Atanas P. Slavov (1947-2022)

Atanas P. Slavov

By Valentin D. Ivanov: Bulgarian fandom has lost one of its leading figures: on May 6, 2022 the prominent Bulgarian SF writer, artist, translator, fan, and thinker Atanas P. Slavov passed away after a long illness.

He was born in the town of Burgas and in late 1960s organized the first genre clubs and organization in then-communist Bulgaria. He left us with one novel, The Psychoprogrammed [Man], scores of stories and essays. Most importantly, we will remember him for his influence on countless fans whose lives he touched, spreading the ideas about the constant search for paths to a better, brighter and cleaner future in every thinkable aspect – from moral to ecological and technological.

His stories have been published in Bulgarian, English, German, Russian and Ukrainian.

A gallery of his impressive artwork is here.

He was founder and Editor-in-Chief of the English-language magazine Orphia, which only lasted one issue.

Three times he won the European Science Fiction Society’s ESFS Award, in 2003 for his fanzine Fenternet, in 2004 he was honored in the Best Promoter (of European SF) category, and his almanac Fantastika won Best Magazine in 2015.

Probably, the closest counterparts of Atanas P. Slavov from the Western SF milieu are Kim Stanley Robinson, with his optimism and his positive look at the future, and Stanislaw Lem, with his thoughtful and analytic approach to the world.

Artwork by Atanas P. Slavov

Pixel Scroll 4/20/22 “Sorry We’re Late, Kate,” The Sweet Birds Sang

(1) FROM THE LIFE OF JMS. J. Michael Straczynski has released an unlocked Patreon post of a chapter he cut from his autobiography: “Chapter Cut from Bio: The Great Bible Battle”. Here’s his introduction:

As noted elsewhere, I cut a good chunk of material from my autobiography Becoming Superman because there was just too much stuff for one book and I didn’t want to do this in two volumes.  It was already almost too long.  

This is actually one of the better, and in part most heartfelt chapters in the whole book, but it was also one that could be cut without damaging the structure of the book because it was for all intents and purposes unconnected from what came before and what followed.  It also marks one the first times that something I’d done earned me death threats (yes, there were others).  

So I present this to you, good patrons, seen here for the first time anywhere, ever.

(2) AWARD RETURNING. Submissions are being taken for the 2022 IAFA Imagining Indigenous Futurisms Award through December 1, 2022.

The IAFA Imagining Indigenous Futurisms Award recognizes emerging authors who use science fiction to address issues of Indigenous sovereignty and self-determination.

(3) AWARD FLAMBEAU. Serge Ecker’s video takes you inside the foundry to witness the “Making of the European Science Fiction Award 2022 – LuxCon, the 2022 EuroCon”. Molten metal and flames aplenty.

(4) LOVE IS BLUE. Somtow Sucharitkul is creating “Terrestrial Passions: a Regency Romance with Aliens” on Kindle Vella. The wry titles of the first four installments set the tone — “A Most Peculiar Frenchman”, “Universally Acknowledged”, “Dissuasion”, and “Incense and Insensibility”.

The widowed Mrs. Dorrit lives a marginal existence with her brother, a vicar, and twin daughters in a cottage on the estate of her wealthy cousin, Lord Chuzzlewit, in the West London village of Little Chiswick. As the season dawns and a rakish Earl takes up residence in the once-abandoned Flanders House nearby, their lives, and the marital prospects of Emma’s daughters, become immeasurably complicated when a starship lands in her apple orchard. By World Fantasy Award winning author S.P. Somtow

Where did this art come from? Somtow says, “Hilarious cover created for my Vella Serial by an Austrian designer on Fiverr.” No name given.

(5) VERTLIEB HONORED. Steve Vertlieb shared today that he has been honored “for his dedication and tireless activity to keep Miklos Rozsa’s memory alive,” by the Hungarian Hollywood Council. Congratulations, Steve!

(6) HOW KENTUCKY LEGISLATION WILL AFFECT LIBRARIES. “New Kentucky Law Hands Control of Libraries to Local Politicians” reports Publishers Weekly.

In a move that has alarmed library supporters, a new law in Kentucky will give politicians control over local library boards in the state. According to a report in the Lexington Herald Leader, SB 167—which came back from the dead last week with a dramatic veto override—will empower local politicians to “appoint whomever they want to library boards and block major library spending.”

Last week, the bill appeared to be killed after Kentucky governor Andy Beshear vetoed it, and the Kentucky House of Representatives fell short of the necessary votes to override. But in a surprise maneuver, supporters of the bill were able to revive the bill for another override vote—and this time, four representatives who had not voted in the previous effort voted to override Beshear’s veto, carrying the measure into law. The law is scheduled to take effect in January 2023.

According to the Lexington Herald Leader, Kentucky Republicans say the issue is “accountability,” pointing out that most of Kentucky’s public library boards can levy taxes and should therefore “answer to someone elected by voters.” But critics say the bill is in fact a thinly veiled effort to “politicize” library boards, and give unprecedented control over library operations to politicians….

(7) CAN IT BE THEY DON’T LOVE US? Lise Andreasen sends “A warm hug to everybody who feels physical pain at ‘it’s not science fiction’ and ‘it’s science fiction but’” in her roundup of critics’ slighting comments about the sff genre in “They Bellow… Dune edition”.

(8) MEDIA BIRTHDAY.

1955 [Compiled by Cat Eldridge.] Sixty-seven years ago, George Pal’s fourth genre film premiered. It was the Conquest of Space and it had two firsts, our first trip to Mars and our first space station, a marvel in itself. It was based off The Conquest of Space by Willy Ley and Chesley Bonestell. The former author has a crater on the far side of the moon named after him. Later in life he became a believer In cryptozoology. Ohhh well. (I’ve actually met Loren Coleman, the prime proponent of that fake science. Don’t get me started on that subject.) 

Ley and Bonestell would win an International Fantasy Award for the book. Bonestell would be recognized with Special Award for Beautiful and Scientifically Accurate Illustrations at DisCon II (1974). He later won a Hugo for Best Related Work for The Art of Chesley Bonestell at ConJosé (2002). He’d also pick up a Retro Hugo at Noreascon 4 (2004) for Best Professional Artist. 

(Pal had hired Bonestall to the technical adviser on Destination Moon buthe bought the book’s film rights at the urging of Ley.) 

The screenplay was by James O’Hanlon from an adaptation by Barre Lyndon, Phil Yordan and George Worthing Yates. O’Hanlon had done the Destination Moon screenplay which won a Retro Hugo at the Millennium Philcon.

It was directed by Byron Haskin who is best remembered for directing The War of the Worlds, one of many films where he teamed with producer George Pal. Bonestell who is known for his photorealistic paintings of outer space, provided the film’s space matte paintings.

So what did critics think about when it was released? 

The Variety said of it that, “When Byron Haskin’s direction has a chance at action and thrills they come over well, but most of the time the pacing is slowed by the talky script fashioned from the adaptation of the Chesley Bonestell-Willy Ley book by Philip Yordan, Barre Lyndon and George Worthington Yates.”

The New York Times likewise liked it: “THERE is very little doubt about who should receive a generous amount of credit and praise for ‘Conquest of Space,’ yesterday’s science-fiction entry at the Palace. They are the special effects artists, John P. Fulton, Irmin Roberts, Paul Lerpae, Ivyle Burks and Jan Domela. In telling the fanciful tale of man’s first trip to Mars, they created top-flight effects such as ‘the wheel,’ a self-contained station orbiting about earth, rocket flights in space and a horrendous near-collision with an asteroid. These facets of the Paramount production—and fortunately they are many and frequent—are much to marvel at. But then there is a story. As plots go in this type of unearthly entertainment—and it is nothing more than broad, undemanding entertainment—it is not offensive.”

Audience reviewers at Rotten Tomatoes do not like it at all giving at just a twenty percent rating. Damned if I know why this is so. 

(9) TODAY’S BIRTHDAYS.

[Compiled by Cat Eldridge.]

  • Born April 20, 1908 Donald Wandrei. Writer who had sixteen stories in Astounding Stories and fourteen stories in Weird Tales, plus a smattering elsewhere, all in the Twenties and Thirties. The Web of Easter Island is his only novel. He was the co-founder with August Derleth of Arkham House. He received the World Fantasy Award for Lifetime Achievement, and he’s a member of First Fandom Hall of Fame. Only his “Raiders of The Universe“ short story and his story in Famous Fantastic Mysteries (October 1939 issue) are available at the usual digital suspects. (Died 1987.)
  • Born April 20, 1937 George Takei, 85. Hikaru Sulu on the original Trek. And yes, I know that Vonda McIntyre wouldn’t coin the first name until a decade later in her Entropy Effect novel. Is it canon? Post-Trek, he would write Mirror Friend, Mirror Foe with Robert Asprin. By the way, I’m reasonably sure that his first genre roles were actually dubbing the English voices of Professor Kashiwagi of Rodan! The Flying Monster and the same of the Commander of Landing Craft of Godzilla Raids Again.  Oh, and it won’t surprise you he played Sulu again in the fan fic video Star Trek: Phase II episode, “World Enough and Time.”
  • Born April 20, 1939 Peter S. Beagle, 83. I’ve known him for about twenty years now I realize, met him but once in that time. He’s quite charming. (I had dinner with him here once several years back. His former agent is not so charming.)  My favorite works? A Fine and Private PlaceThe Folk of The AirTamsinSummerlong and In Calabria. He won the Novelette Hugo at L.A. Con IV for “Two Hearts”. And he has the World Fantasy Award for Lifetime Achievement. He is working on a new novel now I’m told by his editor Deborah Grabien, another friend of mine.
  • Born April 20, 1949 Jessica Lange, 73. Her very first role was Dwan in the remake of King Kong. Later genre roles are Sandra Bloom Sr. in Big Fish, Katherine Pierson in Neverwas, and the amazing run of Constance Langdon / Elsa Mars / Fiona Goode / Sister Jude Martin in American Horror Story
  • Born April 20, 1949 John Ostrander, 73. Writer of comic books, including GrimjackSuicide Squad and Star Wars: Legacy. Well those are the titles he most frequently gets noted for but I’ll add in The SpectreMartian Manhunter and the late Eighties Manhunter as well. His run on the Suicide Squad is available on the DC Universe app as is his absolutely amazing work on The Spectre.
  • Born April 20, 1951 Louise Jameson, 71. Leela of the Sevateem, companion to the Fourth Doctor. Appeared in nine stories of which my favorite was “The Talons of Weng Chiang” which I reviewed over at Green Man. She segued from Dr. Who to The Omega Factor where she was in the regular cast as Dr. Anne Reynolds. These appear to her only meaningful genre roles. And she like so many Who performers has reprised her role for Big Finish. 
  • Born April 20, 1964 Sean A. Moore. He wrote three Conan pastiches, Conan the Hunter, Conan and the Grim Grey God and Conan and the Shaman’s Curse. He also wrote the screenplay for Kull the Conqueror, and the novelization of it. All were published by Tor. He was active in Colorado fandom. He died in car crash in Boulder. (Died 1998.)
  • Born April 20, 1964 Andy Serkis, 58. I will freely admit that the list of characters that he has helped create is amazing: Gollum in The Lord of the Rings films and The Hobbit: An Unexpected Journey, King Kong in that film, Caesar in the Planet of the Apes reboot series, Captain Haddock / Sir Francis Haddock in The Adventures of Tintin (great film that was), and even Supreme Leader Snoke in The Force Awakens and The Last Jedi. Last year, he portrayed the character of Baloo in his self-directed film, Mowgli: Legend of the Jungle. His readings of The Hobbit and The Lord of The Rings are truly amazing as well. 

(10) COMICS SECTION.

  • Bizarro reports a shocking defection from a well-known superhero team.

(11) PANTHER CHOW. In the Washington Post, Emily Heil interviews Nyanyika Banda, author of The Official Wakanda Cookbook, who explains how they tried to come up with a cuisine that wasn’t just pan-African but actually might have recipes that would come from that imaginary country. “Wakanda cookbook brings Black Panther food lore to life”.

The fictional worlds spun in many TV shows, movies and video games can feel as real and as meaningful to fans as places with actual Zip codes. Think of Hogwarts, the magic-filled, honey-lit boarding school in the world of Harry Potter books and movies; the faraway galaxy of “Star Wars”; or even the lovably quirky small town of Stars Hollow in “Gilmore Girls.”

Wakanda, the wealthy, technologically advanced, mountain-ringed land of the “Black Panther” comics and blockbuster 2018 movie, though, occupies an even more rarefied role. It’s not just the setting for the action in a beloved franchise; it has become a symbol of African greatness, a mythical place that feels like an actual homeland to many people, and not just to comics geeks with posters of King T’Challa on their bedroom walls.

This week, the mythical country is seeing its culture expand with “The Official Wakanda Cookbook,” a collection of recipes sanctioned by “Black Panther” publisher Marvel….

… Aside from the challenges posed by satisfying an avid fan base and respecting a cultural touchstone, Banda faced another, more practical task. Often, a cookbook author writing about a region of the world is concerned about staying true to the dishes, the ingredients, the people and the history of the land. But what does it mean to be faithful to something that doesn’t actually exist?…

(12) JEOPARDY! Andrew Porter was tuned into Monday night’s episode of Jeopardy! and watched as contestants drew blanks on several items about the fantasy genre:

Category: Fantasy Fiction

Answer: In George R.R. Martin’s saga of Westeros, this blustery & bloody volume follows “A Game of Thrones” & “A Clash of Kings”

No one could ask, What is “A Storm of Swords?”

***

Answer: Set in ancient China, “A Hero Born” by Jin Yong takes place in a world where this martial art is practiced magically.

Wrong question What is Karate?

Right question: What is Kung-Fu?

***

Answer: Victor LaValle’s “The Changeling” tells the tale of a human baby switched at birth with one of these Nordic creatures.

No one could ask, What is  troll?

(13) FUTURE IS NOW FOR SJW CREDENTIALS. [Item by Martin Morse Wooster.] In the Washington Post, Maria Luisa Paul discusses  ViaGen Pets, which will clone your dead cat for $25,000.  But while the clone may look like the original cat, it won’t have the personality of the original feline. “A woman cloned her pet after it died. But it’s not a copycat.”

… When the beloved 5-year-old cat died in 2017, there was nothing her owner, Kelly Anderson, could do — or so she thought.

Chai’s body had not yet turned cold when Anderson remembered a conversation with her roommate about the Texas-based ViaGen Pets, one of just a few companies worldwide that clones pets. The next morning, she called them.

Some $25,000 and five years later, Anderson — a 32-year-old dog trainer from Austin — has a 6-month-old carbon copy of Chai curled up in her lap. Belle is nearly identical to Chai, down to her deep-blue eyes and fluffy white coat. The two cats share a couple of quirks, like sleeping with their bodies stretched out against Anderson’s back. But that’s where the similarities end, Anderson said….

(14) PUTTING IT ALL TOGETHER. What could be more wholesome? Mecha Builders is coming from the makers of Sesame Street.

Catch a sneak peek of an all-new series from Sesame Street in this official Mecha Builders Trailer! Together Elmo, Cookie Monster, and Abby are the Mecha Builders! The Mecha Builders are always ready to save the day, and while they may not get it right the first time, they won’t give up until they do! There’s no problem too big or too small for this super team to solve … all before snack time. New series coming to Cartoonito! Watch on Cartoon Network May 9th and stream the next day on HBO Max!

(15) SUMMERTIME, AND THE CONCATENATING IS EASY. [Item by SF Concatenation’s Jonathan Cowie.] The SF² Concatenation summer* edition is now up, which is a few days later than usual so as to capture news announced over Easter. This edition has its full news page, articles and convention reports, including:  Film NewsTelevision News;  Publishing News;  General Science News  and  Forthcoming SF Books from major imprints for the season, among much else.  Plus there is a tranche of stand-alone book reviews.  Something for everyone.

* ‘Summer’ season here being the northern hemisphere, academic year summer.

v32(3) 2022.4.20 — New Columns & Articles for the Summer 2022

v32(2) 2022.4.20 — Science Fiction & Fantasy Book Reviews

v32(3) 2022.4.20 — Non-Fiction SF & Science Fact Book Reviews

(16) E.T. FAMILY REUNION. Dee Wallace played Drew Barrymore’s mom in the iconic film E.T. almost 40 years ago. They will be reuniting at the 40th Anniversary screening of E.T. the Extra-Terrestrial on Opening Night of the: 2022 TCM Classic Festival. And Wallace got a head start by appearing on Drew’s TV show. Yahoo! has the story: “Drew Barrymore Reunites with E.T. Onscreen Mom Dee Wallace Ahead of Film’s 40th Anniversary”.

Drew Barrymore is taking fans on a trip down memory lane.

The Golden Globe winner, 47, reunited with Dee Wallace, who played her mother in 1982’s E.T. the Extra-Terrestrial, as they reminisced about the film ahead of its 40th anniversary Monday on The Drew Barrymore Show.

“That was the first day on the set and I’m sitting in this really high director’s chair,” Wallace, 73, recalled of a photo of the two of them. “And Drew comes up to me and she says, ‘Hi, I’m going to sit on your lap now.’ And I said, ‘Well, come on up Drew.'”

“I mean, I knew you were going to be a director/producer back then,” she told Barrymore.

Barrymore raved about how “sexy” Wallace looked in the cheetah costume her character wore for the Halloween scene. “I still fit in it too,” Wallace proclaimed….

(17) VIDEO OF THE DAY. Neil deGrasse Tyson was on Colbert last night to talk about his new book Welcome To The Universe In 3D. “Aliens May Have Been Watching Earth’s TV Shows For The Last 80 Years – Neil deGrasse Tyson”.

[Thanks to Michael Toman, Cat Eldridge, Chris Barkley, Rob Thornton, Michael J. Walsh, Mike Kennedy, Martin Morse Wooster, JJ, John King Tarpinian, and Andrew Porter for some of these stories. Title credit belongs to File 770 contributing editor of the day Daniel Dern.]

2022 ESFS Awards

The European Science Fiction Society named the 2022 winners of the ESFS Achievement Awards and the ESFS Hall of Fame Awards on April 9 during Eurocon / Luxcon 2022 held in Dudelange, Luxembourg.

ACHIEVEMENT AWARDS

AwardWinnerCountry
Best Dramatic PresentationWill Sliney’s StorytellersIreland
Best FanzinePrésences d’esprit 105France
Best Internet PublicationThe National Leprechaun Museum Talking Stories podcastIreland
Best Work for ChildrenMarta Ignerska “Swiat Lema” (The world of Lem)Poland
Best Work of ArtCover art by Sparth, for La Dernière Emperox by ScalziFrance
Best Written Work of FictionFuturespotting by Francesco VersoItaly

HALL OF FAME AWARDS

AwardWinnerCountry
Best ArtistIgor Kordej
(Joint winner)
Croatia
Best ArtistRoch Urbaniak
(Joint winner)
Poland
Best AuthorFrancesco VersoItaly
Best MagazineSci Phi Journal – A Universe of WonderBelgium
Best PromoterYuri ShevelaUkraine
Best PublisherHangar 7
(Joint winner)
Croatia
Best PublisherCopernicus Corporation
(Joint winner)
Poland
Best TranslatorJack FennellIreland

Ukraine SFF Community Calls for Russia and Belarus To Be Excluded from European Science Fiction Society

Ukranian fan Borys Sydiuk has released the text of a letter to the European Science Fiction Society (ESFS) board asking for an emergency general meeting to be run online “to review the questions about formal[ly] excluding Russia and Belarus from the list of ESFS members until the war is over taking into consideration the principle of zero-tolerance of any aggression [that] European nations follow.”

ESFS, founded in 1972, is an international organization of fans and professionals that promotes sff, administers the ESFS Awards, and determines the site of the Eurocon.

The Ukranian sff community in its letter also demands that ESFS Awards nominations submitted by Russia and Belarus be investigated to determine whether any of their nominees support the Russian invasion of Ukraine. Those who do must be disqualified. Then, any remaining nominees from Russia and Belarus may not be identified with those countries but must be identified as nominees of ESFS or another sponsoring nation, following the Olympic Games’ example for handling entrants from banned countries.   

If an emergency meeting cannot be held, the letter calls for these points to be discussed at the first session of the ESFS meeting at Eurocon 2022, which will be held next week concurrently with LuxCon from April 7-10 in Dudelange, Luxembourg.

If the ESFS does not adopt these proposals, the Ukrainian sff community will officially quit ESFS, withdraw its 2022 ESFS Awards nominations, and not take part in any further ESFS activities until the war is over.

The complete text of the letter follows. (The English rendering may have been produced by Google Translate.)

For immediate release

To ESFS board

The algorithm we expected from the board and GM of ESFS

1. Call an EGM (emergency general meeting to be run online) to review the questions about formal excluding Russia and Belarus from the list of ESFS members until the war is over taking into consideration the principle of zero-tolerance of any aggression European nations follow.

2. Nominations accepted from Russia and Belarus to be subject to investigation if any of the nominees supports the Russian invasion of Ukraine. If so it should lead to immediate disqualification of such nominees.

3. Accepted and non-disqualified nominations should go under ESFS nominations or a sponsoring country, not Russia or Belarus using Olympic principle – Olympic flag, sponsoring country flag, not embargoed country flag.

4. These should be voted during the EGM.

5. If EGM is not possible, pp 1 to 4 should be discussed at the first at the scheduled first ESFS General business meeting in Luxembourg.

6. In the case Russia and Belarus remain in ESFS member list and/or Russian and Belarusian nominations will go as Russian and Belarusian, not under ESFS or a sponsoring country title, after EGM or the first General business meeting in Luxembourg, Ukraine officially quits ESFS and withdraws all Ukrainian nominations for ESFS 2022 Awards. In this case Ukrainian delegates or their proxy representatives will not take part in the second business meeting, ESFS Award voting and any further ESFS activities until the war is over.

Ukrainian SF&F Community

Pixel Scroll 3/21/22 Go Strider In The Sky 

(1) BALTICON GUEST NEWS. Balticon 56 announced that Odera Igbokwe has had to withdraw as Artist Guest of Honor due to personal reasons.

They followed up by naming two special guests: Kevin Roche, a costumer, conrunner, and quantum scientist and his husband Andy Trembley, a filker, costumer, and conrunner.

Balticon, which takes place May 27-30, also confirmed they will be streaming their most popular program tracks, and hosting virtual panels, kaffeeklatsches, author readings and more.

Virtual pricing for the whole weekend is $30 for adults and $20 for young adults. Virtual membership is automatically included with any in-person membership purchase. (Full rate information is here.)

(2) ESFS AWARDS NOMINEES. The European Science Fiction Society has released the nominations for the 2022 Achievement Awards, Hall of Fame Awards, and Chrysalis Awards.

The winners of these awards will be selected at the next general meeting of the ESFS, which will take place at Luxcon 2022, which takes place from 7th to 10th April, 2022 in Dudelange, Luxembourg.

(3) GRRM-CONNECTED GAME SUCCESS. Yahoo! reports “’Elden Ring’ Sells Over 12 Million Copies Worldwide”  — “Almost as many as PacMan,” teases John King Tarpinian.

While publisher Bandai Namco initially predicted that FromSoftware‘s Elden Ring would sell around 4 million units, the game has more than surpassed expectations. In the 18 days following its release, over 12 million copies of Elden Ring have been sold worldwide, the two companies announced on Monday.

According to the press release, the game was released throughout North America, Europe, Asia, Africa and the Middle East. 1 million units were sold in Japan alone.

Created in collaboration with novelist George R. R. Martin, who is best known for writing the series behind Game of Thrones, Elden Ring is an open-world action RPG that entered development in 2017. Players begin with a linear opening but are gradually enabled to explore the mythical Lands Between….

And George R.R. Martin recently took a moment to deny a story about the game.

…Oh, and as long as I am setting stuff straight, there’s a weird story all over the internet about how I “hid” my initials in ELDEN RING because… ah.. some of the characters have names beginning with R, or G, or M.   To which I say, “Eh?  What?  Really?”   This was news to me.    I have been writing and publishing stories since 1971, and I suspect that I have been giving characters names beginning with R and G and M since the start.   Along with the other twenty-three letters of the alphabet as well…  

(4) WHAT WOULD IT LOOK LIKE IF THE MANDALORIAN WAS INDIGENOUS? [Item by Olav Rokne.] Pretty cool Star-Wars-Inspired works by Canadian artist Christal Ratt got featured on the CBC News this weekend. Ratt, a member of the Barriere Lake Algonquin Nation in Quebec, used traditional techniques to create birch-bark armour modelled after the Mandalorian’s beskar armour. “What if the Mandalorian’s armour was birch bark instead of beskar? An Algonquin artist brings that to life”.

…And while it may not be able to stop lightsabers, the wearable piece of art also includes a birch bark helmet, with quilled Woodland florals and different shades of orange to honour residential school survivors from her community. 

The piece is called Shemaginish, which means warrior….

Personally, I find it really interesting to note that several artists of Indigenous Canadian descent are reinterpreting Star Wars iconography through traditional Indigenous styles. In addition to Ratt, there are several examples I can think of this, including well-known Canadian artists Andy Everson (a member of the Comox First Nation), and Aaron Paquette (a member of the Métis community in Edmonton) have found inspiration in mixing Star Wars with styles drawn from their respective Indigenous communities.

(5) AUTHOR’S GUILD SUPPORTS SMART COPYRIGHT ACT. The Author’s Guild announced, “AG Supports Introduction and Passage of the SMART Copyright Act of 2022”.

Why the Smart Copyright Act Is Necessary

The safe harbors for internet platforms in the Copyright Act are conditioned on the platforms’ cooperation to remove pirated content. The law has not worked as intended by Congress to encourage that cooperation, however, because the courts resisted enforcing the loss of safe harbors. In doing so, they took the teeth out of the law. As a result, piracy is out of control today, and the only mechanism that creators have to combat piracy is to send continuous takedown notices to the platforms, which is not only costly and time-consuming—for both the creators and platforms—but it is also ineffective because pirates often repost the infringing material. Online piracy harms the entire publishing and other creative ecosystems, leaving creators, who are usually at the bottom of the food chain, with only crumbs. Writers and other creators have no recourse except to watch the income from legitimate sales of their works dwindle while e-book pirates line their coffers.

The best way to curb piracy is for service providers to adopt STMs that automatically limit the amount of piracy on their services. These technologies already exist, and many platforms already use them effectively for certain types of works. The Authors Guild and other organizations representing creators have asked Congress to require all the major user-generated content sites to use such technologies to prevent or curb piracy. While the current law contemplates voluntary multi-industry convenings to create and adopt STMs, there has been no incentive for online providers to do so. As a result, no STMs have been formally recognized in the 23 years since the law was passed.

Bill co-sponsor Sen. Thom Tillis (R-NC) says on his site:

…Online service providers struck a deal with Congress twenty years ago—they wouldn’t have to pay for copyright theft facilitated by their systems if they worked with copyright owners to create effective standardized technical measures (STMs) to identify and protect against distribution of stolen content. In enacting this grand bargain, Congress clearly envisioned this safe harbor immunity would act as an incentive for platforms and rights holders to collaborate on developing effective measures to combat copyright theft, lower transaction costs, accelerate information sharing, and create a healthy internet for everyone. 

Yet rather than incentivizing collaboration, the law actually inhibits it because service providers cannot risk losing their valuable safe harbors if an STM is created. In addition, the current statute provides only one path to establish that a technological measure is a consensus-based STM that must be available to all. As a result, no STMs have been identified since the law took effect.  The issue isn’t whether technical measures to combat rampant copyright infringement exist—plenty do—but rather how to encourage service providers to adopt technical measures to combat stealing and facilitate sharing of critical copyright data.   

The Strengthening Measures to Advance Rights Technologies (SMART) Copyright Act of 2022 takes a measured approach to addressing these barriers in two ways. It creates flexibility so that more existing measures could be eligible for consensus created STMs and it addresses the incentive issue by authorizing the Librarian of Congress to designate through an open, public rulemaking process technical measures identified by stakeholders that certain service providers must accommodate and not interfere with. Instead of “bet the company” loss of safe harbors, violations involving designated technical measures (DTMs) risk only actual or statutory damages, from which innocent violators can be exempt.

Read a one-pager of the bill HERE and myth vs. fact HERE.

(6) LISTEN IN. Cora Buhlert is interviewed by Oliver Brackenbury in episode 36 of the So I’m Writing a Novel podcast: “Interview with Cora Buhlert”.

Cora Buhlert is a Hugo-nominated author and genre scholar who Oliver was lucky enough to meet through his research for the novel, and he’d love for you to meet her too!

Oliver and Cora discuss her falling in love with the very American body of work known as pulp fiction while she grew up travelling the world, the survival of dime novels in modern Germany, the irresistible pull of forbidden fiction, Thundarr and He-Man, “the best thing that happened in Germany in 1989”…

(7) SLICE OF LIFE. Did you ever want to know what H.P. Lovecraft thought of Gustav Meyrink’s The Golem and its silent film adaptations? If yes, Bobby Derie has you covered: “The Golem (1928) by Gustav Meyrink” at Deep Cuts in a Lovecraftian Vein.

Der Golem (“The Golem”) was a silent film directed by and starring Paul Wegener with German intertitles released in 1915. The film is now believed to be lost, aside from some fragments. This film was followed by two more: Der Golem und die Tänzerin (“The Golem and the Dancing Girl”) in 1917, and Der Golem, wie er in die Welt kam (“The Golem: How He Came Into The World”) in 1920, both of which were also directed by and starring Paul Wegener as the golem. So it isn’t clear which film Lovecraft actually saw. The 1920 film survives and is in the public domain.

Lovecraft claimed in most of his letters to have caught a showing of it in 1921, and like many an English student of the VHS era who needed to write a book report, he assumed somewhat erroneously that it was faithful to the plot of the book….

(8) ONCE UPON A NEWSSTAND. [Item by Cora Buhlert.] At Dark Worlds Quarterly, G.W. Thomas takes a look at Weird Tales’ shortlived sister magazine Oriental Stories a.k.a. Magic Carpet Tales: “Magic Carpet Tales: The Other Weird Tales” I’ve read some of Robert E. Howard’s contributions to Oriental Stories/Magic Carpet Tales and they were very good.

… Exotic locales, sexy seductresses and plotting agents aside, much of what appeared was a type of Horror fiction. Not always supernatural, torture tales, conte cruels but not your run-of-the-mill werewolf and vampire stories. For those who love Robert E. Howard and other WT authors, this is a bonanza of secondary tales….

(9) MEDIA BIRTHDAY.

1968 [Item by Cat Eldridge.] On this day in the United Kingdom fifty-four years ago, Planet of The Apes premiered. It was directed by Franklin J. Schaffner. The screenplay was by Michael Wilson and Rod Serling, and was based loosely upon Pierre Boulle‘s La Planète des Singes

It starred Charlton Heston, Roddy McDowall, Kim Hunter, Maurice Evans, James Whitmore, James Daly and Linda Harrison. Roddy McDowall had a long-running relationship with this series, appearing in four of the original five films (absent only from the second film of the series, Beneath the Planet of the Apes, in which he was replaced by David Watson in the role of Cornelius), and also in the television series.

It was met with critical acclaim and is widely regarded as a classic film and one of the best films of that year.  Roger Ebert of the Chicago Sun-Times said that it was “much better than I expected it to be. It is quickly paced, completely entertaining, and its philosophical pretensions don’t get in the way.” And Kevin Thomas of the Los Angeles Times exclaimed that it was, “A triumph of artistry and imagination, it is at once a timely parable and a grand adventure on an epic scale.” 

It did exceedingly well at the box office costing less than six million to make and making more than thirty million in its first year of screening.

Audience reviewers at Rotten Tomatoes give it an eighty-seven percent rating with over a hundred thousand reviewers having expressed an opinion!

(10) TODAY’S BIRTHDAYS.

[Compiled by Cat Eldridge.]

  • Born March 21, 1931 Al Williamson. Cartoonist who was best known for his work for EC Comics in the ’50s, including titles like Weird Science and Weird Fantasy, and for his work on Flash Gordon in the Sixties. He won eight Harvey Awards, and an Eisner Hall of Fame Award.  (Died 2010.)
  • Born March 21, 1944 Lorene Yarnell Jansson. Yarnell played Dot Matrix (body acting, with Joan Rivers performing the voice) in Spaceballs. She was Sonia in The Wild Wild West Revisted, Formicida / Dr. Irene Janis in Wonder Woman’s “Formicida” episode and on the Muppet Show in season four episode, “Shields And Yarnell”. (Died 2010.)
  • Born March 21, 1946 Terry Dowling, 76. I was trying to remember exactly what it was by him that I read and it turned out to be Amberjack: Tales of Fear and Wonder, an offering from Subterranean Press a decade ago. Oh, it was tasty! If it’s at all representative of his other short stories, he’s a master at them. And I see he’s got just one novel, Clowns at Midnight which I’ve not read but really should. He’s not at all deeply stocked at the usual digital suspects but they do have this plus several story collections. He’s won ten Ditmars, very impressive indeed, and quite a few other Awards as well.
  • Born March 21, 1946 Timothy Dalton, 76. He is best known for portraying James Bond in The Living Daylights and Licence to Kill but is currently in The Doom Patrol as Niles Caulder, The Chief. As I’ve said before, go watch it now! He also was Damian Drake in Looney Tunes: Back in Action, Sir Malcolm on the Penny Dreadful series and Lord President of the Time Lords (Rassilon) during the Time of Tenth and Eleventh Doctors. He went to theatre to play Lord Asriel in the stage version of His Dark Materials.
  • Born March 21, 1956 Teresa Nielsen Hayden, 66. She is a consulting editor for Tor Books and is well known for her and husband, Patrick Nielsen Hayden’s superb weblog Making Light, and back in the Eighties, they published the Izzard fanzine. And she has three fascinating framing pieces in The Essential Bordertown, edited by Delia Sherman and Terri Windling. 
  • Born March 21, 1958 Gary Oldman, 64. First genre film role was as Rosencrantz in Rosencrantz & Guildenstern Are Dead. Next up is the lead role in Bram Stoker’s Dracula. And of course he was Jean-Baptiste Emanuel Zorg in Fifth Element, followed by being Lost in Space‘s Dr. Zachary Smith, which in turn led to Harry Potter’s Sirius Black, and that begat James Gordon in the Batman filmsAlthough some reviewers give him accolades for us as role as Dr. Dennett Norton in the insipid Robocop remake, I will not. Having not seen Dawn of the Planet of the Apes, I can’t say how he is as Dreyfus in it.
  • Born March 21, 1965 Cynthia Geary, 57. Best remembered as Shelly Tambo on Northern Exposure. It’s genre, isn’t it? If that’s not enough, she’s got a prime genre role in The Outer Limits episode “Mary 25” in which she plays Teryl who is not what she seems. And she shows up on Fantady Island in the “Dying to Dance” as Pamela Lewis.
  • Born March 21, 1970 Chris Chibnall, 52. Current showrunner for Doctor Who and the head writer for the first two (and I think) best series of Torchwood. He first showed up in the Whoverse when he penned the Tenth Doctor story, “42”.  He also wrote several episodes of Life on Mars. He’s been nominated for a Hugo three times for work on Doctor Who, “Rosa” at Dublin 2019, “Resolution” CoNZealand and for “Fugitive of the Judoon” at DisCon III.
  • Born March 21, 1985 Sonequa Martin-Green, 37. She currently plays Michael Burnham on Discovery which is now In its fourth series. She had a brief recurring role as Tamara in Once Upon a Time, and a much longer recurring role on The Walking Dead as Sasha Williams but I’ve never seen her there as zombies hold absolutely no interest to me. Well Solomon Grundy does…  And she was in the Shockwave, Darkside film.

(11) COMICS SECTION.

  • The Duplex shows the history you learn from watching movies.
  • Lise Andreasen says these are “Exactly the same things I would do!”

(12) OUTFOXED. Arturo Serrano reviews the new Pixar film for Nerds of a Feather in “’Turning Red’ finds joy in the scary messiness of puberty”.

…Disney/Pixar’s new animated movie Turning Red takes this metaphor of puberty as transformation and situates it in the no less stressful context of the immigrant experience during the rise of digital mass media. If being a teenager is hard, it’s almost unbearably so when inherited traditions and expectations conflict with multicultural openness and pop culture sex symbols. When protagonist Meilin Lee learns that the women of her family have the power to transform into enormous red pandas, it feels like it couldn’t have come at a worse time: she’s busy enough pleasing her parents and excelling at school and daydreaming about boy bands without going all Katie Ka-Boom every time she gets emotional. So she panics, and tries to hide what’s happening to her, and pretends to be in full command of her feelings—but her inner animal won’t be tamed. There’s no denying the call of nature….

(13) EFF ME. That was my reaction to the headline “Hugh Grant ‘in conversation’ to replace Jodie Whittaker as Doctor Who” at Metro News.

…Well, rumour has it the Love Actually star could be taking over from Jodie Whittaker as the Time Lord.

According to The Mirror, the BBC series could be heading for a Marvel-style makeover, with Hugh at the helm….

(14) WIN BY LOSING. “Loki Award Show Lost Saves Universe, According to Miss Minutes”Gizmodo has the story.

Awards season hit a high note this weekend as multiple guilds and groups gave awards leading up to the grand finale, the Oscars, which happen this coming Sunday. One of the biggest to do so was the Writers Guild of America—and apparently one specific category literally saved the world, at least according to a certain animated talking clock from the Marvel Cinematic Universe.

… In the Drama category, Succession was up against The Handmaid’s Tale, The Morning Show, Yellowjackets, and Marvel’s Loki. And it’s that last one we’re going to concentrate on. Showrunner and head writer Michael Waldron revealed on Twitter that, had Loki won, this is the acceptance speech the writers submitted to air.

(15) REGENCY TEA TIME. [Item by Cora Buhlert.] Aja Romano shares her appreciation for the works of Georgette Heyer and wonders why Heyer is not a household name and has never had a film or TV adaptation: “When will Hollywood discover Georgette Heyer?” at Vox. I’d say that Georgette Heyer is at least genre-adjacent, since a lot of SFF fans seem to like her and Regency romance in general. Plus, Regency dancing is a thing at many cons.

…[Jane] Austen’s relative lack of sentiment also helped her gain popularity and respect as a writer in a male-dominated century of literature. While other women writers of her time like Fanny Burney were reviled as trashy, Austen’s lack of interest in high drama and romance made her work acceptable to male readers as well as to women. One 19th-century critic wrote approvingly that “she sets her face zealously against romantic attachments.”

That patriarchal lack of respect for the art of writing about love may also explain why few outside of romance fans have ever heard of Austen’s primary successor: Georgette Heyer. Despite singlehandedly creating the modern romance, Heyer is still a niche author. And though she has nearly 10 times as many books available for cinematic adaptation as Austen, Hollywood has yet to discover her….

(16) PARALLAX VIEWS OF WESTEROS. George R.R. Martin introduces The Rise Of The Dragon” at Not A Blog and explains how it complements Fire & Blood. Sample art at the link.

We’re so excited to announce The Rise of The Dragon, a lavish visual history of House Targaryen – the iconic family at the heart of HBO’s Game of Thrones prequel series, House of the Dragon – featuring over 180 all-new illustrations!

For those of you who are wondering: What’s the difference between The Rise of the Dragon and Fire & Blood? Think of The Rise of the Dragon as a deluxe reference book, in which Westeros’ most infamous family – and their dragons – come to life in partnership with some truly incredible artists.

Fire & Blood was scribed as a grandmaesters’ account of events from Aegon Targaryen’s conquest of Westeros through to the infamous Dance of the Dragons, the civil war that nearly undid the Targaryen rule. The Rise of the Dragon will cover the same time period, but is written in a more encyclopedic style similar to The World of Ice and Fire. In fact, The World of Ice and Fire authors Elio M. García, Jr. and Linda Antonsson have returned to help with this tome. …

(17) AIRING ON THE SIDE OF CAUTION. [Item by Daniel Dern.] From the “By The Book” weekly interview in the NY Times (Sunday) Book Review section, 3/20/22, with Jeremy Denk, a question that IIRC is part of every interview:

Q: What books are on your night stand.

A: In Manhattan, my night stand has become commandeered by a CPAP machine. I chose breathing over reading.

He then goes on to list books elsewhere in his domicile(s).

(18) IT’S FOR YOU. [Item by Martin Morse Wooster.] The BBC shows it’s possible to walk outside with a mobile phone “as big as a walkie talkie” and make a phone call in this clip from a 1974 episode of Blue Peter.

[Thanks to John King Tarpinian, Andrew Porter, Michael Toman, Lise Andreasen, Olav Rokne, Daniel Dern, Cora Buhlert, Cat Eldridge, Mike Kennedy, Martin Morse Wooster, and JJ for some of these stories. Title credit belongs to File 770 contributing editor of the day Daniel Dern, who calls it his Tolkien cowboy title.]

2021 ESFS Awards

The European Science Fiction Society named the 2021 winners of the ESFS Achievement Awards and the ESFS Hall of Fame Awards, as well as the European Grandmaster, on July 17 during Eurocon in Fiuggi, Italy.

Note: The nominating country is listed, which in some cases is not the country associated with the work. For links related to each nominee, see here. Some names have been done as screencaps to work around WordPress’ failure to support certain special characters.

EUROPEAN GRANDMASTER

Maurizio Manzieri (Italy)


ESFS ACHIEVEMENT AWARDS

BEST WORK OF ART

FRANCE

“L’Héliotrope” book cover by Vaderetro

First of two 2020 YA novels by E. S. Green, a French woman author. Vaderetro is Alexandre Debelloir & Julian Santus, illustrators & graphic designers. Working for music, edition & brands, their visual production mostly inherits from ancient engraving.They won the last « Grand Prix de l’Imaginaire » for best work of art for these « Steam Sailors » series covers. https://vaderetrostudio.com

BEST WRITTEN WORK OF FICTION

POLAND

Radek’s novel (A Tale of the Serpent Heart, or yet another word bout Jakób Szela) is a great work of Fantasy. Although it is a genre novel it was not only seen but also appreciated by the mainstream critics. The book received multiple awards – including SFF related Janusz A. Zajdel Award and Jerzy Zulawski Award. Radek also won Nike Award – one of the most prestigious awards in Polish literature.

BEST DRAMATIC PRESENTATION NOMINATIONS

RUSSIA

Russian Cyberpunk Farm

The Birchpunk studio, a team of artists from Russian, shared their project that tells a story about a farm in the future. The farm is swarmed with robots and new technologies and located on Mars.

BEST FANZINE

MONTENEGRO

Galaxy 42 #4

The Galaxy 42 is a F&SF literature and art magazine. They publish the following categories: F&SF prose & poetry, essays, science articles, book or film reviews, music, films, visual art and graphics. G42 is coordinated by Alexandru Lamba, Daniel Timariu, and Cristian Vicol.

BEST WORK FOR CHILDREN NOMINATIONS

BULGARIA

“An Adventure in the Lower Earth. Christmas Carolers vs Hallus Beasts” by Elena Pavlova

Aimed at middle graders, the book combines ethno-fantasy, electropunk and environmentalism in a dizzying adventure, where characters discover the strength of kinship, the secret of Thracian sanctuaries and the bizarre fairy world from Bulgarian folklore. They manage to save both the Lower Earth from poachers and our own Upper Earth from the invasion of the Hallus electricus

BEST INTERNET PUBLICATION NOMINATIONS

CROATIA

Decameron 2020, price iz karantene

The online literary event Decameron 2020 was created as a reaction to the sudden closing down of cultural events and subsequent lockdown in Croatia. During these times, three young speculative fiction writers came up with an idea to create a new publishing platform for local writers, inspired by Boccaccio’s legendary work. An E-book with English translation is currently in work


THE HALL OF FAME

BEST ARTIST

UKRAINE

Igor Baranko

Igor Baranko is an Ukrainian comic artist that published his graphic novels not only in his home country, but also in United States, France and some other countries. Not only he was published in these countries, but also lived there working with local comics artists. Now Igor lives in Thailand and is working on a comic strip based on the Indian epic Mahabharata.

BEST AUTHOR

RUSSIA

Victor Pelevin

Pelevin wrote in various fantastic genres. In his work, you can find both mystical motivations, and works in the genre of anti-utopia and science fiction. Pelevin books have been translated into many languages. According to a French Magazine, Pelevin is among the 1,000 most significant people in the contemporary culture. His name is included in the list of nominees for the Nobel Prize.

BEST PUBLISHER

[Joint Winners]

BULGARIA

Colibri

CROATIA

Shtriga

RUSSIA

Azbooka

BEST PROMOTER

MONTENEGRO                              

A Convention Leader of the Zagreb Science Fiction Convention SFERAKON and Secretary of the Sfera Association. Long-term member of the ESFS, a participant in conventions in the region and Europe. Participant in numerous Eurocons. She is a translator and promoter of SF.

BEST MAGAZINE

RUSSIA

Mir Fantastiki

A monthly Russian magazine and portal about fantasy and science fiction. Published since September 2003 and is the largest science fiction magazine in the former USSR. The publication reviews books, movies, TV series, games and comics in such genres as science fiction, fantasy and horror, publishes articles about fictional universes, famous science fiction, fandom, mythology and futurology.

BEST TRANSLATOR

RUSSIA, UKRAINE

Serhiy Legeza

For a great contribution to the promotion of Polish fiction.He translated from Polish into Ukrainian the works of Andrzej Sapkowski and Jacek Dukaj, from Polish into Russian the works of Andrzej Sapkowski, Jacek Dukaj, Jakub Nowak, Jacek Pekara, Robert Schmidt, Robert Wegner, and Stanislaw Lem.

Serhiy translated a huge number of works of contemporary Polish science fiction writers into Ukrainian and Russian. Thanks to him, Ukrainian and Russian readers were able to get acquainted with the best modern Polish science fiction writers.

ESFS Awards Nominations for 2021

The European Science Fiction Association released the 2021 nominees for the ESFS Achievement Awards and the ESFS Hall of Fame Awards on June 29.

The Hall of Fame award celebrates lifetime contributions.

The winners of these awards will be selected at the next general meeting of the ESFS, which will take place at Eurocon 2021 which takes place from July 15-18 in Fiuggi, Italy.

Note: The nominating country is listed, which in some cases is not the country associated with the work. For links related to each nominee, see here. Some names have been done as screencaps to work around WordPress’ failure to support certain special characters.

The nominations for the ESFS Achievement Awards and ESFS Hall of Fame Awards follow the jump. There is also a link to the ESFS Awards website for each award, which has links to additional resources about the nominees.

Continue reading

Pixel Scroll 5/16/21 The Dinosaurs That Fall On You From Nowhere

(1) DESIGNS FOR THE TIMES. Jane Frank reviewed a portfolio project by famed sff artist Richard Powers as a vehicle for studying his career and influence: “Richard Powers: The World of fFlar” at NeoText.

…Powers happily obliged, by portraying the Portfolio as a single story told in 16 (17, if you include the cover) illustrations even though the very first painting reproduced in the portfolio, The Ur-City of fFlar, cropped on the right, began life in 1958 as the cover to the fourth in a popular digest anthology series Star Science Fiction, edited by Frederik Pohl. And the same image served further duty, cropped on the left side this time, as the cover for The Deep by John Crowley, published by Berkley, 1976.

This use, and re-use of imagery, I should add, was common for Powers’ – who excelled in “re-purposing” his art, both to gain monetarily from additional usages, but also to save time. He had no qualms about cutting up and pasting portions of existing artworks in order to fashion “new” illustrations, and publishers either didn’t realize it, or didn’t care. Not only the images themselves, but also certain compositional elements, can be spotted on other covers, as if both publishers and Powers himself enjoyed creating variations on a favored theme . . . and there are fans of Powers’ art who make a sport out of discovering such connections. The humorous caption for The Ur City of fFlar indeed suggests that Powers was well aware of several uses to which one painting could be put:

Jane Frank also did an analysis of the paperback covers and other works of an iconic sff artist in “Paul Lehr: Unexpected Rhythms” at NeoText.

binary comment

…Freed from the need to produce garish imagery designed to lure adolescent readers to buy magazines, Lehr soon developed his own unique voice and palette.

One of Lehr’s studio experiments ended up being his first published cover.

“I constructed spaceships out of wire, cardboard toilet paper tubes, ping pong balls and the like, making strange looking ships. I painted them silver and white, and hung them up as still lifes against dark backgrounds, shining a strong light upon them, embellishing them with stars, bursts of fire, and other bits of painterly cosmic excitement. I also bought model kits and assembled them in crazy ways. A B-17 would become a moonlander or shuttleboat.” (Visions of Never” 2009)…

(2) INCREDIBLE BABEL. Cora Buhlert’s latest contribution to Galactic Journey is a review about the brand-new-in-1966 novel Babel-17 by Samuel R. Delany: “[MAY 16, 1966] SPIES, POETS AND LINGUISTS: BABEL-17 BY SAMUEL R. DELANY”

With so much grim news in the real world, you just want to escape into a book. So I was happy to find Babel-17, the latest science fiction novel by Samuel R. Delany, in the spinner rack at my local import bookstore. The blurb promised a mix of space opera and James Bond style spy adventure, which sounded right up my alley….

(3) JOHNNY B BAD. “The Ballad of Russell & Julie”, performed a decade ago, is a hysterical “Musical Tribute to the Creators of the Rebooted ‘Doctor Who’ Series” as Laughing Squid explains. It’s newsworthy for a line that alludes to the kind of behavior which saw John Barrowman back in the headlines this week. (Around the 2:02 mark.)

During a Doctor Who wrap party in 2011, actors David TennantCatherine Tate, and John Barrowman performed “The Ballad of Russell and Julie,” a musical tribute to Russell T. Davies (RTD) and Julie Gardner, the creators of the new version of Doctor Who, which was first broadcast ten years ago today. The tribute pokes gentle fun at RTD’s smoking uncertainty and Gardner’s incredible confidence.

(4) PREDICTING STAR TREK. And there’s still time for you to add your guess to Galactic Journey’s poll about what that soon-to-premiere TV show Star Trek will be like. (Is the second choice below really a title? It looks like a code off my phone bill.)

(5) WELL-MET IN LAKE GENEVA. James Maliszewski, who runs the RPG blog Grognardia, has dug up a 1976 report about GenCon IX by none other than Fritz Leiber:  “Fritz Leiber at GenCon”.

Earlier this month, I posted an image of an article penned by author Fritz Leiber that appeared in the San Francisco Examiner on September 5, 1976. Leiber recounts his experiences as guest of honor at GenCon IX and, as one might expect, what he writes is of great interest. He begins by briefly recounting the recent history of wargaming, starting with the publication of Gettysburg by Avalon Hill in 1958. (Why he starts there rather than with Tactics in 1954, I am not sure) 

Moving on from that, he speaks of GenCon, the “oldest gathering of tabletop generals in America,” which is “held at the pleasant Wisconsin resort-town near Chicago.

(6) ESFS AWARDS OPEN. The European Science Fiction Society is gathering nominations for the Next ESFS Awards.

Nominations are now open for the ESFS Awards that will be held at the 2021 Eurocon in Fiuggi, 15th to 18th July. The last day nominations will be accepted is Tuesday 15th June 2021. This is also the last day that bids for future Eurocons will be accepted for discussion in the Business Meeting, and the last day that topics to be raised in the Business Meeting will be accepted.

There should only be a single nomination from each country, as selected by their own rules. In the event of multiple nominations from one country, only matching nominations or nominations without a competing name will be accepted. In the event that all ballots from one country contain different names, there will be no nominees accepted for that country.

Nominations are made for a country by representatives of that country. If you are not familiar with how your country chooses its nominations, the EuroSMOF Facebook group is a good place to connect with other Eurocon attendees from your country.

Before nominating, read the list of current awards and their requirements, and the Awards FAQ.

(7) MONSTROUS FUN FOR TOURISTS. Travel Awaits encourages you to come and look for yourself: “Unicorns, Kelpies, And Wulvers: 7 Of Scotland’s Most Captivating Mythical Creatures”.

You probably know about the Loch Ness Monster, but have you ever heard of kelpies or wulvers?

Scots are legendary storytellers (they even host an International Storytelling Festival), and their culture is rich with imaginary creatures — or, perhaps, creatures not so imaginary… Here are some of my favorites. 

1. Unicorns 

No list of Scottish mythical creatures would be complete without mentioning Scotland’s national animal — the infamous unicorn, which adorns the country’s royal coat of arms. In Celtic mythology, the unicorn represents both purity and power, innocence and dominance. The creature has been part of Scotland’s ethos for centuries….

Pro Tip: Unicorns are ubiquitous in Scotland! The Palace of HolyroodhouseEdinburgh CastleCraigmillar Castle, and St Giles’ Cathedral — all in Edinburgh — sport unicorns. But, really, anywhere you go in Scotland, you can find a unicorn. Consider visiting on National Unicorn Day (celebrated on April 9) to get your unicorn fix. 

(8) FOLLOW THE BOUNCERS. On “The Muppet Show” on Saturday Night Live: “Security! Security!  Statler and Waldorf are causing trouble again!”

(9) RITTENHOUSE OBIT. Juris doctor, conrunner and Sidewise Award judge Jim Rittenhouse (1957-2021)  died May 16.

Steven H Silver paid tribute on Facebook.

I woke up to the news that my longtime friend and fellow Sidewise Award judge Jim Rittenhouse has lost his final battle. Jim welcomed me into fandom early and we discovered our shared love for alternate history. While working on my first Windycon under the auspices of the late Ross Pavlac, Ross was listening to Jim and me discuss alternate history and at the next meeting he presented each of us with Captain Midnight decoders, so he would be able to understand what we were talking about in the future.

Eventually Jim founded the Apazine Point of Divergence, which I was a founding member of and stayed with for a while. I later invited Jim to become a judge for the Sidewise Award for Alternate History, for which he was one of the longest serving judges.

Jim had a deep and personal interest in Chinese history and last year when I was working on my story “The Prediscovered Country,” we discussed the history of the Ming Dynasty to figure out what a Chinese colony in Australia would look like. In return, I modeled the Dutch character De Bruijn after Jim.

There will probably be a memorial service for Jim at either Windycon or Capricon.

May his memory be for a blessing.

(10) MEMORY LANE.

  • 1953 – Sixty-eight years ago, Alfred Bester’s Demolished Man wins a Hugo for Best Novel. It was first serialized in three parts, beginning with the January 1952 issue of Galaxy Science Fiction. The novel is dedicated to Galaxy’s editor, H. L. Gold, who made writing ideas to Bester. Bester’s suggested title was Demolition!, but Gold talked him out of it. It would be his only Hugo Award. 

(11) TODAY’S DAY.

National Mimosa Day – They’re celebrating the six-time Hugo-winning fanzine at Fanac.org.

(12) TODAY’S BIRTHDAYS.

[Compiled by Cat Eldridge and John Hertz.]

  • Born May 16, 1918 – Colleen Browning.  Set designer, illustrator, lithographer, painter.  A Realist in the face of Abstract Realism and Abstract Expressionism, she later turned to Magic Realism blurring the real and imaginary.  Here is Union Mixer.  Here is Mindscape.  Here is The Dream.  (Died 2003) [JH]
  • Born May 16, 1920 – Patricia Marriott.  Cover artist and illustrator, particularly for Joan Aiken; a score of covers, as many interiors.  Here is Black Hearts in Battersea.  Here is A Small Pinch of Weather.  (Died 2002) [JH] 
  • Born May 16, 1925 – Pierre Barbet.  Author and (under another name) pharmacist.  Towards a Lost FutureBabel 3805; space opera, heroic fantasy, alternative history. In The Empire of Baphomet an alien tries to manipulate the Knights Templar; in Stellar Crusade the knights go into Space after him; six dozen novels, plus shorter stories, essays.  (Died 1995) [JH]
  • Born May 16, 1937 —  Yvonne Craig. Batgirl on Batman, and that green skinned Orion slave girl Marta on “Whom Gods Destroy” on the original Trek. She also one-offs in The Man from U.N.C.L.E.The Wild Wild WestVoyage to The Bottom of the SeaThe Ghost & Mrs. MuirLand of the GiantsFantasy Island and Holmes and Yo-Yo. (Died 2015.) (CE)
  • Born May 16, 1942 – Judith Clute, age 79.  Two dozen covers, thirty interiors.  Here is the Dec 90 Interzone.  Here is Chip Crockett’s Christmas Carol.  Here is Pardon This Intrusion.  Here is Stay.  [JH]
  • Born May 16, 1944 — Danny Trejo, 77. Trejo is perhaps most known as the character Machete, originally developed by Rodriguez for the Spy Kids films. He’s also been on The X-FilesFrom Dusk till DawnLe JaguarDoppelgangerThe Evil WithinFrom Dusk Till Dawn 2: Texas Blood MoneyMuppets Most Wanted and more horror films that I care to list here. Seriously he’s really done a lot of really low-budget horror films. (CE)
  • Born May 16, 1953 — Pierce Brosnan, 68. James Bond in a remarkably undistinguished series of such films. Dr. Lawrence Angelo in The Lawnmower Man,and he was lunch, errr, Professor Donald Kessler in Mars Attacks! and Mike Noonan in Bag of Bones. (CE) 
  • Born May 16, 1953 – Lee MacLeod, age 68.  Four dozen covers, plus interiors, for us.  Lee MacLeod SF Art Trading Cards.  BatmanHoward the DuckPocahontas (i.e. Disney’s).  Air Force Art Program.  Here are two covers for The Mote in God’s Eye from 1993 and 2000.  For his fine art e.g. plein air, see here.  [JH]
  • Born May 16, 1962 — Ulrika O’Brien, 59. A Seattle-area fanzine fan, fanartist, con-running fan, and past TAFF winner. Her list of zines in Fancyclopedia 3 is quite amazing —  Fringe, Widening Gyre and Demi-TAFF Americaine (TAFF Newsletter). Her APAzines include Mutatis Mutandis, and APA memberships include APA-L, LASFAPAMyriad and Turbo-APA. U. O’Brien won Best Fanartist in the 2021 FAAn (Fan Activity Achievement) Awards. (CE) 
  • Born May 16, 1968 — Stephen Mangan, 53, Voiced Bigwig, Silverweed and Shale in the 1999 Watership Down series, Green Javelins in the Hyperdrive SF comedy series, and Dirk Gently in that series after the pilot. (CE) 
  • Born May 16, 1969 — David Boreanaz, 52. Am I the only one that thought Angel was for the most part a better series than Buffy? And the perfect episode was I think “Smile Time” when Angel gets turned into a puppet. It even spawned its own rather great toy line including of course an Angel puppet. (CE) 
  • Born May 16, 1978 – Marion Poinsot, age 43.  Illustrator of comics, role-playing games.  In the audio series The Keep [«le donjon»of Naheulbeuk by John Lang, here is MP’s Quilt of Oblivionhere is Chaos Under the Mountain.  Here is a poster for her Nina Tonnerre.  Here is Perle the black dragon.  [JH]

(13) COMICS SECTION.

(14) AUDIO FICTION. The latest episode of the Simultaneous Times podcast from Space Cowboy Books includes Jean-Paul Garnier reading Cora Buhlert’s short story “Little Monsters” and “Hidden Underneath” by Toshiya Kamei.

(15) WORKING ON THE RAILROAD. In the Washington Post, Stuart Miller interviews five actors on The Underground Railroad about their work on the Amazon Prime show. “Filming ‘The Underground Railroad’ was grueling. But the cast grasped ‘the weight of what we were doing.’”

…So while Mbedu always felt well cared for during filming — there was a guidance counselor on set “to bring me back to myself,” she says, and Jenkins himself “was always checking up on me” — the supportive cast and crew understood that putting on the chains and the burdens of being Black in antebellum America naturally took a toll.

“I had to have tricks, like moving through the set with my eyes downcast, so that when I opened my eyes I’d be experiencing everything only as Cora, because otherwise it would be too much for Thuso to take in,” Mbedu says.

The South African actress grew up in the immediate aftermath of apartheid and, like Cora, lost her parents at a young age. But she drew a sharp border between her life and Cora’s, relying on “a whole lot of research” to bring the character’s vocal, physical and psychological journey to life.

“The one time in the past where I made the mistake of trying to draw from my own experience, my brain went, ‘That was too traumatizing, we’re shutting down now.’ I can empathize, but I cannot personalize because it’s too traumatic to relive.”…

(16) IRREPLACEABLE. The Guardian gets Patrick Ness’ reaction to various books he’s read. One genre author stands out: “Patrick Ness: ‘Terry Pratchett makes you feel seen and forgiven’”.

My comfort read
Discworld by Terry Pratchett. I am always at some point through the cycle (I’m currently on The Thief of Time). They’re not only gloriously funny, they’re humane in a way that makes you actually feel seen and forgiven, with all your faults. He was a one-off, Sir Terry. When I finish reading them through, I simply put the last book down and pick the first one up again.

(17) GREATEST OF ALL TIME TRAVEL. Ryan Britt makes a daring claim at Inverse: “The best time-travel show of all time is streaming for free right now”. And that show is? Quantum Leap!

…Trying to figure out the actual sci-fi rules of Quantum Leap is a bad idea. As stated in the voice-over, Sam Beckett “stepped into the quantum leap accelerator and vanished.” The premise of the series is that his consciousness is transferred into various people’s bodies — regardless of gender — throughout time. Once Sam shows up in one of these bodies, a holographic projection from his associate Al (Dean Stockwell) advises him on what he’s supposed to accomplish in whatever historical period he’s found himself in.

Basically, Quantum Leap is a paint-by-numbers science fiction drama. Every episode begins with Sam trying to acclimate to his new body, while Al tells him the stakes. Despite the fact that Al is assisted by a super-computer named “Ziggy,” there’s never a clear path for what Sam is supposed to do. His essential mission — which is ill-defined — is to “set right what once went wrong” — but what that means exactly is relatively opaque until the end of each episode. This makes zero sense. It’s also brilliant.

[Thanks to John Hertz, Andrew (not Werdna), Mike Kennedy, Andrew Porter, Martin Morse Wooster, JJ, Michael Toman, Cora Buhlert, John King Tarpinian, Rich Lynch, and Cat Eldridge for some of these stories. Title credit goes to contributing editor of the day OGH.]

2020 ESFS Awards

The European Science Fiction Society’s 2020 ESFS Award Winners were announced during the virtual Futuricon on October 3.

Achievement Awards – Best Work of Art

  • The Dublin 2019 Hugo Award bases

Achievement Awards – Best Written Work of Fiction

  • Luna: Moon Rising (Luna #3) by Ian McDonald

Achievement Awards – Best Dramatic Presentation

  • Good Omens

Achievement Awards – Fanzine

  • Journey Planet – A Half Pint of Flann

Achievement Awards – Best Work for Children

  • The Invasion by Peadar Ó Guilín

Best Internet Publication

(tie)

  • The Irish Fandom Community Group on Facebook
  • Fantascientificast

Hall of Fame – Best Artist

  • Sergey Shikin

Hall of Fame – Best Author

  • Milena Benini

Hall of Fame – Best Publisher

  • L’Atalante

Hall of Fame – Best Promoter

  • Cristina Jurado

Hall of Fame – Best Magazine

  • Esensja

Hall of Fame – Best Translator

  • Pilar Ramírez Tello

Chrysalis Awards

  • Caroline Hofstätter (Austria)
  • Zoe Penn (Croatia)
  • Edmund Schluessel (Finland)
  • Chloé VEILLARD (France)
  • Oein DeBhairduin (Ireland)
  • Linda De Santi (Italy)
  • Jean Bürlesk (Luxembourg)
  • Diana Alzner (Romania)
  • Olga Rejn (Russia)
  • Haizea Zubieta (Spain)

Grandmaster

  • Franz Rottensteiner

[Thanks to Edmund Schluessel for the story.]

ESFS Awards Nominations for 2020

The European Science Fiction Association released the 2020 nominees for the ESFS Achievement Awards and the ESFS Hall of Fame Awards on September 13.

The Hall of Fame award celebrates lifetime contributions while the Chrysalis award recognizes authors who have emerged in the past three years.

The winners will be selected at the next general meeting of the ESFS, which will take place (online) during Futuricon, the 2020 Eurocon, which will be held October 2-4.

Note: The nominating country is listed, which in some cases is not the country associated with the work. For links related to each nominee, see here. Some names have been done as screencaps to work around WordPress’ failure to support certain special characters.

BEST WORK OF ART NOMINATIONS

AUSTRIA

Däniken zum Schmunzel by Reinhard Habeck

“Däniken zum Schmunzeln” is a comic book inspired by the works of the Swiss author Erich von Däniken. While his books claim to be science, mainly palaeoastronomy, Reinhard Habeck turns those wild theories into funny comics of speculative fiction, very often featuring a loveable alien character.

CROATIA

As quoted by the artist herself: “Although these photographs look as abstract expression of colors and shapes, for me they represent a search for broader spaces, wider horizons, and a proof that even between the four walls of your room you could travel far with your imagination.”

FRANCE

Utopiales19 book cover, by Mathieu BABLET

The cover of this anthology (Utopiales 19) comes from the same-name festival’s poster of that year. It is by Mathieu Bablet, comics author and illustrator (France, 1987-). He was the invited artist with a large art show.  His 31 works translated in 6 languages works include The Beautiful Death, DoggyBags, Shangri-La…

IRELAND

The Dublin 2019 Hugo Award bases

The Dublin 2019 Hugo bases were created by Eleanor Wheeler, based on a design by Jim Fitzpatrick.

ITALY

Maurizio Manzieri – Poster for Cartoons on the bay

World famous Italian illustrator. Poster for Cartoons on the bay 2019, the children’s television animation festival promoted by Rai Com, the Italian public broadcasting company.

LUXEMBOURG

Tow & Tank (Andy Genen)

Tow & Tank is Andy Genen’s latest series of comics taking a mute tow tank driver and a sentient zombie into a post-apocalyptic weird-land to discover the secret behind glyphs that the duo uncover on their journey.

RUSSIA

Cover of the anthology “Other Sky”

Cover of the anthology “Other Sky” by Sergey Shikin

SPAIN

Art for La guerra de Dios. Artist: Juan Alberto Hernández

This collection consists of nine illustrations (including the cover art) by Juan Alberto Hernández. The technique used is digital, but the strokes and the high contrast colours make the images appear as if they were oil paintings. Hernández’s work is an extraordinarily accurate depiction of the fantastic world build by Kameron Hurley (as the author herself mentioned during her Spanish tour).

SWEDEN

Urtidsbilder

Simon Stålenhag is a Swedish artist is famous for his paintings. “Urtidsbilder” is his latest work with paintings of dinasaures. The text is written by Anna Davour

BEST WRITTEN WORK OF FICTION NOMINATIONS

AUSTRIA

Shape Me by Melanie Vogltanz

The “Encouragment Award”-winner 2016 Melanie Vogltanz is back with her new novel “Shape Me” about the fascinating method of body-exchange-technologies. In her story the state controlls  stuff like body weight, so a fitness trainer changes her body with her clients to “shape them” with her discipline. But then her body is stolen

CROATIA

Krsnik by Ana Cerovac

A fantasy novel set in the time of Uskok wars against Venice and inspired by Istrian folklore, Krsnik is a compelling advenutre about the supernatural as much as the everyday, with stregas and curses as integral to the plot as soldiers and spies. Based on both historical research and local legends, the story is one of war, conspiracy, and the fates of both nobles and commoners alike.

FRANCE

Trois hourras pour Lady Évangeline, by Jean-Claude DUNYACH

(L’Atalante, 2019) In this space opera novel, a young girl has to merge in a alien hive to survive. Maybe what she learns in these slimy settings will allow her to help her diplomat father so they can successfully face a new menace, an intelligent interstellar cloud. 

IRELAND

Luna: Moon Rising (Luna #3) by Ian McDonald

Luna: Moon Rising is the final book in the Luna trilogy. 
Luna: Moon Rising was nominated for the 2020 Locus Award for Best Science Fiction Novel.

ITALY

No/Mad/Land by Francesco Verso

Last novel by Francesco Verso, finishing The Walkers story. 

LUXEMBOURG

The Harm Tree by Rose Edwards

Rose Edwards is nominated for her recent publication, The Harm Tree, ‘an epic fantasy set in a world still recovering from one war, and on the brink of another. The resistance is rising and dark forces stir to take back what was once theirs. Belief in the ancient gods runs strong–the sacrificial Harm Tree still stands.’ (editor’s synopsis)

SPAIN

Bionautas, by Cristina Jurado

Bionautas is the ordinary account of an extraordinary story, which Jurado tells in a quotidian and exquisitely simple way. The novel is a monologue, the transcription of a recording; a rather unusual and bold way to tell such a complex story. It’s also an ode to nature and a reflection about relations and language, which are so inherent to any intelligent species, no matter how apart they are.

BEST DRAMATIC PRESENTATION NOMINATIONS

AUSTRIA

Little Joe

CROATIA

Slice of Life

“Slice of Life” is an original short Science Fiction film.

The whole film is made the old school way like the legendary SciFi movies of the 80’s. Think miniatures, matte paintings, rear projections – You won’t find any CGI here!!!

Slice Of Life is a love letter to the Science Fiction genre of the 80’s. We invite you to follow our journey back to the future envisioned by the 80’s!

FINLAND

Aniara

A modern take of Harry Martinson’s classical poem that goes deep under the spectator’s skin.

FRANCE

Terra Willy  – Planète inconnue

Animated feature (90 mn, 2019) 

IRELAND

Dr. Krell & The Carnyx of Terror (as performed at Dublin 2019 – An Irish Worldcon by Crazy Dog Audio Theatre)

The full performance of the live radio play Dr. Krell & The Carnyx of Terror as performed at Dublin 2019 – An Irish Worldcon by Crazy Dog Audio Theatre can be viewed on YouTube. It was written, directed and produced by Roger Gregg.

ITALY

Good Omens

Series based on Neil Gaiman and Terry Pratchett’s novel of the same name.

LUXEMBOURG

Superjhemp Retörns (Felix Koch, 2018)

To save the small Luxusbourg from a cosmic catastrophy, a government clerk, himself deep in mid-life crisis, has to recover his lost superpowers and confront his biggest fear: his family.
The film is the first based on Lucien Czuga and Roger Leiners’ long series of Bande Dessinee around a very Luxembourgish superhero who draws his powers from the national dish of ‘boiled cheese’.

RUSSIA

The Outbreak

Epidemic is a 2019 Russian sci-fi drama television series directed by Pavel Kostomarov, based on the debut novel by Russian writer Yana Wagner, “Vongozero”. 
An unknown virus turns Moscow into a city of the dead. Outbreak is a family drama in the midst of a global disaster. It is one of the first post-apocalyptic TV shows in Russia.

SPAIN

Klaus, directed by Sergio Pablos

A traditionally animated Christmas adventure comedy, Klaus is an alternate origin story of Santa Claus. A truly emotional plot full, of empathy and positivity, is rounded by the outstanding performances of the voice actors. It won 7 Annie Awards, including Best Animated Feature, as well as the BAFTA award for Best Animated Film. It was also nominated to the Oscar award for Best Animated Feature.

SWEDEN

Aniara

Aniara is based on the space poem by Harry Martinsson. The directors are Pella Kagerman and Hugo Lilja

BEST FANZINE NOMINATIONS

AUSTRIA

Super Pulp #5

Austria want to intruduce “Sulper Pulp”. It is horror, science-fiction and of course pulp-magazine culture!

CROATIA

FantaSTine #3

A fanzine written by young authors aimed predominantly at children and teens, with SF stories, articles and reviews, as well as interviews.

FRANCE

Présences d’esprits #96

This French Fanzine exists since 1992 (the oldest still thriving) and just reached its 100 issue !
News fanzine, published 4/year (with critics of books, comics, games and medias, and a special feature).

IRELAND

Journey Planet

A Half Pint of Flann. Edited by James Bacon, Michael Carroll, Chris Garcia, Pádraig Ó Méalóid, this issue of Journey Planet is dedicated to Flann O’Brien (aka Brian O’Nolan or Myles na gCopaleen), the Irish author of At Swim-Two-Birds and The Third Policeman.

LUXEMBOURG

Sci-Fan – Science Fiction, Fantasy and Horror Radio

1st September show in 2019

Sci-Fan has been on air at Radio ARA for over ten years and every other week provides a mix of reviews, discussions, news and music for SF, Fantasy and Horror fans.

ROMANIA

ZIN 4/19

ZIN is a fanzine of Wolf’s Pack sci-fi club from Bucharest, with two magazine issues printed
in 2019. 

RUSSIA

Aconitum  No. 7-8, 2020

The first fanzine in Russia dedicated to weird fiction and everything adjacent.

SPAIN

Cuentos para Algernon, by Marchetto #7 (2019)

A non-profit on-line fanzine focused on increasing the exposure of short stories written in English in the Spanish market, the blog translates and publishes the stories for free (always with the owner’s permission). It won the 2014 Spanish Ignotus Award for Best Website. Some of the Cuentos para Algernon’s stories have been nominated for the Ignotus Awards, winning in two occasions.

BEST WORK FOR CHILDREN NOMINATIONS

AUSTRIA

Thalmus by Ursula Poznanski

“Thalamus” is a SF-thriller for teenagers. In the novel the young protagonist has a bike-accident with severe brain damage. He cannot talk and hardly control his movements anymore, but he finds out that some patients in the clinic in even worse condition walk around during the night, what seems to be the result of a futuristic experimental treatment …

CROATIA

The newest installment of the award winning series following the supernatural adventures of six teenage friends. The novel and series has been a hit with young readers and has won critical acclaim and literary awards.

FRANCE

Mers Mortes, by Aurélie WELLENSTEIN

(Scrinéo, 2019) A chilling novel on ecology. In this dark future, oceans and seas disappeared, but ghostly tides and marine fauna wraiths seek revenge on human souls.

Aurelie Wellenstein (1980-) has won many young adult awards since her first novel (2013).

IRELAND

The Invasion by Peadar Ó Guilín

The Invasion is the conclusion to the story begun in The Call. The Invasion was nominated for the 2019 Lodestar Awards (the award for YA that is part of the Hugo Awards ceremonies).

LUXEMBOURG

Illustrated Fairytales (Sabrina Kaufmann)

With Illustrated Fairytales Sabrina Kaufmann takes her Manga influenced art to the masses. Sabrina has been working as a freelance illustrator since leaving art school and this is the first major publication of this young talent.

RUSSIA

Julia Ivanova. Cycle “Charovodjie”

Seven islands are fraught with many secrets: everything here is saturated with magical power that can be controlled with the help of living stones – charonites, brave defenders riding on winged dragon-hounds patrol the sky, once driven away horsemen suddenly return to avenge long-standing grievances.

SPAIN

Rapunzel con piojos, by Miguel López “El Hematocrítico”

This is the fourth work of a series of children’s books in which López takes traditional fairy tales and gives them a twist in order to use them to depict our modern world and make you think about deep issues. The book, however, is not exemplary, but extremely witty and funny. Hematocrítico’s books have been translated to several languages and are very popular in Asia, mainly in South Korea.

BEST INTERNET PUBLICATION NOMINATIONS

CROATIA

Over the course of two lockdown months in Spring 2020 this webpage published new original works by Croatian SF authors, both established and new, written specifically for the page. The authors had their choice of ten very different topics, all inspired by the literary classic Decameron but with a genre twist. With 52 stories and 48 authors, this webpage was a smash hit with readers and writers.

FRANCE

ActuSF

ActuSF is a French webzine on written, movies and TV SFF news : new books, interviews, special features. It records SF conventions & festivals panels and conferences, building living archives.
The Web Forum has 224 429 messages on 21782 subjects with 2453 members. 14789 members on Facebook.

IRELAND

The Irish Fandom Community Group on Facebook

To keep the enthusiasm and momentum generated by the Dublin 2019 Worldcon going, a Facebook group was created to carry on after the Worldcon had ended, and is open to all interested in supporting Irish Fandom.

ITALY

Fantascientificast

Most important Italian podcast on science fiction.

RUSSIA

Author’s blog of Vladimir Anikeev

A project that has been going on for over 6 years and is dedicated to science fiction and the Polish magazine “FANTASTYKA”. The author gradually tells about the content and authors of the magazine to Russian readers. Carefully scrutinizing each issue of the magazine has made the blog an invaluable source of information on Polish science fiction.

SPAIN

La nave invisible

La Nave Invisible is a collaborative non-profit project which is focused on improving the visibility of female SFF writers. La nave is a strong team effort of over 25 people dedicated to raise awareness about female authors from all over the world through social media, essays, reviews, translated articles, interviews and a bibliographic library with over 200 entries.

2020 HALL OF FAME AWARD NOMINATIONS

BEST ARTIST NOMINATIONS

CROATIA

A master artist and illustrator whose works of art blend photography and digital art into enchanting, otherworldly collages. Popular in Croatia and abroad, with multiple books and covers under his belt.

FINLAND

Petri Hiltunen

Hiltunen has produced work in a variety of genres, but is most notable for his fantasy and horror work. He has won the prestigious Puupäähattu award in 2002, which is regarded as the highest honour for Finnish comic artists. He is also a well-known figure in Finnish science fiction fandom and a regular panelist and guest of honour at conventions, such as Finncon.

FRANCE

Philippe CAZA

CAZA (1941-) began in 1970 in comics, magazines, & drew many legendary SF covers. He also worked on the animated films Gandahar, and The Rain Children.
A long time SF fan, he conceived the Rosny (French SF) awards and often gave drawings or created posters for conventions and fandom. 

IRELAND

Iain Clark

Iain Clark created many of the stunning promotional artworks used for the Dublin 2019 WorldCon, and for the bid to host the 2024 WorldCon in Glasgow, Scotland. He created the wraparound cover of the Dublin 2019 Souvenier Book. He was nominated in the Best Fan Artist Category for the 2020 Hugo Awards.

LUXEMBOURG

Ken Barthelmey

Ken Barthelmey works mainly in Creature and Character design and his organic renderings are both fascinating and unsettling. He has worked on big productions like the Maze Runner Films, IT!, Bright, Fantastic Beasts: The Crimes of Grindlewald, The Predator, Godzilla: King of Monsters, and Detective Pikachu 

POLAND

Tomasz is a Polish artist creating astounding pictures as well as great models. When it comes to graphics he has experience in both traditional and computer graphics.

ROMANIA

Adrian Chifu

Adrian Chifu asserted himself as a writer, composer, graphic artist, director, photographer. Member of the electronic music band Urban Experience. Music albums in 1995 and 1997. Ambient and electronic music concerts, starting in 1995. Individual graphic exhibitions, from 1992. Illustrations and covers for magazines and books with sci-fi and fantasy themes.  Short films. Professional photography.

RUSSIA

Sergey Shikin

Sergey Shikin is one of the best contemporary Russian artists who designed over 100 books, including those for foreign publishing houses. Has been working with book design since the early 90s. Multiple laureate of local awards for artist. Participated in the art exhibition at the Worldcon, which took place in Dublin.

SPAIN

Enrique Corominas

Corominas has been a prominent illustrator in the Spanish fantastic scene since the 1980’s and has worked for the main publishers in the country, like Gigamesh, Minotauro or Planeta. He is known for his covers for the Game of Thrones series as well as his comic books, like the Dorian Grey graphic novel, originally published in France. He is also a painter whose work is sold across Europe.

UKRAINE

Igor Baranko

Ukrainian comic artist, best known for his sardonic and sometimes scary stories.

BEST AUTHOR NOMINATIONS

AUSTRIA

Marc Elsberg

After his  past bestselling novels Marc Elsberg has released his novel “Gier”. People in the whole world are demonstrating against “greed” (what is actually the meaning of the title), as they demand a socially balanced system. And then it turns into a very exciting near-future future story!

CROATIA

Milena Benini

One of key authors of Croatian SF for decades. A multi-award winnning writer, writing teacher, translator and editor, as well as geek extraordinaire, Milena Benini was a mainstay of SF conventions and a role model for many aspiring authors. Her literary work set a high bar for SF in Croatia and even though she unfortunately passed away this year, her legacy will live on for decades to come.

FINLAND

Johanna Sinisalo

Sinisalo has won the Atorox award for the best Finnish-language SF short story 7 times, and was awarded Finlandia Prize in 2000 for her first novel, which was translated as Not Before Sundown/Troll – A Love Story. It won the James Tiptree Jr. Memorial in 2004. Sinisalo was nominated for a Nebula in 2009 for her novelette Baby Doll. Examples of translated novels Blood of Angels and Core of the Sun 

FRANCE

Philippe CURVAL

Philippe Curval (1929-) is a French science fiction writer, journalist and photograph. 
Since 1960, Curval is one of the most eminent French SF writers.  He wrote more than 100 short stories and 40 novels, some translated in 14 countries, & won many awards.
He is also known for his works of science fiction criticism and as an editor.

IRELAND

Maura McHugh

Maura McHugh has written fiction (Twisted Fairy Tales, Twisted Myths, The Boughs Withered The Boughs Withered (When I Told Them My Dreams), 2000AD), comic books (2000AD, Hellboy: Witchfinder, Jennifer Wilde), radio plays (The Love of Small Appliances).
Her short story “Bone Mother” was adapted into a short stop-motion animated film. She was also a 2018 BFS Best Non-Fiction Award nominee.

ITALY

Francesco Verso

Multiple awards winner. Published in Italy, USA, UK and China.

LUXEMBOURG

Claude Peiffer

Claude Peiffer has been involved with fandom for a long time and will be intimately known to the Perry Rhodan fans for Sternenstaub which he edited between 1994 and 1997. A short story set in the Perry Rhodan universe was awarded and published in Begegnungen an der Grossen Leere in 1996. Between 2009 and 2020 he published five space opera novels in the Hammanon cycle. 

POLAND

Anna received ESFS Encouragment Award in 2007. In the years since she became really well established as one of the most important SFF writers in Poland. She won Janusz A. Zajdel Award five times. She writes both novels and shorter stories. Both her adult and YA works are a great reading. Apart from SFF she also creates crime fiction.

ROMANIA

Gheorghe Sasarman

Gheorghe Sasarman is one of the most prolific Romanian sci-fi writers of all
time. At the 1980 Italian Eurocon, Sasarman was awarded the Europa Prize for the novel 2000, translated into German and published by the Fisher Verlag PH in Munich.
Cuadratura Cercului (Squaring the Circle), published in 1978 has been translated into French, Spanish, German and English (by Ursula K. LeGuin).

RUSSIA

Victor Pelevin

Victor Pelevin is a Russian fiction writer. He is a laureate of multiple literary awards including the Russian Little Booker Prize and the Russian National Bestseller. His books are multi-layered postmodernist texts fusing elements of pop culture and esoteric philosophies while carrying conventions of the science fiction genre. Was nominated by Russia for the Nobel Prize in Literature.

SPAIN

José Carlos Somoza

José Carlos Somoza is a Spanish scriptwriter, dramatist and novelist, whose fiction has won several awards, including La Sonrisa Vertical, Café Gijón, Fernando Lara and Hammett. In 2000 his novel Dafne desvanecida was a runner-up for the Premio Nadal. Two years later, La caverna de las ideas won the Gold Dagger for the best crime novel and was translated into over twenty languages.

BEST PUBLISHER NOMINATIONS

AUSTRIA

Ohneohren

The publishing house Ohneohren, founded in 2013 by Ingrid Pointecker is specialized in speculative fiction. A focus is on so called “unpopular” topics and on supporting female authors.

CROATIA

Hangar 7

For the past decade Hangar 7 has provided a platform for Croatian authors by publishing both novels and short story collections. They have also been translating SF into Croatian, both from current writers such as Brett and Tchaikovsky as well as classics such as Lafferty, Dick and Lovecraft. They received the Artefakt award for special contribution to Croatian SF fandom.

FRANCE

L’Atalante

Famous & respected, this independant publishing house for +30 years publishes French & US authors but also many Europeans as British MOORCOK, PRATCHETT, Jamie SAWYER,  Frances HARDINGE, German ESCHBACH, Kai MEYER, Hans BEMMANN, Thomas VON STEINAECKER,  Italian GUERRINI, Ukrainian DIATCHENKOs, Spanish NEGRETE, LEDESMA, Russian GLUCKHOVSKY, Swiss Laurence SUHNER, GESSLER, ROUILLER…
& many more!

ITALY

Zona 42

Young small publisher dedicated to quality international science fiction.

LUXEMBOURG

Robert ‘Gollo’ Steffen

Robert Steffen edited the first, and so far only, science fiction collection in Luxembourg with contributions in German, French and English, bringing together 20 authors and artists in 1979.

POLAND

Wydawnictwo MAG

Wydawnictwo MAG was established in 1993. They publish both SF and Fantasy books. MAG publishes almost exclusively translations. They published books by Robin Hobb, Neil Gaiman, Brandon Sanderson, Cassandra Clare, Ada Palmer, and many more. Their books have excellent covers – many of them created by very talented artists from Poland.

ROMANIA

PAVCON

Founded in 2002 in Bucharest, publishing marketing and education books.
In 2016 Pavcon founded the Science-Fiction Collection, publishing only Romanian authors. Distinguished in 2018 and 2020, with the ROMCON award for the best sci-fi publishing house. Many of the published authors have been awarded with national prizes. Since 2020 Pavcon has started publishing Romanian authors on Amazon.

RUSSIA

Fanzon

It is an imprint of the Eksmo publishing holding, founded in 2016. Fanzon publishes contemporary world fiction. The authors are Joe Abercrombie, Christopher Priest, Liu Cixin, Neal Stephenson, China Mieville, Patrick Rothfuss, Michael Swanwick, James Corey and many others. Also publishes contemporary comics.

SPAIN

Crononauta

Crononauta is a Spanish non-profit independent publisher that showcases feminist science fiction, fantasy and horror literature. They also focus on stories that depict diversity in every way. As publishers of the Binti series, by Nnedi Okorafor, in Spanish, they were honoured with the Ignotus Award for Best Foreign Story in 2019.

BEST PROMOTER NOMINATIONS

CROATIA

Vesna is a writer, a librarian and a passionate cheerleader of SF in Croatia. She organized promotions for SF writers in libraries, and was active in literary workshops and the local NaNoWriMo scene. She was one of the editors of Decameron 2020. She has been organizing educational SF-related larps and workshops and book clubs for children and young adult.

FRANCE

Raymond MILÉSI

French SF writer, anthologist (Mouvances) & active fan for almost 40 years. 
He went to the 2nd French SF national convention (1975) & only missed 4 since!?
Since 1988, he is responsible for their attribution vote and the guardian of their smooth running.
He receives the Cyrano special award in 2018 in Amiens for his writings and his commitment to SF fandom and genre.

IRELAND

Marguerite Smith

Marguerite Smith was the co-division head of Promotions for the Dublin 2019 Worldcon. Many people were involved with promoting the con, but Marguerite was involved from the start of the bid to the very end of the con. Bid Parties, con flyers, social media – her management of the Bid and Con’s promotion and Social Media strategy cannot be understated.

ITALY

Deep Space One

No profit association dedicated to promoting science fiction in Italy. Founded more than 20 years ago. Eurocon organizer in 2009 and 2020.

LUXEUMBOURG

Gérard Kraus

Gérard Kraus was a founding member of Luxembourg’s Science Fiction and Fantasy Society in 1995 and has been working towards making science fiction, fantasy and horror in its different media more popular. 
He is the current president of SFFS Luxembourg, the chair of LuxCon, holds an MA in Science Fiction Studies from the University of Liverpool.

RUSSIA

Alexey Karavaev 

Author is studying the history of the formation and development of the genre in Russia and the USSR, richly illustrated materials of these studies are published in the form of colorful albums in the series “How fiction was published in the USSR”. Cultural phenomena of the Soviet book subculture as the special book series an the magazines are considered in detail in this albums.

SPAIN

Cristina Jurado

A translator, editor and multiple award-winning author, Jurado has contributed to the promotion of SFF in many ways; she founded ‘Supersonic’, the ESF award winning magazine; she has been the editor of several anthologies, many of them focused on women’s work in SFF and horror; she works in the new bilingual mag ‘Constelación’, and co-edited The Apex Book of World SF#5.

UKRAINE

Yuri Shevela

Old fan. Bibliographer of Ukrainian SF and fantasy. Founder of unique Museum of SF and SF.

BEST MAGAZINE NOMINATIONS

CROATIA

Sirius B

Since 2011 it has been the only Croatian SF magazine publishing
both translations of current and classic authors, as well as stories by current Croatian authors.

FRANCE

Gandahar

Gandahar is a  quaterly magazine, published since 2014 by Jean-Pierre
Fontana and Christine Brignon. They publish illustrated short stories.

ITALY

IF – Insolito e Fantastico

One of the Italian Science Fiction magazine.

POLAND

Esensja

Esensja is an online pop-culture magazine published since 2000 and available for free. They publish mainly reviews and other articles but it is not uncommon to find there short stories as well.
They write about books, movies, games, music and more. Although they are not limited to SFF it is the main field of their interest.

ROMANIA

Helion

Helion is a distinguished SF magazine, published by Helion Club Timisoara.
In recent years, six printed issues were published annually.

Some of its long-standing columns are Laborator SF (SF
(Lab), Cronica de familie (Family Review) Alternative (Alternatives),
Meridian SF (SF Meridian), Fototeca (Photo Gallery).

RUSSIA

Mu Cephei

Science fiction almanac based on the print on demand platform. A publication for experiments with style and genre diversity: SF and fantasy, magrealism and cosmoopera, sur and horror … A cut of Russian-language fiction here-and-now. Each issue is dedicated to one topic. Distributed electronically (free of charge) and in print.
Chief editor: Alexandra Zlotnitskaya.

SPAIN

Tantrum

Tantrum is a Spanish quarterly magazine, featuring short stories and serial novels focused on a strong sense of wonder. Its compact and contemporary design revisits the concept of pocketbooks. The magazine has been nominated to the Ignotus Awards in 2020.

BEST TRANSLATOR NOMINATIONS

CROATIA

FRANCE

Michelle CHARRIER

ITALY

Silvia Castoldi

ROMANIA

Silviu Genescu

RUSSIA

SPAIN

Pilar Ramírez Tello

CHRYSALIS AWARD

AUSTRIA

Caroline Hofstätter

Caroline Hofstätter debuted just in 2019 with a short story in the German magazine “phantastisch!”, but it didn’t take long to have a print of her first science-fiction novel “Das Ewigkeits-Projekt” at the publishing house Atlantis in her hands. Her story deals with living in a virtual world – a topic more current than ever!

CROATIA

Zoe Penn

The Library of Secrets is the first novel by young Croatian author Zoe Penn.  It was described by reviewers as “highly creative”, “Indiana Jones for a younger audience” and “filled with characters both human and fantastic, and spiced with many enjoyable twists and turns”.

Zoe Penn describes herself as a writer, reader, coder and a passionate puzzle solver, which inspired her novel.

FINLAND

Edmund Schluessel

A long-short story A Funeral for Massachusetts

Technically, it’s eldritch horror. Under that is the alien-ness of life outside the city to city dwellers, and the inevitability of seeing yourself in that unknown if you look.

FRANCE

Chloé VEILLARD

Concept artist / character Artist / editor.

SF magazine cover and illustrations.

Also working on for Video Games, Animation Movie, AAA Games, Advertising.

IRELAND

Oein DeBhairduin

Oein DeBhairduin’s first book was published in September 2020. “Why The Moon Travels” is a collection of  tales of spirits, giants and fairies rooted in the oral tradition of the Irish Traveller community, collected throughout his childhood and retold by Oein.

ITALY

Linda De Santi

Promising young talented author published by Urania.

LUXEMBOURG

Jean Bürlesk

Jean Bürlesk is emerging as the first in a range of voices in the nascent field of Luxembourg Science Fiction and Fantasy Literature. He is the recipient of the encouragement award of Luxembourg’s national Servais literature award. 
His short story collection The Pleasure Of Drowning is out from Luna Press.

ROMANIA

DIANA ALZNER

Diana Alzner – young author launched in recent years in the Romanian sci-fi. Debut in 2009. She published many stories in sci-fi genre magazines. Debut in 2018 with the novel “Tunnel at the end of the world” (Pavcon). In 2019 she published at the short stories volume TROVANTUL, both awarded with the National Prize for
Sci-Fi in 2019 and 2020. She currently works as a teacher in Ramnicu-Valcea.

RUSSIA

Olga Rejn

Olga Rajn is a social fiction, fantasy and magical realism writer. Author of numerous stories. In 2017 and 2019, short story collections were printed special project – paired stories female with male authors. The first author’s collection and the first author’s novel were published in 2020.

SPAIN

Haizea Zubieta

A young Spanish author and former cosplayer, Zubieta’s short stories and first novel, ‘Infinitas’, have become very popular among YA readers. A second novel, ‘Tocar el cielo’ –an urban fantasy, vampire story located in Madrid–, was released in July 2020 and a third book will be published in 2021. Zubieta is a women rights’ and LGTB+ activist who also works as a sensitivity reader.

UKRAINE

Volodymyr Kuznietsov

Ukrainian sci-fi/horror writer, game designer, comix writer, and metal musician

[Thanks to Edmund Schluessel for the story.]