CoNZealand Will Also Host the 41st NZ National Science Fiction Convention

CoNZealand, the 78th World Science Fiction Convention, to be held in Wellington from July 29–August 2, 2020, has announced it will also host the 41st New Zealand national science fiction convention (natcon), including the Sir Julius Vogel (SJV) Awards.

Co-chair of CoNZealand Norman Cates said, “By hosting the natcon alongside CoNZealand, we can showcase work by New Zealanders not just to our local members, but also to the wider international fannish community.”

The Sir Julius Vogel Awards recognize excellence in science fiction, fantasy, or horror works created by New Zealanders and New Zealand residents. All SJV finalists will be admitted to the SJV Award Ceremony (and at no cost if they are not members of CoNZealand.)

The main difference for the SJV Awards is that voting will take place before CoNZealand, due to practicalities of administration.

The Science Fiction and Fantasy Association of New Zealand’s (SFFANZ) annual general meeting, the SFFANZ business session and the bidding session for future national NZ conventions will also be held at CoNZealand. All SFFANZ members will be able to attend these SFFANZ events at no cost.

Mr. Cates said, “We acknowledge that attending CoNZealand is more expensive than attending a regular natcon. We are therefore committed to ensuring the important natcon events are accessible to all those who wish to attend.”

“We’re happy to be able to offer SFFANZ members and the New Zealand fan community an opportunity to attend events that are regular fixtures at our natcons,” said Mr Cates.

The vote for hosting rights occurred at Geysercon, the 40th NZ natcon, recently held over Queen’s Birthday Weekend in Rotorua. CoNZealand was the only bidder. Before the vote, a number of sessions were held over the weekend to discuss how CoNZealand might meet its responsibilities should it be selected.

For more information, see www.conzealand.nz.

2019 Sir Julius Vogel Award Winners

The Sir Julius Vogel Award

The Sir Julius Vogel Award

The winners of the 2019 Sir Julius Vogel Awards were announced Sunday night at GeyserCon, New Zealand’s 40th National Science Fiction and Fantasy Convention, in Rotorua. The Vogels, which recognize excellence in science fiction, fantasy and horror by New Zealanders, were nominated and voted on by members of SFFANZ (the Science Fiction and Fantasy Association of New Zealand Inc.) and Geysercon.
 

PROFESSIONAL AWARD WINNERS

Best Novel

  • Into the Sounds by Lee Murray (Severed Press)

Best Youth Novel

  • Lutapolii – White Dragon of the South by Deryn Pittar (Junction Publishing)

Best Novella / Novelette

  • The Martian Job by M. Darusha Wehm (Choice of Games)

Best Short Story

  • “Girls Who do not Drown” by A.C. Buchanan (Apex Magazine, December 2018)

Best Collected Work

  • Te Korero Ahi Ka, edited by Grace Bridges, Lee Murray and Aaron Compton (SpecFicNZ)

Best Professional Artwork

  • Cover for The Baker Thief by Laya Rose (The Kraken Collective)

Best Professional Production / Publication

  • Black Archive #15 by John Toon (Obverse Books)

Best Dramatic Presentation

  • Wellington Paranormal, directed by Jermaine Clement and Jackie van Beek (New Zealand Documentary Board)

 
FAN AWARD WINNERS

Best Fan Artwork

  • The Thirteenth Doctor by Laya Rose

Best Fan Production / Publication

  • Star Trek in the Park – The Trouble with Tribbles (Enterprise Entertainment)

 
SPECIAL AWARD WINNERS

Best New Talent

  • Kura Carpenter (The Kingfisher’s Debt)

 
[Thanks to Jo Van Ekeren for the story.]

2019 Sir Julius Vogel Award Nominees

The 2019 Sir Julius Vogel Awards nominees have been announced.

The awards recognize excellence in science fiction, fantasy and horror by New Zealanders.

The winners will be decided by a vote of the members of SFFANZ, the Science Fiction and Fantasy Association of New Zealand Inc., and of the national convention, GeyserCon, to be held May 31-June 2.

PROFESSIONAL AWARD NOMINEES

Best Novel

  • The Kingfisher’s Debt by Kura Carpenter (IFWG Publishing)
  • Restoration Day by Deborah Makarios (Oi Makarioi)
  • Into the Sounds by Lee Murray (Severed Press)
  • Teeth of the Wolf by Dan Rabarts & Lee Murray (Raw Dog Screaming Press)
  • The Voyage of the White Cloud by M. Darusha Wehm (In Portentia Press)

Best Youth Novel

  • When Gina Pressed Enter by Elise De Silva (EDS Publishing)
  • Ezaara, Riders of Fire, Book 1 by Eileen Mueller (Phantom Feather Press)
  • Lutapolii – White Dragon of the South by Deryn Pittar (Junction Publishing)
  • Quest by A.J. Ponder (Phantom Feather Press)
  • The Suburban Book of the Dead by Jamie Sands

Best Novella / Novelette

  • Where the Sun Does Not Shine by Paul Mannering (Adrenaline Press)
  • Skin Deep by Violet Penrose (Griffon Press)
  • The Glassblower’s Peace by James Rowland (Published in Aurealis #114, September 2018)
  • The Martian Job by M. Darusha Wehm (Choice of Games)

Best Short Story

  • “On the Run” by Kevin Berry in Te Korero Ahi K? (SpecFicNZ)
  • “Girls Who do not Drown” by A.C. Buchanan (Apex Magazine, December 2018)
  • “We Feed the Bears of Fire and Ice” by Octavia Cade (Strange Horizons)
  • “A Devoted Husband” by Melanie Harding-Shaw (Breach Zine)
  • “Dead End Town” by Lee Murray in Cthulu: Land of the Long White Cloud (IFWG Publishing)

Best Collected Work

  • The Fairies of Down Under and other P?keha Fairy Tales by Geoff Allen (Makaro Press)
  • Te Korero Ahi K? Edited by Grace Bridges, Lee Murray and Aaron Compton (SpecFicNZ)
  • 80,000 Totally Secure Passwords that no Hacker Would Ever Guess by Simon Petrie
  • Cthulu: Land of the Long White Cloud Edited by Steve Proposch, Christopher Sequiera and Bryce Stevens. (IFWG Publishing)

Best Professional Artwork

  • Cover for Te Korero Ahi K?, Created by Evelyn Doyle (SpecFicNZ)
  • Cover for Quest, Created by Craig Phillips (Phantom Feather Press)
  • Cover for Capricious 9, Created by Laya Rose (Capricious)
  • Cover for The Baker Thief, Created by Laya Rose (The Kraken Collective)

Best Professional Production/Publication

  • Breach Magazine, volumes 5-9 Edited by Peter Kirk
  • New Orbit Magazine Edited by Naomi Moore (New Orbit Productions)
  • Writing from a Dark Place by Lee Murray (Victoria University Press)
  • Overgrown by Laya Rose
  • Info Text subtitles for Earthshock, on Doctor Who: The Collection – Season 19 Blu-ray Box Set (BBC, 2018) by Paul Scoones (BBC)
  • Black Archive #15 by John Toon (Obverse Books)

Best Dramatic Presentation

  • Wellington Paranormal, Directed by Jermaine Clement and Jackie van Beek (New Zealand Documentary Board)
  • Mortal Engines, Directed by Christian Rivers (Universal Pictures)

FAN AWARD NOMINEES

Best Fan Artwork

  • The Thirteenth Doctor by Laya Rose

Best Fan Production/ Publication

  • The Future According to Mikey (Curdled Milk Productions)
  • Star Trek in the Park – The Trouble with Tribbles (Enterprise Entertainment)
  • Phoenixine Edited by John and Lynelle Howell (Phoenix Science Fiction Society)

Special Award Nominees

Best New Talent

(Nominations are numbered to aid clarity — the number has no other significance).

1. Kura Carpenter

The Kingfisher’s Debt is Kura Carpenter’s debut novel and very cleverly set in an Urban Fantasy world overlaying (or underlying, depending on your perspective) Dunedin, New Zealand. The writing is crisp, the plot excellently designed and executed. The work, I believe, clearly shows a writer who has taken the writing process seriously, from conception to drafting, to re-drafting, and producing a book that fits neatly into the Urban Fantasy genre while also having a strong Kiwi flavour.

2. Saf Davidson

With her unique and empathetic perspectives on disability, sexuality, and the human condition, Saf Davidson has quickly cemented herself as one of the foremost upcoming New Zealand SFF writers. Her work on serials “Tourist” and “Mountain Sound” has garnered broad praise, and as an award-winning comics writer and editor of games, it’s clear that she refuses to be put in a box—whether creatively or professionally.

3. M.W. Innes-Jones

As Concealment’s publisher, I nominate and highly recommend this fast paced, action packed and gripping Sci-Fi novel. The below precis speaks for itself.

Our genes: will they be our hope or our undoing?

Three centuries from now humanity has made its last stand – a city high in the Swiss Alps, a place of safety and security from a deadly past. This is the reality of Nathanial Paquette’s life and it has been this way for the whole of his sheltered twenty-three years. But with a knock at the family’s apartment door everything changes. Now he must face an uncertain future and unexpected truth – he is genetically altered, and what really matters is what lies hidden within his blood.

Together with eleven others, Nathanial discovers not only does he have to navigate the competing agendas of the city’s ruling council and a man of science but survive the rigorous training he and his fellow recruits are faced with.

It’s a world where friendships are forged, enemies are made, and death awaits – ever wanting to become everyone’s new best friend.

This is the first book of a six-book saga, I promise you, you will be on the edge of your seat from the beginning to the end. The author quickly draws you into the characters’ lives and their world and moves the story along at pace. Using compelling language, this new author reels you into the narrative and leaves you wanting for more.

4. Deborah Makarios

Deborah Makarios has produced a beautifully presented novel that is warm, laugh-out-loud funny, full of twists, and well-drawn characters. The fantasy has not only believable characters, but the land itself is a key character, possessing a magic of its own. She sticks to her genre, but the surprises are many along the way, and the ending is satisfyingly positive. Effortlessly woven into the fast-moving story, there are many current themes – the environment, justice, corporate greed and racism – even though the setting is old. I can’t wait to see what Makarios produces next.

The back-cover description of the novel is as follows:

“Princess Lily was born to be queen, but she leads a pawn’s existence in the shadow of her guardians’ control. She dreams of the day when she will take her rightful place in the world.

At last her chance arrives, with a quest for the three Requisites of Restoration Day, the royal rite which renews the life of the land. But she’s been hidden away too long, and Arcelia has changed.

Stripped of everything but the identity which has become a life-threatening liability, Lily will need to do more than cross the board if she is to emerge triumphant as the queen she knows she must be. The land she thought was hers becomes the field for a gripping game–and this time she’s playing for her life.”

5. Fraser Newman

6. Anna Ryan

Since writing and publishing her first novel (The Lady in the Coat) in 2017, Anna’s confidence of writing horror stories has been continually improving. She is a real enigma in the world of horror writing.

What astounds more than anything, is that Anna understands how the brain works; how we, as human beings cope/deal with fear, terror and paranoia.

After reading Deceptive Cadence, Anna’s collection of short stories, you will question the noises you hear as you drift off to sleep at night. Could there really be someone lurking outside you window, waiting?

And let’s not forget the monsters living in The Room at the End of the Hall. They cannot be real, can they?

You will seriously second guess yourself after you have read Deceptive Cadence. You will jump at every noise you hear.

Anna Ryan is an up and coming writer with imagination and writing skill to be a hugely successful horror writer

Pixel Scroll 12/31/18 Three…(Click)…Two…(Click)….One…(Click)…Godstalk!

(1) DOCTOR WHO SPECIAL AIRS TOMORROW. And you can preview the New Year’s Day Special Doctor Who: Resolution.

The Doctor Who cast talk about what to expect in the New Years Day Special, Doctor Who: Resolution.

(2) THE YEAR’S MOST WTF. ScienceFiction.com is right – there were plenty: “The Most WTF Moments Of 2018”.

There were a lot of memorable moments in pop culture in 2018, including many highs, as well as a few lows.  But in addition to that, there were a few events that were just weird or shocking, to the point that some folks are still reeling months later.   Yes, there were many deaths.  There were also a large number of sexual misconduct accusations.  But omitting those, here are a few other moments that you may recall.

Their list begins with —

12. Netflix Dropped A Surprise Movie, ‘The Cloverfield Paradox’ After The Super Bowl

(3) 2018 MOST INFLUENTIAL SFF WOMEN. At SYFY Wire, the Fangrrls column lists their “2018’s most influential women in genre.”

This was a hard year. For many of us, 2018 was surreal, and for many more, it was deeply painful. But in the face of adversity, as always, it is the women who made us feel we can survive, thrive, and make a difference. 

In 2018, women like Christine Blasey Ford stood firm against a wave of screams attempting to silence, dismiss and discredit her. But firm she stood. For better or worse, and still experiencing attacks and threats, she and so many other women reminded us that we are strong. Often because the world has given us no choice. But it’s what these women do with that strength that is empowering, inspiring, and life-changing for those of us their lives touch. 

The genre world is no different. This year, we were still told, constantly and from people who should know better, that there is simply not room at the table for us, or, possibly worse, gaslit into believing there aren’t enough of us capable or even willing to do the work men are handed with far less experience

These women inspired us to say “f*ck that” and be everything the world says we can’t be. And we are eternally grateful.

Details are in the article for about each selectee. The list (along with an attempt to distill the roles for which each woman was selected) is:

* Eve Ewing (academic, author, visual artist)—selected by Sara Century

* Jody Houser (comic book author)—selected by Riley Silverman

* N.K. Jemisin (author, activist)—selected by S.E. Fleenor

* Jodie Whittaker (actor)—selected by Jenna Busch

* Laila Shabir (founder/CEO of Girls Make Games)—selected by Courtney Enlow

* Margot Robbie (actor, producer)—selected by Jenna Busch

* Janelle Monáe (musician)—selected by Clare McBride

* Ava DuVernay (director)—selected by Tricia Ennis

* Natalie Portman (actor, activist)—selected by Emma Fraser

* Tessa Thompson (actor, singer, songwriter)—selected by S.E. Fleenor

* Christina Hodson (screenwriter)—selected by Jenna Busch

* Brie Larson (actor, activist)—selected by Carly Lane

(4) GOING TO HAVE TO REFILL THE MIRROR. A.V. News says “Bandersnatch was so complex that season five of Black Mirror has been delayed”.

We never would’ve guessed this, but it turns out that developing an interactive movie with tons of branching paths and alternate endings is kind of difficult. Perhaps that’s why most movies only have the one narrative and end the same way no matter how many times you watch it?

…The movie has so many different variations based on what choices you make that Brooker (the creator of Black Mirror) says he has “forgotten” how many different endings there are, going so far as to reject producer Annabel Jones’ claim in a Hollywood Reporter interview that there are five “definitive” conclusions.

That Hollywood Reporter piece goes deep into how Bandersnatch was made and some of the behind-the-scenes magic that allows it to work, but the biggest reveal is that Bandersnatch required such an “enormous” amount of time and work that the fifth season of the oppressively dark sci-fi horror series has been delayed….

(5) NEW BUHLERT POSTS. Galactic Journey has published Cora Buhlert’s review of Andre Norton’s Ordeal in Otherwhere (her first Norton), as well her original 1960s recipe for spaceman’s punch, a New Year’s party favorite.

Cora also has a poem in Issue eleven of the poetry webzine Umbel & Panicle, out today, which also features photographs by Paul Weimer and Elizabeth Fitzgerald.

(6) EVOLVED GINGERBREAD. Aftonbladet reports how “Caroline’s gingerbread makes success”. Hampus Eckerman translated the first part of this Swedish-language article for Filers to enjoy:

In Caroline Eriksson’s family, it has always been a tradition to build gingerbread houses.

But over the years, Caroline began to get tired of “just” building houses.

This year she has built a 130×90 centimeter replica of Alien – made in gingerbread.

For three and a half weeks, Caroline Eriksson, 31, has worked with the gingerbread during evenings and weekends.

Building gingerbread houses always used to be a tradition in Caroline’s family during her childhood in Tyresö. But in recent years, the gingerbread cookies have become increasingly advanced.

– After a few years I got tired of doing houses and started to do more special things like boats and some movie creations, says Caroline.

For several years, Caroline has lived in Oslo. In 2013, she participated in a gingerbread competition in Norway and since then the gingerbread cookies have become more extreme.

– Then I built Optimus Prime, the transformer robot, in gingerbread. I won the competition which was super cool and after that, the tradition of making a gingerbread figure every year continued. I try to challenge myself and make more crazy creations every year, says Caroline.

(7) SIR JULIUS VOGEL AWARDS YEAR KICKS OFF. Nominations are now being accepted for the 2019 Sir Julius Vogel Awards, and will be taken until the window closes on March 30, 2019.

The awards recognise excellence and achievement in science fiction, fantasy, or horror works created by New Zealanders and New Zealand residents, and first published or released in the 2018 calendar year.

…Anyone can make a nomination and it is free! Get busy reading NZ authors and watching NZ movies to find work to nominate. The awards will be presented at Geysercon – the 2019 National SF&F Convention.

(8) AMONG THE RUINS. Harvard Gazette’s ‘Stepping inside a dead star” offers “A virtual reality experience of being inside an exploded star.” You’ll need the VR hardware to try this out.

Cassiopeia A, the youngest known supernova remnant in the Milky Way, is the remains of a star that exploded almost 400 years ago. The star was approximately 15 to 20 times the mass of our sun and sat in the Cassiopeia constellation, almost 11,000 light-years from earth.

Though stunningly distant, it’s now possible to step inside a virtual-reality (VR) depiction of what followed that explosion.

A team led by Kimberly Kowal Arcand from the Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics (CfA) and the Center for Computation and Visualization at Brown University has made it possible for astronomers, astrophysicists, space enthusiasts, and the simply curious to experience what it’s like inside a dead star. Their efforts are described in a recent paper in Communicating Astronomy with the Public.

The VR project — believed to be the first of its kind, using X-ray data from NASA’s Chandra X-ray Observatory mission (which is headquartered at CfA), infrared data from the Spitzer Space Telescope, and optical data from other telescopes — adds new layers of understanding to one of the most famous and widely studied objects in the sky.

(9) ROMAN OBIT. NPR reports: “Nancy Grace Roman, ‘Mother Of Hubble’ Space Telescope, Has Died, At Age 93”. She defied a guidance counselor who asked “what lady would take math instead of Latin”; joined NASA when it was 6 months old.

When Nancy Grace Roman was a child, her favorite object to draw was the moon.

Her mother used to take her on walks under the nighttime sky and show her constellations, or point out the colorful swirls of the aurora. Roman loved to look up at the stars and imagine.

Eventually, her passion for stargazing blossomed into a career as a renowned astronomer. Roman was one of the first female executives at NASA, where she served as the agency’s first chief of astronomy.

Known as the “Mother of Hubble,” for her role in making the Hubble Space Telescope a reality, Roman worked at NASA for nearly two decades. She died on Dec. 25 at the age of 93.

(10) LUSK OBIT. SYFY Wire reports the death of classic Disney animator Don Lusk:

Don Lusk, longtime Disney animator and Hanna-Barbera director, has died. The multi-hyphenate artist behind dozens of iconic characters roaming throughout animation was 105. His longevity was only matched by his output, as Lusk’s six decade career saw him make the faces of Alice in Wonderland, Charlie Brown, Babar, Papa Smurf, and Goofy familiar to an entire culture.

(11) TODAY IN HISTORY

  • December 31, 1958 The Crawling Eye showed up at the drive-in.
  • December 31, 1958  — The Strange World Of Planet X made for a good double bill at the drive-in.
  • December 31, 1961The Phantom Planet appeared in theaters.

(12) TODAY’S BIRTHDAYS.

[Compiled by Cat Eldridge.]

  • Born December 31, 1937  — Anthony Hopkins, 80. I never know what I’ve going to find when I look these Birthday possibilities so imagine my surprise when I discover his first genre role was Ian McCandless in Freejack followed soon by playing Helsing in Bram Stoker’s Dracula! He went to have a number of genre roles including being C. S. Lewis in Shadowlands, the lead in The Mask of Zorro, the narrator of that stink, stank, stunk How the Grinch Stole Christmas and Odin in three Thor MCU films. 
  • Born December 31, 1943 Ben Kingsley, 75. First SF character he played was Avatar in Slipstream, later roles included Dr. John Watson in Without a Clue, Minister Templeton in Photographing Fairies, The Great Zamboni In Spooky House, Specialist in A.I., Man in the Yellow Suit in Tuck Everlasting,  Merenkahre in Night at the Museum: Secret of the Tomb and that’s just a partial listing. God he’s had an impressive genre history! 
  • Born December 31, 1945Connie Willis, 73. She has won eleven Hugo Awards and seven Nebula Awards for her work, a feat that impresses even I who isn’t generally impressed as you know by Awards! Of her works, I’m most pleased by To Say Nothing of the DogDoomsday Book and Bellwether, an offbeat novel look at chaos theory. I’ve not read enough of her shorter work to give an informed opinion of it, so do tell me what’s good there.
  • Born December 31, 1949Ellen Datlow, 69. Let’s get start this Birthday note by saying I own a complete set of The Year’s Best Fantasy & Horror which, yes , I know, it was titled The Year’s Best Fantasy for the first year. And I still read stories for them from time to time. If that was all she had done, she’d have been one of our all-time anthologists but she also, again with Terri Windling, did the Fairy Tale and Mythic Fiction series, both of which I highly recommend. On her own, she has the ongoing Best Horror of Year, now a decade old, and the Tor.com anthologies which I’ve not read but I assume collect the fiction from the site. Speaking of Tor.com, she’s an editor, something she’s also done at Nightmare MagazineOmni, the hard copy magazine and online, Sci Fiction webzine and Subterranean Magazine
  • Born December 31, 1958 Bebe Neuwirth, 60. Ok she’s had but one television SF credit to her name which is playing a character named Lanel in the “First Contact” episode of the Next Gen series during season four but I found a delightful genre credential for her. From April 2010 to December 2011, she was Morticia Addams in the Broadway production of The Addams Family musical! The show itself is apparently still ongoing. 
  • Born December 31, 1959Val Kilmer, 59. Lead role in Batman Forever where I fought he did a decent job, Madmartigan in Willow, Montgomery in The Island of Dr. Moreau, voiced both Moses and God in The Prince of Egypt, uncredited role as El Cabillo in George and the Dragon and voiced KITT in the reboot of Knight Rider.

(13) COMICS SECTION.

  • In this Brewster Rockit, Cliff Clewless may have the right idea—retroactive New Year resolutions.

(14) ON TONIGHT’S JEOPARDY! Andrew Porter, Jeopardy! game show genre reference correspondent, spotted another:  

Double Jeopardy Answer, for $3,000: He wrote 1899’s “Father Goose”; he came up with a “Wonderful” adventure the following year.

Wrong question: “Who is [Upton] Sinclair?” [which cost the contestant $3 grand]

Correct question: Who is L. Frank Baum?

(15) POOP QUIZ. Meanwhile, Daniel Dern is proposing his own game show – “Today’s SF and SF-adjacent Pop Quiz.”

What (a) SF story, and (b) folk song (story, more precisely) do these articles make you think of:

“Maine woman who makes artwork out of moose poop might be getting a TV show”

which in turn refers back to —

“People love this Maine woman who makes artwork out of moose poop”

Stay tuned to ROT-13 for the answers —

a) Gur Ovt Cng Obbz ol Qnzba Xavtug

b) “Zbbfr Gheq Cvr,” ol gur yngr Oehpr “H. Hgnu” Cuvyyvcf, Gur Tbyqra Ibvpr bs gur Terng Fbhgujrfg naq “Nzrevpn’f Zbfg-Srnerq Sbyxfvatre,” bevtvanyyl ba uvf TBBQ GUBHTU nyohz — urer vg abj

<uggcf://jjj.lbhghor.pbz/jngpu?i=0mo1dfIdwjt>

Abgr, V ybir gung n jro frnepu gheaf hc uvgf yvxr:

    Fubc Zbbfr Gheq Cvr: Nznmba

Gur FS-nqwnprag nfcrpg: Cuvyyvcf jnf n thrfg (TbU, creuncf) ng ng yrnfg bar FS pbairagvba — ZvavPba?

And that’s the name of that tune!

(16) KSR’S LATEST. Vidvuds Veldavs totes up the pluses and minuses about Kim Stanley Robinson’s Red Moon for readers at The Space Review.

[Note: the review contains spoilers regarding the novel.]

Kim Stanley Robinson’s latest novel, Red Moon, is set in 2047. China has become the dominant player on the Moon with large-scale operations at the South Pole. The US and other players have facilities at the North Pole. China achieved this position using the experience of massive infrastructure projects to mount an operation possibly larger and more intensive in scope than the U.S. Apollo project. According to the novel, President Xi Jinping secured the commitment of the Chinese Communist Party at the 20th People’s Congress in 2022 to the goal “… that the moon should be a place for Chinese development, as one part of the Chinese Dream.” Insofar as 2022 is still more than three years into the future, Robinson may be advocating for such a future. Xi Jinping is highly praised in the book for his Moon declaration as well as for the environmental cleanup that takes place on Earth. The hills surrounding Beijing in 2047 are green and the air is fresh and breathable as a result of the environmental policies of Xi.

(17) A DIFFERENT KIND OF YEAR IN NEWS. The BBC’s “2018 in news: The alternative end-of-the-year awards” features videos of masterfully-incompetent criminals, and of an attempt to stifle press questions that got shown up by a phone app.

(18) YOUNG JUSTICE. The final trailer of Young Justice Season 3: Outsiders has been released. The TV series will premiere January 4.

[Thanks to John King Tarpinian, JJ, Rich Lynch, Hampus Eckerman, Cat Eldridge, Mike Kennedy, Chip Hitchcock, Martin Morse Wooster, Carl Slaughter, and Andrew Porter for some of these stories. Title credit belongs to File 770 contributing editor of the day OGH.]

2018 Sir Julius Vogel Award Winners

The winners of the 2018 Sir Julius Vogel Awards have been announced. The awards recognize excellence in science fiction, fantasy and horror by New Zealanders.

The winners were decided by a vote of the members of SFFANZ, the Science Fiction and Fantasy Association of New Zealand Inc., and of the national convention, Conclave 3, held March 30-April 2.

Best Novel

Hounds of the Underworld – Dan Rabarts and Lee Murray

Best Youth Novel

The Traitor and the Thief – Gareth Ward

Best Novella / Novelette

Matters Arising from the Identification of the Body – Simon Petrie

Best Short Story

“Crimson Birds of Small Miracles” – Sean Monaghan

Best Collected Work

Mariah’s Prologues – Grace Bridges

Best Professional Artwork

Cover for “Teleport” – Kate Strawbridge

Best Professional Production/Publication

Mistlands – Laya Rose

Best Dramatic Presentation

The Changeover – Stuart McKenzie, Miranda Harcourt, Emma Slade

Best Fan Artwork

John Toon

Best Fan Production/ Publication

Lexicon convention booklet – Darusha Wehm

Best Fan Writing

Jo Toon

Best New Talent

Gareth Ward

Services To Science Fiction, Fantasy And Horror

Darian Smith

Services To Fandom

Jan Butterworth

2018 Sir Julius Vogel Award Finalists

The finalists for the 2018 Sir Julius Vogel Awards have been announced. The awards recognize excellence in science fiction, fantasy and horror by New Zealanders.

The winners will be decided by a vote of the members of SFFANZ, the Science Fiction and Fantasy Association of New Zealand Inc., and of the national convention, Conclave 3, to be held March 30-April 2.

PROFESSIONAL AWARDS

Best Novel

  • In the Earth’s Embrace, by J.C. Hart (Etherhart Press)
  • Bastet’s Daughters, by Lyn McConchie (Wildside Press)
  • Tyche’s Flight, by Richard Parry (Independent)
  • Hounds of the Underworld, by Dan Rabarts and Lee Murray (Raw Dog Screaming Press)
  • Starlight’s Children, by Darian Smith (Wooden Tiger Press)

Best Youth Novel

  • Earthcore, Book 1: RotoVegas, by Grace Bridges (Splashdown Books)
  • The Locksmith, by Barbara Howe (IFWG Publishing)
  • A Dash of Belladonna, by J. Rackham (Lemon Ink)
  • The Kahutahuta, by Douglas A. Van Belle (Intergalactic Media Group)
  • The Traitor and the Thief, by Gareth Ward (Walker Books Australia)

Best Novella/Novelette

  • The Meiosis of Cells and Exile, by Octavia Cade, published in Asimov’s Science Fiction, Jan/Feb 2017 edition
  • Standard Hollywood Depravity, by Adam Christopher (Tor)
  • Beautiful Abomination, by Frances Duncan
  • Matters Arising from the Identification of the Body, by Simon Petrie (Peggy Bright Books)
  • Blood Money, by Chris Underwood

Best Short Story

  • Earthcore: Initiation” by Grace Bridges, published on http://www.gracebridges.kiwi.
  • Syren Song” by A.C Buchanan, published in Kaleidotrope.
  • The Stone Weta” by Octavia Cade, published in Clarkesworld, issue 131.
  • From the Womb of the Land, Our Bones Entwined” by A.J. Fitzwater, published in Pacific Monsters anthology (Fox Spirit Books).
  • Crimson Birds of Small Miracles” by Sean Monaghan, published in Asimov’s Science Fiction Magazine, Jan/Feb 2017.

Best Collected Work

  • Mariah’s Prologues, by Grace Bridges
  • Once Upon a Southern Star: A Collection of Retold Fairy Tales, edited by Shelley Chappell

Best Production/Publication

Best Artwork

  • Earthcore: Initiation, story poster by Grace Bridges
  • Cover for Teleport, by Kate Strawbridge
  • Cover for Beneath Broken Waves, by Kate Strawbridge
  • Cover for The Madman’s Bridge, by Patrick McDonald
  • Cover for In the Earth’s Embrace, by Kate Strawbridge

Best Dramatic Presentation

  • The Changeover, directed by Stuart McKenzie and Miranda Harcourt, produced by Emma Slade (Firefly Films)
  • The Cul de Sac, season 2, (Greenstone TV)
  • One Thousand Ropes, directed by Tusi Tamasese (Blueskin Films)

Best New Talent
(Platform descriptions for the nominees will be provided in the official list on the SFFANZ web site.)

  • Barbara Howe
  • Mark Johnson
  • J. Rackham
  • Gareth Ward

FAN AWARDS

Best Fan Artwork

  • John Toon, for cartoons in Phoenixine and 2017 LexiCon convention booklet.

Best Fan Production/Publication

  • Phoenixine, edited by John and Lynelle Howell
  • Lexicon convention booklet, produced by Darusha Wehm
  • Summer Star Trek – Journey to Babel, Enterprise Entertainment

Best Fan Writing

  • Alex Lindsay for SITREP (produced in Phoenixine)
  • Jo Toon for Pass the Rules (produced in Phoenixine)

Services to Fandom
(Platform descriptions for the nominees will be provided in the official list on the SFFANZ web site.)

  • Jan Butterworth

Services to Science Fiction, Fantasy and Horror
(Platform descriptions for the nominees will be provided in the official list on the SFFANZ web site.)

  • Andi Buchanan
  • Darian Smith

Sir Julius Vogel Awards Photos

Sir Julius Vogel Award set. Photo by Paul Weimer.

Paul Weimer’s DUFF trip took him to Lexicon in New Zealand this weekend, where he shot these photos of the 2017 Sir Julius Vogel Awards presentation.

  • Back row: Dan Rabarts, Lee Murray, Octavia Cade, Keith Smith, Lynelle Howell, Publisher Marie Hodgkinson accepting for Emma Weakley, and AJ Fitzwater
  • Front row: Jean Gilbert, Eileen Mueller, and Lynelle Howell’s daughter dressed as a “Living Sir Julius Vogel Award”.

Here are links to some more good photos in public posts on Facebook:

2017 Sir Julius Vogel Awards

The winners of the 2017 Sir Julius Vogel Awards were announced June 4 at Lexicon in Taupo, New Zealand. The awards recognize excellence in science fiction, fantasy and horror by New Zealanders.

The winners were chosen by a vote of the members of SFFANZ, the Science Fiction and Fantasy Association of New Zealand Inc., and of the national convention, Lexicon 2017.

Professional Award Nominees

Best Novel

  • Into the Mist by Lee Murray (Cohesion Press)

Best Youth Novel

  • Light in My Dark by Jean Gilbert and William Dresden (Rogue House Publishing)

Best Novella / Novelette

  • The Convergence of Fairy Tales by Octavia Cade (Book Smugglers)

Best Short Story

  • “Splintr” by A.J. Fitzwater, published in At the Edge (Paper Road Press)

Best Collected Work

  • At the Edge, Edited by Dan Rabarts and Lee Murray (Paper Road Press)

Best Professional Artwork

  • Cover artwork for At the Edge, Emma Weakley (Paper Road Press)

Best Professional Production / Publication

  • That Kind of Planet, Emma Weakley (Random Static)

Best Dramatic Presentation

  • This Papier Mache Boulder is Actually Really Heavy, Andrew Beszant and Christian Nicholson (Little Hero Productions)

Fan Award Nominees

Best Fan Production/ Publication

  • Summer Star Trek: Mirror, Mirror, Enterprise Entertainment

Best Fan Writing

  • Octavia Cade, For Food and Horror Column Series (Book Smugglers)

Best Fan Artist

  • Keith Smith, Contributions to Novazine

Special Award Nominees

Best New Talent

  • Eileen Mueller

Services To Science Fiction, Fantasy And Horror

  • Lee Murray

Services To Fandom

  • Lynelle Howell

The supporting statements for the Special Award winners can be read at the SFFANZ  website.

[Thanks to JJ for the story.]

2017 Sir Julius Vogel Award Finalists

The nominees for the 2017 Sir Julius Vogel Award have been announced.  The awards recognize excellence in science fiction, fantasy and horror by New Zealanders.

The winners will be decided by a vote of the members of SFFANZ, the Science Fiction and Fantasy Association of New Zealand Inc., and of the national convention, Lexicon 2017.

Professional Award Nominees

Best Novel

  • Innocents by Sarah Fayermann (FeedARead.com Publishing)
  • Den of Wolves by Juliet Marillier (Pan MacMillan Australia)
  • Into the Mist by Lee Murray (Cohesion Press)
  • Daybreak Rising (Embers of Redemption, vol 1) by Kiran Oliver (CreateSpace Independent Publishing)
  • Night’s Fall by Richard Parry (Mondegreen)

Best Youth Novel

  • Stranded Starship (You Say Which Way) by Kevin Berry (Fairytale Factory)
  • The Ghosts of Moonlight Creek by Sue Copsey (CreateSpace Independent Publishing)
  • Battlesaurus: Clash of Empires by Brian Falkner (MacMillan)
  • Light in My Dark by Jean Gilbert and William Dresden (Rogue House Publishing)

Best Novella / Novelette

  • The Convergence of Fairy Tales by Octavia Cade (Book Smugglers)
  • Babylon’s Song by Woelf Dietrich, published in Interspecies (Kosa Press)
  • The Sleeper’s Dance – A Novella by Mouse Diver-Dudfield (Pouakai Books)
  • Spindle by Dan Rabarts, published in Andromeda Spaceways Inflight Magazine issue 63
  • Tipuna Tapu by Dan Rabarts (Clan Destine Press)

Best Short Story

  • “Narco” by Michelle Child, published in At the Edge (Paper Road Press)
  • “Splintr” by A.J. Fitzwater, published in At the Edge (Paper Road Press)
  • “Wakers” by Sean Monaghan, published in Asimov’s Science Fiction, August 2016
  • “Call of the Sea” by Eileen Mueller, published in At the Edge (Paper Road Press)
  • “BlindSight” by A.J. Ponder, published in At the Edge (Paper Road Press)
  • “London’s Crawling” by Emma Pullar, published in Dark Minds Charity Collection (Bloodhound Books)

Best Collected Work

  • At the Edge, Edited by Dan Rabarts and Lee Murray (Paper Road Press)
  • Everything is Fine, Grant Stone (Racket House)

Best Professional Artwork

  • Cover artwork for Write Off Line 2016: Everyone’s a Winner by Kodi Murray (Rogue House Publishing)
  • Cover artwork for Beyond the Stars by Kodi Murray (Tauranga Writers Publishing)
  • Cover artwork for Chameleon Moon, by Laya Rose
  • Midnight Star, Laya Rose
  • Cover artwork for That Kind of Planet, Emma Weakley (Random Static)
  • Cover artwork for At the Edge, Emma Weakley (Paper Road Press)

Best Professional Production / Publication

  • That Kind of Planet, Emma Weakley (Random Static)

Best Dramatic Presentation

  • This Papier Mache Boulder is Actually Really Heavy, Andrew Beszant and Christian Nicholson (Little Hero Productions)
  • Chronesthesia, Directed by Hayden J. Weal, collaborator Simeon Duncombe
  • AFK: the webseries, episode 12, “ZERG”, Directed by Peter Haynes (Epically Casual Productions)

Fan Award Nominees

Best Fan Production/ Publication

  • Novazine, Edited by Jacqui Smith
  • Phoenixine, Edited by John and Lynelle Howell
  • Summer Star Trek: Mirror, Mirror, Enterprise Entertainment

Best Fan Writing

  • Alex Lindsay for SITREP, Published in Phoenxine
  • Jacqui Smith, For contributions to Novazine
  • Octavia Cade, For Food and Horror Column Series (Book Smugglers)

Best Fan Artist

  • Keith Smith, Contributions to Novazine

Special Award Nominees

Best New Talent

  • Eileen Mueller
  • Richard Parry
  • Laya Rose
  • Darian Smith

Services To Science Fiction, Fantasy And Horror

  • Lee Murray

Services To Fandom

  • Jan Butterworth
  • Lynelle Howell

The lengthy supporting statements for the Special Award nominees can be read at the SFFANZ  website.

[Thanks to JJ for the story.]

 

Pixel Scroll 12/31/16 We All Know That The Pixel Never Scrolls Twice

(1) ON ITS WAY TO BEING DEADJOURNAL? LiveJournal was purchased by a Russian company in 2007 but continued to operate on U.S.-based servers until this month. According to Metafilter

As of a few days ago, the IP addresses for blogging service LiveJournal have moved to 81.19.74.*, a block that lookup services locate in Moscow, Russia. Now users — especially those who do not trust the Russian government — are leaving the platform and advising others to leave.

For years, the online blogging community LiveJournal — popular in Russia, Belarus, and the Ukraine — has served as a key communications platform for Russian dissidents (the Committee to Protect Journalists earlier this month called on Russian authorities to release a LiveJournal user who has been sentenced to 2 years in prison for a critical blog post). Even after Russian company SUP bought it from California-based Six Apart in 2007 (previously), the fact that SUP continued to run the servers in the US meant that users felt relatively safe; a 2009 press release specifically said that LiveJournal, Inc.* would continue to run technical operations and servers in the United States (and claimed that 5.7 million LiveJournal users were Russia-based).

(2) REANIMATION NOW A HOLLYWOOD ISSUE. “Actors seek posthumous protections after big-screen resurrections” – Reuters has the story.

California law already gives heirs control over actors’ posthumous profits by requiring their permission for any of use of their likeness. As technology has improved, many living actors there are more focused on steering their legacy with stipulations on how their images are used – or by forbidding their use.

Robin Williams, who committed suicide in 2014, banned any use of his image for commercial means until 2039, according to court documents. He also blocked anyone from digitally inserting him into a movie or TV scene or using a hologram, as was done with rapper Tupac Shakur at Southern California’s Coachella music festival in 2012 – 16 years after his murder.

Virtual characters have been used when an actor dies in the middle of a film production, as when Universal Pictures combined CGI and previous footage for Paul Walker’s role in 2015’s “Furious 7” after Walker’s 2013 death in a car crash.

But “Rogue One” broke new ground by giving a significant supporting role to a dead star. A digital embodiment of British actor Peter Cushing, who died in 1994, reprised his role from the original 1997 “Star Wars” film as Tarkin.

Walt Disney Co recreated Tarkin with a mix of visual effects and a different actor.

A Disney spokeswoman declined to comment on whether Princess Leia would appear in films beyond “Episode VIII,” set for release in 2017. Fisher had wrapped filming for the next “Star Wars” episode before she died. She suffered a heart attack on a flight from London to Los Angeles.

(3) ALL ROMANCE EBOOKS CLOSES. Quoting from JJ in a comment on yesterday’s Scroll:

Kristine Kathryn Rusch has made a public posting on Patreon: “All Romance Ebooks and its sister website Omnilit did something incredibly awful on December 28, 2016. It sent out a handful of emails, letting writers, publishers, readers, and others know that it was shutting its doors four days later.”

This is a really well-thought-out and helpful piece. The TL;DR is: 1) if you’re an author who was using them as a distributor, get your rights reverted immediately; 2) if you’re a reader who bought books through them, get them copied to your computer immediately.

There’s a lot more helpful advice for affected authors in there. I really hope that no Filers are affected by this, and I feel bad for all authors who were involved with that business; they are almost certainly not going to get any money they are owed.

Part of what Rusch explained:

ARe is a distributor, mostly, and so it is dealing with its writers as suppliers and unsecured creditors. I’ve been through a bunch of distributor closings, many in the late 1990s, with paper books, and they all happen like this.

One day, everything works, and the next, the distributor is closed for good. In some ways, ARe is unusual in that it gave its suppliers and creditors four days notice. Most places just close their doors, period.

I’m not defending ARe. I’m saying they’re no different than any other company that has gone out of business like this. Traditional publishers have had to deal with this kind of crap for decades. Some comic book companies went out of business as comic book distributors collapsed over the past 25 years. Such closures have incredible (bad) ripple effects. In the past, writers have lost entire careers because of these closures, but haven’t known why, because the publishing house had to cope with the direct losses when the distributor went down.

The difference here is that ARe wasn’t dealing with a dozen other companies. It was dealing with hundreds, maybe thousands, of writers individually, as well as publishers. So, writers are seeing this distribution collapse firsthand instead of secondhand.

To further complicate matters, ARe acted as a publisher for some authors, and is offering them no compensation whatsoever, not even that horrid 10 cents on the dollar (which, I have to say, I’ll be surprised if they pay even that).

(4) NZ ORDER OF MERIT. Professor Anthony Phillip Mann,  a Sir Julius Vogel winner whose novel The Disestablishment of Paradise was a finalist for the Clarke and Campbell Awards, has been named a Member of the New Zealand Order of Merit, for services to literature and drama.

(5) NOMINATIONS OPEN FOR SIR JULIUS VOGEL. Nominations for the 2017 Sir Julius Vogel awards are being accepted until 8.00 p.m. on March 31, 2017.

The awards recognise excellence and achhievement in science fiction, fantasy, or horror works created by New Zealanders and New Zealand residents, and first published or released in the 2016 calendar year.

We are using a web-based system for nominations this year to aid our administrative processes. Full information about the awards, including the rules and criteria for the Sir Julius Vogel Award, can be found here.

Anyone can make a nomination and it is free! To make a nomination, go to http://www.sffanz.org.nz/sjv/sjvAwards.shtml  and fill out the web-based nomination form.

Get busy reading NZ authors and watching NZ movies to find work to nominate. We have a list of New Zealand works that may be eligible for nomination here.

(6) CAMPBELL AWARD. Mark-kitteh reports, “Writertopia have set their Campbell Award eligibility page to 2017 mode. It’s obviously very sparse on 1st year eligibility at the moment, but there are a few new entries already.”

The John W. Campbell Award uses the same nomination and voting mechanism as the Hugo, even though the Campbell Award is not a Hugo.

Like the Hugo Awards, the Campbell Award voting takes place in two stages. The first stage, nomination, is open to anyone who had a Supporting or Attending membership in the previous, current, or following year’s Worldcon as of January 31. For Worldcon 75 in Helsinki, this means members of MidAmeriCon II, Worldcon 75 itself, and Worldcon 76 can nominate any eligible author. This web page helps identify eligible authors for the Campbell Award.

The official nomination page will be posted when it is available on the Worldcon 75 website. Nominations will likely close on March 31, 2017.

To be able to vote for the award, you must be a member of Worldcon 75 in Helsinki. If you are not a member of Worldcon 75 and wish to vote, you must purchase a supporting membership or an attending membership before January 31.

(7) COVERS REVEALED. Greg Ruth’s cover art for Nnedi Okorafor’s Akata Witch  and Akata Warrior has debuted online. Ruth wrote —

We often in art mistake race for color, and what this taught me was a way to skip past those initial assumptions and get right to the heart of her structure rather than her tone. This meant a lot of research into what physical features are distinctively Nigerian, and bringing those to bear on this young woman. She had to, without leaning on skin color, be authentically Nigerian and herself as a true native of her culture in every bit as much the same way in which I might need to address and accomplish the same for a Cambodian scientist, or an Icelandic luthier. We all within our tribes carry specific physical marks that stem from our localized familial genetics. Folks of a Rwandan Tutsi heritage have different physical features even from Rwandan Hutu people due to the way we as people form our tribes via family and region. Whether or not my own self-aware whiteness drove me to paying especial attention to these subtle but significant differences, or whether it was just about cleaving close to that aforementioned ethic of art making to be its best and truly objective self, I can’t say. But I do confess to feeling as someone coming from a  different cultural experience, I owe a lot to research as a means to be the best scribe for the cultural truths and realities of one that is not mine. That means, int he case of INDEH, years of research, tracking tribal origins, genetic traits and societal issues so that the Apaches look like Apaches, especially to actual real Apaches. If I had done this first as part of this ongoing series, I am not sure I would have been able to if I were being honest. I think I needed to do the other three to fully grok what it was this pair of images needed to have done. It was entirely essential to this potential hubris that Nnedi had been so excited about the previous three- and particularly to have been so spot on with them both culturally and inherent in her mind to the characters as she see saw them. Her words brought great comfort to me in times of doubt- (Thanks Nnedi!).

(8) HINES AUCTION RESULTS. Jim C. Hines’ fundraiser for Transgender Michigan brought in $1,655.55.

We know transgender youth are at a higher risk of depression and suicide, and these coming months and years could be very difficult. So I’m proud and grateful to announce that with the help of some SF/F friends and the generosity of everyone who bid and donated, we raised a total of $1,655.55 to help Transgender Michigan continue their important work.

I wanted to pass along this thank you from Susan Crocker of Transgender Michigan:

Transgender Michigan would like to thank everyone involved with the fundraiser auctions run by Jim C. Hines. All of you are helping us provide services to the transgender communities of Michigan and beyond. This will help our help line, chapters, referral system, community building, and advocacy.

(9) RULES VARIATION. Cheryl Morgan has “Arabian Nights Questions”:

Something else I did over Christmas, as a bit of a break from the Wagnerthon, was remind myself of the rules for Arabian Nights, just in case I should end up in a game at Chance & Counters. There are solo play rules, and it didn’t take long to get back into the swing of things (not to mention crippled, enslaved, and ensorcelled). However, a couple of questions occurred to me along the way and I was wondering if anyone out there could enlighten me.

First up, I remember from playing the original version that you were not allowed to win if you were gender-swapped. Indeed, I wrote a whole blog post about that a couple of years ago. Checking the rules of the new edition it appears that rule has been dropped. The card for Geas still says you can’t win while you have that status, but no other statuses seem to have that effect. Can anyone confirm this, or have I missed something?

(10) WONG OBIT. Tyrus Wong (1910-2016) who worked on Disney’s Bambi, died December 30 according to the New York Times.

When Walt Disney’s “Bambi” opened in 1942, critics praised its spare, haunting visual style, vastly different from anything Disney had done before. But what they did not know was that the film’s striking appearance had been created by a Chinese immigrant artist, who took as his inspiration the landscape paintings of the Song dynasty. The extent of his contribution to “Bambi,” which remains a high-water mark for film animation, would not be widely known for decades

(11) TODAY IN HISTORY

  • December 31, 1931 — A doctor faces horrible consequences when he lets his dark side run wild in Dr.Jekyll and Mr. Hyde, seen for the first time on this day. This was the first horror movie ever to win an Academy Award, it was for Best Actor. The movie was also nominated for Best Writing Adapted Screenplay and Best Cinematography.

dr-jekyll

  • December 31, 1935 — C. B. Darrow received a patent for his Monopoly game.
  • December 31, 1958Cosmic Monsters, aka The Strange World of Planet X, opens.

(12) TODAY’S BIRTHDAY AMPHIBIAN

  • Born December 31, 1955  — Michigan J. Frog, pictured with his dad, Chuck Jones.

frog-and-chuck-jones

(13) PROGRAM BREAKERS. The BBC discusses examples of names that break computer systems.

Some individuals only have a single name, not a forename and surname. Others have surnames that are just one letter. Problems with such names have been reported before. Consider also the experiences of Janice Keihanaikukauakahihulihe’ekahaunaele, a Hawaiian woman who complained that state ID cards should allow citizens to display surnames even as long as hers – which is 36 characters in total. In the end, government computer systems were updated to have greater flexibility in this area.

Incidents like this are known, in computing terminology, as “edge cases” – that is, unexpected and problematic cases for which the system was not designed.

I remember cracking up when I read an Ann Landers column about the soldier who didn’t have a regular name, just two initials, and once the military had processed him he was legally stuck with the name “Bonly Nonly.”

(14) PRESTIDIGITIZATION. Rich Lynch announces, “From out of the mists of nearly 30 years past, the third issue of the fanzine Mimosa is now online.  You can view it here: Mimosa #3.”

“Like everything else on the Mimosa website, the issue has been put online in eye-friendly HTML format.  This will make it easier to view, as it was originally published in two-column format and you do not need to turn pages to read an article in its entirety.”

Rich has also launched the 17th issue of his personal fanthology My Back Pages at eFanzines.com.

Issue #17 is a year-end collection that starts with a long and at times strange journey, and includes essays involving teetering glass display cases, sweaty dinner expeditions, accusations of spying, protected sanctuaries, icy traverses, well-attired mountain climbs, earthquake epicenters, frigid hitchhikes, altitude-challenged terrain, river confluences, photography challenges, clear skies, city park pow-wows, employment outsourcing, focal-point fanzines, woodland views from on high, Viennese composers, good and bad winter weather, entertaining musicals, minimalist paintings, subway mosaics, and the New York City street grid.  This issue also, for the first time in the run, includes a previously unpublished essay.”

(15) LEGENDS OF THE FALL. Jo Lindsay Walton’s blog has an impressive origin story, but he may be throttling back in 2017.

Superadded to this general siege of opinion, I had started to feel that those closest to me would sometimes, in a real casual way, slip into conversation a chance remark, not obviously aimed at me, which intimated that to hide one’s l33t under a bushel might itself be construed as vanity, and that in a way wouldn’t you say that, like, the most ostentatious blog you can have as a white middle class western cis man is no blog at all — the eyes flick anxiously to mine, linger an unsettling instant, flick away. I caved. My caving is all around you. In the end it was probably the dramatis personae itself that did it: what was reiterated strategum by strategum, however laughable the local strategic design, was this bald provocation: if so many millions of entities, living, dead, exotic, imaginary, could draw together under this one bloggenic banner, if Alex Dally MacFarlane, Alice Tarbuck, and Aliette de Bodard, if Amal El-Mohtar, Amy Sterling Casil, and Ann Leckie, if Anna MacFarlane, Benjanun Sriduangkaew, and Brad R. Torgersen?, if Carol Emshwiller, Catherynne M. Valente, and China Miéville, if Christina Scholz, Chuck Tingle, and Connie Willis, if Elizabeth Jones, George O. Smith, and George RR Martin, if Gillian Anderson, Harlan Ellison, and Jack Vance, if Jim Butcher, John C. Wright, and John Scalzi, if Jonah Sutton-Morse, Joseph Tomaras, and Kate Paulk, if Kathy Acker, Kevin J. Anderson, and Kim Stanley Robinson, if Kir Bulychev, Lois McMaster Bujold, and L. Ron Hubbard, if Larry Correia, Laura J. Mixon, and Lavie Tidhar, if Margaret Cavendish, N.K. Jemisin, and Nalo Hopkinson, if Naomi Novik, Nick Mamatas, and Paul Weimer, if R.A. Lafferty, Renay, and Robert Heinlein, if Robert Jordan, Rochita Loenen-Ruiz, and Saladin Ahmed, if Sarah Hoyt, Sofia Samatar, and Sophie Mayer, if Steven Gould, Tricia Sullivan, and Vox Day, if countless others, could all make cause together to beg this one blog of me, if even Alice Bradley Sheldon and James Tiptree Jnr. could set aside their differences to ask this one thing, why then could I not set my false modesty aside, look into my historically-determined and socially-constructed heart, and blog? But now the PhD is kinda done, so … well, this will probably go a bit dormant now.

A volcano puffing out the odd mothball.

(16) PAGES TURNED. Abigail Nussbaum closes out with “2016,  Year in Reading: Best Reads of the Year” at Asking the Wrong Questions.

The Winged Histories by Sofia Samatar (review) I wrote several thousand words about Samatar’s second novel, the companion piece to her equally wonderful A Stranger in Olondria, earlier this year, and yet I still don’t feel that I’ve fully grappled with how special and revolutionary this book is.  This despite the fact that Histories initially feels a great deal more conventional, and much easier to sum up, than Olondria.  Its use of familiar epic fantasy tropes and styles is more pronounced than the previous novel, and whereas Olondria circled around the edges of a fantasyland civil war, Histories sets its story almost in the middle of it.  What ultimately becomes clear, however, is that just like the hero of A Stranger in Olondria, the four women who tell the story of The Winged Histories are trying to give shape to their lives by casting them into literary forms–in this case, the forms of epic fantasy, even if none of them are aware of that genre or would call it that.  And, one by one, they discover the limitations of those forms, especially where women and colonized people are concerned.  Not unlike Olondria, The Winged Histories is ultimately forced to ask whether it is even possible for people to tell their own stories using the tropes and tools left to them by their oppressors.  If the entire purpose of your existence is to be the Other, or the object, in someone else’s story, can you ever take their words, their forms, and make it a story about yourself?  For most of the novel’s characters, the solution is ultimately to fall silent, and yet The Winged Histories itself rings loudly.  As much as it is a rebuke of the fantasy genre, it is also a major work within it, and one that deserves more discussion and attention than it has received.

(17) KYRA LOOKS BACK AT 2016. In comments, Kyra sketched some mini-reviews of what she read this past year.

(18) SOME GOOD IN 2016 AFTER ALL. Creature Features, the Burbank collectibles store, put together a tribute to 2016 sff.

[Thanks to JJ, Andrew Porter, Kip W, Joe Rico, and John King Tarpinian for some of these stories. Title credit goes to File 770 contributing editor of the day Ken Richards.]