2015 Aurealis Awards

Aurealis Awards COMPThe winners of the 2015 Aurealis Awards, as well as the recipient of the Convenors’ Award for Excellence, were announced at a ceremony at the Australian National Convention in Brisbane on March 25.

BEST CHILDREN’S FICTION

A Single Stone, Meg McKinlay (Walker Books Australia) 

BEST GRAPHIC NOVEL / ILLUSTRATED WORK

The Singing Bones, Shaun Tan (Allen & Unwin)

BEST YOUNG ADULT SHORT STORY

“The Miseducation of Mara Lys”, Deborah Kalin (Cherry Crow Children, Twelfth Planet Press)

BEST HORROR SHORT STORY

“Bullets”, Joanne Anderton (In Sunshine Bright and Darkness Deep, AHWA)

BEST HORROR NOVELLA

“The Miseducation of Mara Lys”, Deborah Kalin (Cherry Crow Children, Twelfth Planet Press)

BEST FANTASY SHORT STORY

“The Giant’s Lady”, Rowena Cory Daniells (Legends 2, Newcon Press)

BEST FANTASY NOVELLA

“Defy the Grey Kings”, Jason Fischer (Beneath Ceaseless Skies, Firkin Press)

BEST SCIENCE FICTION SHORT STORY

“All the Wrong Places”, Sean Williams (Meeting Infinity, Solaris)

BEST SCIENCE FICTION NOVELLA

“By Frogsled and Lizardback to Outcast Venusian Lepers”, Garth Nix (Old Venus, Random House)

BEST COLLECTION

To Hold the Bridge, Garth Nix (Allen & Unwin)

BEST ANTHOLOGY

Bloodlines, Amanda Pillar (ed.) (Ticonderoga Publications)

BEST YOUNG ADULT NOVEL

In The Skin of a Monster, Kathryn Barker (Allen & Unwin)

BEST HORROR NOVEL

Day Boy,Trent Jamieson (Text Publishing)

BEST FANTASY NOVEL

Day Boy,Trent Jamieson (Text Publishing)

BEST SCIENCE FICTION NOVEL

Illuminae, Amie Kaufman and Jay Kristoff (Allen & Unwin)

SARA DOUGLASS BOOK SERIES AWARD

The Watergivers [The Last Stormlord (2009), Stormlord Rising (2010), Stormlord’s Exile (2011)], Glenda Larke (HarperVoyager)

THE CONVENORS’ AWARD FOR EXCELLENCE

Letters to Tiptree, Alexandra Pierce and Alisa Krasnostein (Twelfth Planet Press)

11 thoughts on “2015 Aurealis Awards

  1. Interesting that Day Boy, by Trent Jamieson, one best horror novel AND best fantasy novel. Must be a good ‘un.

    (Strangely, the shortlist has “no shortlist released” in the horror novel section. See here. Wonder why?)

  2. They have a series award? It would be interesting to know what the rules for it are.

    I also note that as well as a number of YA awards, they have a children’s award. (As do the Edgars, I noticed a while ago – yes, I know, different genre.) This seems right to me; if you have a YA award, and actually mean YA, rather than just using it as a loose term for young people’s fiction, it’s only fair that children’s fiction should get a look in as well.

  3. BEST YOUNG ADULT SHORT STORY

    “The Miseducation of Mara Lys”, Deborah Kalin (Cherry Crow Children, Twelfth Planet Press)

    BEST HORROR NOVELLA

    “The Miseducation of Mara Lys”, Deborah Kalin (Cherry Crow Children, Twelfth Planet Press)

    I get that a story can be both horror and YA, but how can it be both a short story and a novella?

  4. @mgdevery: I thought that was odd, that Day Boy won both Fantasy and Horror. It’s even odder when there’s no Horror short list. And BTW, the book’s also on the YA novel short list! It really cleaned up. Or no one could decide how to nominate it, so they put it in every category they could. 😉 It does make me think I should look into it, though.

    @Lenore Jones: Good catch; that’s…weird. Okay this whole award is confusing me tonight.

  5. P.S. There’s a sort of interview with Trent Jamieson about his book on the publisher’s site. It’s very pricey and has DRM; that combo means it’s not for me right now, but I’m bookmarking it for much later down the road..

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  7. @Kendall: those are the exact reasons why I’m not buying it right now – NZ$31.49 on the Kobo site, with Adobe DRM.
    I’m a little broke these days (and destined to be broker due to an impending job loss) and can’t justify that. Still, I’ll be keeping an eye on it.

  8. Having now checked out the Sara Douglass award: it’s a trial, so we don’t know exactly what it’s long term form will be. But:
    It’s for completed (or seemingly completed) series.
    It’s given periodically, not annually (the period is not yet fixed).
    There’s a delay between the close of the qualifying period and the actual award (this year’s are for 2011-2014).

    This is almost exactly what I would do if I were running a series award. However, the awards are juried and you have to submit entries, so it isn’t perfectly parallel with the Hugos.

  9. Further to this: the awards being juried, with different panels for different sections, may explain some of the anomalies. As for novellas, they are newly introduced, to recognise the expansion of this field (which is interesting), and the rules don’t seem to say anywhere what a novella is – so if, say, one panel was using the Hugo definition while another was following more recent usage, confusion might arise.

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