Worldcon 76 Hugo Base Designers

2018 HUGO BASE. Sara Felix and Vincent Villafranca are collaborating to create the 2018 Hugo Award base.

Each artist individually has created a past Hugo base.

Villafranca produced the iconic 2013 LoneStarCon 2 Hugo base. (And he designed the new World Fantasy Award trophy.)

Sara Felix of Austin, who is also the current president of the Association of Science Fiction and Fantasy Artists, created the 2016 MidAmeriCon II Hugo base.

1943 RETRO HUGO BASE. The 1943 Retrospective Hugo Award base is being created by con chair Kevin Roche.

[Thanks to JJ for the story.]

6 thoughts on “Worldcon 76 Hugo Base Designers

  1. Okay, that’s interesting. Have any artists repeated before? I like the idea of a new designer each year, though to forestall the obvious: yes, two people collaborating is somewhat different.

    Have any Worldcon chairs designed Hugo award bases before?

    I couldn’t find a list. The Wikipedia page doesn’t link to a page just about the based or have a list of designers, and while thehugoawards.org has a page about the trophy and links to pictures that appear to have credits, the idea of clicking through 70 or however many times and taking notes makes me think . . . ye gods, someone must have a list already?!?!?!

  2. Kendall: Have any artists repeated before?

    Deb Kosiba designed the bases for the 2012, 2006, and 2005 Hugo Awards. Marina Gélineau designed the 2011 Hugo base and the 1939 Retro Hugo base (which was given in 2014). Johnna Klukas designed the 2000 and 2001 bases.

     
    Kendall: Have any Worldcon chairs designed Hugo award bases before?

    They have, but it was back when the bases were pretty basic — rectangular pedestals or truncated pyramids.

  3. Kendall on May 7, 2018 at 10:24 pm said:

    Have any Worldcon chairs designed Hugo award bases before?

    Note exactly, but I was Deputy Chair of ConAdian, the 1994 Worldcon, when my basic design for what became the 1994 Hugo Award trophy base was fleshed out by Janet Moe (who actually did the laser cutting of the base from Canadian maple wood) and Jeff Berry and enhanced by the addition of the “space metal” plates (salvage from Canadian sounding rockets, visible in the photo as the maple-leaf-shaped plates) from Stan Philippon.

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