Journey Planet 62: Crafting during Covid 

By James Bacon: It’s been a challenging time, but fans have risen to the challenge in ingenious, interesting and beautiful ways, creating, making, painting and arting.  

It’s been a productive time, and with issue 62 of Journey Planet we look at some of the incredible work and fun times fans have had. 

The issue can be found here.

We celebrate some of the wonderful things people have been up to which include: 

  • fitting out a camper van
  • building a Lego steam train 
  • making galifraen tiles 
  • crochet octopus helmet cover 
  • pens and inks 
  • Knitting
  • Peeps theatre
  • wooden mushrooms 
  • a TARDIS door 

We also have a wonderful look at the art of Meg Frank, Sara Felix and Iain Clark who share their work, Tiaras, Block Printing and painting.  

With contributions from Vanessa Applegate, Constanze Hoffman, Emma King, Alissa McKersie, Edie Stern, Christy Kearny, Liz Loikkanen, and James Shields, we also touch upon what and how fandom has managed, with a consideration of the Virtual year of cons from Marcin Klack and how inertia will be overcome as fandom strives to regather in our enditorial. 

A feast for the eyes, the “Crafting in Covid” issue is co-edited by Sara Felix, Christopher J. Garcia and James Bacon. We hope you enjoy it. 

Future issues being worked on range from SF, Comics and the American War in Vietnam, Warrior Comic a 40th celebration, and V for Vendetta amongst a number of subjects.  

Contributions, comments, feedback and letters of comment always welcome to journeyplanet@gmail.com

Season’s Greetings from Journey Planet

By James Bacon: It’s that time of the year, and Sara Felix, Sarah Gulde, Errick Nunnally, Erin Underwood, Christopher J. Garcia and James Bacon have come together to bring you an incredible look at 2021, holiday rituals, food, winter, Christmas stories, cards and much, much more! Season’s Greetings! – Journey Planet – Issue # 61

Starting with a stunning piece of art as a cover by Sara Felix, with a design by Errick Nunally, the 78-page issue came together immediately after DisCon III, the co-editors feeling enthused and invigorated and wanting to share some seasonal celebrations. 

With a carol from Shana Worthen, a song by Meg MacDonald, art from Fia Karlsson, Sara Felix, and Linda Miller, there is a wide selection available in this Journey Planet selection box of delights. 

Marguerite Smith, vice chair of DisCon III is interviewed, there are articles on The Tomb of Dracula #84—’Twas the Night Before Christmas, Where Eagles Dare, Lucasfilm Christmas Cards, Christmas Ghosts: Past, Present, and Future, Tamales and Tradition, Christmas and SFF as well as recipes for Wild Boar and Cocktails. 

The co-editors hope you enjoy this issue, with many more words, well wishes and seasonal greetings from a variety of fans and writers, a cornucopia of good tidings.  

Journey Planet logo by Sara Felix. 

Journey Planet 60 — A Zine in a Day

By James Bacon: The day was November 27, 2021, and a group of fanzine writers, artists, editors, and… others? Well, they’ve gathered virtually to put together an issue they’re calling One Day on Journey Planet!

Chris originally had the idea but as he says, “’SO, what exactly are we doing here????’  ‘That’s a difficult question. More difficult than you think, honestly. It comes down to this: one afternoon, I got an idea. Everybody is staying home, there’s so much more free time now that no one has to commute. We can make a Journey Planet happen by choosing a day and then making everything in that issue in that day! It’s a call back to our first issue ever and the always fun concept of Fanzine in an Hour! I had this idea in April of 2020.”

The team welcomed co-editor Vanessa Applegate who came on board, to help with art, editorial, and seeking submissions.

Starting with an Autun Purser cover, there a host of brilliant articles including  ‘Artists New to Me from the 2021 Chesley Award Nominees: Suggestions I Love’ by Sara Felix, ‘Army of the Dead: Viva Las Vengeance at Area 15’ by Jacq Monahan, ‘ Five Classic Suicidology Texts’ by Chuck Serface and  ‘Reflections on The Lost Boys’ by Douglas E. Berry to name but four of the many. 

There are a number of interviews, including ones with Marguerite Smith, Alma Alexander and Steven H Silver, and an outstanding article, ‘Flann O’Brien, Marcel Duchamp, and the Problem of the Ready-Mades’ by Pádraig Ó Méaloid that somehow involves Brian Eno! 

With art, photos and crafts by  Alissa McKersie, España Sheriff, Christopher J. Garcia & DeepDreamGenerator, Vanessa Applegate and ArtBreeder.

Chris reviews: Slaughterhouse-Five: The Graphic Novel Reviewed and “Did You Hear What Eddie Gein Done?” by Harold Schechter and Eric Powell and James contemplates Hawkeye or Hawkguy, in comic and TV form, and writes at length about Kindness during Covid. 

Although Chris was meant to work on layout the whole time, he wanted to read and write, as he will not be at Discon III, it offered him the opportunity to catch up on messenger and zoom with Helena Nash, Chuck Serface, Sarah Gulde and others, so he did. 

Download the issue here: Journey Planet 60: One Day on Journey Planet.

Spend One Day on Journey Planet on November 27

By Chris Garcia: Ever wanted to be a part of an issue of Journey Planet, but never knew where to start? 

Have an idea for a thing, but don’t think it’s got a place?

You like doing stuff with fun folks with a completely artificial deadline? 

Then join Team Journey Planet on Saturday, November 27th as we spend One Day on Journey Planet! 

We’re making an issue starting the minute it becomes November 27th (just at the International Dateline) and be continuing until it’s not November 27th anymore (or, more realistically, when Chris decides to go to bed…) 

We’ll be providing prompts for pieces, but we’re open to a whole lot of everything! Been thinking about writing an article about your favorite 1970s ghost comic? Do it! Wanna draw a series of works of El Vez fighting dinosaurs? Sure! Wanna pre-flight and write now, but send on Saturday? DO IT!!! We’re looking for art, articles, reviews, comics, photos, and just about anything! 

One prompt we’re giving away ahead of time is you can send in letters of comment on our older issues at http://journeyplanet.weebly.com or on https://efanzines.com/JourneyPlanet/ and let us know what you think? Have they aged like wine? Let us know!

And be sure to look out for the issue on November 28th (maybe the 29th…)

Questions? Send ’em to Journeyplanet@gmail.com

“Cancelled Too Soon” Is Theme of Journey Planet 58

Hugo Award winning fanzine Journey Planet’s issue 58, co-edited by Steven H Silver, Evan Reeves, James Bacon, and Chris Garcia, is themed “Cancelled Too Soon” and explores television shows from the ‘60s to the ‘10s that were cancelled within two seasons of their debut.  

Ranging from for the four-episode Wonderfalls to the impressive single season of 85 episodes of Battle of the Planets, the writers share their favorite shows that disappeared as well as shows that acquired another life in syndication, video release, or streaming.

Featuring more than 55,500 words covering 31 television shows with authors ranging from Alan Smale to Rich Horton to Oghenechovwe Donald Ekpeki the authors welcome you to the shows that helped shape their imaginations. The issue includes articles on Dark Skies by showrunner Bryce Zabel, on StrangeLuck by screenwriter Michael Cassutt, on The Middleman by screenwriter Margaret Dunlap, and on FlashForward by Robert J. Sawyer, upon whose novel the show was based.

Download Journey Planet 58: Cancelled Too Soon at the link.  This is the fourth issue of Journey Planet co-edited by Steven H Silver and the first with Evan Reeves.

Tim Lane (1951-2021)

Remembrance by Joseph T. Major:

Bruce Gardner knew another wargaming guy.

It was after I had graduated from the University of Louisville, back in 1976.  I was back up in Louisville, trying to put things in order, and there was this guy who was a wargamer.  So I went along.

Tim was portly.  I soon found out that he was fatherless, too: his father had died in Vietnam.  But more to the point, he was also into science fiction.

He blended in quickly.  He went to Rivercon, our convention in Louisville, then to MidAmeriCon 1976 with B. J. Willinger, Grant McCormick, and me.  We had a splendid time, except for the problems you get when you share a room.

Tim flourished.  He joined FOSFA, our local club (the Falls of the Ohio Science Fiction Association), participated in the meetings, and managed to expand his field of operations.

Time passed.  The group changed.  After two or three turnovers, he ended up being the editor of FOSFAx, the clubzine (with Janice Moore as co-editor to curb his enthusiasms).  We started running reviews, had a large and often acerbic letter column, and regular monthly publication (I’m sure this astounded many people).

One thing we did was to send the zine to writers who were reviewed in it.  As a result, we ended up getting letters of comment from people such as L. Sprague de Camp.  On the other hand, we got letters of comment from people such as Piers Anthony, which stirred controversy.

FOSFAx was where most of the articles which were collected as my book Heinlein’s Children were first published.  And there were other reviews and reviewers.  We would do perhaps twenty to twenty-four pages a month, with maybe twenty letters or more, and about as many reviews.  For example, Tim himself would write about baseball, and politics.

Not that we were entirely sercon.  One would have but to get the zine Phosgene (or PhosGene), composed of humorous and satirical (not always the same) articles, some new, many old.

But, as age and debility crept up on us all, things changed.  Tim’s conservative political views became more acerbic, which provoked long and strident debates in the letter column.  He lost his job due to an inability to adapt to changing computer technology.  Finally, his health broke down, and he had to abandon the publication, back in 2011.  He spent some time in various residential hotels before having to move to a care facility.

He was bedridden, but still alert, and trying to express himself in various venues.  Lisa and I would go see him.  We had been used to having Friday dinners with him and Elizabeth Garrott, his housemate, and sometimes Grant McCormick, our tenant, and now that he was unable to get out, we tried to bring him information.

Then the lockdown came.  He had email, he communicated, but it became less and less.  I heard from him on my birthday and then the next day on Christmas.  Grant said he heard from him January 6th.  He seemed all right then.  After that . . .

It turned out he had died on January 15, a little more than a month after his 69th birthday, and was buried in the family funeral plot he had.  So ended a faned with multiple Hugo nominations.

Timothy Brian Lane

December 12, 1951 — January 15, 2021

eFanzines Drops N3F Zines After Group’s President Seeks to Promote It on Parler and Gab

Bill Burns announced eFanzines.com has stopped hosting announcements about National Fantasy Fan Federation (N3F) publications since yesterday, after N3F President George Phillies sent an email to his list asking for recipients to promote the N3F on Parler and Gab.

Burns says his response to Phillies’ email (which File 770 also received) was that he found “it hard to believe that this was a serious request.” Burns wrote back: “George: I assume you’re not aware that Parler and Gab are the sites frequented by those who planned and executed the recent attempted insurrection at the Capitol, which resulted in five deaths” and included links to the Wikipedia articles about Parler and Gab which explain their popularity with “Donald Trump supporters, conservatives, conspiracy theorists, and right-wing extremists” “including neo-Nazis, white supremacists, white nationalists, and the alt-right…”

In a related exchange about the decision on a public Facebook group, Phillies justified his interest in making contacts through the two platforms:

Your assumption is simply wrong. I am entirely aware of the namecalling contests that have replaced political discourse in this country.

Whatever their political inclinations — I am mostly not interested in politics these days — these people who use each of the sites I listed are also science fiction fans. If they have been banned from other sites, well, that makes it difficult to reach them using those other sites, now doesn’t it? Curiously, while they are doing stfnal things, they are not doing political things.

Phillies today sent another email to his N3F list:

I will repeat my request for people interested in publicizing the N3F with short posts in places like twitter, parler, gab, etc.  I have already heard complaints from people who think that Parler is full of neo-Nazis or Twitter is full of Communists. (Parler, by the way, is inoperative and empty.)  That completely misses the point, namely both those places are also full of people who are primarily SF fans who could be lured into joining us.

Parler sued Amazon last week after the cloud services provider cut off service, and it has been working to get back online. The Guardian reported today “Parler website partially returns with support from Russian-owned technology firm”.

The network vanished from the internet after it was dropped by Amazon’s hosting arm and other partners over a lack of moderation after its users called for violence and posted videos glorifying the attack on the US Capitol on 6 January.

On Monday, Parler’s website was reachable again, though only with a message from its chief executive, John Matze, saying he was working to restore functionality.

The internet protocol (IP) address it used is owned by DDos-Guard, which is controlled by two Russian men and provides services including protection from distributed denial of service attacks, infrastructure expert Ronald Guilmette told Reuters.

DDoS-Guard’s other clients include the Russian ministry of defence, as well as media organisations in Moscow. Until recently, it offered 8kun – which was previously known as 8chan – protection from DDoS. Last week, DDoS-Guard became the latest company to cut ties with 8kun’s hosting company, VanwaTech, following inquiries from the Guardian.

Gab also has been offline at times over the past couple years, dropped by domestic hosts who cited that many accounts engage in the “perpetuation of hate, violence or discriminatory intolerance,” and then by hosts in Norway for unspecified reasons. It is now hosted by Epik, which the Wikipedia describes as “a domain registrar and web hosting company known for providing services to websites that host far-right, neo-Nazi, and other extremist content.”

The National Fantasy Fan Federation was founded in 1941 by Damon Knight with the support of Art Widner and Louis Russell Chauvenet. George Phillies has been President of the N3F since 2015, and has edited some of its publications. He won the N3F Franson Award for club service in 2015, and in 2019 won one of its speculative fiction awards, the Neffys, Best Novel, for Against Three Lands.

Bill Burns adds:  

I stopped hosting the N3F fanzines a couple of years ago, when I realized that they couldn’t be bothered to update their own website and were using me as an unpaid webmaster instead.  Since then I have been posting announcements whenever Phillies sent me a note that their site was updated, but he was only sending these intermittently, and has been badmouthing me not posting updates he didn’t send.

When I got the unwanted email that included his absurd request, I felt I had to respond, but this was not connected to the previous hosting situation.

Before this I would have kept posting the announcements, but Phillies, despite his protestations on Facebook, had not sent me an update since May 2020. If he had I would have posted them, but now I’m done with them altogether.

Update 01/19/2021: Corrected that it is the announcements which will no longer be hosted at eFanzines, because the hosting of copies of the zines had already ended some time ago for another reason.

Journey Planet 56:
The Mandalorian Issue

By James Bacon: John Coxon and Alissa McKersie joined Chris and James on a Journey Planet with a focus on The Mandalorian and Star Wars. Originally John suggested a Star Wars issue focusing on the sequel trilogy to James and Chris at the Dublin Worldcon, and then Alissa suggested expanding it to cover The Mandalorian. The groundwork for this zine was laid earlier in 2020, and then with determination and a huge amount of support at short notice over the holiday season from all contributors, the zine came together for a strong finish to the year. 

The stylised cover by Auton Purser is joined by a selection of art from a number of professionals and fans, including 2000AD artist Patrick Goddard, Marvel Artist Ryan Brown, Star Wars cards artist Col-Art and Hugo and Chesley nominee Sara Felix. We also got to share a number of artists’ work, from Deviant Art. We are very grateful to Col Art as he is working over the season with the Northern Ireland Ambulance Service, in a voluntary capacity. 

The editors were especially pleased to have contributions from younger fans, Rosie Gray who made a Mando costume and shared that experience with Anne and Brian Gray and Alex Heltzer who contributed to our instant fanzine section, with many others. 

With articles by Carol Connolly, Abigail Nussbaum, Jacq Monahan, Warren Frey, Hamish Walker, David Ferguson, James Mason, Ken Marsden and two photo selections from Hedge Scout and Christine Burnham, we hope there is something for everyone here 

The zine can be found here.

Journey Planet 55: Russian Space — a Free Download

Cover by Sara Felix

By James Bacon: This unique issue of Journey Planet comes in two languages in parallel text, Russian and English. With bilingual text on every page we look at the Science, Engineering, Science Fiction, Films, Comics and poetry that the theme of Russian Space has to offer. 

Moscovite Co-Editor Ann Gry (Anna Gryaznova) was committed to ensure the issue was as accessible as possible to the readers, interested in the subject and spent a tremendous amount of time working on translations as well as seeking out new voices, and hearing from voices who may be very new to Journey Planet readers. This issue is a curated glimpse into the creative realms mostly inaccessible due to the language barrier and is an attempt to give an idea of how space theme connects us all. 

With articles from Maria Ku, Mikhail Katyurichev and Danila Chvanov, a comprehensive look at space-themed comics by Andrey Malyshkin, as well as interviews with the creators of “Meteora” from Bubble comics, Askold Akishin and Alexandra Shevchenko, prose and comics are well covered. An interesting part is dedicated to visual poetry along with some traditional verses by Andrey Suzdalev.

An extensive article on space-themed films, we also have an interview with Konstantin Bronzit (Oscars nominee) and Christopher Riley (BAFTA & Emmy nominee). 

With writings on visits to Museums or exhibitions by Nicholas Whyte and Dr Emma J. King, and Ann Gry visiting Kaluga — the place where Konstatnin Tsiolkovsky lived and worked, we have first hand reportage of some amazing space places and artifacts. 

Finally with articles on TEM2 and R7’s, a paper model of the MIG 105 by Oleg Ivanov and a selection of postage stamps featuring space, this issue offer many aspects of Russian Space and we hope readers enjoy it. 

This issue’s cover is a melding of art, collage work by Christopher J. Garcia, layout by Ann  Gry and a star field background by Hugo and Chesley finalist Sara Felix.

You can find the issue here:

Journey Planet Takes on
The Future of Policing in Science Fiction

By James Bacon: Journey Planet announces the publication of their 53rd edition of their Hugo Award winning fanzine, JP53: The Future of Policing. Co-editor, author, and fan Errick Nunnally suggested the theme for this issue because he felt that it was a rich and timely subject that could be explored from a diverse set of perspectives. As he explains in his “enditorial”:

“The concept of law enforcement in speculative fiction is an old one… The entire world was just beginning to wake up to the plight of Blacks, trans-folk, Native Americans, and other minority populations with law enforcement officers and justice systems. Then the pandemic hit. And George Floyd’s name was added to the seemingly neverending list of Black people killed by the police. What has followed are the most significant and enduring protests since the Civil Rights era, altering the world’s perception of law enforcement systems. Enter fans. What you’re reading is the raw enthusiasm of fans for the theme of this issue.”

With a wonderful cover by Afua Richardson, an exclusive preview panel from The Legend of Luther Arkwright, a work-in-progress by Bryan Talbot, and a fabulous rendition of a classic film poster by Mike Carroll, the imagery is presented alongside incredible essays about the future of policing. Also included in the zine is a micro focus on the TV programme Watchmen

With over thirty contributors, we are pleased to offer these fabulous examples of thoughtfulness and sincerity that consider just what the hell is going on right now. 

Essays include “The Tears Of A Policeman” by Brendan DuBois, “Suspension Of Disbelief And Policing In SF.” by Christopher Golden, “The Future Is Now,” by Nicole Givens Kurtz, Brenda Noiseux’s examination of hard-pressed, cibopath detective Tony Chu from Chew, and David Ferguson’s look at Doctor Who. “The Algorithms of Policing” by Anton Marks offers a Black SF writer’s perspective from London. We also have voices from Ireland, Pádraig Ó Méalóidm and Noelle Ameijenda; China, Regina Kanyu Wang; and Germany, Tobias Reckermann. All with their own very different perspectives. 

We were especially pleased about our “Instant Fanzine” response from Jeannette Ng, who offers a realistic and determined view on the future of policing as well as fabulous insight into her thoughts on the Watchmen TV series as well as many other responses that truly capture this moment in time. 

As co-editor Erin Underwood says, “We were looking for impressions from our community within fandom and that is exactly what we received. This edition of Journey Planet is powerful. I think that may unsettle some people. Some may even argue that it has an anti-police feel because of the unvarnished truths that this fanzine shares.”

This issue was edited by Erin Underwood, Errick Nunnally, Christopher J. Garcia and James Bacon. We all hope you find this zine thought-provoking.

Click here for a PDF copy.