Poll Result: The Top Awards in SFF

In last week’s poll (“Which of These Are the Top 5 Awards in SFF?”) I invited File 770 readers to tell me which of the field’s awards mean the most to them. Ninety-two participants here and on Facebook picked up to six from a list of 31 suggested awards (write-ins were also accepted).  

The Hugo and Nebula Awards proved near-unanimous choices. The World Fantasy Awards and Locus Awards were named by almost three-quarters of the voters. And BSFA Awards, James Tiptree Jr. Award, and Arthur C. Clarke Award were the next three awards with the greatest support.

Here for your entertainment is the complete list. (Apologies for a little formatting problem I was unable to overcome.)

TOTAL VOTES: 92

  1. Hugo Awards (91)
  2. Nebula Awards (SFWA) (90)
  3. World Fantasy Award (72)
  4. Locus Awards (63)
  5. BSFA Awards (British Science Fiction Assocation) (37)
  6. James Tiptree Jr. Award (34)
  7. Arthur C. Clarke Award (33)
  8. Philip K. Dick Award (18)
  9. Bram Stoker Awards (Horror Writers Association) (16)
  10. John W. Campbell Memorial Award  (13)
  11. Chesley Awards (ASFA) (9)
  12. British Fantasy Awards (BFS) (7)
  13. Theodore Sturgeon Memorial Award (7)
  14. Eisner Awards (3)
  15. Seiun Awards (3)
  16. Aurora Awards (2)
  17. Dragon Awards (2)
  18. Edward E. Smith Memorial Award for Imaginative Fiction (the Skylark) (2)
  19. The Kitschies (2)
  20. Shirley Jackson Award (2)

Also receiving votes:

  • Angouleme Award (1)
  • Aurealis Awards (1)
  • Ditmar Awards (1)
  • Eugie Foster Award (1)
  • FAAn Awards (1)
  • Inkpot Award (1)
  • Mythopoeic Awards (1)
  • Robert A. Heinlein Award (BSFS) (1)
  • Sidewise Awards (1)
  • WSFA Small Press Award (1)

Listed awards receiving no votes:

  • Prometheus Awards (Libertarian Futurist Society)
  • Rhysling Award (SFPA)
  • Rondo Hatton Classic Horror Awards
  • Scribe Awards (IAMTW)
  • Self-Published Fantasy Blog-Off
  • Writers of the Future / Illustrators of the Future Contest

2018 Locus Awards

The 2018 Locus Awards winners were announced during the Locus Awards Weekend in Seattle on June 23.

The Locus Awards are chosen by a survey of readers in an open poll.

SCIENCE FICTION NOVEL

  • The Collapsing Empire, John Scalzi (Tor US; Tor UK)

FANTASY NOVEL

  • The Stone Sky, N.K. Jemisin (Orbit US; Orbit UK)

HORROR NOVEL

  • The Changeling, Victor LaValle (Spiegel & Grau)

YOUNG ADULT BOOK

  • Akata Warrior, Nnedi Okorafor (Viking)

FIRST NOVEL

  • The Strange Case of the Alchemist’s Daughter, Theodora Goss (Saga)

NOVELLA

  • All Systems Red, Martha Wells (Tor.com Publishing)

NOVELETTE

  • “The Hermit of Houston”, Samuel R. Delany (F&SF 9-10/17)

SHORT STORY

  • “The Martian Obelisk“, Linda Nagata (Tor.com 7/19/17)

ANTHOLOGY

  • The Book of Swords, Gardner Dozois, ed. (Bantam; HarperCollins UK)

COLLECTION

  • Ursula K. Le Guin: The Hainish Novels and Stories, Ursula K. Le Guin (Library of America)

MAGAZINE

  • Tor.com

PUBLISHER

  • Tor

EDITOR

  • Ellen Datlow

ARTIST

  • Julie Dillon

NON-FICTION

  • Luminescent Threads: Connections to Octavia E. Butler, Alexandra Pierce & Mimi Mondal, eds. (Twelfth Planet)

ART BOOK

  • The Art of the Pulps: An Illustrated History, Douglas Ellis, Ed Hulse & Robert Weinberg, eds. (IDW)

INAUGURAL SPECIAL LOCUS AWARD 2018 COMMUNITY BUILDING & INCLUSIVITY

  • Clarion West

2018 Locus Awards Shortlist

The 2018 Locus Awards Finalists have been posted at Locus Online.

Just to excerpt a category at random —

MAGAZINE

  • Analog
  • Asimov’s
  • Beneath Ceaseless Skies
  • Clarkesworld
  • F&SF
  • File 770
  • Lightspeed
  • Strange Horizons
  • Tor.com
  • Uncanny

The Locus Awards were voted by readers in an open online poll. The winners will be announced during the Locus Awards Weekend in Seattle WA, June 22-24.

2017 Locus Recommended Reading List Is Out

The 2017 Locus Recommended Reading List from the magazine’s February issue has been posted by Locus Online.

The list is a consensus by Locus editors, reviewers, and other professionals — editor-in-chief Liza Groen Trombi; reviews editor Jonathan Strahan; reviewers Liz Bourke, Carolyn Cushman, Paul Di Filippo, Gardner Dozois, Stefan Dziemanowicz, Amy Goldschlager, Paula Guran, Rich Horton, John Langan, Russell Letson, Adrienne Martini, Colleen Mondor, Tim Pratt, Tom Whitmore, and Gary K. Wolfe; Bob Blough; online editor Mark R. Kelly; Ysabeau Wilce; critics Paul Kincaid, Cheryl Morgan, and Graham Sleight. The young-adult list group wrapped in Laurel Amberdine, Gwenda Bond, Barry Goldblatt, Justina Ireland, and Justine Larbalestier. Art books were compiled with help from Arnie Fenner, Karen Haber, and Locus design editor Francesca Myman. Short fiction recommendations included editors and reviewers John Joseph Adams, Ellen Datlow, Liz Grzyb, Faren Miller, Charles Payseur, Nisi Shawl, and A.C. Wise.

On the list are —

  • 28 SF novels, 21 fantasy novels, 14 horror novels, 22 YA books, 23 first novels;
  • 25 collections, 11 original anthologies, 8 reprint/year’s best anthologies;
  • 14 nonfiction books, 16 art books
  • 26 novellas
  • 42 novelettes
  • 55 short stories

While the number of recommendations has expanded to recognize the field’s outburst of novellas – 26 this year versus 11 last year – and the novelette recommendations have increased by around 25%, there are just 55 short stories on the list versus 78 last year.

None of the recommended books is self-published (one self-published work made the 2016 list, an art book, and the 2015 list had three.) There is one self-published short story on the 2017 list, but it was also published by a magazine later in the year.

Baen placed one book on the 2017 list, Tim Powers’ collection Down and Out in Purgatory. (Baen had two books on the 2016 list, one in 2015, and zero in 2013 and 2014.)

The Locus Poll & Survey will soon open for online voting and will decide the winners of the Locus Awards.

[Thanks to Mark Hepworth and Cat Eldridge for the story.]

2017 Locus Awards

The winners of the 2017 Locus Awards were announced at Locus Awards Weekend in Seattle on June 24.

SCIENCE FICTION NOVEL

  • Death’s End, Cixin Liu (Tor; Head of Zeus)

FANTASY NOVEL

  • All the Birds in the Sky, Charlie Jane Anders (Tor; Titan)

HORROR NOVEL

  • The Fireman, Joe Hill (Morrow)

YOUNG ADULT BOOK

  • Revenger, Alastair Reynolds (Gollancz; Orbit US ’17)

FIRST NOVEL

  • Ninefox Gambit, Yoon Ha Lee (Solaris US; Solaris UK)

NOVELLA

  • Every Heart a Doorway, Seanan McGuire (Tor.com Publishing)

NOVELETTE

  • “You’ll Surely Drown Here If You Stay”, Alyssa Wong (Uncanny 5-6/16)

SHORT STORY

  • “Seasons of Glass and Iron“, Amal el-Mohtar (The Starlit Wood)

ANTHOLOGY

  • The Big Book of Science Fiction, Ann & Jeff VanderMeer, eds. (Vintage)

COLLECTION

  • The Paper Menagerie and Other Stories, Ken Liu (Saga; Head of Zeus)

MAGAZINE

  • Tor.com

PUBLISHER

  • Tor

EDITOR

  • Ellen Datlow

ARTIST

  • Julie Dillon

NON-FICTION

  • The Geek Feminist Revolution, Kameron Hurley (Tor)

ART BOOK

  • Charles Vess, Walking Through the Landscape of Faerie (Faerie Magazine)

[Thanks to Cat Rambo for the story.]

2017 Locus Award Finalists

The Locus Science Fiction Foundation has announced the finalists for the 2017 Locus Awards.

The awards will be presented at Locus Awards Weekend in Seattle, June 23-25.

SCIENCE FICTION NOVEL

  • Company Town, Madeline Ashby (Tor)
  • The Medusa Chronicles, Stephen Baxter & Alastair Reynolds (Gollancz; Saga)
  • Take Back the Sky, Greg Bear (Orbit US; Orbit UK)
  • Visitor, C.J. Cherryh (DAW)
  • Babylon’s Ashes, James S.A. Corey (Orbit US; Orbit UK)
  • Death’s End, Cixin Liu (Tor; Head of Zeus)
  • After Atlas, Emma Newman (Roc)
  • Central Station, Lavie Tidhar (Tachyon)
  • The Underground Railroad, Colson Whitehead (Doubleday; Fleet)
  • Last Year, Robert Charles Wilson (Tor)

FANTASY NOVEL

  • All the Birds in the Sky, Charlie Jane Anders (Tor; Titan)
  • Summerlong, Peter S. Beagle (Tachyon)
  • City of Blades, Robert Jackson Bennett (Broadway)
  • The Obelisk Gate, N.K. Jemisin (Orbit US; Orbit UK)
  • Children of Earth and Sky, Guy Gavriel Kay (NAL; Viking Canada; Hodder & Stoughton)
  • The Wall of Storms, Ken Liu (Saga; Head of Zeus)
  • The Last Days of New Paris, China Miéville (Del Rey; Picador)
  • The Winged Histories, Sofia Samatar (Small Beer)
  • The Nightmare Stacks, Charles Stross (Ace; Orbit UK)
  • Necessity, Jo Walton (Tor)

HORROR NOVEL

  • The Brotherhood of the Wheel, R.S. Belcher (Tor)
  • Fellside, M.R. Carey (Orbit US; Orbit UK)
  • The Fireman, Joe Hill (Morrow)
  • Mongrels, Stephen Graham Jones (Morrow)
  • The Fisherman, John Langan (Word Horde)
  • Certain Dark Things, Silvia Moreno-Garcia (Dunne)
  • HEX, Thomas Olde Heuvelt (Tor; Hodder & Stoughton)
  • The Family Plot, Cherie Priest (Tor)
  • Lovecraft Country, Matt Ruff (Harper)
  • Disappearance at Devil’s Rock, Paul Tremblay (Morrow)

YOUNG ADULT BOOK

  • Crooked Kingdom, Leigh Bardugo (Holt)
  • The Girl Who Drank the Moon, Kelly Barnhill (Algonquin)
  • Lois Lane: Double Down, Gwenda Bond (Switch)
  • Truthwitch, Susan Dennard (Tor Teen; Tor UK)
  • Poisoned Blade, Kate Elliott (Little, Brown)
  • Burning Midnight, Will McIntosh (Delacorte; Macmillan)
  • Goldenhand, Garth Nix (Harper; Allen & Unwin; Hot Key)
  • Revenger, Alastair Reynolds (Gollancz; Orbit US ’17)
  • This Savage Song, Victoria Schwab (Titan; Greenwillow)
  • The Evil Wizard Smallbone, Delia Sherman (Candlewick)

FIRST NOVEL

  • The Reader, Traci Chee (Putnam)
  • Waypoint Kangaroo, Curtis Chen (Dunne)
  • The Star-Touched Queen, Roshani Chokshi (St. Martin’s)
  • The Girl from Everywhere, Heidi Heilig (Greenwillow; Hot Key)
  • Roses and Rot, Kat Howard (Saga)
  • Ninefox Gambit, Yoon Ha Lee (Solaris US; Solaris UK)
  • Arabella of Mars, David D. Levine (Tor)
  • Infomocracy, Malka Older (Tor.com Publishing)
  • Everfair, Nisi Shawl (Tor)
  • Vigil, Angela Slatter (Jo Fletcher)

NOVELLA

  • The Lost Child of Lychford, Paul Cornell (Tor.com Publishing)
  • The Dream Quest of Vellitt Boe, Kij Johnson (Tor.com Publishing)
  • Hammers on Bone, Cassandra Khaw (Tor.com Publishing)
  • The Ballad of Black Tom, Victor LaValle (Tor.com Publishing)
  • Every Heart a Doorway, Seanan McGuire (Tor.com Publishing)
  • This Census-taker, China Miéville (Del Rey; Picador)
  • The Iron Tactician, Alastair Reynolds (NewCon)
  • The Dispatcher, John Scalzi (Audible; Subterranean 2017)
  • Pirate Utopia, Bruce Sterling (Tachyon)
  • A Taste of Honey, Kai Ashante Wilson (Tor.com Publishing)

NOVELETTE

  • ‘‘The Art of Space Travel”, Nina Allan (Tor.com 7/27/16)
  • “Pearl”, Aliette de Bodard (The Starlit Wood)
  • “Red as Blood and White as Bone”, Theodora Goss (Tor.com 5/4/16)
  • “Foxfire, Foxfire”, Yoon Ha Lee (Beneath Ceaseless Skies 3/03/16)
  • “The Visitor from Taured”, Ian R. MacLeod (Asimov’s 9/16)
  • “Spinning Silver”, Naomi Novik (The Starlit Wood)
  • “Those Shadows Laugh”, Geoff Ryman (F&SF 9-10/16)
  • “The Future is Blue”, Catherynne M. Valente (Drowned Worlds)
  • The Jewel and Her Lapidary, Fran Wilde (Tor.com Publishing)
  • “You’ll Surely Drown Here If You Stay”, Alyssa Wong (Uncanny 5-6/16)

SHORT STORY

  • “The Story of Kao Yu“, Peter S. Beagle (Tor.com 12/7/16)
  • “Our Talons Can Crush Galaxies“, Brooke Bolander (Uncanny 11-12/16)
  • “A Salvaging of Ghosts“, Aliette de Bodard (Beneath Ceaseless Skies 3/17/16)
  • “Seasons of Glass and Iron“, Amal el-Mohtar (The Starlit Wood)
  • “The City Born Great“, N.K. Jemisin (Tor.com 9/28/16)
  • “Seven Birthdays”, Ken Liu (Bridging Infinity)
  • “Afrofuturist 419“, Nnedi Okorafor (Clarkesworld 11/16)
  • “Sixteen Questions for Kamala Chatterjee”, Alastair Reynolds (Bridging Infinity)
  • “That Game We Played During the War“, Carrie Vaughn (Tor.com 3/16/16)
  • “A Fist of Permutations in Lightning and Wildflowers“, Alyssa Wong (Tor.com 3/02/16)

ANTHOLOGY

  • Children of Lovecraft, Ellen Datlow, ed. (Dark Horse)
  • The Year’s Best Science Fiction: Thirty-Third Annual Collection, Gardner Dozois, ed. (St. Martin’s Griffin; Robinson as The Mammoth Book of Best New SF 29)
  • Hidden Youth: Speculative Fiction from the Margins of History, Mikki Kendall & Chesya Burke, eds. (Crossed Genres)
  • Tremontaine, Ellen Kushner, ed. (Serial Box; Saga ’17)
  • Invisible Planets, Ken Liu, ed. (Tor; Head of Zeus)
  • The Starlit Wood, Dominik Parisien & Navah Wolfe, eds. (Saga)
  • The Best Science Fiction & Fantasy of the Year: Volume Ten, Jonathan Strahan, ed. (Solaris US; Solaris UK)
  • Bridging Infinity, Jonathan Strahan, ed. (Solaris US; Solaris UK)
  • Drowned Worlds, Jonathan Strahan, ed. (Solaris US; Solaris UK)
  • The Big Book of Science Fiction, Ann & Jeff VanderMeer, eds. (Vintage)

COLLECTION

  • Sharp Ends, Joe Abercrombie (Orbit US; Gollancz)
  • Hwarhath Stories: Twelve Transgressive Tales by Aliens, Eleanor Arnason (Aqueduct)
  • A Natural History of Hell, Jeffrey Ford (Small Beer)
  • The Complete Orsinia, Ursula K. Le Guin (Library of America)
  • The Found and the Lost, Ursula K. Le Guin (Saga)
  • The Paper Menagerie and Other Stories, Ken Liu (Saga; Head of Zeus)
  • The Best of Ian McDonald, Ian McDonald (PS)
  • Dreams of Distant Shores, Patricia A. McKillip (Tachyon)
  • Beyond the Aquila Rift: The Best of Alastair Reynolds, Alastair Reynolds (Subterranean; Gollancz)
  • Not So Much, Said the Cat, Michael Swanwick (Tachyon)

MAGAZINE

  • Analog
  • Asimov’s
  • Beneath Ceaseless Skies
  • Clarkesworld
  • F&SF
  • File 770
  • Lightspeed
  • Strange Horizons
  • Tor.com
  • Uncanny

PUBLISHER

  • Angry Robot
  • Baen
  • DAW
  • Gollancz
  • Orbit
  • Saga
  • Small Beer
  • Subterranean
  • Tachyon
  • Tor

EDITOR

  • John Joseph Adams
  • Neil Clarke
  • Ellen Datlow
  • Gardner Dozois
  • C.C. Finlay
  • Jonathan Strahan
  • Lynne M. Thomas & Michael Damian Thomas
  • Ann & Jeff VanderMeer
  • Sheila Williams
  • Navah Wolfe

ARTIST

  • Kinuko Y. Craft
  • Galen Dara
  • Julie Dillon
  • Bob Eggleton
  • Donato Giancola
  • Victo Ngai
  • John Picacio
  • Shaun Tan
  • Charles Vess
  • Michael Whelan

NON-FICTION

  • Science Fiction Rebels: The Story of the Science-Fiction Magazines from 1981-1990, Mike Ashley (Liverpool University)
  • Octavia E. Butler, Gerry Canavan (University of Illinois Press)
  • Speculative Blackness: The Future of Race in Science Fiction, André M. Carrington (University of Minnesota Press)
  • Shirley Jackson: A Rather Haunted Life, Ruth Franklin (Liveright)
  • The View From the Cheap Seats, Neil Gaiman (Morrow; Headline)
  • Time Travel: A History, James Gleick (Pantheon)
  • The Geek Feminist Revolution, Kameron Hurley (Tor)
  • Words Are My Matter: Writings about Life and Books 2000-2016, Ursula K. Le Guin (Small Beer)
  • The History of Science Fiction: Second Edition, Adam Roberts (Palgrave Macmillan)
  • Traveler of Worlds: Conversations with Robert Silverberg, Alvaro Zinos-Amaro (Fairwood)

ART BOOK

  • Yoshitaka Amano: Illustrations, Yoshitaka Amano (VIZ Media)
  • Kinuko Y. Craft, Beauty and the Beast, Mahlon F. Craft (Harper)
  • Kinuko Y. Craft, Myth & Magic: An Enchanted Fantasy Coloring Book (Amber Lotus)
  • Spectrum 23: The Best in Contemporary Fantastic Art, John Fleskes, ed. (Flesk)
  • Stephanie Law, Descants & Cadences: The Art of Stephanie Law (Shadowscapes)
  • Ralph McQuarrie, Star Wars Art: Ralph McQuarrie (Abrams)
  • Spaceships: An Illustrated History of the Real and the Imagined, Ron Miller (Smithsonian/Elephant Book Company)
  • The Art of the Film: Fantastic Beasts and Where to Find Them, Dermot Power, ed. (Harper Design; HarperCollins UK)
  • Shaun Tan, The Singing Bones: Inspired by Grimms’ Fairy Tales (Allen & Unwin 2015; Arthur A. Levine; Walker UK)
  • Charles Vess, Walking Through the Landscape of Faerie (Faerie Magazine)

Pixel Scroll 6/25/16 All My Kzins Remembered

(1) PHOTOS FROM THE LOCUS AWARDS.

File 770 was a Locus Award finalist in the magazine category and I did arm someone with an acceptance statement in case I unexpectedly won. It never occurred to me to dramatize my feelings about losing, however, I see First Novel nominee Sylvia Moreno-Garcia refused to admit defeat. (Or was that just her reaction to Nick Mamatas?)

My designated accepter, Suzle Tompkins, stands at the right of this photo.

(2) THUMB UP. Gary Westfahl delivers his verdict at Locus Online: “The Fogeys of July: A Review of Independence Day: Resurgence”. BEWARE SPOILERS.

Since I was recently complimented at a conference for writing “honest” film reviews, I feel obliged to begin this one by conveying my honest reaction to Independence Day: Resurgence: although I was bored and appalled by the original Independence Day (1996), and utterly baffled by its tremendous popularity, I somehow found its belated sequel to be surprisingly engaging, even moving, despite some obvious issues in its logic and plausibility. Perhaps this indicates that I am finally becoming senile, unable to distinguish between worthwhile entertainment and reprehensible trash; perhaps this is a sign of the times, so that a film modeled on a film that stood out in 1996 for its risible inanity and clumsy manipulativeness now seems, amidst scores of similar films, merely typical, or even a bit superior to its lamentable competitors. Perhaps, though, it is simply a better film than its precursor, the theory that merits some extended exploration.

(3) ONLINE COMICS. David Brin is back with “A look at Science Fiction webcomics: Part 3”.

Crowded Void, by Mike West offers one of the more unusual concepts. Finding Earth too crowded and people rather distasteful, Vincent Foxwell thought he could find peace when he took a job on a cargo vessel, hauling junk in space, with only an AI for company. Space turns out to be more crowded than he imagined…. when his spacecraft is swallowed by a massive space worm, where there is already an intestinal civilization of over a million humans and aliens, jockeying for position in the worm’s digestive cycle. He must find a way to escape… before digestion is complete. But first he must deal with the The Joint Intestinal Monarchy, which controls the worm, harvesting parts from spaceships. No end of good material for humor… a new theory of wormholes? Start at the beginning here.

(4) BANDERSNATCH. Charles de Lint reviewed Diana Pavlac Glyer’s Bandersnatch in the July/August Fantasy & Science Fiction.

Yes, there is a wonderful font of information about the Inklings, but it also provides one of the better guides to the collaborative process, including a chapter with the end about how to get the most out of a group set up in a style similar to that of the Inklings.  I think one of the best  pieces of advice she gives is the difference between “I don’t personally like this’ and ‘This isn’t any good’ in critiquing a manuscript.

To writers setting up a writing group, I recommend Bandersnatch wholeheartedly,  That said, those who simply love to read–especially those who particularly appreciate the work of Tolkien, Lewis, and Williams–will find much to enjoy as well.

(6) EAU DE MIDCHLORIAN. When you wear Star Wars Perfumes, the Force is with you….

The trilogy of futuristic “must have” perfumes transfers the essence of the Star Wars universe skillfully into a fascinating world of fragrances, which represent the best-known elements and characters from the saga.

The products are presented in a luxurious and lavish flacon which draws upon the symbolism of probably the most emblematic element of the movie – the lightsaber.

There’s Amidala, for women, and Jedi, and Empire for men.

AMIDALA inspired this fragrance through her royal elegance as well as by her strong, indomitable will. The elegant and sensual notes of vanilla, musk and patchouli are complemented by a fruity top note of apple and tangerine and merges into a sovereign seductive aura for any situation by day and by night; a floral perfume with oriental and powdery notes, which makes its wearer irresistible.

Should you want to smell like Darth Vader, spritz yourself liberally with this stuff —

EMPIRE covers you with an aura of masculinity and power. A scent that captures the dark side of the Force; mystical, formidable and superior. It starts with a sparkle of fruity notes from lime and apple. Powerful chords of amber, patchouli and tonka-bean characterize the powerful heart and base note that refine the composition. The result is a distinctive, oriental, seductive fragrance – perfect for the night, made for men which one better does not get in the way.

I just love that The Mary Sue kicks off its post about these perfumes with a GIF from the first Star Wars movie showing our heroes in the garbage bin and Han Solo demanding, “What an incredible smell you’ve discovered.”

(7) TODAY IN HISTORY

  • June 25, 1951 — On this day in 1951, CBS aired the first commercial color television network broadcast. At the time, no color TV sets were owned by the public. The broadcast was seen on color TV sets in public buildings. (Emphasis on commercial – there were other network broadcasts in color the previous year, 1950.)
  • June 25, 1982 — John Carpenter’s The Thing, seen for the first time on this day.

(8) TODAY’S BIRTHDAY GIRL

  • June 25, 1925 — June Lockhart, whom some remember from Lassie, while fans remember her from Lost in Space.

(9) TODAY’S BIRTHDAY BOY

  • June 25, 1903 – George Orwell

(10) MARK THIS DATE: Neil Gaiman will be on Late Night with Seth Meyers next Friday night, July 1.

(11) HARD TO WIN. Chuck Tingle had a good excuse for not getting a Locus Award.

(12) BREXIT DEBRIEFING. Camestros Felapton registered his disapproval of Brexit by refusing to art containing a notorious Leave supporter.

Not doing cat pictures because Timothy is still running around the house wearing a mop and pretending to be Boris Johnson whilst shouting “effinEurolosers” at squirrels.

(13) FREE SPEECH. The July Harper’s Magazine excerpted the brief the Language Creation Society filed in the Axanar lawsuit claiming that CBS and Paramount did not have copyright over the Klingon language.

Plaintiffs claim copyright over the entire Klingon language.  The notion is meqHutlh (‘lacking reason.’)  If this court commits this qab qech (“bad idea”), an entire body of thought will be extinguished.  Hoch jaghpu’Daj HoHbogh Suvwl’ ylvup-‘ (‘Pity the warrior who kills all his enemies.’)  By Plaintiffs’ account, everyone who translates something into Klingon, writes a poem in Klingon, gives a speech or presentation at a Klingon Language Institute meeting or Star Trek convention, or gives lessons on how to speak Klingon is a copyright infringer. Qam ghu’vam, loD!  (“This will not stand, man!”)  Plaintiffs’ argument that ‘a language is only useful if it can be used to communicate with people, and there are no Klingons with whom to communicate’ is an insulting assertion.  Many humans speak Klingon.  People get married in Klingon.  Linguist d’Armond Speers spent three years teaching his infant son how to speak Klingon. Speaking and writing in Klingon is not simply a matter of transposing words from a different language, either.  The Sesame Street theme-song lyric ‘Sunny day, chasing the clouds away’ translates into Klingon as jaj pen puQmo’, chaw’nIS je Jaj ‘ej Haw’raDchen, or ‘Day of the daytime star, the clouds are filled with dread and forced to flee.’  Klingon is not just a language, but a state of mind.

(14) TEMPLE GRANDIN. A Blank on Blank animation of an interview with Temple Grandin contains lots of food for thought for geeks and nerds. (Don’t be thrown off by the Squarespace ad about 4:30, because Grandin resume talking for another 90 seconds when it’s done.)

(15) RAINING ON A PARADE. Jesse Hudson, in a review of Alastair Reynolds’ Chasm City for Speculiction, compares its execution unfavorably with an Iain Banks standby.

This is important to note given the bifurcated storyline, and its intended effect. Seemingly an emulation of the narrative structure of Iain Banks Use of Weapons, Reynolds’ adherence to plot above character does not allow the big reveals to be very big. I will not spoil the story for those unable to put one and one (not even two and two) together, but suffice to say the underlying reality of the situation is telegraphed in the least subtle ways the length of the novel, emphasized by the lack of complete coherence at the character level. Where Banks’ story resolves itself in surprising fashion upon the final chapter, a surprise that feeds logically back through the entire book, I have doubts Chasm City does the same for the majority of readers—this coming from a person who is terrible at predicting endings

I’m not implying any defect in Hudson’s opinion of Reynolds’ book, but I have to say I saw the ending of Use of Weapons coming from a long way off. To me, Banks’ success was in delivering the expected “surprise” in an elegant way.

(16) TOM REAMY. Joachim Boaz reminds readers about a strong award contender, now forgot, Tom Reamy’s Blind Voices (1978), at Science Fiction and Other Suspect Ruminations.

Tom Reamy’s Blind Voices (1978) was nominated for the Nebula, Hugo, and BFSA awards and came in second in Locus voting for best novel in 1979.  Posthumously released, Reamy died of a heart attack while writing in the fall of 1977 at 42.  His take on small town America transformed by the arrival of a traveling circus and its array of wonders will stay with you for years to come.  The science fiction elements (revealed more than halfway through the novel) interlace and add to the elegiac and constrained fantasy feel.  The specter of sexuality and violence spells cataclysm.

(17) OLD SCHOOL FAN. In a piece cleverly titled “Trexit”, Steve Davidson says “Get off Star Trek’s lawn!”

Alec Peters, you asked for it and you got it.  A set of fan work guidelines for the Star Trek universe that pretty much kills everything except maybe Lego animations. (Which are fine for what they are, but…)

I don’t personally do fanfic, fan films, fan art, etc., I’m sufficiently happy to stick with the originals, lament the lack of “more of the same”, and to spend some time dithering over whether or not I want to invest in the latest whatever released by the franchise holders.

But maybe that’s because I’m an old school fan with old school ideas about how one goes about engaging with someone else’s property….

(18) A LIZARD WITHOUT THUNDER. At Galactic Journey, The Traveler is falling out of love with one of the major prozines: “[June 25, 1961] The Twilight Years (July 1961 Fantasy and Science Fiction.

Like Victorian ladies’ hats, the dinosaurs became increasingly baroque until they were too ungainly to survive.

I worry that The Magazine of Fantasy and Science Fiction is heading in that direction.  I’m all for literary quality in my sf mags, but F&SF has been tilting so far in the purple direction that it is often all but unreadable.  I present Exhibit A: the July 1961 “All-Star” issue.

[Thanks to Martin Morse Wooster, and John King Tarpinian for some of these stories. Title credit goes to File 770 contributing editor of the day Daniel Dern.]

2016 Locus Awards

The winners of the 2016 Locus Awards were announced on June 25 in Seattle.

SCIENCE FICTION NOVEL

  • Ancillary Mercy, Ann Leckie (Orbit US; Orbit UK)

FANTASY NOVEL

  • Uprooted, Naomi Novik (Del Rey)

YOUNG ADULT BOOK

  • The Shepherd’s Crown, Terry Pratchett (Harper; Doubleday UK)

FIRST NOVEL

  • The Grace of Kings, Ken Liu (Saga)

NOVELLA

  • Slow Bullets, Alastair Reynolds (Tachyon)

NOVELETTE

  • ‘‘Black Dog’’, Neil Gaiman (Trigger Warning)

SHORT STORY

  • ‘‘Cat Pictures Please’’, Naomi Kritzer (Clarkesworld 1/15)

ANTHOLOGY

  • Old Venus, George R.R. Martin & Gardner Dozois, eds. (Bantam)

COLLECTION

  • Trigger Warning: Short Fictions and Disturbances, Neil Gaiman (Morrow)

MAGAZINE

  • Asimov’s

PUBLISHER

  • Tor

EDITOR

  • David G. Hartwell

ARTIST

  • Michael Whelan

NON-FICTION

  • Letters to Tiptree, Alisa Krasnostein & Alexandra Pierce, eds. (Twelfth Planet)

ART BOOK

  • Julie Dillon, Julie Dillon’s Imagined Realms, Book 2: Earth and Sky (self-published)