Origins Game Fair Drops Larry Correia as Guest

Larry Correia won’t be one of the guests when the Origins Game Fair takes place June 13-17 in Columbus, OH. Shortly after publicizing that Correia had been added to the lineup, John Ward, the event’s Executive Director, received so many negative social media comments (on Twitter, particularly) that he announced Correia’s invitation has been rescinded.

Ward wrote on Facebook:

I want to discuss our invitation to Larry Correia a guest at Origins. By all counts he is a very talented author.

Unfortunately, when he was recommended I was unaware of some personal views that are specifically unaligned with the philosophy of our show and the organization.

I want to thank those of you that brought this error to our attention. Origins is an inclusive and family friendly event. We focus on fun and gaming, not discourse and controversy.

I felt it necessary to recend [sic] his invitation to participate in the show. I apologize again to those of you that were looking forward to seeing him at Origins.

John Ward, Executive Director

Many of the critical tweets mentioned Correia’s history with Sad Puppies.

Correia subsequently responded on Facebook with a statement that begins:

So I’m no longer the writer guest of honor at origins. My invitation has been revoked. It was the usual nonsense. Right after I was announced as a guest some people started throwing a temper tantrum about my alleged racist/sexist/homophobic/whatever (of course, with zero proof or actual examples), and the guy in charge (John Ward) immediately folded. He didn’t even talk to me first. He just accepted the slander and gave me the boot in an email that talked about how “inclusive” they are….

His statement also says “none of these people can ever find any actual examples of me being sexist, racist, or homophobic.”


BEFORE AND AFTER:


795 thoughts on “Origins Game Fair Drops Larry Correia as Guest

  1. “But, for LitRPG, about the best I’ve seen is the series Play to Live.”

    While I’ve been to hospital, I’ve had LitRPG for comfort reading. The type where I’ve had no reason to think very hard, only to enjoy and forget. I started with Way of the Shaman which was kind of okay at the start, then became too much epic this and that and wish fulfillment. And stupid plot twists.

    I read Awaken Online, and found the first book really good, surprisingly well done. Good enough to force it on my brother. I did try The Completionist Chronicles, but again to much wish fulfillment and cheat skills. Right now I’m trying The Land-books. They are kind of funny, well written and have humour. Again too much cheat skills and the sexism, macho speak and gratious homophobia is grating. Thank god much of the books are about quests where those parts aren’t as prominent.

    I have read a few others, but they weren’t really worth remembering. If I’d recommend any LitRPG to others, it would be Awaken Online.

  2. Mister Dalliard: Baen have Lois McMaster Bujold

    Yes, and as someone previously mentioned she has a team of beta readers who help her polish her books, which is why they have so few errors compared to the majority of Baen books.

  3. “There’s no gatekeepers. Nope, not a one. Its just that conservatives are really terrible writers. That’s the ticket.’ Yeah, okay, whatever dude.

    I believe Gene Wolfe is pretty universally recognized as a great writer, as well as a conservative. Le Guin called him ‘our Melville.’

    I read the Books of the New Sun with puzzled respect – obviously very well written, but, damn, he made you work for everything.

  4. Trying this a third time. Hopefully I have not crossed the intertubes somehow as it just vanishes.

    Rev. Bob, how would one know that there was an unserved market? Well, you could do like Christopher Paolini, dress up in costume, stand around in snow falling in mall parking lots, and sell books out of the back of your car.

    As to businesses not liking to serve some markets, you would think so. But the phrase ‘get woke, go broke’ shows that for some, the Crusade is more important than the Money. Its admirable in a way. SJW President of Major Corp, Inc. is willing to tank his stocks for a moral choice.

    I’d also point out Fox News. Their biz model was basically….hmmm, there is half of America that isnot being served. I wonder if they like News as well.

    And I think you were on about Afrofuturism. That’s the great thing about the Glorious New World. You can have your Afrofuturism. The dull as dishwater sorts probably never saw much of a market in it. And they might well have been wrong. But now, it does not matter if they were wrong or right.

    Now, I think I missed one or two, but hey, a lot of folks wanted to express their undying admiration for my brilliance, so if I missed your sloppy kisses, so sorry.

    In any case, to sum up, Bigotry or the notion that Certain People Should Not Be Allowed to Do Certain Things is alive and well in America.

    I have no connection to Mr. Correia other than being able to recognize him if he walked past.

    While finding it is a matter of extraordinary difficulty, the existence of the best is not in doubt.

    The gatekeepers had created a boring, dying, stale world. Thankfully technology has liberated us, and continues to do so every more from the dead hand of the past. Get a KU subscription (I also have no connection to Amazon.)

    Mr. Correia demonstrated his point. No conservative was particularly surprised by this as this sort of behavior is what we expect. Luckily, most of us are like honey badger. We just don’t care.

    I hope this discourse has enlightened you. Even if you find me wrong in every particular, know that most of my views are not that extreme. You need to understand where you have gone wrong, if an assumption of mala fides in general is considered reasonable.

    As to the gracious Meredith’s question:
    1. Lawdog Files. Its funny cop stories in the tradition of Its Always a Full Moon?? My favorite story was where Santa dumped a load of ice water onto the crook hiding under the police car after chasing subject up and down the icy road.

    2. Opera Aeta Alterna?? Probably Vox’s best. A deep short story on disbelief, belief, and the courtesy shown to a believer by an unbeliever.

    3. The Unexpected Enlightenment of Rachel Griffin. Narnia crossed with Potter and Fringe. Quite wonderful. I liked David Weber, but his girls are ‘men with breasts’. This heroine is actually a girl.

    4. The Deed of Paksennarrion. Probably the best post-Tolkien I’ve come across. Her scene where she forgives her enemies in the last book is epic.

    5. The General series (not the later ones). Probably the best MilSF in existence. So much knowledge that its aweinspiring.

    6. Caliphate. Because how can you not like someone who is scary enough to make Dracula puke blood. The simple presence of this book has forestalled at least one alien invasion. Not for the faint of heart.

    7. Fire Upon the Deep. Like Monster Hunter International, has some of the best opening lines in modern SF. Vinge does something that not many authors do. He shows both the good and the bad. You can think up some critics of the Singularity, and Vinge has already been there, often enough.

    I would not swear to this being the best seven out there, but its a very good list. YMMV, as you guys seem to think John Scalzi is anything more than a decent mid-list writer (I read Old Man’s War…its was okay, although he needs to learn to develop his ideas more. The ending where the Dyson Sphere OP Aliens of Doom decide due to ‘religion’ to have a dance fight, or was it a duel of champions was …pathetic.) I understand on your side, he’s considered the Second Coming of Some Really Great Writer or Something. He’s not bad, but any of the books above, or dozens others are superior.

    PS: Oh yes, Clarke and his end. Summerlands? Well, what he’s rumored to have done would seem to have barred him from any pleasant domain. I don’t know the requirements for entering the Summerlands, but one would think the pagan gods would have certain standards.

    As to my not being sad, let it be said that I don’t even want Josef Stalin to suffer in eternal darkness. I understand that if it must be, then it is the most merciful thing, Almighty God can do, but I have no appetite for such destruction.

    In any case, see ya’. Don’t applaud, just throw money.g to find if I’ve been banned or something, so if this comes up three times, oh well. Or if I’m just doing something else that the computer don’t like.

  5. JJ: The number of slate voters who supported TGE was almost certainly marginal (as one Puppy put it, the protagonist was a “loser”).

    Not so, as is easily refuted by the 2015 voting statistics. When the last slate novel, Jim Butcher’s Skin Game, was eliminated, here’s what happened to its 1013 votes:

    237 No Preference
    123 Ancillary Sword
    249 The Goblin Emperor
    404 Three-Body Problem

    The only reason The Goblin Emperor was still in striking distance at the last stage of the runoff was because they inherited so many Jim Butcher votes.

    And I don’t think anybody’s eyesight is good enough to spot which ballots had the puppy paw-prints on them at that stage.

  6. Gene Wolfe might not be the best example since he has been writing for over 30 years and I think most of the claims of anti-conservative say that it has been increasing over about that same period so he just got in before the gates were locked.

    Just my two cents worth, but there are some editors I have known who would turn up their nose at a too strongly conservative book and some who would publish Hitler if he was a live and they thought they could get away with their piles of money before the lench mobs got them. How the current population of them breaks down and how it has changed over time I leave to someone better informed.

  7. I don’t know if Weisskopf has literally said that their audience doesn’t care about typos and errors, so they don’t bother to fix them, but I personally heard her say (perhaps slightly paraphrased) at Manticon that they don’t copyedit David Weber’s work because he’s so bad with deadlines that copyediting would only only make his submissions that much later. IIRC, she also added a caveat that she didn’t think he needed much copyediting. At the time, I had the impression that Baen was making an exception for Weber because he was one of their best-selling authors, even with minimal or no copyediting.

    Personally, with all the eArcs they do, I would expect that they would clean up any egregious errors before final release. On the other hand I’ve seen a couple of cases where Baen misspelled authors names on either the cover or the spine, which I find shocking. I’d have to try to find them again to see if they ever fixed them.

  8. So Benevolent Airships donating books to children’s libraries in the hopes of creating more fans? Sounds good. I like that idea.

    I had suggested school libraries rather than children’s libraries — certainly, there’s a big overlap, but I would expect most children’s libraries would want YA books and younger, since adult books would be carries by the adult library, while school libraries might carry general SF/fantasy beyond YA.

    But it’s entirely possible my expectations are completely off-base.

  9. @Eric Ashley: Christopher Paolini, whose first novel was published by his parents’ publishing company? Whose book was picked up by Knopf on the recommendation of Carl Hiaasen and subsequently became a bestseller? That Christopher Paolini?

    Also, look up the Sinclair Broadcast Group – a heavily Conservative media company who own a whole bunch of local news networks, and find the Last Week Tonight episode where they cut together reams of clips of newscasters creepily reading out the same heavily conservative message. Half of your country isn’t being served by the news – it’s not the half you think.

  10. Dear David,

    – “There’s an old fannish saying that anything fans do three times is an Established Tradition. This is the second.”

    No, it’s at least the fourth, to my knowledge, in modern times (for the purposes of this conversation, anything that happened in the previous century is ancient history)**. That doesn’t make it a common practice. There’s a good reason for that. It’s damned embarrassing for the concom.

    I think your concern is misplaced. You’ve been focusing on what happens to the GoH as if that’s the most important aspect of the problem. It’s not. The convention is being put on for the attendees, not the guest of honor nor the concom. The attendees’s experience is paramount. When the concom and/or the guests start to think that their experience is more important, you’ve got a problem. It’s been known to happen.

    For the sake of argument, let us accept that Origins concom did screw up by inviting a guest who, if they’d done any reasonable amount of checking, they would’ve decided was a poor fit for their convention and their attendees.

    (If you think that was an incorrect assessment by Origins, that’s an argument you might make. It is not the one you’re making.)

    The fuck-up has happened. It is on the concom’s head, no question of that. They will take a reputation hit for it, and they deserve to.

    What you’re arguing is that in order to not discomfort the GoH, they should make the entire convention live with their fuck-up. Which, if their assessment has been correct, means that a whole bunch of attendees will have a less good time than they would have otherwise (possibly, even will the GoH, but they are one person).

    To argue that this is the right or honorable thing to do means not putting the enjoyment of the attendees first, that how the GoH feels is more important than how the attendees will feel.

    There are many concoms that would do just that. Rather than take the personal reputation hits, they’ll act as though they didn’t fuck up and risk the attendees’s experiences. That does not make their behavior admirable.

    **( no, I’m not going to name the other two I’m thinking of, because I’m really not interested in reading more diversionary rehashing of history, which is what would inevitably follow)

    – pax \ Ctein
    [ Please excuse any word-salad. Dragon Dictate in training! ]
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  11. Mike Glyer; The only reason The Goblin Emperor was still in striking distance at the last stage of the runoff was because they inherited so many Jim Butcher votes.

    Yet not nearly so many as was inherited by The Third-Body Problem (and in any case, there were a lot of voters who ranked Skin Game above No Award who weren’t Puppies). In fact, 3BP inherited right about the same amount of voters as those who ranked Vox Day above Jim Minz.

    It’s not at all unreasonable to believe that of 400+ Puppy voters, at least 200 of them voted for The Three-Body Problem over The Goblin Emperor. Which doesn’t change the fact that 3BP’s win was legitimate.

  12. @David K. M. Klaus–

    Bolgeo’s zine, several issues of it, of his selection, were included in the Hugo packet the year he was nominated. It was not just one joke. One example did become emblematic, but there was in fact quite a bit of material of varying levels of offensiveness.

    Corriea created the Puppies and controlled the campaigns the first three years. Many of us spent time we can never get back, reading his arguments and attempting to engage him fairly, honestly, and in Hope of achieving better mutual understanding.

    As I said, time we can never get back.

    I have to agree with JJ. You say you’re familiar with the Puppy kerfuffle, but it does seem your familiarity may be pretty superficial.

    I agree that withdrawing an invitation like this after it’s accepted and announced is quite bad. The problem us that not withdrawing it would also have been bad, not just for the convention, but for attendees of views and/or personal identities Correia has been willing to attack when displeased. It’s not that I think the con did the right thing. It’s that I think that once Correia was announced as GoH, there wasn’t a “right thing” available for them to do. All the possible choices were bad, because they didn’t do their due diligence first.

  13. Eric Ashley: the phrase ‘get woke, go broke’ shows

    … nothing, apart from that some conservative came up with a pithy statement for a claimed, but undocumented, phenomenon.

     
    Eric Ashley: Mr. Correia demonstrated his point.

    The only thing Correia demonstrated was that he could rally a bunch of mindless goons to attempt a freeping of the Hugos, while dragging in a neo-Nazi as a collaborator who ended up pwning his ass.

    But if that’s not the “point” you’re thinking of, you’ll have to state what you think his point was, and provide links to evidence that he proved it.

  14. Dear Mike and JJ,

    I admit to have gotten a bit lost in the “who voted for what” discussion. A question for clarification — beyond the particular slate they were promoting, were the Sad Puppies under any marching orders regarding the other books on the ballot?

    If they were not instructed who to vote for in second, etc. place, and they just voted for which books they liked best, their votes are just as properly legitimate (under the rules and customs of Hugo voting before the Sad Puppies tried to game the hell out of them) as anybody else’s.

    It really doesn’t matter how many of the Sad Puppies preferred TBP over TGE if that was indeed their individual preference as voters and not some block voting to “send a message.”

    Somebody should be able to answer that definitively — it’s not like they were secretive in their campaign.

    – pax \ Ctein
    [ Please excuse any word-salad. Dragon Dictate in training! ]
    ======================================
    — Ctein’s Online Gallery. http://ctein.com 
    — Digital Restorations. http://photo-repair.com 
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  15. Dear Lis,

    I suspect our postings crossed in cyberspace, but if not:

    I would posit that doing what is best for the body of attendees is a much better choice than doing what is best for the GoH.

    Either one is good for many negative karma points, but one garners a lot more than the other.

    pax / Ctein

  16. JJ: Feel free to walk us through your Vox Day/Jim Minz numbers and explain what relevance they have to the Best Novel.

    “It’s not at all unreasonable” is begging the question. It’s just as not-unreasonable to show that TGE benefitted from redistributed slate votes.

  17. @robinareid

    I’ll have to go back and re-read, but while I remember one person disliking both, has anybody talked about liking or loving them both?

    I liked both. I waver between liking and loving TGE, between liking and meh-ing TBP. I voted TBP above TGE at the time. Despite the clunky writing and cardboard characterization, I found it an exciting book. I never could get through the beginning of the second book. The time investment was too great.

    @Eric Ashley – I second the Vinge rec (not an unpopular opinion here). am a bit confused at your Scalzi claim. It seems you are only half-engaged in a discussion with us, and half responding to a straw commentariat of your own creation.

    Not gonna engage with your understanding of politics or capitalism, as it’s straw turtles all the way down.

  18. Logically there has to be a best.

    Nuh-uh, as the kids say.

    Also, magic mirrors aside, there is no “fairest of them all,” either.

    Logically (and definitionally), subjective judgments ain’t objective.

  19. Ctein: I could be wrong, but I swear I’ve seen your disclaimer about Dragon Dictate in training for months, if not longer. Just how long does it take to get it right? Is it just a crappy product, or is voice recognition still that immature a technology that nobody is really getting it right reliably?

  20. Ctein: if that was indeed their individual preference as voters and not some block voting to “send a message.” Somebody should be able to answer that definitively

    No one’s going to be able to answer that, in any way close to definitively — unless you know of a database where the Puppies registered what they voted for (and were honest about it).

    The question isn’t whether their votes were legitimate. They were members, their votes were legitimate (as I’ve already said).

    Legitimacy is a question in terms of whether what got on the ballot through slating actually belonged there. And that’s a moot point. It got there. Worldcon members voted on the ballot they were given, and got the results they were given. We’ll never know for sure what the 5 finalists would have been if the Puppies hadn’t interfered, and we’ll never know what would have won.

  21. @Ctein – VD made some noise about digging TBP. It was his Aristotelian out to ensure victory in defeat. I don’t know how much that influenced his RP party, as my understanding is that they tended to vote for just the ridiculous stuff, and nothing Hugo-worthy. And I have no idea how much that influenced the SP party.

  22. Mike Glyer: “It’s not at all unreasonable” is begging the question. It’s just as not-unreasonable to show that TGE benefitted from redistributed slate votes.

    You mean, apart from the fact that Three-Body Problem was #1 on VD’s voting slate, and The Goblin Emperor was #3?

    [edited for accuracy]

  23. Ctein: If they were not instructed who to vote for in second, etc. place, and they just voted for which books they liked best, their votes are just as properly legitimate (under the rules and customs of Hugo voting before the Sad Puppies tried to game the hell out of them) as anybody else’s.

    No matter how or for what reason they voted, those were legal votes, so how are you deciding what is “properly legitimate”?

    Vox Day told Rabid Puppies “They are my recommendations for the 2015 nominations, and I encourage those who value my opinion on matters related to science fiction and fantasy to nominate them precisely as they are.” Analysis of the nominating stats after they were released shows that the Rabid Puppies did not all vote the straight ticket. And yet enough did to lock up almost the entire ballot.

    (Everybody tends to talk about the Sad Puppies, including those who were behind the idea and want to keep feeling important, but they did very little damage to the Hugos before Vox Day involved the readers of his blog.)

  24. Dear Kurt,

    Even if one believes one can apply objective criteria to evaluating literature (snort), “best” is a multidimensional evaluation. It does not lie on one axis, there is not one single criterion by which one can make this evaluation. Plot, characterization, dramatic impact, emotional hit, complexity, and I could go on. Consequently, there will be many “bests” along many different axes. And even more-many bests depending on how one weights and combines those various axes.

    If one even believed in objectivity. I repeat: snort.

    And because I am a total fanboi and I have not said it before, please don’t ever stop doing Astro City. It is sooooo wonderful.

    – pax \ Ctein
    [ Please excuse any word-salad. Dragon Dictate in training! ]
    ======================================
    — Ctein’s Online Gallery. http://ctein.com 
    — Digital Restorations. http://photo-repair.com 
    ======================================

  25. @JJ Pretty sure his point was that books by middling-level authors who write pretty good adventure yarns (with lumps of political ranting mixed in) should get awards over better books, *if* the author in question is conservative enough.

    And yes, I’ve not exactly tight with that crowd, but I’ve never heard anybody say anything about woke and broke. It’s probably another of those wacky theories like the one with absolutely everyone reading Saul Alinsky and basing their entire lives off that pamphlet. They all agree that everyone who isn’t them is brainwashed. Usually after asking a local cleric to cast, “Protection from Irony”.

  26. Dear Mike,

    I’m totally on your side in this. I think it’s a stoopid road to go down.

    What I’m getting at is the argument that some people are raising that the Sad Puppies vote, after their top slate was kicked out, in some way inappropriately changed the results. Unless they can produce some evidence that VD or whoever told them to vote for TBP or TGE, none of the rest matters. Whether they voted lockstep or not with the SP/RP recommendations, if these weren’t part of the recommendations there is no argument to be made.

    They, or somebody, needs to come up with a citation before they can follow that road.

    – pax \ Ctein
    [ Please excuse any word-salad. Dragon Dictate in training! ]
    ======================================
    — Ctein’s Online Gallery. http://ctein.com 
    — Digital Restorations. http://photo-repair.com 
    ======================================

  27. Christopher Paolini, whose first novel was published by his parents’ publishing company? Whose book was picked up by Knopf on the recommendation of Carl Hiaasen and subsequently became a bestseller? That Christopher Paolini?

    Who apparently proved that no one knew there was a market for farmboy-errant novels with dragons…

  28. JJ: You mean, apart from the fact that Three-Body Problem was #1 on VD’s voting slate, and The Goblin Emperor was #3?

    And The Skin Game was his #2 — yet those votes split among all three remaining candidates.

    But I’m glad you’ve come around to agree with my other point —

    “No one’s going to be able to answer that, in any way close to definitively — unless you know of a database where the Puppies registered what they voted for (and were honest about it).”

  29. And because I am a total fanboi and I have not said it before, please don’t ever stop doing Astro City. It is sooooo wonderful.

    Thanks! We will, indeed, stop someday, but not soon.

    Glad you’re enjoying it.

  30. @kathodus – just saw your post about Vinge/Scalzi- you made the point about the straw world that these guys like to fight more clearly than I.

    I suspect that with Scalzi in particular, they are so obsessed with him, (and assume we are too) because his first few big books were milsf and so he seems like a traitor to them, he should be on *their* side, darnit!

  31. Dear JJ,

    Ah, OK, citation. Never mind. I still agree with Mike, but there is an argument to be made.

    Wish i could delete my posts, grump.

    pax / Ctein

  32. Vinge’s aliens, the Tines, were seriously some of the best. I fear Deepness in the Sky didn’t hold me the same way, but possibly that was more about where I was at that moment than the book.

    I guess I didn’t get the memo that Scalzi was the second coming. I like him enormously as a person, and thus have a terrible dread of reading his books, a recurring problem with authors I meet before I’ve read their stuff. (Except Shadow War of the Night Dragons, which was fun.)

  33. Maximillian: It’s probably another of those wacky theories like the one with absolutely everyone reading Saul Alinsky

    The hilarious thing is that I had never even heard of Saul Alinsky until the Puppies started bandying his name around, and so I went and Googled him (and then promptly forgot most of what I’d read about him within a month or so). I’ve seen a great many other progressives say the same thing.

    It’s as if neocons go digging through the distant past trying to find straw bogeymen that they can use to accuse progressives of something something something.

  34. “And I prefer to be called ‘Hampus’ as I find titles insulting”
    .

    “When I am asked if I should be addressed as “Mr. Ctein,” I reply that there are no honorifics attached to Ctein.

    “Peculiarly, nobody has ever argued that point. Life is a mystery…”
    .

    And an attempt to address a stranger respectfully is taken as an insult by one, and would be (presumably) simply corrected by another.

    I guess I never should be the one making First Contact….

  35. Ctein–

    Yes, disinviting the GoH in this situation is the less-bad option, hurting fewer people and doing less damage to the convention. But at this point, it’s strictly a question of choosing the less-bad option of two bad choices. Not doing their due diligence has eliminated their chance to do the right thing.

  36. Mike Glyer: But I’m glad you’ve come around to agree with my other point

    I’ve always believed that, and if you go back through my posts in this thread, you’ll see that I never said otherwise. Which is why I thought it was bizarre that you were getting so defensive about it.

  37. @Eric Ashley: “on your side”

    Meh. There really aren’t any sides except yours and “everyone else” (not a cohesive “side”). Out here in the real world, opinions vary. Even the commenters here don’t agree on everything (shock!).

    And despite the obsessive hate-on people like Beale and Torgersen (sp?) have for Scalzi, opinions in the real world (opinions of people who don’t make a career out of hating a specific person) vary, including here in the comments. Some like his blog, some like his writing, some like both, and some like neither. Some like some of his books but not others. Etc. There’s not this consistency of opinion on him you seem to imagine.

    Personally, I frequently like Scalzi’s blog, but as with any blog, some entries are of no interest to me (so I skip them). I’ve enjoyed (to varying degrees) everything I’ve read of Scalzi’s, but, since I’m a Bad Fan, I haven’t read everything. One or two of his books sound like they’re Not My thing; a few things, though, I just haven’t gotten to yet. Let me introduce you to my TBR stack, er, mountain, er, at this point I should just call it a small island. 😉

    “if I’ve been banned”

    This isn’t MGC; you won’t get banned for disagreeing with anyone or even everyone. @Mike Glyer is a gracious host (hence some folks call him “OGH” – “Our Gracious Host”) and rarely bans – and then, only for astoundingly egregious behavior.

  38. ” Luckily, most of us are like honey badger. We just don’t care.”

    That was a very, very long rant from someone that claims to not care.

  39. Ctein: Ah, OK, citation

    A lot of the people who became Filers in the summer  months from April to August of 2015, like me, got to see the Puppy actions and words in excruciating detail, and still have a pretty good memory of what went down and when (including the actual slates, and many of the Puppies’ most egregious racist, sexist, and Worldcon/Hugo-derogatory comments). Mike covered a lot of it in great detail.

    So I know that VD published “here’s what to nominate” and “here’s what to vote for” lists each year from 2015 through 2017, and I forget that not everyone knows that happened.

    Anyone who is feeling bereft at having missed all or part of it can click on The Compleat Litter of Puppy Roundup Titles at the top of the blog and re-visit the 2015 events in living color, if they have the time and stomach for it. (eyerolling injury insurance is highly recommended)

  40. David K. M. Klaus on May 15, 2018 at 10:17 pm said:

    And an attempt to address a stranger respectfully is taken as an insult by one, and would be (presumably) simply corrected by another.

    Don’t worry, you are free to, but in no way required to, address me as your royal highness.

    Iphinome works as well, not picky.

  41. Kurt Busiek:

    “Thanks! We will, indeed, stop someday, but not soon.

    Glad you’re enjoying it.”

    I tried to buy the second volume, but it was out of print according to my local comics dealer. Do you know if there are plans for some new collectors edition or something like that? Or should I just try to find it second hand?

  42. Lis wrote:

    “Corriea created the Puppies and controlled the campaigns the first three years. Many of us spent time we can never get back, reading his arguments and attempting to engage him fairly, honestly, and in Hope of achieving better mutual understanding.

    “As I said, time we can never get back.”
    .

    I realize that and I’m sorry that it happened. I’m particularly aware of the limits of time these days, for a reason you know.
    .

    “I have to agree with JJ. You say you’re familiar with the Puppy kerfuffle, but it does seem your familiarity may be pretty superficial.
    .

    I only read about it vs. being directly involved as so many others were, so that can make a difference in how indelibly some memories were created, I have to admit.

    Also, I’m more willing to accept your opinion as you’re a friend who I consider to be honest, vs. whoever is hiding behind the initials JJ, who started by essentially saying I was a liar about my motives and never posted in reply to me with something which wasn’t a snide insult.

    JJ: -3 credibility points, one for hiding from responsibility for your writing, and two for deliberately acting like a Puppy in being doubly rude to someone who hadn’t harmed you, hadn’t insulted you, and had no ill feelings toward you up to that point.

  43. I tried to buy the second volume, but it was out of print according to my local comics dealer. Do you know if there are plans for some new collectors edition or something like that? Or should I just try to find it second hand?

    It’ll be brought back into print at some point, but I don’t know how soon. So second-hand might work. Or the whole series is available digitally.

  44. David M. Klaus:

    “And an attempt to address a stranger respectfully is taken as an insult by one, and would be (presumably) simply corrected by another.”

    He, it can be kind of confusing with different cultures, right? In Sweden, we had an active policy of removing honorifics from speech. It started around the 60:s and was more or less done by the 70:s. Before that you used titles or formal “you” with regards to others. So when I hear a title, it irritates me, because it implies that my value system has a base in the 50:s and hasn’t developed much since then, implies that I am anti-egalitarian. Which of course can’t be easy for people from other countries to understand, especially when they think they are showing respect instead.

    So my apology if it came out as if I saw your comment as an insult. That was not my meaning and I should have expressed my dislike for titles in a better way.

  45. Kendall: and then, only for astoundingly egregious behavior.

    There’s that, and in addition another subjective factor which amounts to whether my asnwer to “Do I want to host this on my blog?” is yes or no. Like, if somebody wrote a lengthy comment extolling Castalia House books. Which is what I thought somebody (no names please) had done til I researched who had published the titles.

  46. Lisa Hertel wrote:

    “Since the invitation was recinded pretty shortly after it was issued, I doubt many such preparations had been made.”
    .

    I’m sure you’re correct, as I didn’t know the short amount of time involved here when I first commented; that this could begin to happen more, could become acceptable concom behavior, has been my concern here, though, because if it does it’s going to someday really hurt someone in those areas.

  47. Btw, I always have a feeling I’m being terribly impolite in some English speaking countries, because I do not really know If I’m supposed to say ‘Sir’ or ‘Mr’ to people in different situations. I also do not have the reflex to loudly say sorry to people when we meet in doorways or are in the way for each other.

    Americans always make me feel like a rude country bumpkin.

  48. @Mike Glyer: BTW I realize the peril in summarizing my personal impressions of your moderation style. ::blush:: I trust no one thinks I was speaking for you. 🙂

    @Hampus Eckerman: I had no idea regarding honorifics in Sweden. Thanks for elaborating on that.

  49. David M. Klaus: JJ: -3 credibility points, one for hiding from responsibility for your writing, and two for deliberately acting like a Puppy in being doubly rude to someone who hadn’t harmed you, hadn’t insulted you, and had no ill feelings toward you up to that point.

    I have no idea what “hiding from responsibility for your writing” means.

     
    David M. Klaus: deliberately acting like a Puppy in being doubly rude to someone who hadn’t harmed you, hadn’t insulted you, and had no ill feelings toward you up to that point.

    Oh, were we supposed to be publishing credibility ratings on commenters? I didn’t realize.

    David M. Klaus: –10 credibility points for repeatedly saying “I haven’t bothered to read this person’s blog or look up any information about this thing, that thing, or the other thing, but I haven’t seen anything to back up the comments which have been made here”.

    David M. Klaus: –2 credibility points for wasting peoples’ time having to educate you and then getting snippy when that is pointed out to you.

    David M. Klaus: –3 credibility points for snottily claiming that you are familiar with the Puppy history, then accusing other people of being rude for pointing out your ignorance and the fact that you have made no effort to remedy that ignorance.

     
    If you think that repeatedly calling into question the statements of other people here without any legitimate reason for doing so is not rude or insulting, then I recommend that you consider taking some courses in social skills.

  50. Rev. Bob on May 15, 2018 at 12:39 pm said:
    …if I’m reading a book and spot a typo, I highlight it because It Tasks Me

    At first I was all “A-HAH!! That’s who’s doing that!”
    But then I realized that Rev Bob assuredly isn’t the type of person to mark up library books here (which always throws me out of what I’m reading and makes me want to track them down and take their pencils and library cards away). No one here would defile library books, of course.

    As for books currently read–I think that was a question somewhere up the list; I’ve just finished Elizabeth Bear’s new Karen Memery book “Stone Mad”. Not very long but very enjoyable. I’d like to see more of her. And the anthology “Robots vs Fairies” was fun.
    I’ve been reading more out-of-genre books lately–a number of ‘celebrity memoir’ things. If that’s your thing then I’d suggest Nile Rodger’s “Le Freak” for a look at the music world; Illeana Douglas’ “I Blame Dennis Hopper” for indie films and “My Mother was Nuts” by Penny Marshall just for fun.

    I couldn’t get through 3BP and TGE wasn’t even on my radar. I’ll admit to a goblin/fantasy/elf bias.

    Finally, everyone knows the winner is decided by talent, swimsuit and question.

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