2016 Prometheus Novel and Hall of Fame Winners

The Libertarian Futurist Society has announced the Best Novel and Hall of Fame winners of the 36th annual Prometheus Awards.

PROMETHEUS BEST NOVEL

  • Seveneves by Neal Stephenson

PROMETHEUS HAL OF FAME

  • Courtship Rite by Donald M. Kingsbury

A Special Award will also be presented, as announced earlier, to Alex + Ada, a graphic novel by Jonathan Luna and Sarah Vaughn (Image Comics) that dramatizes conflict over the rights of artificial intelligences and explores the nature of personhood.

The awards will be presented during MidAmeriCon II, August 17-21 in Kansas City, Missouri.

The Prometheus Award, sponsored by the Libertarian Futurist Society (LFS), was established in 1979. Presented annually since 1982 at the World Science Fiction Convention, the awards includes a gold coin and plaque for the winners.

For more than three decades, the Prometheus Awards have recognized outstanding works of science fiction and fantasy that dramatize the perennial conflict between liberty and power, expose the abuses and excesses of coercive government, critique or satirize authoritarian ideas, or champion individual rights and freedoms as the mutually respectful foundation for civilization, cooperation, peace, prosperity, progress and justice.

For a full list of past Prometheus Award winners in all categories, visit www.lfs.org.

The full press release follows the jump.

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Special Prometheus Award for “Alex + Ada”

The Libertarian Futurist Society has given a Special Award to Alex + Ada, a graphic novel by Jonathan Luna and Sarah Vaughn.

Alex + Ada was published by Image Comics. The collected edition appeared in three volumes from July 29, 2014 to August 25, 2015.

The LFS’ award citation explains —

Set in a near future United States, Alex + Ada explores the social and political impact of the creation of artificial intelligences through the personal story of a young man, Alex, who receives an android companion as a gift from his wealthy grandmother. He faces a series of increasingly challenging moral choices about his relationship with the android, which he names Ada. As the story progresses, Alex, Ada, and other characters are caught up in a moral panic over androids that inspires repressive legislation and outbreaks of mob violence—and are tested by how they respond.

Luna and Vaughn’s treatment of artificial intelligence and virtual reality is sophisticated and technologically plausible. They tie the ethical question of which beings have rights to deeper philosophical issues of the nature of conscious experience and selfhood. And in the end, they hold up personal integrity in the face of a repressive society as an example worth following. Their story gives us a look at issues that a future world might have to address.

The award ceremony will take place at MidAmeriCon II in Kansas City, at a time to be announced. The award includes a gold coin and plaque for the winners. Also to be presented are the annual Best Novel and Hall of Fame Awards, finalists for which were previously announced.

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2016 Prometheus Award Finalists

libertycoinThe Libertarian Futurist Society has announced the Best Novel finalists for the 36th annual Prometheus Awards.

  • Golden Son, by Pierce Brown (Del Rey)
  • Apex, by Ramez Naam (Angry Robot)
  • Seveneves, by Neal Stephenson (William Morrow)
  • The Just City, by Jo Walton (TOR Books)
  • A Borrowed Man, by Gene Wolfe (TOR Books)

This is the first Prometheus nomination for Pierce Brown and Gene Wolfe. Naam previously won the 2014 Prometheus Award for Best Novel for Nexus, part of a trilogy that continued with Crux and ends with Apex. Stephenson won the Prometheus for Best Novel in 2005 for The System of the World. Walton won the Prometheus for Best Novel in 2008 for Ha’penny

The award will be presented during MidAmeriCon II, the 74th World Science Fiction Convention, August 17-21 in Kansas City. The Prometheus Award includes a gold coin and plaque for the winner.

The award, sponsored by the Libertarian Futurist Society (LFS), was established in 1979. It has been presented during the Worldcon since 1982.

Fourteen novels were on the longlist. In addition to the finalists, the other titles were: Luna: New Moon, by Ian McDonald (TOR Books), Squirrel Days, by Dustin Costa (CreateSpace Independent Publishing Platform), The Turing Exception by William Hertling (Liquididea Press), InterstellarNet: Enigma, by Edward M. Lerner (FoxAcre Press) , Annihilation Score by Charles Stross (Ace Books),  The Miskatonic Manuscript, by Vin Suprynowicz (Mountain Media), The Testament of James by Vin Suprynowicz (Mountain Media), Joe Steele, by Harry Turtledove (ROC) and  Harry Potter and the Methods of Rationality by Eliezer Yudkowsky.

The full press release follows the jump.

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L. Neil Smith Wins LFS Lifetime Achievement Award

L. Neil Smith

L. Neil Smith

The Libertarian Futurist Society has selected L. Neil Smith to receive a Special Prometheus Award for lifetime achievement. Time and place of the ceremony to be announced.

Smith is the fourth author recognized by LFS for lifetime achievement. Previous winners were Poul Anderson (2001), Vernor Vinge (2014) and F. Paul Wilson (2015).

He has been recognized by the LFS many times during his career, winning four Prometheus Awards — for The Probability Broach (1982), part of his seven-book North American Confederacy series, Pallas (1994), The Forge of the Elders (2001), and a Special Award given to him and illustrator Scott Bieser for The Probability Broach: The Graphic Novel in 2005.

Smith, was the creator of the Prometheus Award – originally conceived as a one-off award when it was given for the first time in 1979. In 1982, the Libertarian Futurist Society was organized by other fans to continue the Prometheus Awards program.

With 28 books to his credit, Smith may be most widely-known for three Star Wars novels featuring Lando Calrissian.

Including their Lifetime Achievement awards, Anderson, Vinge, Wilson and now Smith have all been recognized five times with various Prometheus Awards.  (The only author to receive more awards from the LFS was Robert Heinlein (1907-1988), with a grand total of six.) Visit LFS.org to see a comprehensive list of Prometheus Award recipients.

The full press release follows the jump.

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Shortlist Announced for Libertarian Futurist Society’s 2016 Hall of Fame Award

The Libertarian Futurist Society has selected five finalists for the 2016 Hall of Fame Award, given in recognition of a classic work of science fiction or fantasy with libertarian themes.

The descriptions of the works and their themes come from the Society’s press release.

  • Manna, by Lee Correy (published 1984)

A novel about the economic development of space in the twenty-first century, and about competing economic philosophies that shape it. One of its most interesting aspects is the setting: the United Mitanni Commonwealth, an imaginary small East African country founded on a distinctive vision of personal freedom of choice. Correy’s hero, a former American aerospace officer, is drawn into the Mitanni struggle both for a vision of the future and for simple survival, while discovering the customs of his new homeland.

  • Courtship Rite, by Donald M. Kingsbury (published 1982)

A novel set on a planet in a remote solar system, where human colonists struggle with a harsh environment. The author, a mathematician, explores the mathematical concept of optimization in biological evolution, in political institutions, in culture, and in personal ethics—through linked dramatic struggles over political ambition and the creation of a family.

  • “As Easy as A.B.C.,” by Rudyard Kipling (published 1912)

One of Kipling’s two “airship utopia” stories, set in the year 2065—but the utopia is an ambiguous one. Striking for its vision of a future that looks back in horror at the lynchings and racism of Kipling’s own time. Compact and evocatively written.

  • The Island Worlds, by Eric Kotani and John Maddox Roberts (published 1987)

A novel of asteroidal rebellion against a corrupt and oligopolistic Earth. Unusual in its portrayal of an internally divided liberation movement with conflicting ethical and strategic beliefs.

  • A Mirror for Observers, by Edgar Pangborn (published 1954)

A novel of conflicting factions of Martian refugees working in secret to influence humanity toward enlightenment and self-destruction. Notable for its vision of a future United States with two entirely new leading political parties—a constitutionalist party and a fascistic Organic Unity Party—and of its reaction to an engineered plague. Pangborn offers no radical solutions; he focuses on personal ethics, and he shows reasons for despair and then turns back to hope.

Fourteen nominees were considered for the award. Those not making the shortlist were: Firesign Theater’s “I Think We’re All Bozos on This Bus,” James P. Hogan’s The Mirror Maze, Murray Leinster’s “Exploration Team,” C.S. Lewis’s That Hideous Strength, O.T. Nelson’s The Girl Who Owned a City, Rush’s 2112, Robert Silverberg’s A Time of Changes, T.H. White’s The Book of Merlyn, and F. Paul Wilson’s Hosts.

Hall of Fame candidates are nominated by the members of the Libertarian Futurist Society. Any work first published more than five years ago is eligible. The finalists have been selected by a committee of judges. The winners will be determined by a vote of all members.

Last Year’s Hall of Fame Winner: Harlan Ellison recorded a short video accepting the 2015 LFS Hall of Fame award for “‘Repent, Harlequin!’ Said the Ticktockman.”

2015 Prometheus Award Goes to Suarez

Daniel Suarez’ novel Influx has won the Libertarian Futurist Society’s Prometheus Award for Best Novel of 2014.

Influx, the fourth techno-thriller by Daniel Suarez (Dutton Adult, Feb. 20, 2014), dramatizes the evils of totalitarian government control over people’s lives by depicting a government so concerned about politically destabilizing and potentially dangerous innovations that it creates the Bureau of Technology Control to manage the introduction of new technologies. Inventors who don’t follow their edicts are sentenced to a high-tech prison with fiendishly oppressive use of new technology. To end the impending new dark age, the prisoners must fight ruthless individuals already living in our future and armed with mind-blowing genetic technology.

This was Suarez’s second Prometheus award nomination, following Kill Decision, which was a Prometheus Award finalist in 2013.

The award, which includes a gold coin and plaque, will be presented Friday, August 21 at Sasquan, the 2015 World Science Fiction Convention in Spokane, Washington.

The full press release follows the jump.

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2015 Prometheus Award Novel Finalists

libertycoinThe Libertarian Futurist Society has announced the finalists in the Best Novel category of the Prometheus Awards, representing the best pro-freedom novel of 2014:

  • The Three-Body Problem, by Liu Cixin (TOR Books, Nov. 2014) is a first contact novel by one of China’s best loved science fiction authors. Ye Wenjie, a young astrophysicist whose life is molded by experiences during China’s brutal Cultural Revolution, makes crucial decisions about the future of humanity. The struggle to make rational sense of the universe, using methods of logic and science, is essential to nearly all of the human and alien characters.
  • Raising Steam, by Terry Pratchett (March 18, 2014, Knopf Doubleday) is the 40th Discworld novel and the last published in Pratchett’s lifetime.  further explores the theme of technological advances in communication and transportation and their liberating impact. Moist von Lipwig, the protagonist of Going Postal and Making Money, reappears as the key figure in the creation of the Discworld’s first railroad, and in the legal negotiations that make it possible.
  • A Better World, by Marcus Sakey (Amazon, Thomas & Mercer, June 2014) is a sequel to Brilliance, which explored a world populated by people with fantastic talents. In this story, some Brilliants are using terrorism to work toward separation, while others work to make a more civil, cooperative society.
  • Influx, the fourth techno-thriller by Daniel Suarez (Dutton Adult, Feb. 20, 2014), depicts a government so concerned about politically destabilizing and potentially dangerous innovations that it creates the Bureau of Technology Control to manage the introduction of new technologies. Inventors who don’t follow their edicts are sentenced to a high-tech prison. To end the impending new dark age, the prisoners must fight ruthless individuals already living in our future and armed with mind-blowing genetic technology.

The Prometheus Award was established in 1979 and is presented annually at the World Science Fiction Convention. Winners received a gold coin and a plaque. For a full list of past Prometheus Award winners in all categories, visit www.lfs.org.

The full press release follows the jump.

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Ellison Story Elected To Libertarian Futurist Society Hall of Fame

Harlan Ellison’s “‘Repent, Harlequin!’ Said the Ticktockman” has been chosen by members of the Libertarian Futurist Society as the 2015 Prometheus Hall of Fame winner.

Originally published in Galaxy in December 1965, “Repent, Harlequin!” portrays one man’s surrealist rebellion against a repressive future society obsessed with timeliness. Ellison’s rule-breaking narrative structure and style have made the story memorable to generations of readers.

Prometheus Awards for Best Novel and Hall of Fame commemorate works of science fiction and fantasy with pro-freedom themes.

The award ceremony will take place Saturday, May 9, at Marcon in Columbus, Ohio, as part of the Libertarian Futurist Society’s participation in the celebration of Marcon’s fiftieth anniversary. The LFS will present a Special Award for Lifetime Achievement to F. Paul Wilson in the same ceremony.

The awards consist of plaques with gold coins mounted on them, a symbol of free minds and free trade.

A full list of past Prometheus Award winners in all categories is here.

Wilson To Get LFS Lifetime Achievement Award

The Libertarian Futurist Society will honor F. Paul Wilson with a Special Prometheus Award for Lifetime Achievement on May 9 at Marcon.

Wilson has won four other Prometheus Awards during his career, including the first ever presented, in 1979, for Wheels Within Wheels.

He has been recognized often by the LFS over the decades. The other two novels in addition to Wheels that make up Wilson’s science fiction trilogy have been inducted into the Prometheus Hall of Fame, Healer in 1990 and An Enemy of the State in 1991.

Wilson also won a Prometheus Award for Best Novel in 2004 for Sims, which explores foundational issues of individual rights.

Wilson will be the third recipient of an LFS Lifetime Achievement Award. Poul Anderson received the first in 2001 and Vernor Vinge received the second in 2014.

The full press release follows the jump.
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Vinge To Receive Libertarian Futurist Society Honor on 10/11

Vernor Vinge in 2006.

Vernor Vinge in 2006.

One of science fiction’s most lauded writers, Vernor Vinge, will be recognized with a Special Prometheus Award for Lifetime Achievement by the Libertarian Futurist Society this weekend. 

The LFS will make the presentation on Saturday, October 11 at noon during Conjecture 2014 in San Diego.

This is only the second Lifetime award given by the Society. Poul Anderson received the first in 2001.

A five-time Hugo winner, Vernor Vinge is also one of the writers most frequently recognized by the Libertarian Future Society. He won its Prometheus Award for Best Novel for Marooned in Realtime (1987) and A Deepness in the Sky (2000), and two of his stories have received LFS Hall of Fame Awards, “The Ungoverned” (2004) and “True Names” (2007).

His impact on the genre is outlined in the Society’s press release:

Vinge’s concept of a technological singularity, in which the future is radically  transformed by the attainment of superhuman intelligence, has been a major influence on science fiction, the transhumanist movement, and the high-tech community generally. His novella “True Names” explored many of the themes that soon after became central to the cyberpunk movement. Speculation about libertarian, anarchist, and free-market themes has been a recurring focus of his novels and stories.

Libertarian Futurist Society President William H. Stoddard will make the presentation at Saturday’s award ceremony. All members of the convention are welcome.