is a composite of a Peter Gimbel photo and a de Neuville print Hildibrand engraved.  Here is Aronnax studying the giant squid.  Here is the underwater destroyed town (note de Neuville’s signature at lower left).  (Died 1897) [JH]
  • Born June 19, 1872 – Sutton Griggs.  Son of a slave; Baptist minister; active in the Nat’l Ass’n for the Advancement of Colored People; published and distributed his own books and pamphlets, thirty of them. Imperium in Imperio has a black nation hidden in Texas, outsold many contemporaries to whom he was invisible.  (Died 1933) [JH]
  • Born June 19, 1881 – Maginel Enright.  Younger sister of Frank Lloyd Wright (Maginel a contraction of Margaret Ellen).  Illustrated Frank Baum’s Twinkle TalesPoliceman BluejayJuvenile Speaker; five dozen by others.  See here and here and here.  Memoir, The Valley of the God-Almighty Joneses.  (Died 1966) [JH]
  • Born June 19, 1915 – Julius Schwartz.  Co-published pioneer fanzine The Time Traveller. Helped organize NyCon I the first Worldcon.  Co-founded Solar Sales Service, representing Bester, Bloch, Bradbury.  In reviving or re-creating the Flash, Green Lantern, and like that, instrumental in opening Silver Age of Comics.  Edited BatmanSuperman, fifteen years each; dozens more.  Memoir Man of Two Worlds subtitled “my life in science fiction and comics”; also he was active as fan and pro; also “Man of Two Worlds” was his creation Adam Strange – in whose stories Alanna’s father Sardath looked like him. Inkpot, Jack Kirby Hall of Fame, Will Eisner Hall of Fame.  (Died 2004) [JH]
  • Born June 19, 1921 Louis Jourdan. Fear No Evil and Ritual of Evil, two tv horror films in the late Sixties, appear to be his first venture into our realm. He’d play Count Dracula in, errr, Count Dracula a few years later. And then comes the role you most likely remember him for, Dr. Anton Arcane in Swamp Thing which he reprised in The Return of Swamp Thing. Definitely popcorn films at their very best. Oh and let’s not forget he was Kamal Khan, the villain in Octopussy! (Died 2015.) (CE)
  • Born June 19, 1926 Josef Nesvadba.A Czech writer, best known in his SF short stories, many of which have appeared in English translation. ISFDB lists a number of stories as appearing in English and two collections of his translated stories were published, In The Footsteps of the Abominable Snowman: Stories of Science and Fantasy and Vampires Ltd.: Stories of Science and Fantasy. Neither’s available in digital format. (Died 2005.) (CE)
  • Born June 19, 1947 Salman Rushdie, 73. Everything he does has some elements of magic realism in it. (Let the arguments begin on that statement.) So which of his novels are really genre? I’d say The Ground Beneath Her FeetGrimus (his first and largely forgotten sf novel), Two Years Eight Months and Twenty-Eight Nights and Haroun and the Sea of Stories. If you’ve not read anything by him, I’d start with The Ground Beneath Her Feet which is by far both one of his best works and one of his most understandable ones as well. (CE)
  • Born June 19, 1949 – Marilyn Kaye.  Taught twenty years at St. John’s University (New York), now lives in Paris.  A hundred children’s and young-adult books, four dozen ours.  In her Replica series, teenage Amy’s discovering she is a clone, genetically modified for superhuman abilities, is only the beginning.  In her Gifted series, each in a small middle-school class has a superhuman ability; an outside group seeks to manipulate them and their abilities for profit; the students dislike their abilities and one another.  [JH]
  • Born June 19, 1953 Virginia Hey, 67. Best-remembered  for her role as Pa’u Zotoh Zhaan in the fabulous Farscape series and playing the Warrior Woman in Mad Max 2: The Road Warrior. She’s also Rubavitch, the mistress of the KGB Head, General Pushkin, in The Living Daylights. She also had a brief appearance as a beautician in The Return of Captain Invincible, an Australian musical comedy superhero film. No, I’ve not seen it. (CE)
  • Born June 19, 1957 Jean Rabe, 63. She’s a genre author and editor who has worked on the DragonlanceForgotten RealmsRogue Angel and BattleTech series, as well as many others. Ok I admit to a degree of fascination with such writers as I’m a devotee of the Rogue Angel audiobooks that GraphicAudio does and she’s written according to ISFDB five of the source novels under the house name of Alex Archer. (CE)
  • June 19, 1963 – Aleksandar Žiljak.  A dozen short stories; some covers and interiors, see here (his collection Blind Birds).  Co-edited Ad Astra anthology of Croatian SF 1976-2006; co-edits literary SF journal Ubiq.  Six SFera Awards: three for Best Story, two for Best Illustration, one (shared) for Ad Astra.  The Wayback Machine has this interview.  [JH]
  • Born June 19, 1978 Zoe Saldana, 42, born with the lovely birth name of Zoë Yadira Saldaña Nazario. First genre role was Anamaria in Pirates of the Caribbean: The Curse of the Black Pearl. She’s Nyota Uhura in the new Trek series, and she’s also Neytiri in the Avatar franchise. She portrays Gamora in the MCU, beginning with Guardians of the Galaxy, a truly great film though I’m less impressed with the second film by far. (CE)

(9) COMICS SECTION.

(10) THE GREATEST. “Panel Mania: Jack Kirby: The Epic Life of the King of Comics by Tom Scioli”Publishers Weekly has an 11-page excerpt. The book will be released in July.

There’s a reason why Jack Kirby, co-creator of such iconic comics characters as the Fantastic Four, Black Panther, and Captain America, is called the “King of Comics.” Considered one of the great innovators in the history of American comics, Jack Kirby (1917-1994) is arguably the greatest superhero comic book artist of all time. 

In the new graphic biography, Jack Kirby: The Epic Life of the King of Comics, comics artist and biographer Tom Scioli pays tribute to Kirby in a vividly illustrated and comprehensively researched examination of Kirby’s life and career from his rough and tumble childhood growing up on the Lower East Side of New York in the early 20th century to his military service in WWII to the transformative comics he created for Marvel and later for DC Comics…. 

(11) SACKY HACK. This is real thinking outside the box.

(12) MARCH OF TIME. At the LA Review of Books, Aleida Rodriguez’s autobiographical essay “Time Machine”, in addition to Wells and Borges, even mentions Clyde Crashcup from the Rocky & Bullwinkle Show.

WHEN I LANDED in the US as a child of nine, I felt I had not only traveled in space but also in time. Though it was 1962, behind me lay a 19th-century world of oil lamps, muddy rutted roads, and horse-drawn carts, while before me flickered a vision so sleek and modern there were no shadows and bright-green lawns sprouted cones of mist.

Time traveler became my invisible identity. Secretly, I searched for mentors in movies like The Time Machine (1960), envying Rod Taylor his ability to go back and forth, to witness and control the passage of time. Propelled and buoyed by a utopian vision of the future, he set off, watching the rising hemline on a mannequin in a shop window, then the shop itself disintegrating to dust in an instant, the surrounding buildings crumbling and disappearing, replaced by insect-like cranes scampering on skyscrapers. His present had succumbed to shattered shards. But by moving a crystal-topped lever sharpened to a point like a pen, he could also reverse direction and return to his intact and cloistered world of waistcoats.

I yearned for that, a trip back — not to Bountiful but to a prelapsarian time, before the rupture in my family caused by the Cuban revolution….

(13) X FACTOR. BBC has a picture of a “Breathtaking new map of the X-ray Universe”.

Behold the hot, energetic Universe.

A German-Russian space telescope has just acquired a breakthrough map of the sky that traces the heavens in X-rays.

The image records a lot of the violent action in the cosmos – instances where matter is being accelerated, heated and shredded.

Feasting black holes, exploding stars, and searingly hot gas.

The data comes from the eRosita instrument mounted on Spektr-RG.

This orbiting telescope was launched in July last year and despatched to an observing position some 1.5 million km from Earth. Once commissioned and declared fully operational in December, it was left to slowly rotate and scan the depths of space.

eRosita’s first all-sky data-set, represented in the image at the top of this page, was completed only last week. It records over a million sources of X-rays.

“That’s actually pretty much the same number as had been detected in the whole history of X-ray astronomy going back 60 years. We’ve basically doubled the known sources in just six months,” said Kirpal Nandra, who heads the high-energy astrophysics group at the Max Planck Institute for Extraterrestrial Physics (MPE) in Garching, Germany.

(14) QUARANTINE CAT FILM FESTIVAL. This looks promising!

The most purr-fect, a-meow-zing, and totally fur-tastic cat videos anyone has ever seen!

[Thanks to Darrah Chavey, Frank Olynyk, Mike Kennedy, Lise Andreasen, Martin Morse Wooster, John King Tarpinian, John Hertz, JJ, Cat Eldridge, Chip Hitchcock, Michael Toman, and Andrew Porter for some of these stories. Title credit goes to File 770 contributing editor of the day Kip Williams.]

Kurd Laßwitz Preis 2020 Winners

The winners of the 2020 Kurd Laßwitz Preis, given to works written in or translated into the German language and published during the previous year, were revealed June 8.

The German language edition of Margaret Atwood’s The Testaments won an award, as did Andreas Fliedner, translator of The Last Days of New Paris by China Miéville

The awards are voted on by authors, translators, editors, publishers, graphic artists and journalists working professionally in SF genre in Germany, Austria and Switzerland. This year, 93 eligible voters participated in the election. The translation category was decided by a jury of ten translators and editors, and eight jurors (radio play directors, radio play authors and radio play experts) voted in the radio play category (where the winner has yet to be determined.)

The award is named after German author Kurd Laßwitz, The presentation ceremony is planned as part of the 15th ElsterCon, which they say “(hopefully) will take place this year September 18-20 in Leipzig.”  

Best German language novel first published in 2019

  • Perry Rhodan – Das Größte Abenteuer by Andreas Eschbach, Fischer Tor

Best German language short fiction first published in 2019

  • “Koloss aus dem Orbit” by Jacqueline Montemurri in Exodus 39, edited by René Moreau, Olaf Kemmler and Fabian Tomascheck, Exodus Verlag

Best foreign novel first published in German in 2019

  • Die Zeuginnen (The Testaments) by Margaret Atwood, Berlin Verlag

Best translation first published in 2019

  • Andreas Fliedner for Die letzten Tage von New-Paris (The Last Days of New Paris) by China Miéville, Golkonda

Best cover art first published in 2019

  • Michael Marrak for Der Garten des Uroboros by Michael Marrak, Amrun Verlag

Best German language audio drama first broadcast in 2019

  • Unser Leben in den Wäldern by Marie Darrieussecq and Gerrit Booms, WDR

Special award for one-time outstanding achievements in SF in 2019

  • Melanie Wylutzki, Hardy Kettlitz and Klaus Farin for their efforts to rescue Das Science Fiction Jahr

Special award for longterm outstanding achievements in SF in 2019

  • Michael Haitel as publisher of p.machinery and for his work with the SFCD

[Based on a press release. Thanks to Cora Buhlert for help with titles of translated works.]

[Update 06/19/2020: The jurors have now selected a winner in the Audio Drama category.]

Kurd Laßwitz Preis 2020 Finalists

The finalists for the 2020 Kurd Laßwitz Preis were announced on March 29. The award, named after German author Kurd Laßwitz, is given to works written in or translated into the German language and published during the previous year.

The German language editions of Margaret Atwood’s The Testaments, Adrian Tchaikovsky’s Dogs of War, and Arkady Martine’s A Memory Called Empire  are some of the finalists for Best Foreign Novel. And in the Best Translation category, the translators of Death’s End by Cixin Liu, The Murderbot Diaries omnibus, and John Scalzi’s The Consuming Fire are among the nominees.

Voting is open until May 31. The winners will be announced at ElsterCon 15 in Leipzig, Germany, on September 19, 2020.

Best German language novel first published in 2019:

  • Ein Fremder unter Millionen (Koloniewelten, Band 3) by Galax Acheronian, Twentysix
  • Metropole 7 (Der Letzte Admiral, Band 1) by Dirk van den Boom, Cross Cult
  • Die Nacht war bleich, die Lichter blinkten  by Emma Braslavsky, Suhrkamp
  • Neptunation by Dietmar Dath, Fischer Tor
  • Perry Rhodan – Das Größte Abenteuer by Andreas Eschbach, Fischer Tor
  • Miami Punk by Juan S. Guse, S. Fischer
  • Das Ewigkeitsprojekt by Caroline Hofstätter, Atlantis
  • Die zweite Erde by Christian Humberg, Lübbe e-books
  • Der Moloch by Michael K. Iwoleit, Fabylon
  • Der Garten des Uroboros by Michael Marrak, Amrun Verlag
  • Am Abgrund der Unendlichkeit by Bernd Perplies, Bastei Lübbe
  • Shape Me by Melanie Vogltanz, Ohne Ohren

Best German language short fiction first published in 2019:

  • “Die Eismaschine” by Dirk Alt in Nova 27, edited by Michael K. Iwoleit and Michael Haitel, p.machinery
  • “1Raum” by Gabi Blauert in Flucht von Zamura, edited by Peggy Weber-Gehrke, Modern Phantastik
  • “Die zweite Generation” by Victor Boden in  Exodus 39, edited by René Moreau, Olaf Kemmler and Fabian Tomascheck, Exodus Verlag
  • “Vom Krug auf dem Hügel in Tennessee” by Christopher Ecker in Exodus 39, edited by René Moreau, Olaf Kemmler and Fabian Tomascheck, Exodus Verlag
  • “Die beste aller Welten” by Frank W. Haubold in Nova 27, edited by Michael K. Iwoleit and Michael Haitel, p.machinery
  • “Das Fermi-Paradoxon, ein Erklärungsansatz” by Axel Kruse in Flucht von Zamura, edited by Peggy Weber-Gehrke, Modern Phantastik
  • “Belichtungszeit” by Thorsten Küper in Elvis hat das Gebäude verlassen, edited by André Skora, Armin Rößler und Frank Hebben, Begedia
  • “Koloss aus dem Orbit” by Jacqueline Montemurri in Exodus 39, edited by René Moreau, Olaf Kemmler and Fabian Tomascheck, Exodus Verlag
  • “Score!” by Barbara Schwarz in c’t 16/2019, heise
  • “Die Aura oder Im Zustand der Gnade” by Angelika and Karlheinz Steinmüller in Tor-Online.de
  • “URM 6754 und die Sphärenklänge” by Angelika and Karlheinz Steinmüller in Sphärenklänge by Angelika and Karlheinz Steinmüller, Golkonda
  • “Don’t Be Evil” by Tom Turtschi in Nova 28, edited by Michael K. Iwoleit and Michael Haitel, p.machinery
  • “Zeitspringer” by Matthias Weber in Gegen unendlich 15, edited by Michael J. Awe and Andreas Fieberg, p.machinery  

Best foreign novel first published in German in 2019:

  • Die Zeuginnen (The Testaments) by Margaret Atwood, Berlin Verlag
  • Wie man einen Toaster überlistet (Unauthorized Bread) by Cory Doctorow, Heyne
  • Der zweite Schlaf (The Second Sleep) by Robert Harris, Heyne
  • Die Mauer (The Wall) by John Lanchester, Klett-Cotta
  • Jenseits der Zeit (Death’s End) by Cixin Liu, Heyne
  • Die Reise (Noumenon) by Marina Lostetter, Heyne
  • Im Herzen des Imperiums (A Memory Called Empire) by Arkady Martine, Heyne
  • The Electric State by Simon Stålenhag, Fischer Tor
  • Miss Maxwells kurioses Zeitarchiv (Just One Damned Thing After Another) by Jodi Taylor, Blanvalet
  • Im Krieg (Dogs of War) by Adrian Tchaikovsky, Heyne
  • Tagebuch eines Killerbots (The Murderbot Diaries omnibus) by Martha Wells, Heyne
  • Die Dynastie der Maschinen (Clockwork Dynasty) by Daniel H. Wilson, Knaur

Best translation first published in 2019:

  • Karin Betz for Jenseits der Zeit (Death’s End) by Cixin Liu, Heyne
  • Frank Böhmert for Tagebuch eines Killerbots (The Murderbot Diaries omnibus) by Martha Wells, Heyne
  • Andreas Fliedner for Die letzten Tage von New-Paris (The Last Days of New Paris) by China Miéville, Golkonda
  • Bernhard Kempen for Mars Override (Thin Air) by Richard K. Morgan, Heyne
  • Bernhard Kempen for Verrat (The Consuming Fire) by John Scalzi, Fischer Tor
  • Friedrich Mader for Luna Trilogie (Luna trilogy) by Ian McDonald, Heyne
  • Birthe Mühlhoff for Micro Science Fiction by O. Westin, Mikrotext
  • Pia Oberacker-Pilick for “Interferenz” (Interferencia) by Vlad Hernandez in c’t 24/2019, heise
  • Gesine Schröder for Der Gott am Ende der Straße (The Future Home of the Living God) by Louise Erdrich, Aufbau Verlag

Best cover art first published in 2019:

  • Stefan Böttcher for Gegen unendlich 15, edited by Michael J. Awe and Andreas Fieberg, p.machinery  
  • Alice Conisbee for Miami Punk by Juan S. Guse, S. Fischer
  • Arndt Drechsler for phantastisch! 73, edited by Klaus Bollhöfener, Atlantis
  • Martin Frei for Interferenz by Christopher L. Bennett, Cross Cult
  • Jan Hoffmann for Exodus 39, edited by René Moreau, Olaf Kemmler and Fabian Tomascheck, Exodus Verlag
  • Timo Kümmel for Userland, Berlin 2069 by Uwe Hermann, Atlantis
  • Michael Marrak for Der Garten des Uroboros by Michael Marrak, Amrun Verlag
  • Jens Maria Weber for Maschinengötter by Kai Meyer, Fischer Tor

Best German language audio drama first broadcast in 2019:

  • Unser Leben in den Wäldern by Marie Darrieussecq and Gerrit Booms, WDR
  • Exit. Bericht aus einer verseuchten Zukunft by Bianca Döring, WDR
  • Let them eat money. Welche Zunkunft?! by Andreas Veiel, RBB/DLR

Special award for one-time outstanding achievements in SF in 2019:

  • Dietmar Dath for his non-fiction book Niegeschichte
  • Ulrich Hilgefort, Isabel Grünewald und Peter Schmitz for the c’t SciFiCast
  • Melanie Wylutzki, Hardy Kettlitz and Klaus Farin for their efforts to rescue Das Science Fiction Jahr

Special award for longterm outstanding achievements in SF in 2019:

  • Michael Haitel as publisher of p.machinery and for his work with the SFCD
  • Dieter von Reeken for his achievements in preserving classic German science fiction and recording the history of German science fiction
  • Peggy Weber-Gehrke and Rico Gehrke for their support for German language short science fiction
  • Heinz Zwack for his lifetime achievement as a writer and translator

[Thanks to Cora Buhlert for the story.]

2019 Kurd Laßwitz Preis

The winners of the 2019 Kurd Laßwitz Preis have been posted.

The award is named after German author Kurd Laßwitz and was first given in 1981. It is given to works written in or translated into the German language and published during the previous year.

Best German Science-Fiction Novel

  • NSA – Nationales Sicherheits-Amt by Andreas Eschbach

Best German Short Prosa

  • Confinement by Thorsten Küper

Best Foreign Science-Fiction Book (translated into German):

  • Eiswelt [Early Riser] by Jasper Fforde

Best Translation

  • Jakob Schmidt for the translation of New York 2140 [New York 2140] by Kim Stanley Robinson

Best Radioplay

The decision will be made during a runoff election at a later date.

Best Cover Art or Illustration

  • Michael Marrak for the cover of Die Reise zum Mittelpunkt der Zeit

Special Award for Extraordinary Achievements

  • Ronald M. Hahn, Michael K. Iwoleit, and Helmuth W. Mommers for founding and publishing Nova Magazin, and Olaf G. Hilscher, Frank Kebben and Michael Haitel for the continuation and co-editorship [of the magazine]

The awards will be presented on November 2 at the 11th Penta-Cons, a literary symposium on science fiction to held in the Palitzsch Museum of Dresden, Germany.

[Via Europa SF.]

2019 Kurd Laßwitz Preis Shortlist

The finalists for the 2019 Kurd Laßwitz Preis have been posted.

The award is named after German author Kurd Laßwitz and was first given in 1981. It is given to works written in or translated into the German language and published during the previous year.

The award winners will be announced November 2 at the 11th Penta-Cons, a literary symposium on science fiction to held in the Palitzsch Museum of Dresden, Germany.

Best German Science-Fiction Novel

  • Canopus by Dirk van den Boom
  • Ewiges Leben by Andreas Brandhorst
  • Die Tiefe der Zeit by Andreas Brandhorst
  • NSA – Nationales Sicherheits-Amt by Andreas Eschbach
  • Die Schwärmer by Willi Hetze
  • Hologrammatica by Tom Hillenbrand
  • Miakro by Georg Klein
  • Hexenmacht by Kai Meyer
  • Terra by T.S. Orgel
  • Die Tyrannei des Schmetterlings by Frank Schätzing
  • Roma Nova by Judith C. Vogt

Best German Short Prosa

  • Trolltrupp by Galax Acheronian
  • Eine Million Affen by Andrewas Fieberg
  • Baum Baum Baum by Heidrun Jänchen
  • Confinement by Thorsten Küper
  • Acht Grad by Stefan Lammers
  • Auferstehung des Fleisches by Frank Neugebauer
  • Die Wettermaschine by Lothar Nietsch
  • In der Grube by Matthias Ramtke
  • Enola in Ewigkeit by Thomas Sieber
  • Coming Home by Tetiana Trofusha
  • Omose by Wolf Welling

Best Foreign Science-Fiction Book (translated into German):

  • Die Gabe [The Power] by Naomi Alderman
  • Zwischen zwei Sternen [A Closed and Common Orbit] by Becky Chambers
  • Walkaway [Walkaway] by Cory Doctorow
  • Eiswelt [Early Riser] by Jasper Fforde
  • Autonom [Autonomous] by Annalee Newitz
  • New York 2140 [New York 2140] by Kim Stanley Robinson
  • Ich bin viele [We Are Legion] by Dennis E. Taylor
  • Die Kinder der Zeit [Children of Time] by Adrian Tchaikovsky
  • Central Station [Central Station] by Lavie Tidhar

Best Translation

  • Zoë Beck for the translation of Van der Notwendigkeit, den Weltraum zu ordnen [The Need for Better Regulation of Outer Space] by Pippa Goldschmidt
  • Karin Betz for the translation of Der dunkle Wald [Three Body Trilogy, Band 2] by Cixin Liu
  • Kirsten Borchardt for the translation of Eiswelt [Early Riser] by Jasper Fforde
  • Juliane Gräbener-Müller for the translation of Der Aufstieg und Fall des D.O.D.O. [The Rise and Fall of D.O.D.O.] by Neal Stephenson and Nicole Galland
  • Bernhard Kempen for the translation of Der Zwillingseffekt [The Punch Escrow] by Tal M. Klein
  • Jürgen Kangkowski for the translation of Walkaway [Walkaway] by Cory Doctorow
  • Pia Oberacker-Pilick for the translation of Fragmente einer Fabel [Fragmentos de una fabula] by Vlad Hernandez
  • Pia Oberacker-Pilick for the translation of Elf kuftige Zeiten [Once tiempos del futura] by Carlos Suchowolski
  • Jakob Schmidt for the translation of New York 2140 [New York 2140] by Kim Stanley Robinson
  • Sabine Thiele for the translation of Die Gabe [The Power] by Naomi Alderman
  • Anne-Marie Wachs for the translation of Keine Zeit verlieren [No Time to Spare] by Ursula K. Le Guin

Best Radioplay

  • Anne Krüger, Supermarkt
  • Felix Kubin, Die Maschine steht still
  • Mareike Maage and Theresa Schubert, A.I.R. Artificial Intelligence Rebellion
  • Thoas von Steinaecker, Die Astronautin

Best Cover Art or Illustration

  • Nicole Altenhoff for the cover of Tiefsommer by Jesko Habert
  • Lothar Bauer for the cover of Sylvej by Axel Kruse
  • Stefan Böttcher for the cover of Gegen unendlich 12 edited by Michael J. Awe, Andreas Fieberg, and Joachim Pack
  • Stefan Böttcher for the cover of Gegen unendlich 14 edited by Michael J. Awe, Andreas Fieberg, and Joachim Pack
  • Mario Franke for the cover of Exodus 37 edited by Rene Morau, Olaf Kemmler and Fabian Tomaschek
  • Jan Hoffman for the cover of phantastich! 71 edited by Klaus Bollhofener
  • Michael Hutter for the cover of Gegen unendlich 13 edited by Michael J. Awe, Andreas Fieberg, and Joachim Pack
  • Detlef Klewer for the cover of Scherben edited by Michael Schmidt
  • Michael Marrak for the cover of Die Reise zum Mittelpunkt der Zeit
  • Michael Vogt for the cover of phastastich! 70 edited by Klaus Bollhofener

Special Award for Extraordinary Achievements

  • Klaus N. Frick for 20 years as chief editor of Perry Rhodan
  • Ronald M. Hahn, Michael K. Iwoleit, and Helmuth W. Mommers for founding and publishing Nova Magazin, and Olaf G. Hilscher, Frank Kebben and Michael Haitel for the continuation and co-editorship [of the magazine]
  • Hardy Kettlitz for his nonfiction trilogy Die Hugo Awards
  • Thorsten Kuper for his Second-Life-Lesungen
  • Edward D. Marwitz for lifelong commitment, Hansecons and Confact
  • Jürgen Schütz, for the German-language edition of the works of James Tiptree Jr. (11 volumes)
  • Peggy Weber-Gehrke and Rico Gehrke for their Verlag fur Modern Phantastik, offering a platform for sf novellas
  • Jörg Weigand for his decades of service to German Science Fiction as an Author, Editor, and Journalist

2018 Kurd Laßwitz Preis


The winners of the 2018 Kurd Laßwitz Preis have been posted.

The award is given for works written in or translated into the German language and published during the previous year. Created in 1981, it is named after German author Kurd Laßwitz.

This news comes courtesy of Europa SF’s Nina Horvath who did the relevant German-to-English category translations.

The awards will be presented September 22 at ElsterCon in Leipzig, Germany.

Best German Science-Fiction Novel

  • Michael Marrak, Der Kanon mechanischer Seelen (AMRÛN)

[The name of the publishing houses are in brackets and written in capitals.]

Best German Short Prosa

  • Uwe Hermann, Das Internet der Dinge in: Carsten Könneker : Spektrum der Wissenschaft 6/2017, (SPEKTRUM DER WISSENSCHAFT VERLAGSGESELLSCHAFT)

Best Foreign Science-Fiction Book (translated into German):

  • Nnedi Okorafor, Das Buch des Phönix (The Book of Phoenix) (CROSS CULT)

Best Translation

  • Claudia Kern für die Übersetzung von Connie Willis, Dunkelheit / Licht (Blackout / All Clear), (CROSS CULT)

Best Radioplay

  • Paradise Revisited by Bodo Traber
    (Director: Bodo Traber; Composition: André Abshagen), WDR 2.11.17

Best Cover Art or Illustration

  • Lothar Bauer for the cover of Axel Kruse, Luna Incognita (ATLANTIS)

Special Award for Extraordinary Achievements

  • Thomas Le Blanc for founding and maintaining the Phantastische Bibliothek Wetzlar. (This is a library of speculative fiction.)

Update 06/12/2018: Corrected Short Prosa winner per comment.

2018 Kurd Laßwitz Preis Shortlist

The finalists for the 2018 Kurd Laßwitz Preis have been posted.

The award is named after German author Kurd Laßwitz and was first given in 1981. It is given to works written in or translated into the German language and published during the previous year.

This news comes courtesy of Europa SF’s Nina Horvath who did the relevant German-to-English category translations.

The award winners will be announced September 22 at ElsterCon in Leipzig, Germany.

Best German Science-Fiction Novel

  • Dirk van den Boom, Die Welten der Skiir (CROSS CULT)
  • Andreas Brandhorst, Das Erwachen (PIPER)
  • Uwe Hermann, Versuchsreihe 13 – Die Epidemie (ATLANTIS)
  • Claudia Kern, Divided States of America (CROSS CULT)
  • Marc-Uwe Kling, QualityLand (ULLSTEIN)
  • Jens Lubbadeh, Neanderthal (HEYNE)
  • Michael Marrak, Der Kanon mechanischer Seelen (AMRÛN)
  • Kai Meyer, Die Krone der Sterne (FISCHER TOR)
  • Matthias Oden, Junktown (HEYNE)
  • Uwe Post, Walpar Tonnraffir und die Ursuppe mit extra Chili (ATLANTIS)
  • Doron Rabinovici, Die Außerirdischen (SUHRKAMP)

[The name of the publishing houses are in bracklets and written in capitals.]

Best German Short Prosa

  • Uwe Hermann, Das Internet der Dinge in: Carsten Könneker : Spektrum der Wissenschaft 6/2017, (SPEKTRUM DER WISSENSCHAFT VERLAGSGESELLSCHAFT)
  • Uwe Hermann, Der Raum zwischen den Worten in: René Moreau / Olaf Kemmler / Fabian To-maschek : Exodus 36, (EXODUS VERLAG)
  • Oliver Koch, Ans Tageslicht in: Peggy Weber-Gehrke : Meuterei auf Titan, (MODERN PHANTASTIK)
  • Nikolaj Kohler, Protoplasma mit Hut in: Ellen Norten : Das Alien tanzt Kasatschok, (P.MACHINERY)
  • Frank Lauenroth, Omega 4 in: Peggy Weber-Gehrke : Meuterei auf Titan, (MODERN PHANTASTIK)
  • Jacqueline Montemurri, Störfallin: Peggy Weber-Gehrke : Meuterei auf Titan, (MODERN PHANTASTIK)
  • Monika Niehaus, Ein halbes Dutzend Eier in: Ellen Norten : Das Alien tanzt Kasatschok, (P.MACHINERY)
  • Melanie Vogltanz, PET in: Nadine Muriel / Stefan Cernohuby : Das Dimensionstor, (AMRÛN)
  • Ernst Wegbreiter [= Angela & Karlheinz Steinmüller + Erik Simon], Die größte Reise in: Angela Steinmüller / Karlheinz Steinmüller / Erik Simon, Leichter als Vakuum, (MEMORAN-DA)

Best Foreign Science-Fiction Book (translated into German):

  • Pierre Bordage, Die Sphären (Les dames blanches) (HEYNE)
  • Omar El Akkad, American War (American War) (S. FISCHER)
  • Maja Lunde, Die Geschichte der Bienen (Bienes historie) ( BTB)
  • Ian McDonald, Luna (Luna) (Luna + Wolfsmond) (HEYNE)
  • Nnedi Okorafor, Das Buch des Phönix (The Book of Phoenix) (CROSS CULT)
  • Jeff VanderMeer, Borne (Borne) (ANTJE KUNSTMANN)
  • Connie Willis, Dunkelheit / Licht (Blackout / All Clear) (CROSS CULT)

Best Translation

  • Frank Böhmert for the translation of Daryl Gregory, Afterparty (Afterparty) (FISCHER TOR)
  • Michael Kellner for the translation of Jeff VanderMeer, Borne (Borne) (ANTJE KUNSTMANN)
  • Bernhard Kempen for the translation of Ann Leckie, Imperial Radch Trilogie (Imperial Radch Trilogy) (HEYNE)
  • Bernhard Kempen for the translation of von John Scalzi, Kollaps (The Collapsing Empire) (FISCHER TOR)
  • Claudia Kern für die Übersetzung von Connie Willis, Dunkelheit / Licht (Blackout / All Clear), (CROSS CULT)
  • Pia Oberacker-Pilick for the translation of Vlad Hernández, Krieg der Schrecken (La guerra contra los Langostas) (SAPHIR IM STAHL)
  • Helga Parmiter for the translation of Peter Newman, Vagant (The Vagrant) (CROSS CULT)
  • Helga Parmiter for the translation of Linda Nagata, Funkstille (Going Dark) (CROSS CULT)
  • Gerd Rottenecker & Susanne Gerold for the translation of Anthony O’Neill, Dark Side (The Dark Side) (KNAUR)
  • Peter Torberg for the translation of China Miéville, Dieser Volkszähler (This Census-Taker) (LIEBESKIND)

Best Radioplay

  • Die Prometheus-Protokolle by Thomas Feuerstein
    (Director: Nehle Dick; Composition: Peter Szely), ORF 12.11.17
  • Der Wald by Martin Heindel
    (Director: Martin Heindel), WDR 30.3.17
  • Paradise Revisited by Bodo Traber
    (Director: Bodo Traber; Composition: André Abshagen), WDR 2.11.17

Best Cover Art or Illustration

  • Lothar Bauer for the cover of Axel Kruse, Luna Incognita (ATLANTIS)
  • Dirk Berger for the cover of Klaus Bollhöfener , phantastisch! 67 (ATLANTIS)
  • Thomas Hofmann for the cover of Angela Steinmüller / Karlheinz Steinmüller / Erik Simon, Die Wurmloch-Odyssee (MEMORANDA)
  • Michael Marrak für das Titelbild und die Illustrationen zu Michael Marrak, Der Kanon mechanischer Seelen (AMRÛN)
  • Greg Ruth for the cover of Nnedi Okorafor, Das Buch des Phönix (CROSS CULT)
  • Meike Schultchen for the cover of René Moreau / Olaf Kemmler / Fabian Tomaschek , Exodus 36 (EXODUS VERLAG)
  • Andreas Schwietzke for the cover of Michael Haitel , Andromeda Nachrichten 257 (SFCD)
  • Andreas Schwietzke for the cover of Michael Haitel , Andromeda Nach-richten 259 (SFCD)
  • Julian Tapprich for the cover of Sebastian Guhr, Die Verbesserung unserer Träume (LUFTSCHACHT)
  • Jens Maria Weber for the cover and the illustrations of Kai Meyer, Die Krone der Sterne (FISCHER TOR)

Special Award for Extraordinary Achievements

  • Bernd Behr for being the editor of the SF-stories in the c’t-Magazine
  • The DortCon Team (Arno and Gabriele Behrend, Torsten Frantz, Utz Benscheid, Irma Leu, Michael and Astrid Ehrt, Lars Adler and Thomas Recktenwald) for organizing the DortCons with the Eurocon 2017 as highlight.
  • Mike Hillenbrand and his team for planning and organizing the Phantastika (a convention) in Oberhausen
  • Thomas Le Blanc for founding and maintaining the Phantastische Bibliothek Wetzlar. (This is a library on speculative fiction.)
  • Uschi Zietsch and Gerald Jambor for 30 years of the the publishing house Fabylon.