First Fandom Awards
at CoNZealand

Three First Fandom awards were presented during CoNZealand’s Opening Ceremonies. 

The First Fandom Hall of Fame, created in 1963, is a prestigious achievement award given to a living recipient who has made significant contributions to Science Fiction throughout their lifetime.

First Fandom Hall of Fame

  • Roger Sims
Roger Sims in 2002. Photo by Mark Olson.

Roger discovered Detroit fandom in 1949. He’s belonged to a science fiction club continuously since, and is married to fellow fan Pat Sims. His first club was the Detroit Science Fiction League, the Misfits. He’s been a member of the Lunarians of New York and the Cincinnati Fantasy Group. Currently he’s a member of the Orlando Science Fiction Society.

Roger was co-chair with Fred Prophet of Detention, the 17th Worldcon, held in Detroit in 1959. His first WorldCon was the 1950 NorWesCon. He’s attended 56 WorldCons. At NOLACon, he was one of the people staying in the famous Room 770. He’s been a fan guest of honour at many regional conventions, and in 1995 he was the DUFF co-delegate. Roger Sims is a lifelong true fan, with many accomplishments, and it is fitting that he take an honoured place beside his peers as a living member of the First Fandom Hall of Fame.

The Posthumous Hall of Fame was created in 1994 to acknowledge people in Science Fiction who should have, but did not, receive that type of recognition during their lifetimes.

First Fandom Posthumous Hall of Fame

  • Chad Oliver
Chad Oliver

This year, the members of First Fandom have inducted Chad Oliver to the Posthumous Hall of Fame. Chad Oliver, PhD, was an American anthropologist and science fiction and western fiction writer.

When he was young, he became a science fiction fan and wrote many letters to the pro zines. He also published a fan zine and attended science fiction conventions. He was married at the Ackermansion. Science fiction author Rog Phillips was his best man, and Ray Bradbury was a member of the wedding party.

Chad was a member of the West Coast Writers Group. Two of his most popular science fiction novels were Shadows in the Sun (1954) and The Shores of Another Sea (1971). Two of his western novels won awards.

Over the years, he was guest of honour and toastmaster at several regional conventions. With this award, the members of First Fandom honour and recognise Chad Oliver and his achievements, and welcome him posthumously to the First Fandom Hall of Fame.

Sam Moskowitz Archive Award was created in 1998 to recognise not only someone who has assembled a world-class collection but also what has actually been done with it.

Sam Moskowitz Archive Award

  • John Carter Tibbetts
John Carter Tibbetts

John’s father James, whose passion for Edgar Rice Burroughs led to John’s name, was a member of First Fandom. Together they read and collected all the classics of science fiction. To quote James E Gunn, “John Carter Tibbetts, PhD, is a man of many talents—author, editor, artist, musician, scholar, teacher—and his range of interests is as varied. Art, film, all fields in which he has already published one or more of his many books.”

As an educator and broadcaster, Tibbetts has worked nationally as a news reporter for CBS television, National Public Radio, and Voice of America. He’s written and illustrated 26 books, more than 250 articles, and several short stories.

It’s in recognition of John’s devotion to the lifelong pursuit of a sense of wonder that the members of First Fandom honour him this year with the Sam Moskowitz Archive Award.

First Fandom Awards at Dublin 2019

Three First Fandom awards were presented during Opening Ceremonies at Dublin 2019. 

  • First Fandom Hall of Fame Award:  Ray Faraday Nelson
  • First Fandom Posthumous Hall of Fame Award:  Bob Shaw, James White and Walt Willis
  • Sam Moskowitz Archive Award:  Dr. Bradford Lyau

The First Fandom Hall of Fame Award (est . 1963) is presented annually to honor an individual’s lifetime of accomplishments in the field of science fiction. Geri Sullivan, the TAFF Delegate, announced the Ray Faraday Nelson as the award recipient and it was accepted on Nelson’s behalf by Chair James Bacon.

First Fandom Hall of Fame Award citation:

Because of his life-long genuine love of science fiction and his enthusiastic service to that community for decades, the members of First Fandom have elected Ray Faraday Nelson to the First Fandom Hall of Fame for 2019.

Ray Faraday Nelson – except from Wikipedia entry:

American SF author and cartoonist most famous for his 1963 short story “Eight O’Clock in the Morning,” which was later used by John Carpenter as basis for his 1988 film They Live.  Nelson became an active member of fandom while a teen-ager.  He began his career writing and creating cartoons for SF fanzines.  Later, he wrote many professionally published short stories.  Nelson collaborated with Philip K. Dick (a friend since childhood) on The Ganymede Takeover (published 1967).  At the 1982 Philip K. Dick Awards, Nelson’s novel The Prometheus Man gained a Special Citation.  Nelson professed his greatest claim to fame to be the creator (while still in high school) of the iconic propeller beanie as emblematic of science fiction fandom.

The First Fandom Posthumous Hall of Fame Award (est. 1994) is presented to honor the accomplishments of a worthy member of the SF community who did not receive that recognition during their lifetime. Geri Sullivan announced the selections of Bob Shaw, James White and Walt Willis to be inducted posthumously into the Hall of Fame. 

First Fandom Posthumous Hall of Fame Award citation:

These three great Irish fans collaborated for decades and promoted genuine goodwill around the world.  It is our privilege to honor their memory in the same year that the Worldcon is being held in Dublin.

Background information from the Wikipedia:

Walt Willis

Well-known part of influential Irish SF Fandom, the Wheels of IF.  Special guest, 1952 Worldcon, and recipient of travel funds raised by fans.  This inspired the annual TransAtlantic Fan Fund (TAFF).  Willis was awarded a 1958 Hugo Award as Outstanding Actifan.  Nominated for best fan writer Hugo (1969) and for two Retro-Hugos in the same category (2001, 2004).  Nominated in fanzine category (1957, 1959) for Hyphen.  Received Fanzine Retro-Hugo nominations (2004) for Slant and Hyphen.  He shared a Retro-Hugo for Slant with that fanzine’s art editor James White.  Willis’ best known work is The Enchanted Duplicator (1954), co-written with Bob Shaw.  Willis was Fan Guest of Honor at Magicon (the 1992 Worldcon). (d. 1999.)

James White

Northern Irish author of science fiction novellas, short stories and novels who became a SF fan in 1941.  With Walt Willis, he co-wrote two fanzines, Slant (1948–1953) and Hyphen (1952–1965).  White’s first novel, The Secret Visitors was published in 1957.  White was a long-time Council Member of the British SF Association and a Patron of the Irish SF Association.  (d. 1999.)

Bob Shaw

SF writer and fan from Northern Ireland. Hugo Award for Best Fan Writer (1979, 1980).  His short story “Light of Other Days” was a Hugo Award nominee in 1967, as was his novel The Ragged Astronauts (in 1987).  (d. 1996.)

The Sam Moskowitz Archive Award for attaining “Excellence in Collecting” was presented to Dr. Bradford Lyau by First Fandom International Vice-President Mr. Erle M. Korshak.

Dr. Bradford Lyau

The Sam Moskowitz Archive Award citation:

Dr. Bradford Lyau is a genuine SF enthusiast.  He has been an avid collector for more than fifty years and has assembled an archive of pulp magazines, books and vintage comic books. Through active correspondence, Brad developed friendships with many of his favorite writers.  He knew Sam Moskowitz and visited Forry in the Ackermansion.  Dr. Lyau has published numerous academic articles and scholarly books and has served over the years as a panelist and moderator at conventions throughout the world.

Information from BayCon 2016:

Dr. Bradford Lyau has been a life-long reader of SF, part of fandom for over forty years, and a panelist for over twenty-five years. He is a historian by training (BA, UC-Berkeley; MA, PhD, University of Chicago) and once taught at several universities in California and Europe. He presently works for a start-up company and is a political activist/consultant. He remains active in formal scholarship, publishing academic articles on American, British, French, and other European SF. He was an invited program participant in 1984 for the George Orwell Conference held in London, and in 1991 for the Utopian Conference held in Yverdon-les-Bain, Switzerland, as part of Switzerland’s 700th Anniversary celebration. One of his recent articles analyzed Cixin Liu’s recently translated novels, his first attempt to analyze SF from a non-Western culture. His book analyzing French SF, The Anticipation Novelists of 1950s French Science Fiction: Stepchildren of Voltaire, received very positive reviews from leading academic SF journals and is listed as a reference for further reading in the “France” entry in the Encyclopedia of Science Fiction.

[Thanks to John Coker III for the story.]