2021 Sir Julius Vogel Awards

The 2021 Sir Julius Vogel Award winners have been announced. The awards recognize excellence in science fiction, fantasy, or horror works created by New Zealanders and New Zealand residents.

The Sir Julius Vogel Awards are administered by SFFANZ, the Science Fiction and Fantasy Association of New Zealand Inc.

The Stone Weta by Octavia Cade, art by Emma Weakley
The Stone Weta by Octavia Cade, art by Emma Weakley

Best Novel

  • The Stone Weta by Octavia Cade (Paper Road Press)

Best Youth Novel

  • These Violent Delights by Chloe Gong (Margaret K. McElderry Books)

Best Novella/Novelette

  •  “No Man’s Land” by A.J. Fitzwater (Paper Road Press)

Best Short Story

  •  “For Want of Human Parts” by Casey Lucas (Diabolical Plots)

Best Collected Work

  • The Voyages of Cinrak the Dapper by A.J. Fitzwater (Queen of Swords Press)

Best Professional Artwork

  • Cover art by Laya Rose for No Man’s Land by A.J. Fitzwater (Paper Road Press)
No Man's Land by A.J. Fitzwater, art by Laya Rose Mutton-Rogers
No Man’s Land by A.J. Fitzwater, art by Laya Rose Mutton-Rogers

Best Professional Production/Publication

  •  “How New Zealand’s Best Fantasy and Science Fiction Authors got Shafted on a Global Stage” by Casey Lucas (The Spinoff)

Best Fan Artwork

  • Blue and Red (This is How You Lose the Time War) by Laya Rose

Best Fan Production/Publication

  • FIYAHCON Guest of Honour Speech by Cassie Hart

Best Fan Writing

  • “Alone Together at the Edge of the World” by Andi C. Buchanan (CoNZealand Souvenir Book)

New Talent

  • A.J. Lancaster

Services to Science Fiction, Fantasy and Horror

  • Cassie Hart

Services to Fandom

  • CoNZealand Crew

Pixel Scroll 5/1/21 This Scroll Is Infested With Killer Pixels

(1) HUGO VOTING AND PACKET UPDATE. DisCon III addressed Facebook readers’ questions about when online Hugo voting will be available.

Some of you have been asking about the Hugo voting links so, here’s what’s happening: Hugo voting links won’t appear on your DC3 membership page until voting opens. We’ll let our members and the public know when that happens via email, social media, website, press releases, etc. We’re also working hard to get the Hugo packet of nominated works Worldcon members have come to expect out later this spring.

(2) BEYOND AFROFUTURISM. Clarion West and the Seattle Public Library have two more Beyond Afrofuturism virtual panels happening in May. Register here.

Come talk publishers on Sunday, May 16th, 1 p.m. Pacific with Bill Campbell (Rosarium), Milton Davis (MVmedia), Zelda Knight (AURELIA LEO), and Nicole Givens Kurtz (Mocha Memoirs) for Power in Publishing: Publishers Roundtable

With major publishers stuck in a cycle of selling the same mainstream stories or tightening their belts when it comes to the work of marginalized communities, how are Black publishers shaping opportunities for BIPOC writers to have their voices heard?

Featuring: Bill Campbell (Rosarium), Zelda Knight (AURELIA LEO), Milton Davis (MVmedia), and Nicole Givens Kurtz (Mocha Memoirs)

Moderated by Clinton R. Fluker, Ph.D. Curator of African American collections at Emory University’s Stuart A. Rose Library

The event is presented in partnership with the Seattle Public Library and is supported by The Seattle Public Library Foundation.


And on Monday, May 17th, 7 p.m. Pacific, join editors Eboni Dunbar and Brent Lambert of FIYAH Magazine, Craig Laurance Gidney of Baffling Magazine, Chinelo Onwualu of Omenana and Anathema, and LaShawn Wanak of Giganotosaurus for Zines and Magazines: Expanding Worlds in Speculative Fiction.

(3) U.S. BOOK SHOW. The U.S. Book Show is a new book fair created by Publishers Weekly. The three-day show debuts virtually May 25 – 27. Publishers Weekly says they are focusing “on crafting a meeting place for publishing professionals and book buyers, with an emphasis on serving the interests of librarians and booksellers.”It’s a successor to BookExpo America/

…While at its height ABA and BookExpo America attendance never reached the draw of European book shows such as the Frankfurt Book Fair (286,000 attendees in 2017, according to Wikipedia), BookExpo saw global acceptance from the publishing community. In its 2002 iteration at the Javits Center in New York, BEA saw more than 30,000 attendees, including approximately 7,000 booksellers and librarians. By 2018, BookExpo in the same venue saw 7,800 total attendees.

The demise of the show provided an opening for Publishers Weekly to step in. The U.S. Book Show will be held virtually in 2021 and assessed after the fact for future possibilities.

(4) WHO’S FIRST. Radio Times interviews actor “David Bradley on returning as First Doctor for Time Fracture”.

David Bradley has praised original Doctor Who star William Hartnell as he returns to the role of the First Doctor in much anticipated live event Time Fracture.

The renowned actor first played the role in 2013’s An Adventure in Space and Time, which explored the creation of the long-running series, in which he portrayed both Hartnell and the late actor’s incarnation of the Doctor.

Bradley made such a strong impression on fans that he was invited back by writer Steven Moffat to play the First Doctor in two episodes of Doctor Who, both of which aired as part of Peter Capaldi’s stint on the show.

As he prepares to return to the role once again for Time Fracture, Bradley has hailed Hartnell’s “total dedication” to Doctor Who in an interview on the show’s official YouTube channel.

“He laid the template,” Bradley said. “All of the other subsequent doctors, they all owe a lot to William Hartnell. As it was, it started this phenomenon.”

…Bradley will co-star opposite John Barrowman in upcoming live event Time Fracture, billed as an “immersive experience”, which he believes could convert even non-believers.

(5) CHALLENGING ASSUMPTIONS. Clarion West tells what they’re doing about an “Evolving Workshop Culture to Inspire Equity, Empowerment, and Innovation in Writing Workshops”.

…For over 35 years, Clarion West has held strictly to the Milford peer workshop model, assuming it to be the superior workshop method for all writers. 

This belief was shaken a year ago, when we had to postpone the Summer Workshop for the first time in our history. In discussions with our instructors, we heard something new. A quiet criticism of the unchanging. A gentle push to consider that not every writer has been involved in the conversations around — and represented in — the design of our workshops. 

Over the course of the last year, Clarion West has begun the process of exploring where our assumptions about key components of the workshop, including critiquing methods and social interactions, have limited the experiences of writers from a broad range of underrepresented communities. Communities whose voices are still emerging in prominent speculative fiction outlets. 

And as we started looking for answers, we have found that a serious examination of traditional peer critique methods has been happening in the broader writing and workshopping field. See below for a recommended reading list. 

As a result of this self reflection, Clarion West recognizes that changes need to be made within the workshop model. Our staff, alumni, faculty, and participants will help evolve our workshop culture and create protocols towards equity, empowerment, and innovation. 

Clarion West seeks to make the structural changes needed to ensure that our workshops and classes are places where all participants will feel welcome and safe…. 

(6) HARRYHAUSEN EXHIBITION. The Ray Harryhausen, Titan of Cinema Exhibition just opened at National Galleries Scotland in Edinburgh and continues through February 2022. Quite a bit of material at the link — video, images, articles.

An online counterpart is also available:  Ray Harryhausen: Titan of Cinema Virtual Exhibition Experience, “a carefully curated package which includes a series of films, never-seen-before interviews, exhibition footage, film clips and specially created animation sequences which demonstrate Harryhausen’s innovative processes. Book now.

Film special effects superstar Ray Harryhausen helped elevate stop motion animation to an art. His innovative and inspiring films, from the 1950s onwards, changed the face of modern movie making forever.?This is the largest and widest-ranging exhibition of Ray Harryhausen’s work ever seen, with newly restored and previously unseen material from his incredible archive.

Ray Harryhausen’s work included the films Jason and the Argonauts, the Sinbad films of the 1950s and 1970s, One Million Years B.C. and Mighty Joe Young.  He inspired a generation of filmmakers such as Peter Jackson, Aardman Animations, Tim Burton, George Lucas, and Steven Spielberg, and his influence on blockbuster cinema can be felt to this day.

Titan of Cinema traces Harryhausen’s career as a special effects guru, whose only limits was his boundless imagination. Titan of Cinema shows his creative processes: from embryonic preparatory sketches, through to model making and bringing characters to life who went onto terrorise and delight audiences in equal measure on the cinema screen.

(7) ALIENS AND EXPLOSIONS. This might look familiar. FirstShowing introduces a “Fresh US Trailer for Australian Sci-Fi Spectacle ‘Occupation: Rainfall’”.

Two years after aliens land on Earth, survivors from Sydney, Aus., fight in a desperate war as the number of casualties continue to grow. It’s described as “Avatar meets Star Wars meets Independence Day,”

(8) DUKAKIS OBIT. Actress Olympia Dukakis died May 1 reports NPR. She was 89. An Oscar-winner, she was famous for non-genre roles in Moonstruck and Steel Magnolias. Her claims to genre fame are a role in the TV movie The Librarian: Return to King Solomon’s Mines and, if movies with talking dogs count as genre, Look Who’s Talking and its sequels Look Who’s Talking Too and Look Who’s Talking Now.

(9) MEDIA BIRTHDAY.

  • May 1, 1981 –On this day in 1981 in Canada, Outland premiered. Directed by Peter Hyams and produced by Richard A. Roth and Stanley O’Toole, it starred Sean Connery, Peter Boyle, Frances Sternhagen, James B. Sikking and Kika Markham. It made the final list of nominees for a Hugo at Chicon IV the next year. Most critics liked its high noon in space plot but the audience reviewers at Rotten Tomatoes gave it a mediocre fifty percent rating. The box office barely beat out the cost of making the film. 

(10) TODAY’S BIRTHDAYS.

[Compiled by Cat Eldridge and John Hertz.]

  • Born May 1, 1905 – E. Mayne Hull.  One novel, a dozen shorter stories.  Some when re-issued also bore the name of her husband A.E. Van Vogt; for attempts to give credit where due, see here.  (Died 1975) [JH]
  • Born May 1, 1924 Terry Southern. Screenwriter and author of greatest interest for the screenplay from Peter George’s original novel, Two Hours to Doom (as by Peter Bryant) of Dr. Strangelove Or: How I Learned to Stop Worrying and Love the Bomb directed (and in part written) by Stanley Kubrick. He was also involved in scripting Barbarella. Though uncredited, he did work on the script of Casino Royale as well. (Died 1995.) (CE) 
  • Born May 1, 1937 – Suzanne Vick.  Two fanzines credited to both her and her husband Shelby Vick, one of our greats; much activity names him, careful fanhistory may discover her part more explicitly.  Three daughters, of whom I have learned little.  (Died 2002) [JH]
  • Born May 1, 1946 Joanna Lumley, 75. No, she was no Emma Peel, but she was definitely more than a bit appealing (pun fully intended) in the New Avengers as Purdey. All twenty-six episodes are out on DVD. Her next genre outing was In Sapphire & Steel which starred David McCallum as Steel and her as Sapphire. If you skip forward nearly near twenty years, you’ll find her playing The Thirteenth Doctor in The Curse of Fatal Death in a Comic Relief special. Yes, she played the first version of a female Thirteenth Doctor. 
  • Born May 1, 1952 Andy Sawyer, 69. Member of fandom who managed the Science Fiction Foundation library in Liverpool for 25 years up to last year. For his work and commitment to the SF community, the Science Fiction Research Association awarded him their Thomas D. Clareson Award for Distinguished Service. The  paper he wrote that I want to get and read is “The Shadows out of Time: H. P. Lovecraftian Echoes in Babylon 5” as I’ve always thought The Shadows were Lovecraftian!  And his fanpublication list is impressive, editing some or all issues of &Another Earth Matrix, Paperback Inferno and  Acnestis. (CE)
  • Born May 1, 1954 – Joel Rosenberg.  A score of novels, as many shorter stories.  Correspondent of Asimov’s, the Patchin ReviewSF ChronicleSF Review.  Interviewed in Thrust.  Early author of gamers-transported-into-the-gameworld-which-may-not-be-what-they-thought fiction.  (Died 2011) [JH]
  • Born May 1, 1956 – Phil Foglio, age 65.  Colorful, comical graphic artist.  Illustrated R. Asprin’s MythAdventures, drew comic books from them, worked for DC, Marvel.  Magic: the Gathering cards.  Some of this, and more particularly Buck Godot and Agatha Heterodyne, Girl Genius, with wife Kaja Foglio (who coined gaslamp fantasy: “we have no punk, and we have more than just steam”).  Two Hugos for P as Best Fanartist; three for K & P with Girl Genius as Best Graphic Story.  Website. [JH]
  • Born May 1, 1955 J. R. Pournelle, 66. Some years ago, I got an email from a J. R. Pournelle about some SF novel they wanted Green Man to review. I of course thought it was that Pournelle. No, it was his daughter, Jennifer. And that’s how I came to find out there was a third Motie novel called Outies. It’s much better than The Gripping Hand. (CE)
  • Born May 1, 1957 Steve Meretzky, 64. He co-designed the early Eighties version of The Hitchhiker’s Guide to the Galaxy video game with the full participation of Douglas Adams. ESF also says that he did also a space opera themed game, Planetfall and its sequel A Mind Forever Voyaging in the Eighties as well. He also did the definitely more erotic Leather Goddesses of Phobos as well. CE)
  • Born May 1, 1984 – Lindsay Smith, age 37. Six novels, a dozen shorter stories; also comics, serials.  She & Max Gladstone created, and she is showrunner & lead writer for, The Witch Who Came in From the Cold.  [JH]
  • Born May 1, 1985 – Catherine Cheek, age 36. Three novels, as many shorter stories. Interviewed in Fantasy.  Clarion San Diego graduate.  Brown belts in two martial arts.  Taught English two years in Japan.  Throws pots, binds books, plays with molten glass. Has read Moby-DickLolitaThe Grand SophyWatership Down.  [JH]

(11) NEW ZEALAND AWARD NEWS. Interested parties can get the Sir Julius Vogel Awards Voter Packet and vote on the Awards (through May 31) for a $10 NZD (~$7.15 USD) annual membership in SFFANZ. See “Voting is open for the SJV awards (plus Voters Pack)”. Click here for the list of Sir Julius Vogel award finalists.

(12) INGENUITY BACK IN THE AIR. [Item by Mike Kennedy.] Ingenuity aces flight 4 after a day delay; gets overall program extended from 5 flights to 7. Yahoo! has the story: “Mars helicopter aces 4th flight, gets extra month of flying”.

…Officials announced the flight extension Friday, following three short flights in under two weeks for the $85 million tech demo. Soon afterward, there was more good news: Ingenuity — the first powered aircraft to soar at another planet — had aced its fourth flight at Mars.

For Friday’s trip, Ingenuity traveled 872 feet (266 meters) at a height of 16 feet (5 meters) for two minutes — considerably farther and longer than before. An attempt Thursday had failed because of a known software error.

On its fifth flight in another week or so, the 4-pound (1.8-kilogram) chopper will move to a new airfield on Mars, allowing the rover to finally start focusing on its own rock-sampling mission. The rover is seeking signs of ancient life at Jezero Crater, home to a lush lakebed and river delta billions of years ago….

(13) NORTHERN EXPOSURE. Barry Hertz, in “With new dystopian thriller Hummingbird Salamander, Jeff VanderMeer is set to become a household, or weird household, name” at The Globe and Mail, interviews VanderMeer about the Canadian edition of Hummingbird Salamander.

What are your thoughts about current art that directly addresses the pandemic? Is it too soon?

It’s a balancing act that has to do with the individual person’s talents. I happened to have this already in place, and have the right layering to find something useful. Other writers are different in finding their way in. I’m always trying to write something that hopefully applies to the current moment, but if you read it down the line, it has something that’s meaningful, too.

In the press notes, you said this novel was the result of realizing that “we were living in a dystopia for some time.” Are you a pessimist? Are we getting out of this dystopia any time soon?

The pessimism/optimism thing boils down to me being pessimistic when we’re not dealing with the full issue and full facts in front of us. When we try to deflect. In Florida, we have these solar farms coming in, but which are destroying natural habitats. Green tech is being delinked from environmental issues in distressing ways. That’s the kind of thing that worries me more than, say, a climate-change denier, who isn’t going to help in the first place.

(14) YOU DON’T SAY. Jason Sanford, in “Genre Grapevine for 4/30/2021” (a free Patreon article), starts his comments about a post here with these words:

He later continues, “The Worldcon code of conduct should not be used to shut down a legitimate critique of a genre issue,” leaving untouched the issue actually raised here of whether the Worldcon should adhere to its own Code of Conduct and not broadcast the insulting title. A title Sanford himself is strangely reluctant to repeat, changing the “u” in “Fuck” to an asterisk.

(15) VIVO. Netflix dropped a trailer for Vivo, an animated musical with Lin-Manuel Miranda.

An animated musical adventure that follows VIVO, a one-of-kind kinkajou (aka a rainforest “honey bear,” voiced by Miranda), who must find his way from Havana to Miami in order to deliver a song on behalf of his beloved owner and mentor Andres (Buena Vista Social Club’s Juan de Marcos Gonzáles). The film features original songs by Miranda, a score by Alex Lacamoire, and a screenplay by Quiara Alegría Hudes and director Kirk DeMicco (The Croods)….

Voice talent includes three-time Grammy-winning Latin pop legend Gloria Estefan as Marta, the love of Andres’ life, newcomer Ynairaly Simo as Gabi, Andres’ grand-niece, Zoe Saldana as Rosa, Gabi’s mother, Michael Rooker as Lutador, a villainous Everglades python, Brian Tyree Henry and Nicole Byer as a pair of star-crossed spoonbills, Leslie David Baker as a Florida bus driver, and Katie Lowes, Olivia Trujillo, and Lidya Jewett as a trio of well-meaning but overzealous scout troopers. VIVO is an exhilarating story about gathering your courage, finding family in unlikely friends, and the belief that music can open you to new worlds.

(16) VIDEO OF THE DAY. [Item by Martin Morse Wooster.] In “The Bizarre World of Fan Edits and Restorations” on YouTube, the Royal Ocean Film Society begins with fan edits we’ve all heard about (the mostly Jar Jar Binks-free version of The Phantom Menace) goes on to very strange edits (Planet Of The Apes reduced to a Twilight Zone episode, or Star Wars turned into silent films) and the historically important, such as a fan edit that presents a version of Richard Williams’s unfinished masterpiece The Thief And The Cobbler. As a bonus, you can find out which fan edit of a Brian De Palma film was so good that De Palma turned it into the director’s cut!

 [Thanks to Martin Morse Wooster, Andrew Porter, Cat Eldridge, John Hertz, Michael Toman, John King Tarpinian, Mike Kennedy, and JJ for some of these stories. Title credit goes to File 770 contributing editor of the day Paul Weimer.]

2021 Sir Julius Vogel Award Finalists

The 2021 Sir Julius Vogel Award finalists have been announced. The awards recognize excellence in science fiction, fantasy, or horror works created by New Zealanders and New Zealand residents.

Best Novel

  • Gad’s Army by Drew Bryenton (Sci Fi Cafe)
  • The Stone Weta by Octavia Cade (Paper Road Press)
  • Transference by B.T. Keaton (Ingleside Avenue Press)
  • The Court of Mortals by A.J. Lancaster (Camberion Press)
  • Blood of the Sun by Dan Rabarts and Lee Murray (Raw Dog Screaming Press)

Best Youth Novel

  • Earthcore Book 4: HIgh Tide by Grace Bridges (Splashdown Books)
  • These Violent Delights by Chloe Gong (Margaret K. McElderry Books)
  • Golden City by S.R. Manssen (Manssen Publishing House)
  • Follow Me In by Terri Sinclair
  • Brasswitch and Bot by Gareth Ward (Walker Books Australia)

Best Novella/Novelette

  • “Hexes and Vexes” by Nova Blake (Witchy Fiction NZ)
  • “How to Get a Girlfriend (When you’re a Terrifying Monster)” by Marie Cardno
  • “No Man’s Land” by A.J. Fitzwater (Paper Road Press)
  • “Marbles” by Sean Monaghan (Asimov’s Science Fiction, July/August 2020)
  • “Riverwitch” by Rem Wigmore

Best Short Story

  • “Salt Water, Rose Red”, E. Celeste (Dually Noted F(r)iction Log)
  • “Synaesthete” by Melanie Harding-Shaw (Things in the Well)
  • “For Want of Human Parts” by Casey Lucas (Diabolical Plots)
  • “The Good Wife” by Lee Murray (Weird Tales, issue 364)
  • “Arachne’s Web” by James Rowland (Aurealis issue #132)

Best Collected Work

  • The Voyages of Cinrak the Dapper by A.J. Fitzwater (Queen of Swords Press)
  • Year’s Best Aotearoa New Zealand Science Fiction & Fantasy Volume 2 edited by Marie Hodgkinson (Paper Road Press)
  • Ghost Bus – Tales from Wellington’s Dark Side by Anna Kirtlan
  • The Better Sister and Other Stories by Piper Mejia (Breach)
  • Grotesque: Monster Stories by Lee Murray (Things in the Well)

Best Professional Artwork

  • Cover art by Laya Rose for No Man’s Land by A.J. Fitzwater (Paper Road Press)
  • Cover art by Laya Rose for Year’s Best Aotearoa New Zealand Science Fiction and Fantasy Volume 2 edited by Marie Hodgkinson (Paper Road Press)
  • Cover art by Vivienne To for The Chaos Curse by Sayantani DasGupta (Scholastic)
  • Cover art by Emma Weakley for The Stone Weta by Octavia Cade (Paper Road Press)

Best Professional Production/Publication

  • This is Not the End by Deanna Gunn, chapters 1.5-2.10
  • Masterpiece (Or Artful Dodgers) by Michelle Kan
  • Fantastical Worlds and Futures at the World’s Edge: A History of New Zealand Science Fiction and Fantasy by Simon Litten and Sean McMullen
  • “How New Zealand’s Best Fantasy and Science Fiction Authors got Shafted on a Global Stage” by Casey Lucas (The Spinoff)
  • Wonderland Nights: White Rabbit’s Diary by Sky Bear Games (Steam)
  • “Aotearoa is Not Middle Earth” by Alexander Stronach (The Spinoff)

Best Fan Artwork

  • Ministry for Public Art fan art by Shaun Garea (Estrata Productions)
  • Oriental Bay Piranhas by Shaun Garea (Estrata Productions)
  • Destiny & dead people tea by Michelle Kan
  • Faerie Ring (critical role) by Michelle Kan
  • Blue and Red (This is How You Lose the Time War) by Laya Rose
  • Gyre from The Luminous Dead, by Laya Rose

Best Fan Production/Publication

  • Codex by Stephen Brough (Lost Arcana)
  • FIYAHCON Guest of Honour Speech by Cassie Hart
  • Mollymauk Tealeaf – Court of Jesters (showcase) by Michelle Kan
  • Phoenixine edited by John and Jo Toon
  • “Dramatic Chairing of the 2020 WSFS Business Meeting” by Darusha Wehm
  • CoNZealand Souvenir Book created by Darusha Wehm and Amber Carter

Best Fan Writing

  • “Alone Together at the Edge of the World” by Andi C. Buchanan (CoNZealand Souvenir Book)
  • “Queer Speculative Aotearoa New Zealand” by A.J. Fitzwater (LGBTQ Reads)
  • “Review of Hello Strange, by Dylan Howell” (My Opinion on Books)
  • “SITREP” by Alex Lindsay (Phoenixine)
  • “What If” by Kyra Saywell (Poetry Box)
  • “An exploration of menstruation in horror and dark fiction” by Tabatha Wood (horrortree.com)

New Talent

  • Chloe Gong
  • Deanna Gunn
  • Kate Haley
  • B.T. Keaton
  • A.J. Lancaster
  • Deborah Makarios

Services to Science Fiction, Fantasy and Horror

  • Lee Murray
  • Cassie Hart

Services to Fandom

  • Nigel Rowe et al
  • CoNZealand Crew

The 2021 Long List for the award is at the link.

The Sir Julius Vogel Awards are administered by SFFANZ, the Science Fiction and Fantasy Association of New Zealand Inc. The awards ceremony will be announced by the end of May.

CoNZealand Announces Availability of Sir Julius Vogel Award Voter Packet

Sir Julius Vogel Award Trophies

CoNZealand has announced that the Sir Julius Vogel Awards Nominee Voter Packet has been made available to CoNZealand members via their website:

If you missed out on the Sir Julius Vogel Award voting packet the first time, we are pleased to announce that it is now available again. This time you can access it from the CoNZealand Members’ website. It is available until mid September. Access it here.

A list of the 2020 Sir Julius Vogel Award nominees can be seen here.

Access to the SJV Voter Packet will be limited to those with Supporting or Attending memberships to CoNZealand. Members who have issues accessing the voter packet should contact hugohelp@conzealand.nz.

New Zealand Fan Organization Comments on CoNZealand

Science Fiction and Fantasy Association of New Zealand President John Toon released a statement criticizing CoNZealand for how the group’s Sir Julius Vogel Awards were featured, and saying that he hopes access to the award voter packet can be reopened.

About the SJV Awards ceremony he says:

As President of SFFANZ, I would like to thank all those who worked on and attended the Sir Julius Vogel Awards ceremony in Wellington on Sunday 26 July. The credit for organising this event belongs to Lynelle Howell, Kelly Buehler, Mel Duncan and many others. Thanks also to Lynelle and Jan Butterworth for all their work administering the SJVs.

However, I acknowledge that the editing of the footage of the ceremony as broadcast during CoNZealand could have been better. Most egregiously, Sascha Stronach’s acceptance speech for the award for Best Novel was cut off mid-sentence, and this was not acceptable. I personally apologise to Sascha.

In addition, five of this year’s winners – Gareth Ward, Matthew Willis, David Bishop, Alex Lindsay and Grace Bridges – were unable to attend the ceremony in person or remotely, and did not nominate anyone to collect the trophy on their behalf. The co-presenters acknowledged this during the ceremony and promised to send the trophies to the winners. This information was edited out of the broadcast programme, which could have led viewers to believe that some of the winners had been snubbed. I personally apologise to these five winners.

I also note that many have objected to the juxtaposition of the SJV Awards with the Retro Hugo Awards in CoNZealand’s schedule. SFFANZ understood and accepted the reasoning behind this decision but I accept that, in hindsight, the outcome was not the showcase for and celebration of contemporary New Zealand SFF and fandom that we had hoped it would be.

Toon also hopes that the SJA Award voter packet, which it was hoped would show off New Zealand’s sff to CoNZealand’s worldwide membership, can be made available again. A number of people have remarked in social media that they didn’t know about it.

Lastly, I note that some members of CoNZealand were unaware of the availability of the SJV voter packet during the voting period, and that some nominees and members have asked for it to be made available again to promote awareness of contemporary New Zealand SFF. SFFANZ has contacted all finalists to ask their permission to make their nominated material available again to CoNZealand members, where material was provided. The contents of the reissued SJV packet will, of course, be subject to the agreement of those finalists who consent to participate. CoNZealand has kindly agreed to host the reissued SJV packet via the Hugo Awards voter packet system, and will be contacting CoNZealand members with the relevant details.

2020 Sir Julius Vogel Awards

The 2020 Sir Julius Vogel Awards winners were announced today at CoNZealand. The awards recognize excellence in science fiction, fantasy and horror by New Zealanders.

The winners were decided by a vote of the members of SFFANZ, the Science Fiction and Fantasy Association of New Zealand Inc. and of the national convention, which CoNZealand also is in 2020.

PROFESSIONAL AWARDS

Best Novel

  • The Dawnhounds by Sascha Stronach, Little Hook Press

Best Youth Novel

  • The Clockhill and the Thief by Gareth Ward, Walker Books Australia

Best Novella / Novelette

  • From a Shadow Grave by Andi C. Buchanan, Paper Road Press

Best Short Story

  • “A Shriek Across the Sky” by Casey Lucas, Sponge Magazine 

Best Collected Work

  • Year’s Best Aotearoa New Zealand Science Fiction & Fantasy: Volume 1 edited by Marie Hodgkinson, Paper Road Press

Best Professional Artwork

  • Cover for Dragon Pearl created by Vivienne To

Best Professional Production/Publication

  • Swords: The Webcomic by Matthew Willis

Best Dramatic Presentation

  • Doctor Who: “The Elysian Blade” by David Bishop, BBC Audio

FAN AWARDS

Best Fan Artwork

  • Deet by Laya Rose

Best Fan Production/ Publication

  • Plant Life by Laya Rose

Best Fan Writing

  • “SITREP” by Alex Lindsay, A monthly column in Phoenixine

SPECIAL AWARDS

Best New Talent

  • Sascha Stronach

Services to Fandom

Grace Bridges

Grace Bridges chaired GeyserCon and does a great deal to support writers and artists both nationally and internationally. She represents NZ well on an international stage and encourages young creators to practice and pursue their own dreams. She plays well with others and is a good example of positive fandom.

Grace Bridges has been an integral member of New Zealand’s fan community for over a decade. A writer, graphic artist, cosplayer, publisher, editor, gamer, speaker, panellist, mentor, and strong community activist. Grace fully embraces her role as both a creator and a fan of science fiction and fantasy. Her formal roles include serving as chair of the GeyserCon National science fiction and fantasy convention in Rotorua in June 2019, as a member of the Core of SpecFicNZ for close to a decade (and President of the group for much of that), and as an active member of Young New Zealand Writers (promoting and developing young creatives in science fiction and fantasy) from 2017 onwards. She promotes New Zealand genre work and fandom both locally and internationally and advocates for a science fiction and fantasy community which encourages inclusiveness for all. Most of Grace’s spare time over the past ten years has been devoted to growing and supporting our fan community—usually while dressed as Capt. Kathryn Janeway or as your favourite TimeLord—making her a highly worthy recipient of this award.

Services to Science Fiction, Fantasy, and Horror

Melanie Harding-Shaw

Mel has been instrumental in bridging the gap between Kiwi SFF and Worldcon. She has organized a local group of Wellington writers across the SFF spectrum,including those who are familiar with Kiwi fandom and those who have historically worked in the literary scene. She is also coordinating Kiwi SFF participants at CoNZealand, both ensuring a wide variety of voices and encouraging those who might not otherwise attend to consider doing so. She is involved both with SpecFicNZ and the New Zealand Society of Authors to bring all authors of speculative work together to share knowledge and resources and celebrate Science Fiction, Fantasy, and Horror writing in Aotearoa.

2020 Sir Julius Vogel Award Nominees

The 2020 Sir Julius Vogel Awards nominees have been announced. The awards recognize excellence in science fiction, fantasy and horror by New Zealanders.

The winners will be decided by a vote of the members of SFFANZ, the Science Fiction and Fantasy Association of New Zealand Inc. and of the national convention, CoNZealand, to be held online July 29 – August 2, 2020.

PROFESSIONAL AWARD NOMINEES

Best Novel

Best Youth Novel

Best Novella / Novelette

Best Short Story

Best Collected Work

Best Professional Artwork

Best Professional Production/Publication

Best Dramatic Presentation

FAN AWARD NOMINEES

Best Fan Artwork

Best Fan Production/ Publication

Best Fan Writing

  • “SITREP” by Alex Lindsay, A monthly column in Phoenixine
  • “Welcome to the Con” by Grace Bridges, Geysercon Program Book

SPECIAL AWARD NOMINEES

Best New Talent

Services to Fandom

Grace Bridges

Grace Bridges chaired GeyserCon and does a great deal to support writers and artists both nationally and internationally. She represents NZ well on an international stage and encourages young creators to practice and pursue their own dreams. She plays well with others and is a good example of positive fandom.

Grace Bridges has been an integral member of New Zealand’s fan community for over a decade. A writer, graphic artist, cosplayer, publisher, editor, gamer, speaker, panellist, mentor, and strong community activist. Grace fully embraces her role as both a creator and a fan of science fiction and fantasy. Her formal roles include serving as chair of the GeyserCon National science fiction and fantasy convention in Rotorua in June 2019, as a member of the Core of SpecFicNZ for close to a decade (and President of the group for much of that), and as an active member of Young New Zealand Writers (promoting and developing young creatives in science fiction and fantasy) from 2017 onwards. She promotes New Zealand genre work and fandom both locally and internationally and advocates for a science fiction and fantasy community which encourages inclusiveness for all. Most of Grace’s spare time over the past ten years has been devoted to growing and supporting our fan community—usually while dressed as Capt. Kathryn Janeway or as your favourite TimeLord—making her a highly worthy recipient of this award.

Services to Science Fiction, Fantasy, and Horror

Melanie Harding-Shaw

Mel has been instrumental in bridging the gap between Kiwi SFF and Worldcon. She has organized a local group of Wellington writers across the SFF spectrum,including those who are familiar with Kiwi fandom and those who have historically worked in the literary scene. She is also coordinating Kiwi SFF participants at CoNZealand, both ensuring a wide variety of voices and encouraging those who might not otherwise attend to consider doing so. She is involved both with SpecFicNZ and the New Zealand Society of Authors to bring all authors of speculative work together to share knowledge and resources and celebrate Science Fiction, Fantasy, and Horror writing in Aotearoa.


Note: Nominees are presented in randomised order.

The SJV Voter Packet is currently being assembled. Members of SFFANZ or CoNZealand are able to access the works in the SJV Voter Packet by following the instructions here.

The Sir Julius Vogel Awards recognize excellence in Science Fiction
Fantasy and Horror by New Zealanders.

The Sir Julius Vogel Awards are given for work by fans and professionals that was undertaken completed or released in the year previous to voting. This year the works being voted on are from 2019. They are voted on by New Zealand fans (and this year, by CoNZealand members), and are presented at the National Science Fiction convention each year.

The Sir Julius Vogel Awards are administered by SFFANZ, the Science Fiction and Fantasy Association of New Zealand Inc. SFFANZ supports Science Fiction and Fantasy in New Zealand and can be contacted at enquiries@sffanz.org.nz .

Pixel Scroll 4/30/20 A File And Scroll Reunion Is Only A Pixel Away

(1) CATS TRIUMPHANT. Naomi Kritzer has had a big week. Her YA novel Catfishing on Catnet won an Edgar Award today, and won a  Minnesota Book Award on Tuesday. Here’s an excerpt of the Q&A she did for the St. Paul Library:

How does it feel to be a Minnesota Book Award finalist?

It is a huge honor and feels amazing!

Tell us something about your finalist book that you want readers to know?

It is loosely based on my (Hugo Award-winning) short story Cat Pictures Please, which you can still find online:

Share something about your writing process and preferences. For instance, where is your favorite place to write?

When I’m outlining or brainstorming, I use a notebook of unlined paper, like a sketch diary. I like to write in my sunny living room but discovered at some point that the ergonomics of a couch, hassock, and lap desk will lead quickly to back problems, so I usually write at a desk in my home office.

(2) BOOKSTORE LOVE. LitHub tells the world “Now you can use your favorite indie bookstore as your Zoom background.” Like this shot of Vroman’s – where John King Tarpinian and I got John Scalzi to sign our copies of The Collapsing Empire a few years ago. The complete list of bookstores with notes on each one can be found on the Lookout + Ecotone blog.

(3) INGENIOUS. The Science Fiction and Fantasy Association of New Zealand blog gives a good rundown of Alison Scott’s plans for “The Virtual GUFF Tour”, since she can’t travel there in person this year. It’s an effort completely worthy of a former editor of the fanzine Plokta, “The journal of superfluous technology.” 

Alison Scott is the recently elected European GUFF delegate. The plan was for the winning delegate to travel down under to meet local fans and addend the 2020 Worldcon – CoNZealand. Of course because of you-know-what the borders are closed and CoNZealand has gone virtual. But Alison appears undaunted – she now plans to take a virtual tour of Australasia visiting Australian and New Zealand places and fans before attending the virtual worldcon. There will be a proper itinerary mimicking a physical journey and Alison even plans to adhere to the local timezones (yay jetlag!). You can read more about her plans and follow her progress over on the facebook group dedicated to the trip.

(4) RAMPING UP TO THE APOCALYPSE. The Baltimore Science Fiction Society has completed the ADA compliant ramp in front of their building. The January 20 Pixel Scroll ran details about the permits coming through. Club President Dale S. Arnold said today –

Although the COVID-19 emergency and related closures caused some delays, eventually the weather and logistics worked to allow completion. Many years ago when the plan for renovations to the BSFS Building was announced the author Jack Chalker commented that if a bunch of SF Fans were able to pull off that complex of a plan it would be a sign of the coming apocalypse.  With the completion of this ramp (except final painting the door which was altered in the ramp design) we have now realized the dream from 1991 having completed everything planned when we bought the building.

And BSFS didn’t finish a moment too soon, because the apocalypse appears to be just around the corner.

(5) NOT GENTEEL. Errolwi points out how well today’s Merriam-Webster tweet complements James Davis Nicoll’s famous quote about the English language:

(6) AIMLESS, IF NOT LOST, IN SPACE. And by no coincidence whatsoever, the next item is about James Davis Nicoll’s latest Tor.com post, “Far From Any Star: Five Stories About Rogue Worlds”.

It’s been weeks since you last socialized (in the flesh) with anyone outside your household…or with anyone, if you live alone. Loneliness is tough. But things could be worse: you could be a rogue world, ejected from your home system billions of years ago. You could be a pitiful world formed far from any star. Such worlds are commonplace in our galaxy. They are not quite so common in science fiction. Still, a few of them feature in books that you may have read…

(7) JEMISIN AND GAIMAN. The Fisher Center will present “UPSTREAMING: Neil Gaiman in Conversation with N. K. Jemisin” on May 2 at 7:30 p.m. EST. However, the website says, “Tickets are not currently on sale. Call the box office for more information, 845-758-7900.” So if you’re interested, call.

Join Professor in the Arts Neil Gaiman for a remote, live streamed conversation with Hugo Award-winning author N. K. Jemisin (Broken Earth trilogy), whose new work The City We Became was released in March to great acclaim. The conversation is part of an ongoing Fisher Center series in which Gaiman discusses the creative process with another artist.

(8) LE GUIN IN ’75. Fanac.org has posted a video recording of an Aussiecon (1975) Worldcon panel with Ursula K. Le Guin, Susan Wood and others, “Worlds I Have Discovered.”

AussieCon, the 33rd Worldcon, was held in Melbourne, Australia in 1975. This panel centers on questions to Guest of Honor Ursula Le Guin’s on her writing for young adults (or at least classified as for young adults). The panelists, moderated by Fan Guest of Honor Susan Wood, are Ursula herself, Stella Leeds, Peter Nicholls, Anna Shepherd, and Ann Sydhom. The video quality leaves a lot to be desired, but the discussion on Le Guin’s process of writing, the panel’s views on children’s literature, and children’s literature as a literary ghetto remain interesting and very pertinent. Remember, this was decades before the phenomena of Harry Potter.

Andrew Porter sent the link with this reminder that the same year his Algol Press published Dreams Must Explain Themselves, a 36-page chapbook whose title essay is about how Le Guin got ideas for books.

(9) TODAY IN HISTORY.

  • April 30, 1955  — Science Fiction Theatre’s Y.O.R.D. episode first aired. Directed by Leon Benson from a screenplay by him and George Van Marter as based on a story written by Marter and Ivan Tors. Truman Bradley Was The Host and the cast included Walter Kingsford, Edna Miner Louis,  Jean Heydt and DeForest Kelley. The latter would be playing Captain Hall, M.D.  You can watch it here.

(10) TODAY’S BIRTHDAYS.

[Compiled by Cat Eldridge. Bonus typos provided by OGH.]

  • Born April 30, 1913 Jane Rice. Her first story “The Dream” was published  in the July 1940 issue of Unknown. Amazingly, she’d publish ten stories there during the War. Her only novel Lucy remains lost due to somewhat mysterious circumstances. Much of her short stories are collected in The Idol of the Flies and Other Stories which is not available in digital form. (Died 2003.)
  • Born April 30, 1920 E. F. Bleiler. An editor, bibliographer and scholar of both sff and detective fiction. He’s responsible in the Forties for co-editing the Best SF Stories with T.E. Dikty. They later edited Best Science-Fiction Stories. He also did such valuable reference guides like The Checklist of Fantastic Literature and The Guide to Supernatural Fiction. (Died 2010.)
  • Born April 30, 1926 Edmund Cooper. Pulpish writer of space opera not for the easily offended. His The Uncertain Midnight has an interesting take on androids but most of his work is frankly misogynistic. And he was quite prolific with over twenty-four novels and a dozen story collections. A lot of his work is available at the usual digital suspects. (Died 1982.)
  • Born April 30, 1934 William Baird Searles. Author and critic. He‘s best remembered  for his long running review work for Asimov’s  where he reviewed books, and Amazing Stories and F&SF where he did film and tv reviews. I’m not familiar with his writings but I’d be interested to know who here has read Reader’s Guide to Science Fiction and Reader’s Guide to Fantasy which he did, as they might be useful to own. (Died 1993.)
  • Born April 30, 1938 Larry Niven, 82. One of my favorite authors to read, be it Ringworld, The Mote in God’s Eye with Jerry Pournelle, or the Rainbow Mars stories which I love in the audiobook version. What’s your favorite Niven story? And yes, I did look up his Hugos. “Neutron Star” was his first at NyCon 3 followed by Ringworld at Noreascon 1 followed by “Inconstant Moon” (lovely story) the following year at L.A. Con I,  “The Hole Man” (which I don’t remember reading) at Aussiecon 1 and finally “The Borderland of Sol” novelette at MidAmericaCon. He’s not won a Hugo since 1976. 
  • Born April 30, 1973 Naomi Novik, 47. She wrote the Temeraire series which runs to nine novels so far. Her first book, His Majesty’s Dragon, won the Astounding Award. She most deservedly won the Nebula Award for Best Novel for Uprooted which is a most excellent read. I’ve not yet her Spinning Silver, so opinions are welcome.
  • Born April 30, Gal Gadot, 34. Wonder Woman of course in the DC film universe. Other genre work, well, other than voicing Shank on Ralph Breaks the Internet, there really isn’t any. She did play Linnet Ridgeway Doyle in the Kenneth Branagh production of Murder on the Orient Express which is quite lovely but hardly genre or even genre adjacent. 

(11) SOUNDTRACK. Steve Vertlieb would like to introduce the world to French film composer, Thibaut Vuillermet.

(12) REVENGE OF THE GRINDHOUSE. SYFY Wire reports ”Trolls World Tour Rocks $100 Million On Vod”.

The decision to skip a theatrical release in the age of coronavirus was a wise move that led to big returns for DreamWorks’ Trolls World Tour

According to The Wall Street Journal, the animated movie has racked up nearly $100 million in the three short weeks since it arrived on VOD and digital platforms Friday, April 10. With approximately 5 million rentals at $19.99 a pop, Universal has generated over $77 million from a digital release model that allows studios to keep an estimated 80 percent of profits. Since the traditional theatrical model relies on a 50-50 kind of split, a film playing in a physical venue has to make a lot more money in order for a studio to turn a profit. 

The real point here is that Trolls Would Tour has brought in more tangible revenue during its first 19 days on demand than the first movie did during five months in theaters.

However, one theater chain intends to punish Universal for their plans to reproduce the success by simultaneously releasing movies in theaters and through video-on-demand, presumably trimming their revenue. The Hollywood Reporter covered the announcement: “AMC Theatres Refuses to Play Universal Films in Wake of ‘Trolls: World Tour'”.

AMC Theatres on Tuesday delivered a blistering message to Universal Pictures, saying the world’s largest cinema chain will no longer play any of the studio’s films in the wake of comments made by NBCUniversal CEO Jeff Shell regarding the on-demand success of Trolls World Tour and what it means for the future of moviegoing post-coronavirus pandemic….

“The results for Trolls World Tour have exceeded our expectations and demonstrated the viability of PVOD,” Shell told The Wall Street Journal, which first reported the numbers. “As soon as theaters reopen, we expect to release movies on both formats.”

In a strongly worded letter to Universal Filmed Entertainment Group chairman Donna Langley, AMC Theatres chairman and-CEO Adam Aron said Shell’s comments were unacceptable. AMC is the largest circuit in the world.

“It is disappointing to us, but Jeff’s comments as to Universal’s unilateral actions and intentions have left us with no choice. Therefore, effectively immediately AMC will no longer play any Universal movies in any of our theaters in the United States, Europe or the Middle East,” Aron wrote.

“This policy affects any and all Universal movies per se, goes into effect today and as our theaters reopen, and is not some hollow or ill-considered threat,” he continued. “Incidentally, this policy is not aimed solely at Universal out of pique or to be punitive in any way, it also extends to any movie maker who unilaterally abandons current windowing practices absent good faith negotiations between us, so that they as distributor and we as exhibitor both benefit and neither are hurt from such changes….” 

(13) CHICKEN EATER OF THE SEA. [Item by Chip Hitchcock.] From the Harvard Gazette: “Water Beast: New paper argues the Spinosaurus was aquatic, and powered by predatory tail”.

New paper argues the Spinosaurus was aquatic, and powered by predatory tail

Back in the Cretaceous period, 145 to 66 million years ago, dinosaurs dominated the land and sky. They also, a new paper argues, terrorized the aquatic realm. Recent fossil evidence has revealed that Spinosaurus aegyptiacus, among the largest of all known carnivorous dinosaurs, was a creature of the water, with a center of gravity and a giant tail fin perfect for swimming. The same paper shares robotic modeling by two Harvard scientists that shows how that large, flexible tail fin — unique among dinosaurs — would have given the giant predator a deadly propulsive thrust in the water, similar to a salamander or crocodile tail.

The paper, “Tail-Propelled Aquatic Propulsion in a Theropod Dinosaur,” in the April 29 issue of Nature, uses new fossil evidence and robotically controlled models created by Harvard co-authors Stephanie E. Pierce and George V. Lauder, professors of organismic and evolutionary biology, to show its power.

Pierce said the new fossils were necessary to make their argument, as much of the fossil evidence of Spinosaurus, unearthed by German paleontologist Ernst Stromer, had been destroyed in World War II. University of Detroit paleontologist Nizar Ibrahim, the Nature paper’s lead author, had located more traces of the dinosaur in Morocco in 2014, and in 2018 he went back, successfully excavating extensive Spinosaurus remains. The fossils included tail vertebrae with meter-long spines that seemed to form an expanded paddle, raising questions as to what the tail was used for.

“The working hypothesis was that Spinosaurus used its tail to swim through water,” said Pierce, Thomas D. Cabot Associate Professor of Organismic and Evolutionary Biology. Ibrahim and his team reached out to Pierce, curator of vertebrate paleontology at the Museum of Comparative Zoology, to test their idea. She was immediately intrigued by the 5-plus-meter-long tail.

Yes, Dave, “Predatory Tail” would be a great name for a band.

(14) YOUR MISSION… “Nasa names companies to develop Moon landers for human missions”

Nasa has chosen the companies that will develop landers to send astronauts to the Moon’s surface in the 2020s.

The White House wants to send the next man and the first woman to the Moon in 2024, to be followed by other missions.

Jeff Bezos’ Blue Origin, Elon Musk’s SpaceX and Alabama-based Dynetics were selected to work on landers under the space agency’s Artemis programme.

The 2024 mission will see astronauts walk on the Moon’s surface for the first time since 1972.

Combined, the contracts are worth $967m (£763m; €877m) and will run for a “base period” of 10 months.

“With these contract awards, America is moving forward with the final step needed to land astronauts on the Moon by 2024, including the incredible moment when we will see the first woman set foot on the lunar surface,” said Nasa’s administrator Jim Bridenstine.

“This is the first time since the Apollo era that Nasa has direct funding for a human landing system, and now we have companies on contract to do the work for the Artemis programme.”

(15) RECIPES WITH CHARACTERS. “Need new recipes for quarantine? Pixar’s YouTube channel is here to help”. Entertainment Weekly shares some examples.

As Pixar taught us, anyone can cook… and now the animation studio is giving you something to cook.

The Pixar YouTube channel features a series called “Cooking With Pixar,” a collection of recipes inspired by the studio’s films. At the moment, the series only has three videos, but they should provide some inspiration if you’re in need of something new to cook — which, it’s fair to say, most of us probably are at this point.

(16) YOU’RE MELTING! “Nasa space lasers track melting of Earth’s ice sheets” – BBC has the story.

Scientists have released a new analysis of how the Greenland and Antarctic ice sheets have changed, from 2003 to 2019.

The study shows that ice losses from melting have outpaced increases in snowfall, resulting in a 14mm rise in global sea-levels over the period.

We’ve had a number of very similar reports to this recently.

What makes this one of interest is that it uses data from the highest-resolution satellite system dedicated to studying the poles – IceSat.

This system flies space lasers over glaciers and other ice fields to track their constantly shifting shape.

The US space agency (Nasa) has now launched two of these altimeter instruments.

The first, IceSat, operated between 2003 and 2009; the second, IceSat-2, was put up in 2018.

Thursday’s report is a first attempt to tie both satellites’ observations together.

(17) BROTHER GUY’S AIR. “Antarctic meteorites yield global bombardment rate”

A team of UK scientists has provided a new estimate for the amount of space rock falling to Earth each year.

It’s in excess of 16,000kg. This is for meteorite material above 50g in mass.

It doesn’t take account of the dust that’s continuously settling on the planet, and of course just occasionally we’ll be hit by a real whopper of an asteroid that will skew the numbers.

But the estimate is said to give a good sense of the general quantity of rocky debris raining down from space.

(18) VIDEO OF THE DAY. Horizon on Vimeo is a short film by Armond Dijcks based on images taken by the International Space Station.

[Thanks to Joyce Scrivner, Mike Kennedy, Andrew Porter, Cat Eldridge, Chip Hitchcock, JJ, Martin Morse Wooster, Michael Toman, Errolwi, and John King Tarpinian for some of these stories. Title credit goes to File 770 contributing editor of the day Matthew Johnson.]

CoNZealand Will Also Host the 41st NZ National Science Fiction Convention

CoNZealand, the 78th World Science Fiction Convention, to be held in Wellington from July 29–August 2, 2020, has announced it will also host the 41st New Zealand national science fiction convention (natcon), including the Sir Julius Vogel (SJV) Awards.

Co-chair of CoNZealand Norman Cates said, “By hosting the natcon alongside CoNZealand, we can showcase work by New Zealanders not just to our local members, but also to the wider international fannish community.”

The Sir Julius Vogel Awards recognize excellence in science fiction, fantasy, or horror works created by New Zealanders and New Zealand residents. All SJV finalists will be admitted to the SJV Award Ceremony (and at no cost if they are not members of CoNZealand.)

The main difference for the SJV Awards is that voting will take place before CoNZealand, due to practicalities of administration.

The Science Fiction and Fantasy Association of New Zealand’s (SFFANZ) annual general meeting, the SFFANZ business session and the bidding session for future national NZ conventions will also be held at CoNZealand. All SFFANZ members will be able to attend these SFFANZ events at no cost.

Mr. Cates said, “We acknowledge that attending CoNZealand is more expensive than attending a regular natcon. We are therefore committed to ensuring the important natcon events are accessible to all those who wish to attend.”

“We’re happy to be able to offer SFFANZ members and the New Zealand fan community an opportunity to attend events that are regular fixtures at our natcons,” said Mr Cates.

The vote for hosting rights occurred at Geysercon, the 40th NZ natcon, recently held over Queen’s Birthday Weekend in Rotorua. CoNZealand was the only bidder. Before the vote, a number of sessions were held over the weekend to discuss how CoNZealand might meet its responsibilities should it be selected.

For more information, see www.conzealand.nz.

2019 Sir Julius Vogel Award Winners

The Sir Julius Vogel Award

The Sir Julius Vogel Award

The winners of the 2019 Sir Julius Vogel Awards were announced Sunday night at GeyserCon, New Zealand’s 40th National Science Fiction and Fantasy Convention, in Rotorua. The Vogels, which recognize excellence in science fiction, fantasy and horror by New Zealanders, were nominated and voted on by members of SFFANZ (the Science Fiction and Fantasy Association of New Zealand Inc.) and Geysercon.
 

PROFESSIONAL AWARD WINNERS

Best Novel

  • Into the Sounds by Lee Murray (Severed Press)

Best Youth Novel

  • Lutapolii – White Dragon of the South by Deryn Pittar (Junction Publishing)

Best Novella / Novelette

  • The Martian Job by M. Darusha Wehm (Choice of Games)

Best Short Story

  • “Girls Who do not Drown” by A.C. Buchanan (Apex Magazine, December 2018)

Best Collected Work

  • Te Korero Ahi Ka, edited by Grace Bridges, Lee Murray and Aaron Compton (SpecFicNZ)

Best Professional Artwork

  • Cover for The Baker Thief by Laya Rose (The Kraken Collective)

Best Professional Production / Publication

  • Black Archive #15 by John Toon (Obverse Books)

Best Dramatic Presentation

  • Wellington Paranormal, directed by Jermaine Clement and Jackie van Beek (New Zealand Documentary Board)

 
FAN AWARD WINNERS

Best Fan Artwork

  • The Thirteenth Doctor by Laya Rose

Best Fan Production / Publication

  • Star Trek in the Park – The Trouble with Tribbles (Enterprise Entertainment)

 
SPECIAL AWARD WINNERS

Best New Talent

  • Kura Carpenter (The Kingfisher’s Debt)

 
[Thanks to Jo Van Ekeren for the story.]