2022 Eisner Awards Nominations

Comic-Con International has announced the nominations for the Will Eisner Comic Industry Awards 2022, chosen by a panel of judges.

The nominees in 32 categories reflect the wide range of material being published in the U.S. today in comics and graphic novel media, representing over 150 print and online titles from some 65 publishers, produced by creators from all over the world.

The 2022 Eisner Awards judging panel consists of comics writer/editor Barbara Randall Kesel, author/art historian Kim Munson, writer/editor/journalist Rik Offenberger, librarian Jameson Rohrer, comics journalist/historian Jessica Tseang, and retailer Aaron Trites.

All professionals in the comic book industry are eligible to vote. The deadline for voting is June 8. New voters must have registered by June 1 in order to be invited to the ballot. The Eisner Award trophies will be presented during Comic-Con on July 22.

2022 WILL EISNER COMIC INDUSTRY AWARD NOMINEES

Best Short Story

  • “Funeral in Foam,” by Casey Gilly and Raina Telgemeier, in You Died: An Anthology of the Afterlife (Iron Circus)
  • “Generations,” by Daniel Warren Johnson, in Superman: Red & Blue #5 (DC)
  • (Birdcage Bottom Books)
  • “Tap, Tap, Tap,” by Larry O’Neil and Jorge Fornés, in Green Arrow 80th Anniversary (DC)
  • Triple Dream (Mel Hilario, Katie Longua, and Lauren Davis), in The Nib Vol 9: Secrets (The Nib)

Best Single Issue/One-Shot (must be able to stand alone)

  • Marvel’s Voices: Identity #1, edited by Darren Shan (Marvel)
  • Mouse Guard: The Owlhen Caregiver and Other Tales, by David Petersen (BOOM!/Archaia)
  • Nightwing #87: “Get Grayson,” by Tom Taylor and Bruno Redondo (DC)
  • Wolvendaughter, by Ver (Quindrie Press)
  • Wonder Woman Historia: The Amazons, by Kelly Sue DeConnick and Phil Jimenez (DC)

Best Continuing Series

  • Bitter Root, by David F. Walker, Chuck Brown, and Sanford Greene (Image)
  • The Department of Truth, by James Tynion IV and Martin Simmonds (Image)
  • Immortal Hulk, by Al Ewing, Joe Bennett, et al. (Marvel)
  • Nightwing, by Tom Taylor and Bruno Redondo (DC)
  • Something Is Killing the Children, by James Tynion IV and Werther Dell’Edera (BOOM! Studios)

Best Limited Series

  • Beta Ray Bill: Argent Star, by Daniel Warren Johnson (Marvel)
  • The Good Asian, by Pornsak Pichetshote and Alexandre Tefenkgi (Image)
  • Hocus Pocus, by Rik Worth and Jordan Collver, hocuspocuscomic.squarespace.com
  • The Many Deaths of Laila Starr, by Ram V and Filipe Andrade (BOOM! Studios)
  • Stray Dogs, by Tony Fleecs and Trish Forstner (Image)
  • Supergirl: Woman of Tomorrow, by Tom King and Bilquis Evely (DC)

Best New Series

  • The Human Target, by Tom King and Greg Smallwood (DC)
  • The Nice House on the Lake, by James Tynion IV and Álvaro Martínez Bueno (DC Black Label)
  • Not All Robots, by Mark Russell and Mike Deodato Jr. (AWA Upshot)
  • Radiant Black, by Kyle Higgins and Marcelo Costa (Image)
  • Ultramega, by James Harren (Image Skybound)

Best Publication for Early Readers (up to age 8)

  • Arlo & Pips #2: Join the Crow Crowd!, by Elise Gravel (HarperAlley)
  • Chibi Usagi: Attack of the Heebie Chibis, by Julie and Stan Sakai (IDW)
  • I Am Oprah Winfrey, by Brad Meltzer and Christopher Eliopoulos (Dial Books for Young Readers)
  • Monster Friends, by Kaeti Vandorn (Random House Graphic)
  • Tiny Tales: Shell Quest, by Steph Waldo (HarperAlley)

Best Publication for Kids (ages 9-12)

  • Allergic, by Megan Wagner Lloyd and Michelle Mee Nutter (Scholastic)
  • Four-Fisted Tales: Animals in Combat, by Ben Towle (Dead Reckoning)
  • Rainbow Bridge, by Steve Orlando, Steve Foxe, and Valentina Brancati (AfterShock)
  • Salt Magic, by Hope Larson and Rebecca Mock (Margaret Ferguson Books/Holiday House)
  • Saving Sorya: Chang and the Sun Bear, by Trang Nguyen and Jeet Zdung (Dial Books for Young Readers)
  • The Science of Surfing: A Surfside Girls Guide to the Ocean, by Kim Dwinell (Top Shelf)

Best Publication for Teens (ages 13-17)

  • Adora and the Distance, by Marc Bernardin and Ariela Kristantina (Comixology Originals)
  • Clockwork Curandera, vol. 1: The Witch Owl Parliament, by David Bowles and Raul the Third (Tu Books/Lee & Low Books)
  • The Legend of Auntie Po, by Shing Yin Khor (Kokila/Penguin Random House)
  • Strange Academy, by Skottie Young and Humberto Ramos (Marvel)
  • Wynd, by James Tynion IV and Michael Dialynas (BOOM! Box)

Best Humor Publication

  • Bubble, by Jordan Morris, Sarah Morgan, and Tony Cliff (First Second/Macmillan)
  • Cyclopedia Exotica, by Aminder Dhaliwal (Drawn & Quarterly)
  • Not All Robots, by Mark Russell and Mike Deodato Jr. (AWA Upshot)
  • The Scumbag, by Rick Remender and various (Image)
  • Thirsty Mermaids, by Kat Leyh (Gallery 13/Simon and Schuster)
  • Zom 100: Bucket List of the Dead, by Haro Aso and Kotaro Takata, translation by Nova Skipper (VIZ Media)

Best Anthology

  • Flash Forward: An Illustrated Guide to Possible (And Not So Possible) Tomorrows, by Rose Eveleth and various, edited by Laura Dozier (Abrams ComicArts)
  • My Only Child, by Wang Ning and various, edited by Wang Saili, translation by Emma Massara (LICAF/Fanfare Presents)
  • The Silver Coin, by Michael Walsh and various (Image)
  • Superman: Red & Blue, edited by Jamie S. Rich, Brittany Holzherr, and Diegs Lopez (DC)
  • You Died: An Anthology of the Afterlife, edited by Kel McDonald and Andrea Purcell (Iron Circus)

Best Reality-Based Work

  • The Black Panther Party: A Graphic History, by David F. Walker and Marcus Kwame Anderson (Ten Speed Press)
  • Hakim’s Odyssey, Book 1: From Syria to Turkey, by Fabien Toulmé, translation by Hannah Chute (Graphic Mundi/Penn State University Press)
  • Lugosi: The Rise and Fall of Hollywood’s Dracula, by Koren Shadmi (Humanoids)
  • Orwell, by Pierre Christin and Sébastien Verdier, translation by Edward Gauvin (SelfMadeHero)
  • Seek You: A Journey Through American Loneliness, by Kristen Radtke (Pantheon/Penguin Random House)
  • The Strange Death of Alex Raymond, by Dave Sim and Carson Grubaugh (Living the Line)

Best Graphic Memoir

  • Factory Summers, by Guy Delisle, translated by Helge Dascher and Rob Aspinall (Drawn & Quarterly)
  • Parenthesis, by Élodie Durand, translation by Edward Gauvin (Top Shelf)
  • Run: Book One, by John Lewis, Andrew Aydin, L. Fury, and Nate Powell (Abrams ComicArts)
  • Save It for Later: Promises, Parenthood, and the Urgency of Protest, by Nate Powell (Abrams ComicArts)
  • The Secret to Superhuman Strength, by Alison Bechdel (Mariner Books)

Best Graphic Album—New

  • Ballad For Sophie, by Filipe Melo and Juan Cavia, translation by Gabriela Soares (Top Shelf)
  • Destroy All Monsters (A Reckless Book), by Ed Brubaker and Sean Phillips (Image)
  • In., by Will McPhail (Mariner Books)
  • Meadowlark: A Coming-of-Age Crime Story, by Ethan Hawke and Greg Ruth (Grand Central Publishing)
  • Monsters, by Barry Windsor-Smith (Fantagraphics)

Best Graphic Album—Reprint

  • The Complete American Gods, by Neil Gaiman, P. Craig Russell, and Scott Hampton (Dark Horse)
  • Locke & Key: Keyhouse Compendium, by Joe Hill and Gabriel Rodríguez (IDW)
  • Middlewest: The Complete Tale, by Skottie Young and Jorge Corona (Image)
  • Rick and Morty vs Dungeons and Dragons Deluxe Edition, by Patrick Rothfuss, Jim Zub, and Troy Little (Oni)
  • The True Lives of the Fabulous Killjoys: California Deluxe Edition, by Gerard Way, Shaun Simon, and Becky Cloonan (Dark Horse)

Best Adaptation from Another Medium

  • After the Rain, by Nnedi Okorafor, adapted by John Jennings and David Brame (Megascope/Abrams ComicArts)
  • Bubble by Jordan Morris, Sarah Morgan, and Tony Cliff (First Second/Macmillan)
  • Disney Cruella, adapted by Hachi Ishie (VIZ Media)
  • George Orwell’s 1984: The Graphic Novel, adapted by Fido Nesti (Mariner Books)
  • The Ragged Trousered Philanthropists, by Robert Tressell, adapted by Sophie and Scarlett Rickard (SelfMadeHero)

Best U.S. Edition of International Material

  • Ballad For Sophie, by Filipe Melo and Juan Cavia, translation by Gabriela Soares (Top Shelf)
  • Between Snow and Wolf, by Agnes Domergue and Helene Canac, translation by Maria Vahrenhorst (Magnetic)
  • Love: The Mastiff, by Frederic Brrémaud and Federico Bertolucci (Magnetic)
  • The Parakeet, by Espé, translation by Hannah Chute ((Graphic Mundi/Penn State University Press)
  • The Shadow of a Man, by Benoît Peeters and François Schuiten, translation by Stephen D. Smith (IDW)

Best U.S. Edition of International Material—Asia

  • Chainsaw Man, by Tatsuki Fujimoto, translation by Amanda Haley (VIZ Media)
  • Kaiju No. 8, by Naoya Matsumoto, translation by David Evelyn (VIZ Media)
  • Lovesickness: Junji Ito Story Collection, by Junji Ito, translation by Jocelyne Allen (VIZ Media)
  • Robo Sapiens: Tales of Tomorrow (Omnibus), by Toranosuke Shimada, translation by Adrienne Beck (Seven Seas)
  • Spy x Family, by Tatsuya Endo, translation by Casey Loe (VIZ Media)
  • Zom 100: Bucket List of the Dead, by Haro Aso and Kotaro Takata, translation by Nova Skipper (VIZ Media)

Best Archival Collection/Project—Strips (at least 20 years old)

  • Friday Foster: The Sunday Strips, by Jim Lawrence and Jorge Longarón, edited by Christopher Marlon, Rich Young, and Kevin Ketner (Ablaze)
  • Popeye: The E.C. Segar Sundays, vol. 1 by E.C. Segar, edited by Gary Groth and Conrad Groth (Fantagraphics)
  • Trots and Bonnie, by Shary Flenniken, edited by Norman Hathaway (New York Review Comics)
  • adapted and illustrated by C. C. Tsai, translated by Brian Bruya (Princeton University Press)

Best Archival Collection/Project—Comic Books (at least 20 Years Old)

  • EC Covers Artist’s Edition, edited by Scott Dunbier (IDW)
  • Farewell, Brindavoine, by Tardi, translation by Jenna Allen, edited by Conrad Groth (Fantagraphics)
  • Marvel Comics Library: Spider-Man vol. 1: 1962–1964, by Stan Lee and Steve Ditko, edidted by Steve Korté (TASCHEN)
  • Spain Rodriguez: My Life and Times, vol. 3, edited by Patrick Rosenkranz (Fantagraphics)
  • Steranko Nick Fury: Agent of S.H.I.E.L.D. Artisan Edition, edited by Scott Dunbier (IDW)
  • Uncle Scrooge: “Island in the Sky,” by Carl Barks, edited by J. Michael Catron (Fantagraphics)

Best Writer

  • Ed Brubaker, Destroy All Monsters, Friend of the Devil (Image)
  • Kelly Sue DeConnick, Wonder Woman Historia: The Amazons Book One (DC)
  • Filipe Melo, Ballad for Sophie (Top Shelf)
  • Ram V, The Many Deaths of Laila Starr (BOOM! Studios); The Swamp Thing (DC); Carnage: Black, White & Blood, Venom (Marvel)
  • James Tynion IV, House of Slaughter, Something Is Killing the Children, Wynd (BOOM! Studios); The Nice House on the Lake, The Joker, Batman, DC Pride 2021 (DC); The Department of Truth (Image); Blue BookRazorblades (Tiny Onion Studios)

Best Writer/Artist

  • Alison Bechdel, The Secret to Superhuman Strength (Mariner Books)
  • Junji Ito, Deserter: Junji Ito Story Collection, Lovesickness: Junji Ito Story Collection, Sensor (VIZ Media)
  • Daniel Warren Johnson, Superman: Red & Blue (DC); Beta Ray Bill (Marvel)
  • Will McPhail, In: A Graphic Novel (Mariner Books)
  • Barry Windsor-Smith, Monsters (Fantagraphics)

Best Penciller/Inker or Penciller/Inker Team

  • Filipe Andrade, The Many Deaths of Laila Starr (BOOM! Studios)
  • Phil Jimenez, Wonder Woman Historia: The Amazons (DC)
  • Bruno Redondo, Nightwing (DC)
  • Esad Ribic, Eternals (Marvel)
  • P. Craig Russell, Norse Mythology  (Dark Horse)

Best Painter/Multimedia Artist (interior art)

  • Federico Bertolucci, Brindille, Love: The Mastiff (Magnetic)
  • John Bolton, Hell’s Flaw (Renegade Arts Entertainment)
  • Juan Cavia, Ballad for Sophie (Top Shelf)
  • Frank Pe, Little Nemo (Magnetic)
  • Ileana Surducan, The Lost Sunday (Pronoia AB)
  • Sana Takeda, Monstress (Image)

Best Cover Artist

  • Jen Bartel, Future State Immortal Wonder Woman #1 & 2, Wonder Woman Black & Gold #1, Wonder Woman 80th Anniversary (DC); Women’s History Month variant covers (Marvel)
  • David Mack, Norse Mythology  (Dark Horse)
  • Bruno Redondo, Nightwing (DC)
  • Alex Ross, Black Panther, Captain America, Captain America/Iron Man #2, Immortal Hulk, Iron Man, The U.S. of The Marvels (Marvel)
  • Julian Totino Tedesco, Just Beyond: Monstrosity (BOOM!/KaBoom!); Dune: House Atreides (BOOM! Studios); Action Comics (DC); The Walking Dead Deluxe (Image Skybound)
  • Yoshi Yoshitani, I Am Not Starfire (DC); The Blue FlameGiga, Witchblood (Vault)

Best Coloring

  • Filipe Andrade/Inês Amaro, The Many Deaths of Laila Starr (BOOM! Studios)
  • Terry Dodson, Adventureman (Image Comics)
  • K. O’Neill, The Tea Dragon Tapestry (Oni)
  • Jacob Phillips, Destroy All Monsters, Friend of the Devil (Image)
  • Matt Wilson, Undiscovered Country (Image); Fire Power (Image Skybound); Eternals, Thor, Wolverine (Marvel); Jonna and the Unpossible Monsters (Oni)

Best Lettering

  • Wes Abbott, Future State, Nightwing, Suicide Squad, Wonder Woman Black & Gold (DC)
  • Clayton Cowles, The Amazons, Batman, Batman/Catwoman, Strange Adventures, Wonder Woman Historia (DC); Adventureman (Image); Daredevil, Eternals, King in Black, Strange Academy, Venom, X-Men Hickman, X-Men Duggan (Marvel)
  • Crank!, Jonna and the Unpossible Monsters, The Tea Dragon Tapestry (Oni); Money Shot (Vault)
  • Ed Dukeshire, Once & Future, Seven Secrets (BOOM Studios)
  • Barry Windsor-Smith, Monsters (Fantagraphics)

Best Comics-Related Periodical/Journalism

  • Alter Ego, edited by Roy Thomas (TwoMorrows)
  • The Columbus Scribbler, edited by Brian Canini, Jack Wallace, and Steve Steiner, columbusscribbler.com
  • Fanbase Press, edited by Barbra Dillon, fanbasepress.com
  • tcj.com, edited by Tucker Stone and Joe McCulloch (Fantagraphics)
  • WomenWriteAboutComics.com, edited by Wendy Browne and Nola Pfau (WWAC)

Best Comics-Related Book

  • All of the Marvels, by Douglas Wolk (Penguin Press)
  • The Art of Thai Comics: A Century of Strips and Stripes, by Nicolas Verstappen (River Books)
  • Fantastic Four No. 1: Panel by Panel, by Stan Lee, Jack Kirby, Chip Kidd, and Geoff Spear (Abrams ComicArts)
  • Old Gods & New: A Companion to Jack Kirby’s Fourth World, by John Morrow, with Jon B. Cooke (TwoMorrows)
  • True Believer: The Rise and Fall of Stan Lee, by Abraham Riesman (Crown)

Best Academic/Scholarly Work

  •  Comics and the Origins of Manga: A Revisionist History, by Eike Exner (Rutgers University Press)
  • The Life and Comics of Howard Cruse: Taking Risks in the Service of Truth, by Andrew J. Kunka (Rutgers University Press)
  • Mysterious Travelers: Steve Ditko and the Search for a New Liberal Identity, by Zack Kruse (University Press of Mississippi)
  • Pulp Empire: The Secret History of Comics Imperialism, by Paul S. Hirsch (University of Chicao Press)
  • Rebirth of the English Comic Strip: A Kaleidoscope, 1847–1870, by David Kunzle (University Press of Mississippi)

Best Publication Design

  • The Complete American Gods, designed by Ethan Kimberling (Dark Horse)
  • The Complete Life and Times of Scrooge McDuck Deluxe Edition, designed by Justin Allan-Spencer (Fantagraphics)
  • Crashpad, designed by Gary Panter and Justin Allan-Spencer (Fantagraphics)
  • Machine Gun Kelly’s Hotel Diablo, designed by Tyler Boss (Z2)
  • Marvel Comics Library: Spider-Man vol. 1: 1962–1964 (TASCHEN)
  • Popeye Vol. 1 by E.C. Segar, designed by Jacob Covey (Fantagraphics)

Best Webcomic

Best Digital Comic

  • Days of Sand, by Aimée de Jongh, translation by Christopher Bradley (Europe Comics)
  • Everyone Is Tulip, by Dave Baker and Nicole Goux, everyoneistulip.com
  • It’s Jeff, by Kelly Thompson and Gurihiru (Marvel)
  • Love After World Domination 1-3, by Hiroshi Noda and Takahiro Wakamatsu, translation by Steven LeCroy (Kodansha)
  • Snow Angels, by Jeff Lemire and Jock (Comixology Originals) 

Premios Kelvin 505
– 2022 Finalists

Spain’s Festival Celsius 232 committee revealed the 2021 shortlists for its Premios Kelvin 505 on May 16.

The trophies are scheduled for presentation at Festival Celsius 232 which takes place July 19-23 in Avilés, Spain.

Mejor novela original en castellano publicada por primera vez en España / Best original novel in Spanish published for the first time in Spain

  • Dientes rojos, de Jesús Cañadas (Obscura).
  • El morador, de Daria Piertrzak (Dilatando Mentes).
  • La señora Potter no es exactamente Santa Claus, de Laura Fernández (Random House).
  • Membrana, de Jorge Carrión (Galaxia Gutenberg)

Mejor novela traducida al castellano y publicada por primera vez en España / Best novel translated into Spanish and published for the first time in Spain

  • Klara y el sol [Klara and the Sun], by Kazuo Ishiguro. Translation by Mauricio Bach (Anagrama).
  • La casa al final de Needless Street [The Last House on Needless Street], by Catriona Ward. Translation by Cristina Macía (Alianza Editorial).
  • La parábola del sembrador [The Parable of the Sower], by Octavia Butler. Translation by Silvia Moreno (Capitán Swing)
  • Piranesi, by Susanna Clarke. Translation by Antonio Padilla Esteban (Salamandra).

Mejor novela juvenil traducida al castellano y publicada por primera vez en España / Best youth novel translated into Spanish and published for the first time in Spain

  • El canto de las ruinas, by Costa Alcalá (Nocturna).
  • La balada de los magos, by África Vázquez (Munyx).
  • La memoria del errante, by Alba Quintas (Fandom Books).
  • Migraciones, by Patricia García-Rojo (Oxford University Press).

Mejor novela juvenil original en castellano publicada por primera vez en España / Best original juvenile novel in Spanish published for the first time in Spain

  • El año de gracia [The Grace Year], by Kim Liggett. Translation by Ignacio Villaro Gumpert (Salamandra).
  • El soñador imposible [Mister Impossible], by Maggie Stiefvater. Translation by Xohana Bastida Calvo (Fandom Books).
  • La última descendiente [Daughter of the Deep], by Rick Riordan. Translation by Ignacio Gómez Calvo (Montena).
  • Una educación mortal [A Deadly Education], by Naomi Novik. Translation by Patricia Sebastián Hernández (Umbriel).

Incidentally, the committee has a little rule that the winner has to pick up the hardware in person:

The Kelvin are only delivered in Avilés. Kelvin only travel in the suitcase of their rightful owners. Kelvin are like Thor’s hammer or Arthur’s sword. If the winner of a Kelvin is not present to pick it up, it will faithfully wait in Limbo for Expectant Kelvins until it appears the following year, or the next, or the next … The Kelvins take a breath to Cthulhu, so they are eternal , you know. And very patient.

The 2022 New York Science Fiction Film Festival Winners

The 2022 New York Science Fiction Film Festival has announced the award winners for its second edition, which featured a lineup of sci-fi, fantasy, and horror films and screenplay entries. Held virtually on Friday, May 13 and Sunday, May 15, and in person on Saturday, May 14th at the Producers Club Theaters in Midtown Manhattan, the festival honored the city’s diverse filmmaking community and recognized 15 official selections for exceptional storytelling. More information on this year’s festival is available here.

Congratulations to the award winners of The 2022 New York Science Fiction Film Festival:

BEST SCI-FI FEATURE

Tales of Tomorrow (2020)

Director: Pedro de Lima Marques

Synopsis: In 2165, the kidnapping of a young girl puts the last stronghold of human civilization at war! The problem is that, in order to save humanity, it will be necessary to rely on the help of an adolescent who lives in 1999.

BEST SCI-FI FEATURE IN A DRAMATIC SETTING

12 Months of KAI (2021) — EAST COAST PREMIERE

Director: Mutsumi Kameyama

Synopsis: What would you do if an “impossible thing” was born between humanoids and humans? Kyoka, who works as a web director in Tokyo, gets a personal care humanoid (PCH) Kai. Kai learns various things about the owner. Kyoka gradually invites Kai to “more emotions as a thing.”

BEST DOCUMENTARY

Exegesis: Lovecraft (2021) — EAST COAST PREMIERE

Director: Qais Pasha

Synopsis: A cathartic journey that Qais Pasha, a Pakistani-Canadian filmmaker embarks on as he traces the life of cult author H.P. Lovecraft, from woodland cemeteries in Rhode Island, to the docks of New York and on to the cobbled stone streets of Quebec City.

BEST SCI-FI SHORT

One-Hit Wonder (2021)

Director: Amanda Dow

Synopsis: A cab driver takes a former pop star on a one-way Twilight Zone-like ride.

BEST SUPERNATURAL SHORT

Moore’s Void (2020)

Director: Brad Bangsboll

Synopsis: A grieving mother attempts to speak with her deceased son.

BEST DIVERSITY IN SCI-FI SHORT

Looking Glass (2020)

Director: Ginew Benton

Synopsis: After his father was murdered Benjamin Looking Glass II, a young Native American man builds a time machine using modern science and ancient knowledge in an attempt to bring his father back but ultimately discovers his true purpose in creation.

BEST FANTASY SHORT

Fulgidusen (2020)

Director: Alexander Feichter

Synopsis: Felix has first met his paper friends: He has discovered them on the pages of some of the old books on the bookshelf. Uncle Armin calls them the Fulgiduses. As Felix is browsing through the books again, he discovers something new: Tentacled beings called Skures.

BEST ANIMATION

Kaiju Decode (2021)

Director: S/N

Synopsis: The catastrophe “Skyfall” was brought by the collapsed orbital space colony crashed into the Earth. Inside the crater at the crash site now inhabit Kaiju born by a gene mutation. Ray, an avatar, comes to the area to collect the scattered “seeds”, not knowing what really is going on there, He soon meets Mil, a mysterious girl. Is she a human, or a Kaiju. A secret government film from the 1960s reveals a scientist desperate to work a mysterious AI to uncover the secrets of a fictional reality invading our own.

BEST VIRTUAL REALITY

Kaiju Decode: First Contact (2021)

Creator: Tsuburaya Productions, Toei Animation

Country: Japan

Synopsis: This virtual reality animation work is about a girl, Mil, who encounters, plays and interacts with a Kaiju. This VR film can be watched from three different viewpoints: the audience’s perspective (default), the Kaiju’s perspective, and Mil’s perspective.

BEST WEB SERIES

Atlas – Chapter One (2021)

Director: Ayman Chaudhry

Synopsis: Technology has replaced currency. Wealth has replaced humanity. When a rebel cell interrogates a corrupt politician, they uncover a secret more terrifying than anything they could have imagined

BEST TRAILER

In Search of Hawaiian Bigfoot (2021)

Director: MarQ Morrison 

Synopsis: This award-winning experimental, hybrid, cinematic, vlog film follows “marQ,” an award-winning micro-documentary filmmaker turned Cine-Vlogger as he searches for the Maui Skunk Ape a.k.a. Hawaiian Bigfoot in the jungles of Maui.

BEST SUPERNATURAL SCREENPLAY

The Bad Ones

Writer: Dempsey James Tillman, Ted Dewberry

BEST SCI-FI SCREENPLAY

The Cheating Vaccine

Writer: Duncan B. Putney

BEST WORLD-BUILDING SCREENPLAY

Escape to Hollow Earth

Writer: Colin K. Stewart

BEST SHORT SCREENPLAY

Transistor

Writer: Brendan P Lee

About The New York Science Fiction Film Festival: Founded in 2017, The New York Science Fiction Film Festival celebrates freedom of expression and the unique approaches of independent filmmakers as a merit to the science fiction, supernatural, horror, and fantasy genres. By honoring a groundbreaking past and looking ahead to an unprecedented future, the festival is committed to encompassing the brilliance of film.

[Based on a press release.]

2022 Kate Wilhelm Solstice Awards Go to Arley Sorg, Troy L. Wiggins, and Petra Mayer

The Science Fiction and Fantasy Writers of America (SFWA) will present the Kate Wilhelm Solstice Award to Arley Sorg and Troy L. Wiggins, and posthumously, to Petra Mayer at the 57th Annual SFWA Nebula Awards® ceremony.

The ceremony will stream live on SFWA’s YouTube and Facebook channels on Saturday, May 21, 2022, at 5:00 p.m. Pacific.

The Kate Wilhelm Solstice Award is given by SFWA for distinguished contributions to the science fiction and fantasy community. Sorg, Wiggins, and Mayer join the ranks of previous Solstice Award winners, including Octavia E. Butler, James Tiptree, Jr., and Carl Sagan.

ARLEY SORG

Arley Sorg

Arley Sorg has attended many sff conventions, primarily in his role as a senior editor and photographer for Locus Magazine. His convention reports, interviews, and book reviews have given many up-and-coming and established creators a moment in the spotlight. But Sorg’s work with several of the genres’ most celebrated short fiction markets is arguably more influential, including his recent reprisal of Fantasy Magazine with Christie Yant. Sorg has also been a relentlessly empowering voice for many storytellers behind-the-scenes, giving countless pep talks and good advice online and in person. 

Arley Sorg is co-editor-in-chief at Fantasy Magazine, a 2021 World Fantasy Award Finalist and a 2022 Locus Award Finalist. He is also a finalist for two 2022 Ignyte Awards, for his work as a critic as well as for his creative nonfiction. Arley is a senior editor at Locus Magazine, associate editor at both Lightspeed & Nightmare, and a columnist for The Magazine of Fantasy and Science Fiction. He takes on multiple roles, including slush reader, movie reviewer, and book reviewer, and conducts interviews for multiple venues, including Clarkesworld Magazine and his own site: arleysorg.com. He has taught classes and run workshops for Clarion WestAugur Magazine, and more, and has been a guest speaker at a range of events. He is a frequent reader of File 770.

TROY L. WIGGINS

Troy L. Wiggins

Troy L. Wiggins has been supporting Black speculative fiction storytelling for years through curation, criticism, editorial work, and of course, his own fiction. For over a decade, he’s contributed both commentary on the influence of Black writing in the speculative genres and helped shape it, most recently through his contribution to Black Panther: Tales of Wakanda. As the publisher and former co-editor at the groundbreaking FIYAH Magazine, Wiggins carries this important work to the African diaspora at large.

Troy L. Wiggins is an award-winning writer and editor from Memphis, Tennessee. His short fiction has appeared in the Griots: Sisters of the SpearLong Hidden: Speculative From the Margins of History, and Memphis Noir anthologies, and in Expanded HorizonsFireside, Uncanny and Beneath Ceaseless Skies Magazines. His essays and criticism have appeared in the Memphis FlyerLiterary Orphans Magazine, People of Colo(u)r Destroy Science FictionStrange Horizons, PEN America, and on Tor.com.

Troy is the former co-editor of the Hugo and World Fantasy Award-winning FIYAH Magazine of Black Speculative Fiction. He was inducted into the Dal Coger Memorial Hall of Fame for his contributions to Speculative Fiction in Memphis in 2018. Troy infrequently blogs about writing, nerd culture, and race at afrofantasy.wordpress.com. He lives in Memphis, Tennessee, with his wife and entirely too many books. 

PETRA MAYER

Petra Mayer

Petra Mayer loved the speculative fiction genres, and passionately celebrated them throughout her career in the news media. In choosing what writers she worked with and what books to feature, she repeatedly uplifted marginalized creators and introduced a host of readers to their stories. Mayer made space for unheard voices and developed guides like the Book Concierge, that fans of all backgrounds could use to discover new favorites. Her work and joy were gifts to the industry.

Petra Mayer was an editor at NPR Books. She shared her enthusiasm for genre fiction on air at NPR in the form of book reviews, as a regular guest on the podcast Pop Culture Happy Hour, through her reporting on the San Diego Comic-Con, and through the Book Concierge book recommendation tool. In her earlier career, Mayer was an associate director and producer for All Things Considered. She began working in the news media in 1997.

Mayer passed away at the young age of 46 in November 2021. Her parents established the Petra Mayer Memorial Fund for Internships. This dedicated fund “will support internships with NPR’s Culture Desk, helping to develop passionate journalists who—like Petra—can inspire audiences with a love of learning, passion for books, and dedication to sharing stories that matter.”

SFWA President Jeffe Kennedy remarks, “Arley, Troy, and Petra are shining examples of how people contribute to the greater genre community by pursuing their own personal passions. I’m delighted to celebrate Arley’s and Troy’s wonderful contributions and look forward to what they’ll go on to do. I mourn the loss of Petra and all she contributed to the SFF genre and community. I hope this award will help put a light on someone we lost far too young.”

The 57th Annual Nebula Awards Ceremony will stream live on SFWA’s YouTube and Facebook channels for the public. The ceremony takes place during the 2022 Nebula Conference Online, an annual professional development conference organized by SFWA for aspiring and established professionals of the speculative fiction industry. Registration is $150 and may be purchased at events.sfwa.org.

[Based on a press release.]

2022 Nommo Awards Shortlist

The African Speculative Fiction Society has released the 2022 shortlist for the Nommo Awards for African Speculative Fiction.

The African Speculative Fiction Society, composed of professional and semiprofessional African writers, editors, publishers, graphic artists and film makers, was founded in 2016.

The Nommos were presented for the first time in 2017. The awards are named for twins from Dogon cosmology who take a variety of forms, including appearing on land as fish, walking on their tails.

All works are speculative fiction, were published between January 1, 2021 – December 31, 2021, and are by Africans as defined by the ASFS and Nommo Awards Guidelines

ASFS members will vote on the shortlist until August 31, and the winners will be announced at an online ceremony sometime this autumn.

NOVEL SHORTLIST

  • THEY MADE US BLOOD AND FURY by Cheryl S. Ntumy (Amazon KDP, 2021)
  • THE GILDED ONES by Namina Forna (Delacorte Press, 2021)
  • SON OF THE STORM by Suyi Davies Okungbowa (Orbit US/Orbit UK, 2021)
  • FAR FROM THE LIGHT OF HEAVEN by Tade Thompson (Orbit Books 2021)
  • THE MADHOUSE by T J Benson (Masobe Books 2021)
  • THE LIBRARY OF THE DEAD by T. L. Huchu (Tor Books 2021)

NOVELLA SHORTLIST

  • THE FUTURE GOD OF LOVE by Dilman Dila (Luna Press, February 2021)
  • NOT SEEING IS A FLOWER by Erhu Kome (Eraserhead Press, 2021)
  • AN EXPLORATION OF NICHOLE OTIENO’S EARLY FILMOGRAPHY (1232-1246) by Kola Heyward-Rotimi (Strange Horizons September 2021)
  • REMOTE CONTROL by Nnedi Okorafor (Tor/Forge, Tordotcom, 2021)
  • THE ABOMINATION by Nuzo Onoh (The Magazine of Fantasy and Science Fiction, September-October 2021)

SHORT STORY SHORTLIST

GRAPHIC NOVEL SHORTLIST

  • THE iJOURNAL — Awele Emili
  • IYANU: CHILD OF WONDER VOL 2 — Roye Okupe, Godwin Akpan (YouNeek Studios/Dark Horse Comic)

2022 Tomorrow Prize Finalists

The Tomorrow Prize and The Green Feather Award: Celebrity Readings & Honors, an in-person event on May 22, will recognize outstanding new works of science fiction written by Los Angeles County high school students, as well as this year’s winning ecology-themed sf story.

The 2022 finalists’ stories will be read by celebrity guests on Sunday, May 22 from 4:00-6:00 p.m. Pacific at Vroman’s Bookstore in Pasadena, CA. Register to attend the free event at Eventbrite.

The winners will receive cash prizes. 

  • First, Second, and Third place Tomorrow Prize winners will receive $250, $150, and $100 USD cash prizes.
  • The First place Tomorrow Prize winner will be published in L.A. Parent Magazine

The Green Feather Award is an additional special prize category for an environmentally focused sci-fi story. The winner will receive $250 and online publication by the Nature Nexus Institute.

CELEBRITY GUEST READERS:

  • Rico E. Anderson (The Orville)
  • JB Blanc (Arcane)
  • Shayne Eastin (The Monster Project)
  • Bonnie Gordon (Star Trek Prodigy)
  • Tamara Krinsky (Tomorrow’s World Today)
  • Allison Scagliotti (Stitchers)
  • Marcelo Tubert (Star Trek: Picard)

THE TOMORROW PRIZE FINALISTS:

  • Angel Bran – Hollywood High School (“House on Sand”) 
  • Amy Cervantes – Port of Los Angeles High School (“They’re Coming”)
  • Tais Cortez – Port of Los Angeles High School (“Genetic Slumber”)
  • Madison Kay – John Marshall High School (“Backstitching”)
  • Luna Prieto – John Marshall High School (“The Mechanical Planet”)

THE GREEN FEATHER AWARD WINNERS:

  • Jonathan Kim – Culver City High School (“The Seagulls Save Culver City”)
  • Jennifer Wu – Downtown Magnets High School (“Eden”)

THE TOMORROW PRIZE HONORABLE MENTIONS:

  • Nancy Duran-Lopez – Port of Los Angeles High School (“Idiosyncrasy”)
  • Nyn Kim – Port of Los Angeles High School (“Final Breath”)
  • Sloane Corddry – Girls Academic Leadership Academy (“Your Case is Quite Unique”)
  • Christine Wu – Downtown Magnets High School (“Gone”)

FINALIST JUDGES:

  • Bobak Ferdowsi – Spacecraft Engineer
  • Keenan Norris – Sci-Fi Novelist & L.A. History Expert
  • Lilliam Rivera – Award Winning Y.A. Novelist
  • Sherri L. Smith – Award Winning Y.A. Novelist

The event also will feature a musical guest, theremin player, Steven Collins, an actor and guidance and control engineer at NASA/JPL. Steve has degrees in Theater Arts and Physics from UC Santa Cruz and built his first theremin in 2001. A lifetime fan of theater, science, and science fiction, Steve spends his time dancing, doing Shakespeare, flying spacecraft around the solar system and recently did a bit of technical consulting for season 2 of Star Trek Picard.

Guests are encouraged to wear a sci-fi themed outfit or accessory to get into the spirit of the readings!

[Based on a press release.]

2022 Roswell Award Finalists

The Roswell Award and Feminist Futures Award: Celebrity Readings and Honors on May 21 will recognize outstanding new works of science fiction by emerging writers from across the United States and worldwide, including the winner of this year’s feminist themed sci-fi story.

The free virtual event starts 11:00 a.m. Pacific; Registration required. Use the Zoom Registration link: bit.ly/reg-roswell-ffa-2022

The program will feature dramatic readings by celebrity guests Following the readings, the authors will be honored for their writing.

  • First, Second, and Third place Roswell Award winners will receive $500, $250, and $100 cash prizes.
  • The First Place Roswell Award winner will receive a UCLA Extension Writers’ Program sponsored 11-week or shorter online course.

ROSWELL FINALISTS

  • “Beauty is the Beast” by Ven Pillay
  • “Dr. Harriet Hartfeld’s Home for Aging AIs” by Paul Martz
  • “Astronomology: or How Elon Musk killed Neil deGrasse Tyson” by Ed Marsh
  • “Heart to Heart” by Susan Wachowski
  • “Tyrannosaurus Mechs” by Gregory Norris

HONORABLE MENTIONS

  • “Falling Giants” by Camilla Linde
  • “The Seventh Day is for Resting” by Florencia Hain
  • “Bob’s Your Uncle” by Larry Herbst
  • “Meat Ships Are the Worst” by Addison Marsh

THE 2022 ROSWELL AWARD Finalist Judges

  • SB Divya
  • Nicholas Meyers
  • Danielle Costa
  • Clifford Johnson

2022 FEMINIST FUTURES AWARD

  • “Salt Water,” by Jane Smith

The Feminist Futures Award is an additional special prize category for a feminist themed sci-fi story. The winning story will be published by co-presenter Artemis Journal.

FEMINIST FUTURES HONORABLE MENTIONS

  • “Maximum Potential Skill Level” by Didrik Dyrdal
  • “Chrysanthemums are made to bloom” by Emma Uren
  • “The Part of Paradise where our Anger comes from.” by Yuwinn Kraukamp

2022 Seiun Award Nominees

Art from F-CON, the 2022 Japanese Science Ficton Convention

The 2022 Seiun Award nominees were revealed on May 15. The announcement of the winners and the award ceremony will be held at the 59th Japan Science Fiction Convention (F-CON) to be held in Fukushima Prefecture from August 27-28, 2022.

Thanks to N. for the translation. All titles are in English, with Romanji in the Long Work and Short Story categories. English titles, in the event of no existing English title, are translated.

BEST JAPANESE LONG WORK

  • A Situation Beyond Statistics (Toukeigai Jitai), by Yuri Shibamura (Hayakawa Bunko JA, 2/17)
  • Space Battleship Yamato: Dawn Chapter, Aquarius Algorithm (Uchuu Senkan Yamato: Reimei-hen Aquarius Algorithm), by Yuya Takashima (Kadokawa, 9/27)
  • What Will You Be Doing at the End? Can I See You Just One More Time? (Shūmatsu Nani Shitemasu ka? Mō Ichido dake, Aemasu ka?) by Akira Kareno (Kadokawa Sneaker Bunko, 7/30, 11 volumes)
  • The Youngest Princess in Blue (Aoi no Suehime), by Mitsuhiro Monden (Sōgen Suiri Bunko, 9/24)
  • JAGAE Eccentric Legend of Oda Nobunaga (JAGAE Oda Nobunaga Den Kidou), by Baku Yumemakura (Shodensha, 6/10)
  • Irina: The Vampire Cosmonaut (Tsuki to Raika to Nosferatu), by Keisuke Makino (Gagaga Bunko, 10/19, 7 volumes)
  • Kiryu Police: White Bone Road (Kiryu Keisatsu: Hakkotsu Kaidou), by Ryoe Tsukimura (Hayakawa Shobō, 8/18)
  • Man Kind, by Taiyo Fujii (S-F Magazine, serialization ended in August 2021 issue)

BEST JAPANESE SHORT STORY

  • “Anonymous Akashic Records” (UchiAka-shic Record), by Yuba Isukari (S-F Magazine, June 2021)
  • “A Human History of Cleaning & Cleaning Equipment” (Souji to Souji Yougu no Jinruishi), by Yuri Matsuzaki (Anomalous Papers, Kyosuke Higuchi, ed. Hayakawa Shobō, 10/19)
  • “You Made Me Human” (Kisho ga Watashi wo Ningen ni Shitekureta), by Todoki Uka (S-F Magazine, February 2021)
  • “The Subjectivist” (Shukansha), by Koichi Harukure (S-F Magazine, August/October 2021)
  • “On the Imagination and Creativity of Invertebrates” (Musekitsui-doubutsu no Souzouryoku to Souzousei ni Tsuite), by Yuichi Sakanaga (Kawade Shobo Shinsha NOVA 2021 Summer Issue, 4/6)
  • “How to Defeat a Science Fiction Writer” (SF Sakka no Taoshikata), by Satoshi Ogawa (Anomalous Papers, Kyosuke Higuchi, ed. Hayakawa, 10/19)
  • “Seven Billion Pessimists” (Nana Okunin no Pessimist), by Nirou Katase (S-F Magazine, August 2021)
  • “Selling The Body” (Shintai wo Uru Koto), by Miyuki Ono (S-F Magazine, August 2021)

BEST TRANSLATED LONG WORK

  • Network Effect, by Martha Wells (translated by Naoya Nakahara)
  • The Man with the Compound Eyes, by Wu Ying-Mi  (translated by Satoshi Oguriyama)
  • The Fated Sky, by Mary Robinette Kowal (translated by Akinobu Sakai)
  • Death’s End, by Cixin Liu (translated by Nozomi Omori, Wan Chai, Sakura Mitsuyoshi, Ko Tomari)
  • No Enemy But Time, by Michael Bishop (translated by Yutaka Oshima)
  • Project Hail Mary, by Andy Weir (translated by Kazuko Onoda)
  • This Is How You Lose the Time War, by Amal El-Mohtar and Max Gladstone (translated by Kazuko Yamada)
  • Children of Time, by Adrian Tchaikovsky (translated by Masayuki Uchida)

BEST TRANSLATED SHORT STORY

  • “Yakiniku Planet,” by Liang Qingshan (translated by Keita Kojima)
  • “Mother Tongues,” by S. Qiouyi Lu (translated by Umiyuri Katsuyama)
  • “Nomad,” by Karin Lowachee (translated by Naoya Nakahara)
  • “The Man Who Ended History: A Documentary,” by Ken Liu (translated by Yoshimichi Furusawa)
  • “Power Armor: A Love Story,” by David Barr Kirtley (translated by Naoya Nakahara)
  • “The King of Time,” by Baoshu (translated by Kosaku Ai)
  • “A Witch’s Guide to Escape: A Practical Compendium of Portal Fantasies,” by Alix. E Harrow (translated by Fumiyo Harashima)
  • “The One With the Interstellar Group Consciousnesses” by James Alan Gardner (translated by Chiori Sada)

BEST DRAMATIC PRESENTATION

BEST COMIC

  • Ōoku: The Inner Chambers, by Fumi Yoshinaga (19 volumes)
  • Attack on Titan, by Hajime Isayama (34 volumes)
  • An Interstellar Voyage Fit for a Baron (Danshoku ni Fusawashii Ginga Ryokou), by Rasenjin Hayami (3 volumes)
  • Psychic Squad (Zettai Karen Children), by Takashi Shiina (63 volumes)
  • Astronaut Cat, by Ryo Aizawa (one-shot)
  • Beastars, by Paru Itagaki (22 volumes)
  • JoJolion, by Hirohiko Araki (27 volumes)
  • Sōbōtei Kowasubeshi, by Kazuhiro Fujita (25 volumes)

BEST ARTIST

BEST NONFICTION

  • NHK: 100 Minutes of Masterpieces – Ray Bradbury’s “Fahrenheit 451”, by Kazuhisa Todayama (NHK Publishing)
  • SF Prototyping: New Strategies of Innovation from Science Fiction, by Michito Miyamoto, Yuuki Namba, Hirotaka Osawa (Hayakawa)
  • Rurubu Universe, edited by Kimiyo Hayashi (JTB Publishing)
  • The Thoughts of Shinichi Hoshi, by Michiaki Asaba (Chikuma Shobō)
  • The Best of Japanese SF Comics, edited by Kenta Fukui (Sōgen Suiri Bunko)
  • Super Sentai (Illustrated Gakken Book), edited by Dai Matsui (Gakken)
  • A Physicist Gets Into Sci-Fi Movies, by Yuichi Takamizu (Kobunsha)
  • World Science Fiction Writers Conference, edited by Hayakawa Shobo Editorial Department (Hayakawa Shobo)

FREE NOMINATION

“A novel-generating AI created by an individual and released in July 2021, as it became a hot topic as a creative AI that can be easily enjoyed on the Web.”

“Date is the app’s release. For the app’s release and its scale as a social phenomenon after the production announcement in 2016.”

“Date is the release of the most recent game in the series, “Super Robot Wars 30.” In honor of the increased visibility of robot works, including past works, due to the crossover of robot works.”

“Research into a treatment for kidney disease in cats made the news and raised more than 200 million yen. The reason for this event was that it drew attention to the theme of animal physiology, a topic that is close to our hearts, and that it was a reminder of the high impact of “buzz” on the Internet.” (English article)

“The new movie version, which spanned almost 15 years since 2007, has finally come to an end. Starting from the TV series, it has been about 25 years. Many people did not live to see the end, and the conclusion of the event literally embodied the curse of Eva. We would like to pay tribute not only to the movie as a stand-alone product, but also to the completion of the series over the years.”

“While the whole world was suffering from the new coronavirus, the Freedom was built in Shanghai, China in April, and the Nu Gundam was built in Fukuoka, Japan in December. The construction of two mobile suits (Freedom is not a Gundam) in one year was unprecedented and the first time in history. It could be said to be a modern version of the construction of the Great Buddha to pray for the dispersal of Corona.” (English article)

“Although private citizens have used public organizations for space travel in the past, it is significant that they have successfully completed a manned spaceflight mission that will lead to private space travel in the future.”

2021 Bram Stoker Awards

The Horror Writers Association (HWA) announced the Bram Stoker Award® winners for the 2021 calendar year on May 14 at StokerCon 2022 in Denver.

SUPERIOR ACHIEVEMENT IN A NOVEL

  • Jones, Stephen Graham – My Heart Is a Chainsaw (Gallery/Saga Press)

SUPERIOR ACHIEVEMENT IN A FIRST NOVEL

  • Piper, Hailey – Queen of Teeth (Strangehouse Books)

SUPERIOR ACHIEVEMENT IN A GRAPHIC NOVEL

  • Manzetti, Alessandro (author) and Cardoselli, Stefano (artist) – The Inhabitant of the Lake (Independent Legions Publishing)

SUPERIOR ACHIEVEMENT IN A YOUNG ADULT NOVEL

  • Waters, Erica – The River Has Teeth (HarperTeen)

SUPERIOR ACHIEVEMENT IN LONG FICTION

  • Strand, Jeff – “Twentieth Anniversary Screening” (Slice and Dice) (Independently published)

SUPERIOR ACHIEVEMENT IN SHORT FICTION

  • Murray, Lee – “Permanent Damage” (Attack From the ’80s) (Raw Dog Screaming Press)

SUPERIOR ACHIEVEMENT IN A FICTION COLLECTION

  • Files, Gemma – In That Endlessness, Our End (Grimscribe Press)

SUPERIOR ACHIEVEMENT IN A SCREENPLAY

  • Flanagan, Mike; Flanagan, James; and Howard, Jeff – Midnight Mass, Season 1, Episode 6: “Book VI: Acts of the Apostles” (Intrepid Pictures)

SUPERIOR ACHIEVEMENT IN A POETRY COLLECTION

  • Sng, Christina; Yuriko Smith, Angela; Murray, Lee; and Flynn, Geneve – Tortured Willows: Bent. Bowed. Unbroken. (Yuriko Publishing)

SUPERIOR ACHIEVEMENT IN AN ANTHOLOGY

  • Datlow, Ellen – When Things Get Dark: Stories Inspired by Shirley Jackson (Titan Books) 

SUPERIOR ACHIEVEMENT IN NON-FICTION

  • Knost, Michael – Writers Workshop of Horror 2 (Hydra Publications)

SUPERIOR ACHIEVEMENT IN SHORT NON-FICTION

  • Yuriko Smith, Angela – “Horror Writers: Architects of Hope” (The Sirens Call, Halloween 2021, Issue 55) (Sirens Call Publications)

Also recognized during tonight’s ceremony were these previously announced HWA service and specialty award winners.

LIFETIME ACHIEVEMENT

  • Jo Fletcher
  • Nancy Holder
  • Koji Suzuki

SPECIALTY PRESS

  • Valancourt Books

THE RICHARD LAYMON PRESIDENT’S AWARD

  • Sumiko Saulson

THE SILVER HAMMER AWARD

  • Kevin J. Wetmore

MENTOR OF THE YEAR

  • Michael Knost

2022 Dagger Awards Shortlists

The Crime Writers’ Association (CWA) of the United Kingdom announced the shortlist for the 2022 Dagger Awards on May 13.

The Daggers were first given in 1955, but for the first five years CWA called its top honor the Crossed Red Herring Award.

The winners will be revealed at a ceremony on June 29.

GOLD DAGGER

This award is for the best crime novel by an author of any nationality.

  • BEFORE YOU KNEW MY NAME by JACQUELINE BUBLITZ (Little, Brown • Sphere)
  • SUNSET SWING by RAY CELESTIN (Pan Macmillan • Mantle)
  • RAZORBLADE TEARS by SA COSBY (Headline Publishing Group • Headline)
  • THE UNWILLING by JOHN HART (Bonnier Books UK • Zaffre)
  • THE SHADOWS OF MEN by ABIR MUKHERJEE (Penguin Random House • Harvill Secker)
  • THE TRAWLERMAN by WILLIAM SHAW (Quercus • riverrun)

IAN FLEMING STEEL DAGGER

Eligible books in this category are thrillers set in any period and include, but are not limited to, spy fiction, psychological thrillers and action/adventure stories.

  • FIND YOU FIRST by LINWOOD BARCLAY (HarperCollins • HQ)
  • THE PACT by SHARON BOLTON (Orion Publishing Group)
  • THE DEVIL’S ADVOCATE by STEVE CAVANAGH (Orion Publishing Group)
  • RAZORBLADE TEARS by SA COSBY (Headline Publishing Group)
  • DEAD GROUND by MW CRAVEN (Little, Brown • Constable)
  • DREAM GIRL by LAURA LIPPMAN (Faber)

JOHN CREASEY (NEW BLOOD) DAGGER

This award is for the best crime novel by a first-time author of any nationality.

  • WELCOME TO COOPER by TARIQ ASHKANANI (Thomas & Mercer)
  • REPENTANCE by ELOÍSA DÍAZ (Orion Publishing Group • Weidenfeld & Nicolson)
  • THE MASH HOUSE by ALAN GILLESPIE (Unbound • Unbound Digital)
  • THE APPEAL by JANICE HALLETT (Profile Books • Viper Books)
  • WHERE RAVENS ROOST by KARIN NORDIN (HarperCollins • HQ)
  • HOW TO KIDNAP THE RICH by RAHUL RAINA (Little, Brown)
  • WAKING THE TIGER by MARK WIGHTMAN (Hobeck Books)

CRIME FICTION IN TRANSLATION DAGGER

This award is for a crime novel not originally written in English and which has been translated into English for UK publication.

  • HOTEL CARTAGENA by SIMONE BUCHHOLZ Translated by RACHEL WARD (Orenda Books)
  • BULLET TRAIN by KŌTARŌ ISAKA Translated by SAM MALISSA (Penguin Random House • Harvill Secker)
  • OXYGEN by SACHA NASPINI Translated by CLARISSA BOTSFORD (Europa Editions UK)
  • PEOPLE LIKE THEM by SAMIRA SEDIRA Translated by LARA VERGNAUD (Bloomsbury Publishing • Raven Books)
  • THE RABBIT FACTOR by ANTTI TUOMAINEN Translated by DAVID HACKSTON (Orenda Books)

ALCS GOLD DAGGER FOR NON-FICTION

This award is for any non-fiction work on a crime-related theme by an author of any nationality.

  • THE DEVIL YOU KNOW: STORIES OF HUMAN CRUELTY AND COMPASSION by DR GWEN ADSHEAD & EILEEN HORNE (Faber)
  • THE DUBLIN RAILWAY MURDER by THOMAS MORRIS (Penguin Random House • Harvill Secker)
  • THE UNUSUAL SUSPECT by BEN MACHELL (Canongate Books)
  • THE DISAPPEARANCE OF LYDIA HARVEY: A TRUE STORY OF SEX, CRIME AND THE MEANING OF JUSTICE by JULIA LAITE (Profile Books)
  • EMPIRE OF PAIN by PATRICK RADDEN KEEFE (Pan Macmillan • Picador)
  • THE IRISH ASSASSINS: CONSPIRACY, REVENGE AND THE MURDERS THAT STUNNED AN EMPIRE by JULIE KAVANAGH (Atlantic Books • Grove Press UK)

HISTORICAL DAGGER

This award is for the best historical crime novel, set in any period up to 50 years prior to the year in which the award will be made.

  • APRIL IN SPAIN by JOHN BANVILLE (Faber)
  • SUNSET SWING by RAY CELESTIN (Pan Macmillan • Mantle)
  • CROW COURT by ANDY CHARMAN (Unbound)
  • NOT ONE OF US by ALIS HAWKINS (Canelo)
  • EDGE OF THE GRAVE by ROBBIE MORRISON (Pan Macmillan • Macmillan)
  • A CORRUPTION OF BLOOD by AMBROSE PARRY (Canongate Books)

SHORT STORY DAGGER

This award is for any crime short story first published in the UK in English in a publication that pays for contributions, or broadcast in the UK in return for payment.

  • BLINDSIDED by CAROLINE ENGLAND in Criminal Pursuits: Crime Through Time; Editor: Samantha Lee Howe (Telos Publishing)
  • WITH THE OTHERS by TM LOGAN in Afraid of the Shadows; Editor: Miranda Jewess (Criminal Minds)
  • FLESH OF A FANCY WOMAN by PAUL MAGRS in Criminal Pursuits: Crime Through Time; Editor: Samantha Lee Howe (Telos Publishing)
  • LONDON by JO NESBØ in The Jealousy Man and other stories; Editor: Robert Ferguson (Penguin Random House • Harvill Secker)
  • CHANGELING by BRYONY PEARCE in Criminal Pursuits: Crime Through Time; Editor: Samantha Lee Howe (Telos Publishing)
  • WHEN I GROW UP by ROBERT SCRAGG in Afraid of the Shadows; Editor: Miranda Jewess (Criminal Minds)

PUBLISHERS’ DAGGER

This prestigious Dagger is awarded annually to the Best Crime and Mystery Publisher of the Year.

  • FABER & FABER
  • HARPER FICTION (HARPERCOLLINS imprint)
  • MICHAEL JOSEPH (PENGUIN RANDOM HOUSE imprint)
  • TITAN BOOKS
  • VIPER (PROFILE BOOKS imprint)
  • PUSHKIN VERTIGO (PUSHKIN PRESS imprint)

DEBUT DAGGER

A competition for the opening of a crime novel and synopsis.

  • HENRY’S BOMB by KEVIN BARTLETT
  • HOLLOWAY CASTLE by LAURA ASTON HILL
  • THE 10:12 by ANNA MALONEY
  • THE DEAD OF EGYPT by DAVID SMITH
  • THE DIEPPE LETTERS by LIZ RACHEL WALKER

DAGGER IN THE LIBRARY

The Dagger in the Library is a prize for a body of work by an established crime writer who has long been popular with borrowers from libraries, and who has supported libraries and their users.

  • LIN ANDERSON
  • MARK BILLINGHAM
  • SUSAN HILL
  • EDWARD MARSTON
  • CATH STAINCLIFFE