Pixel Scroll 5/15/19 These Groots Are Made For Walking, Ent That’s Just What They’ll Do

(1) HOGWASH, POPPYCOCK & BALONEY. George R.R. Martin quashed a current rumor in his post “Idiocy on the Internet”.

…All of a sudden this crazy story about my finishing THE WINDS OF WINTER and A DREAM OF SPRING years ago is popping up everywhere. No, I am not going to provide links. I don’t want to reward purveyors of misinformation with hits.

I will, however, say for the record — no, THE WINDS OF WINTER and A DREAM OF SPRING are not finished. DREAM is not even begun; I am not going to start writing volume seven until I finish volume six

It seems absurd to me that I need to state this. The world is round, the Earth revolves around the sun, water is wet… do I need to say that too? It boggles me that anyone would believe this story, even for an instant. It makes not a whit of sense. Why would I sit for years on completed novels? Why would my publishers — not just here in the US, but all around the world — ever consent to this? They make millions and millions of dollars every time a new Ice & Fire book comes out, as do I. Delaying makes no sense. Why would HBO want the books delayed? The books help create interest in the show, just as the show creates interest in the books.

So… no, the books are not done. HBO did not ask me to delay them. Nor did David & Dan. There is no “deal” to hold back on the books. I assure you, HBO and David & Dan would both have been thrilled and delighted if THE WINDS OF WINTER had been delivered and published four or five years ago… and NO ONE would have been more delighted than me.

(2) BUT THIS STORY IS TRUE. Martin confirmed a different report quoting his opinion of two characters created by Tolkien and Rowling:

At the Q&A following the premiere of the new TOLKIEN film in Los Angeles last week, I did indeed say that Gandalf could kick Dumbledore’s ass.

Gandalf COULD kick Dumbledore’s ass. I mean, duh. He’s a maia, folks. Next best thing to a demigod. Gandalf dies and come back. Dumbledore dies and stays dead.

But if it will calm down all the Potterites out there, let me say that Gandalf could kick Melisandre’s ass too.

(3) HORRORMENTARY. The new drama Years and Years, which follows a British family over the next 15 years began Tuesday night on BBC1 in the UK, and will be screened on HBO in the US later in the year. BBC contemplates: “How the near future became our greatest horror”.

…But if [J.G.] Ballard’s thinking was subversive at the time, now we’re beset by the nearest of ‘near future’ narratives. They are intent on imagining not what will become of us in thousands of millennia, or even in a few decades’ time – à la dystopian works like Blade Runner and Soylent Green, previously understood as ‘near future’ – but in as little as the next few years. In doing so, these near-near-future stories create realities that feel immediately recognisable to us, but invariably with a pretty unpleasant twist or three. In literature, these have gone hand in hand with the rise of the ‘mundane science fiction’ movement – which began in the mid-noughties and was built on “not wanting to imagine shiny, hard futures [but give a] sense of sliding from one version of our present into something slightly alienated”, says Roger Luckhurst, a professor in Modern and Contemporary Literature at London’s Birkbeck College and an expert in science fiction.

And, at the moment, such stories are particularly prevalent on the small-screen….

(4) BLACK MIRROR. The show returns to Netflix on June 5:

(5) BEAUMONT REMEMBERED. Pulpfest’s Mike Chomko profiles “THE TWILIGHT ZONE’S Magic Man — Charles Beaumont”, who died too soon —

…At the height of his writing career, Beaumont began to suffer from a mysterious ailment. “By 1964, he could no longer write. Meetings with producers turned disastrous. His speech became slower, more deliberate. His concentration worsened. . . . after a battery of tests at UCLA, Beaumont was diagnosed as having Alzheimer’s Disease; he faced premature senility, aging, and an early death.” He died on February 21, 1967 at the age of thirty-eight.

(6) STORIES REBORN. Paula Guran’s anthology Mythic Journeys: Retold Myths and Legends was released yesterday by Night Shade Books.

The Native American trickster Coyote . . . the snake-haired Greek Gorgon Medusa, whose gaze turned men to stone . . . Kaggen, creator of the San peoples of Africa . . . the Holy Grail of Arthurian legend . . . Freyja, the Norse goddess of love and beauty . . . Ys, the mythical sunken city once built on the coast of France . . . Ragnarok, the myth of a world destroyed and reborn . . . Jason and the Argonauts, sailing in search of the Golden Fleece . . .

Myths and legends are the oldest of stories, part of our collective consciousness, and the source from which all fiction flows. Full of magic, supernatural powers, monsters, heroes, epic journeys, strange worlds, and vast imagination, they are fantasies so compelling we want to believe them true.

(7) FRIEDMAN OBIT. “Stanton Friedman, famed UFO researcher, dead at 84”CBC has the story.

A nuclear physicist by training, Friedman had devoted his life to researching and investigating UFOs since the late 1960s.

He was credited with bringing the 1947 Roswell Incident — the famous incident that gave rise to theories about UFOs and a U.S. military coverup — back into the mainstream conversation.

(8) TODAY IN HISTORY.

Apparently a big day in the history of B-movies.

  • May 15, 1953 Phantom From Space premiered in theaters.
  • May 15, 1959Invisible Invaders debuted in movie houses.
  • May 15, 1969 Witchfinder General, starring Vincent Price, screened for the first time.

(9) TODAY’S BIRTHDAYS.

[Compiled by Cat Eldridge.]

  • Born May 15, 1856 L. Frank Baum. I adore The Wizard of Oz film and I’m betting you know that it only covers about half of the novel which is a splendid read indeed. I’ll confess that I never read the numerous latter volumes in the Oz series, nor have I read anything by him. What’s the rest of his fiction like? (Died 1919.)
  • Born May 15, 1877 William Bowen. His most notable work was The Old Tobacco Shop, a fantasy novel that was one runner-up for the inaugural Newbery Medal in 1922. He also had a long running children’s series with a young girl named Merrimeg whom a narrator told her adventures with all sorts of folkloric beings. (Died 1937.)
  • Born May 15, 1926 Anthony Shaffer. His genre screenplays were the Hitchcock’s Frenzy and Robin Hardy’s The Wicker Man. Though definitely not genre, he wrote the screenplays for a number of most excellent mysteries including Death on the NileMurder on the Orient Express and Sleuth. (Died 2001.)
  • Born May 15, 1955 Lee Horsley, 64. A performer who’s spent a lot of his career in genre undertakings starting with The Sword and the Sorcerer (and its 2010 sequel Tales of an Ancient Empire), horror films Nightmare ManThe Corpse Had a Familiar Face and Dismembered and even a bit of SF in Showdown at Area 51. Not sure where The Face of Fear falls has a it has a cop with psychic powers and a serial killer. 
  • Born May 15, 1960 Rob Bowman, 59. Producer of such series as Alien Nation, M.A.N.T.I.S.Quantum LeapNext Generation, and The X-Files. He has directed these films: The X-Files, Reign of Fire and Elektra. He directed one or several episodes of far too many genres series to list here.  
  • Born May 15, 1966 Greg Wise, 53. I’m including him solely as he’s in Tristram Shandy: A Cock and Bull Story. It is a film-within-a-film, featuring Steve Coogan and Rob Brydon playing themselves as egotistical actors during the making of a screen adaptation of Laurence Sterne’s 18th century metafictional novel Tristram Shandy. Not genre (possibly) but damn fun. 

(10) VIRGIN GALACTIC. The company’s press release, “Sir Richard Branson Announces Virgin Galactic Move to Spaceport America this Summer, as Company Readies for Commercial Service”, does not state when service will commence.

At a press conference [on May 10] at the New Mexico State Capitol Building in Santa Fe, hosted by New Mexico Governor Michelle Lujan Grisham, Virgin Founder Sir Richard Branson announced that Virgin Galactic’s development and testing program had advanced sufficiently to move the spaceline staff and space vehicles from Mojave, California to their commercial operations headquarters at Spaceport America, New Mexico. The move, which involves more than 100 staff, will commence immediately and continue through the summer, to minimise schooling disruption for families.

Virgin Galactic partnered with New Mexico in an agreement which saw the state complete construction of Spaceport America, the world’s first, purpose-built commercial spaceport, and Virgin Galactic committing to center its commercial spaceflight activities at the facilities once its vehicles and operations were ready for service.

(11) ZUBRIN’S CASE. The Space Review hosts Jeff Foust’s coverage of Robert Zubrin’s new book The Case for Space: How the Revolution in Spaceflight Opens Up a Future of Limitless Possibility.

…The second part of the book tackles the question of why humanity should move out in the universe. The reasons are familiar ones, from scientific discoveries to new technologies to the survival of humanity itself. For example, Zubrin reiterates a belief, dating back to his The Case for Mars book more than 20 years ago, that a human settlement on Mars will require ingenuity to survive, stimulating new technologies from robotics to fusion power that might not be developed on Earth.

Zubrin offers a comprehensive plan, one rich in technical detail—perhaps too rich at times, with some passages filled with equations describing chemical processes needed to extract resources on Mars or other worlds or discussing the physics of advanced propulsion technologies. But it seems a little fanciful to talk about concepts for interstellar travel like antimatter and magnetic sails when we find it so difficult today simply to get to low Earth orbit reliably and inexpensively.

(12) DAGGERS. The longlists for the The Crime Writers Association Dagger Awards have been posted.

Lavie Tidhar’s “Bag Man”, in The Outcast Hours anthology, edited by Mahvesh Murad and Jared Shurin, is one of the works longlisted for the CWA Short Story Dagger Award.

(13) REBELS WITH A CAUSE. Marie Kondo really struck a nerve.The Independent had no trouble finding people who have no plans to winnow their book stacks: “Going against the decluttering craze: the book hoarers who defy Marie Kondo”. For one example —  

Jane Green, bestselling author who traded England for New England

I’ve run out of space. Books are starting to get stacked up on the floor, underneath tables, underneath chairs, on top of tables. They’re everywhere. With no more room on the bookshelves, I’ve been eyeing this gorgeous French armoire that takes up an entire wall. That wall is just perfect for shelves and would make the room warmer. I know, however, that my husband really likes the armoire. He sees: storage, storage, storage. I see: books, books, books. We’ll see who wins. 

For years, I couldn’t get rid of anything. I have had to learn to manage the flow. Paperbacks I tend not to keep unless I love them and know I’m going to reread them. Hardcovers are really hard for me to get rid of. They all signify a time in my life. They all have stories around the stories. I will sometimes just stand there and look at my books and remember.

(14) ANOTHER BRICK IN THE PAYWALL. Digiday elaborates on a trend that has made it more challenging for me to research Scroll items at sites that think I should pay for their material (the noive!): “Incognito no more: Publishers close loopholes as paywall blockers emerge”.

Subscription publishers have tightened their paywalls, plugging leaks and reducing the number of articles readers access before subscribing. But as reader revenue becomes more of a focus, more sophisticated ways of dodging paying have emerged.

There have always been a number of low-tech ways to circumvent cookie-based metered paywalls, where the same content is freely available in some but not all cases. For instance deleting cookies, using multiple browsers and copying the URL are go-to methods, and are near impossible to mitigate against. However, over the last 18 months, publishers have started plugging these gaps.

In February, The New York Times started tightening its paywall so readers couldn’t access paywalled content by switching their device to incognito mode. A New York Times spokesperson said it’s too early to glean the impacts of these tests.

(15) MORE INFORMATION ABOUT THE NOMMOS. The announcement of the 2019 Nommo Awards shortlist was followed by a press release with additional details:

The 2019 Nommo Awards for Speculative Fiction by Africans announce the shortlists for the Nommo Awards in all four categories – novel, novella, short story and comics/graphic novels.

The roughly 170 members of the African Speculative Fiction Society (ASFS) nominated works for the Awards long list and short lists.  They will now have a three-month period to read the works and vote for the winners of the Awards. 

The short-listed works must be speculative fiction created by Africans and published in calendar year 2018. The winners of the Ilube Nommo Award and the Comic/Graphic Novel award receive UD$ 1000.00.  The winners of the novella and short story awards receive US$ 500.00.  The ASFS thanks its patron Tom Ilube, CBE for his generosity.

The ASFS was founded in 2015. The creation of the Nommo Awards was announced at the Ake Festival in Abeokuta in November 2016.  The winners will be announced at the Ake Festival in Lagos Nigeria in November.

(16) DOES WHATEVER A SPIDER CAN. BBC:“Spider Uses Web As Slingshot To Ensnare Prey, Scientists Find”.

This high-velocity maneuver is a nightmare if you’re a fly.

There’s a type of spider that can slowly stretch its web taut and then release it, causing the web to catapult forward and ensnare unsuspecting prey in its strands.

Triangle-weaver spiders use their own web the way humans might use a slingshot or a crossbow. Scientists from the University of Akron say this is a process called “power amplification,” and they published their research in Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences this week.

(17) WWW. Cute name: “Wood wide web: Trees’ social networks are mapped”.

Research has shown that beneath every forest and wood there is a complex underground web of roots, fungi and bacteria helping to connect trees and plants to one another.

This subterranean social network, nearly 500 million years old, has become known as the “wood wide web”.

Now, an international study has produced the first global map of the “mycorrhizal fungi networks” dominating this secretive world.

Details appear in Nature journal.

Using machine-learning, researchers from the Crowther Lab at ETH Zurich, Switzerland, and Stanford University in the US used the database of the Global Forest Initiative, which covers 1.2 million forest tree plots with 28,000 species, from more than 70 countries.

(18) ANCIENT PUNCH. “Chang’e-4: Chinese rover ‘confirms’ Moon crater theory” says the BBC.

The Chinese Chang’e-4 rover may have confirmed a longstanding idea about the origin of a vast crater on the Moon’s far side.

The rover’s landing site lies within a vast impact depression created by an asteroid strike billions of years ago.

Now, mission scientists have found evidence that impact was so powerful it punched through the Moon’s crust and into the layer below called the mantle.

Chang’e-4 has identified what appear to be mantle rocks on the surface.

It’s something the rover was sent to the far side to find out.

Chunlai Li, from the Chinese Academy of Sciences in Beijing, and colleagues have presented their findings in the journal Nature.

(19) GAME OF PYTHONS. Funny or Die shows why “Cersei isn’t the only hard-nosed negotiator Tyrion’s ever faced.”

[Thanks to John King Tarpinian, Chip Hitchcock, Martin Morse Wooster, JJ, Cat Eldridge, Mike Kennedy, Carl Slaughter, and Andrew Porter for some of these stories. Title credit goes to File 770 contributing editors of the day Daniel Dern and OGH.]

2019 Nommo Shortlist

The African Speculative Fiction Society has released the 2019 shortlist for the Nommo Awards for African Speculative Fiction.

The African Speculative Fiction Society is composed of professional and semiprofessional African writers, editors, publishers, graphic artists and film makers was founded in 2016.

The Nommos were presented for the first time in 2017. The awards are named for twins from Dogon cosmology who take a variety of forms, including appearing on land as fish, walking on their tails.

NOVEL NOMINEES
CHILDREN OF BLOOD AND BONE Tomi Adeyemi
EMPTY MONSTERS Cat Hellisen
FRESHWATER Akwaeke Emezi
KNUCKLEBONE Nechama Brodie
A SPY IN TIME Imraan Coovadia
THE STRANGE Masha du Toit
NOVELLA NOMINEES
BINTI: NIGHT MASQUERADE Nnedi Okorafor
THE FIREBIRD Nerine Dorman
HARD MARY Sofia Samatar
NEID-FIRE Caldron Mull
SHORT STORY NOMINEES
BRAND NEW WAYS (to lose you over and over
and over)
Blaize Kaye
THE GIRL WHO STARED AT MARS Cristy Zinn
THE LUMINAL FRONTIER Biram Mboob
MEMENTO MORI Tiah Beautement
NJUZU T L Huchu
ORIGAMI ANGELS Derek Lubangakene
THE WITCHING HOUR Oghenechovwe Donald Ekpeki

GRAPHIC NOVEL NOMINEES

AKISSI: TALES
OF MISCHIEF
Marguerite Abouet (writer),  Mathieu Sapin (Illustrator), Judith Taboy (Translator), Marie Bédrune (Translator)
BLACK PANTHER, LONG LIVE THE KING Nnedi Okorafor, Andre Araujo, Mario Del Pennino,
Tana Ford
ERU Tobe Ezeogu , Oze Ezeogu
KWEZI Loyiso Mkize,  Mohale Mashigo, Clyde Beech
KARMZAH Farida Bedwei, and Ravi Allotey of Leti Arts
MALIKA – WARRIOR QUEEN Roye Okupe  (Author), Ayodele Elegba (Editor), Chima Kalu (Illustrator), Raphael Kazeem (Illustrator)
ROVIK Yvonne Wanyoike (writer), Kendi Mberia, Salim Busuru
(Creator and Artist)
SHAKA RISING Luke W. Molver (Author, Illustrator), Mbongeni Malaba
(Foreword) (South African), Mason O’Connor
SHURI Nnedi Okorafor (Writer), Leonardo Romero
TATASHE Cassandra Mark (Creator, Colourist and Writer) , Tobe
Max Ezeogu (Artist)
UNDER THE SUN Austine Osas (writer & creator), Abiodun Awodele
(writer), Yusuf Temitope (art), Nsia Ndidi (colours &
cover art) and Peter Daniel (lettering)

Click on the links to read the shortlist citations, or all the works that were longlisted.

[Thanks to Mark Hepworth for the story.]

2019 Nommo Nominations Longlist

The African Speculative Fiction Society has released the 2019 longlist for the Nommo Awards for African Speculative Fiction.

The African Speculative Fiction Society, composed of professional and semiprofessional African writers, editors, publishers, graphic artists and film makers, was founded in 2016.

The Nommos were presented for the first time in 2017. The awards are named for twins from Dogon cosmology who take a variety of forms, including appearing on land as fish, walking on their tails.

The long lists consist of all titles in their respective categories that were nominated by members of the ASFS.  Some of these works were nominated once, some just missed the shortlist.  The ASFS lists them in full to draw attention to all the works members felt worthy of consideration.

The shortlist is scheduled to be released on May 14.

NOVEL LONG LIST NOMINEES
AFONJA THE RISE Tunde Leye
CHILDREN OF BLOOD AND BONE Tomi Adeyemi
CROWN OF THUNDER Tochi Onyebuchi
EMPTY MONSTERS Cat Hellisen
FRESHWATER Akwaeke Emezi
JAH HILLS Unathi Slasha
KNUCKLEBONE Nechama Brodie
NORTH Frank Owen
SHE WOULD BE KING Wayétu Moore
SHOUNA: LA GENESE Amelie Diack
A SPY IN TIME Imraan Coovadia
THE STRANGE Masha du Toit
WASHINGTON BLACK Esi Edugyan
NOVELLA LONG LIST NOMINEES
BINTI: NIGHT MASQUERADE Nnedi Okorafor
THE FIREBIRD Nerine Dorman
FISTULAS Mame Bougouma Diene
HARD MARY Sofia Samatar
NEID-FIRE Caldron Mull
NOCTURNAL Ishola Abdulwasiu Ayodele
SHORT STORY LONG LIST NOMINEES
AN AMERICAN REFUGEE Tiah Beautement
BEING A GIANT IN MEN’S WORLD Walter Dinjos
BLACK AND GOLD Mame Bougouma Diene
BLOOD SLIPPER Ilse Rensburg
BRAND NEW WAYS (to lose you over and over
and over)
Blaize Kaye
A BRIDAL SHROUD Mirette Bhagat
DRIFT FLUX Wole Talabi
THE FAERIE TREE Kathleen Kayembe
THE FAR SIDE Gabriella Muwanga
FOR WHAT ARE DELUSIONS IF NOT
DREAMS?
Osahon Ize-Iyamu
GHOST STRAIN N Mohale Moshigo
THE GIRL WHO STARED AT MARS Cristy Zinn
THE GREY MAN Vittorio Leonardi
HAUNTED BY THE CITY Mandisi Nkomo
THE HARMONIC RESONANCE OF
EJIRO ANABORHI
Wole Talabi
HEKA AND THE COLOUR THIEF Dennis Dvornak
IN HER BONES Lindiwe Rooney
IN THE GARDEN WATCHING NIM NOMS Osahon Ize-Iyamu
THE INTERPLANETARY WATER COMPANY Masimba Musodza
INTO THE DARK Kelan Gerriety
JIDENNA T J Benson
JOURNAL OF A DNA PIRATE Stephen Embleton
KU’GBO Dare Segun Falowo
LEE-AH (SISTER) H J Golakai
THE LUMINAL FRONTIER Biram Mboob
MEMENTO MORI Tiah Beautement
MIDDLE OF NOWHERE Walter Dinjos
MOTHER OF INVENTION Nnedi Okorafor
MUTSHIDZI Mohale Mashigo
NNEAMAKA’S GHOST Walter Dinjos
NJUZU T L Huchu
ORIGAMI ANGELS Derek Lubangakene
PARENTAL CONTROL Mazi Nwonwu
REMAINS OF AN OLD WORLD Blaize Kaye
RIVER DOLL Tariro Ndoro
SAFARI NYOTA Dilman Dila
SAY IT LOW, THEN LOUD Osahon Ize Iyamu
SECRET LIFE OF THE UNCLAIMED Suyi Davies Okungbowa
AND SONGS DON’T END Osahon Ize-Iyamu
THE TAILORESS OF CRIMSON LANE Shaun van Rensburg
THE THIRD SET OF STITCHES Ray Mwihaki
TIE KIDI Awuor Onyango
TOOTHSOME THINGS Chimedum Ohaegbu
THE UNUSUAL CUSTOMER Innocent Chizaram Ilo
VAIN KNIFE Dare Segun Falowo
OF WARPS AND WELTS Innnocent Chizaram Ilo
WHEN WE DREAM, WE ARE OUR GOD Wole Talabi
WHERE RIVERS GO TO DIE Dilman Dila
THE WITCHING HOUR Oghenechovwe Donald Ekpeki
THE WOODS ARE LOVELY Jason Hess
YARD DOG Tade Thompson

GRAPHIC NOVEL LONG LIST NOMINEES

AKISSI: TALES
OF MISCHIEF
Marguerite Abouet (writer),  Mathieu Sapin (Illustrator), Judith Taboy (Translator), Marie Bédrune (Translator)
BLACK PANTHER, LONG LIVE THE KING Nnedi Okorafor, Andre Araujo, Mario Del Pennino,
Tana Ford
ERU Tobe Ezeogu , Oze Ezeogu
KWEZI Loyiso Mkize,  Mohale Mashigo, Clyde Beech
KARMZAH Farida Bedwei, and Ravi Allotey of Leti Arts
MALIKA – WARRIOR QUEEN Roye Okupe  (Author), Ayodele Elegba (Editor), Chima Kalu (Illustrator), Raphael Kazeem (Illustrator)
ROVIK Yvonne Wanyoike (writer), Kendi Mberia, Salim Busuru
(Creator and Artist)
SHAKA RISING Luke W. Molver (Author, Illustrator), Mbongeni Malaba
(Foreword) (South African), Mason O’Connor
SHURI Nnedi Okorafor (Writer), Leonardo Romero
TATASHE Cassandra Mark (Creator, Colourist and Writer) , Tobe
Max Ezeogu (Artist)
UNDER THE SUN Austine Osas (writer & creator), Abiodun Awodele
(writer), Yusuf Temitope (art), Nsia Ndidi (colours &
cover art) and Peter Daniel (lettering)

[Thans to Mark Hepworth for the story.]

2018 Nommo Awards


The African Speculative Fiction Society announced the winners of the 2018 Nommo Awards for African Speculative Fiction at the Ake Arts and Book Festival in Lagos, Nigeria on October 25.

The African Speculative Fiction Society, composed of professional and semiprofessional African writers, editors, publishers, graphic artists and film makers, was founded in 2016.

The Nommos were presented for the first time in 2017. The awards are named for twins from Dogon cosmology who take a variety of forms, including appearing on land as fish, walking on their tails.

ILUBE AWARD FOR BEST NOVEL

  • Beasts Made of Night by Tochi Onyebuchi

BEST NOVELLA

  • The Murders of Molly Southbourne by Tade Thompson

BEST SHORT STORY

  • “The Regression Test” by Wole Talabi

BEST GRAPHIC NOVEL

The award has been funded for four years, by Mr Tom Ilube. The prize for best novel is $1,000, best novella $500, best short story $500, and best graphic novel $1000 to be shared.

2018 Nommo Nominations

The African Speculative Fiction Society has release the 2018 nominees for the Nommo Awards for African Speculative Fiction.

The African Speculative Fiction Society, composed of professional and semiprofessional African writers, editors, publishers, graphic artists and film makers, was founded in 2016.

The Nommos were presented for the first time in 2017. The awards are named for twins from Dogon cosmology who take a variety of forms, including appearing on land as fish, walking on their tails.

NOVEL NOMINEES

  • Our Memory Like Dust by Gavin Chait
  • The Real by Masha du Toit
  • Fever by Deon Meyer
  • Akata Warrior by Nnedi Okorafor
  • After the Flare by Deji Olokotun
  • Beasts Made of Night by Tochi Onyebuchi

READ THE FULL NOVEL NOMINATION LIST & DETAILS HERE

NOVELLA NOMINEES

  • Binti: Home  by Nnedi Okorafor
  • Fallow by Sofia Samatar
  • The Murders of Molly Southbourne by Tade Thompson

READ THE FULL NOVELLA NOMINATION LIST & DETAILS HERE

SHORT STORY NOMINEES

  • “On the Other Side of the Sea” by Nerine Dorman
  • “A Door Ajar” by Sibongile Fisher
  • “Read Before Use” by Chinelo Onwualu
  • “Snake Story” by Henrietta Rose-Innes
  • “The Regression Test” by Wole Talabi

READ THE FULL SHORT STORY NOMINATION LIST & DETAILS HERE

GRAPHIC NOVEL NOMINEES

READ THE FULL GRAPHIC NOVEL NOMINATION LIST & DETAILS HERE

The Nommos are voted on by ASFS members. Eligible works must be produced by Africans, and may be self-published.

ASFS’ definition of who is an African includes:

  • citizens of African countries,
  • people born on the continent and raised there for substantial periods of time,
  • citizens or people born on the continent who live abroad
  • people who have at least one African parent or
  • Africans without papers, and
  • some migrants to African countries*.

*’African country’ is defined as any country or contested area on the Continent of Africa, ending at the Egyptian border, and including islands such as Zanzibar and Madagascar.

The award has been funded for four years, by Mr Tom Ilube. The prize for best novel is $1,000, best novella $500, best short story $500, and best graphic novel $1000 to be shared.

[Thanks to  Mark Hepworth for the story.]