Amazon Best Books of 2021: Science Fiction and Fantasy

The Amazon editors have announced their picks for the Best Books of the Year, and named Andy Weir’s Project Hail Mary as the best science fiction and fantasy book of 2021.

Both Weir’s book and Klara and the Sun: A novel by Kazuo Ishiguro also made Amazon’s overall Top 20 Books of the Year list.

The 20 books on Amazon’s list of Best Science Fiction and Fantasy of 2021 as ranked by the editors are:

  1. Project Hail Mary: A Novel by Andy Weir
  2. A Court of Silver Flames (A Court of Thorns and Roses Book 4) by Sarah J. Maas
  3. The Crown of Gilded Bones (Blood And Ash Series Book 3) by Jennifer L. Armentrout
  4. Leviathan Falls (The Expanse Book 9) by James S. A. Corey
  5. The Extinction Trials by A.G. Riddle
  6. Klara and the Sun: A novel by Kazuo Ishiguro
  7. The Last Graduate: A Novel (The Scholomance Book 2) by Naomi Novik
  8. Under the Whispering Door by TJ Klune
  9. Iron Widow by Xiran Jay Zhao
  10. Fugitive Telemetry (The Murderbot Diaries Book 6) by Martha Wells
  11. A Desolation Called Peace (Teixcalaan Book 2) by Arkady Martine
  12. A Psalm for the Wild-Built (Monk & Robot Book 1) by Becky Chambers
  13. The Blacktongue Thief by Christopher Buehlman
  14. The Last Watch (The Divide Series Book 1) by J. S. Dewes
  15. A Master of Djinn: a novel (Dead Djinn Universe Book 1) by P. Djèlí Clark
  16. Lore by Alexandra Bracken
  17. Constance by Matthew FitzSimmons
  18. You Sexy Thing by Cat Rambo
  19. The Unbroken (Magic of the Lost Book 1) by C. L. Clark
  20. Appleseed: A Novel by Matt Bell

10 thoughts on “Amazon Best Books of 2021: Science Fiction and Fantasy

  1. Leviathan Falls isn’t even released yet, and You Sexy Thing just came out today.

    What criteria are they using for this list?

  2. Amazon editors presumably have access to ARC’s or digital galleys or the like.

    I don’t know about Amazon, but I’ve seen the Aurealis Awards set submission deadlines for calendar year releases that could only be met by publishers furnishing them prerelease copies of works scheduled for December.

  3. Mike Glyer says Amazon editors presumably have access to ARC’s or digital galleys or the like.

    I don’t know about Amazon, but I’ve seen the Aurealis Awards set submission deadlines for calendar year releases that could only be met by publishers furnishing them prerelease copies of works scheduled for December.

    Since reviewers also read and review books that aren’t out yet in the same manner, I think you’re right. (Cat sent me a personally signed galley of You Sexy Thing.) As long as the actual release date is within the year in question, I have no problem with that.

    Now listening to You Sexy Thing which is damn excellent.

  4. Generally it’s the norm in tradpub for copies to go out early so reviewers have access a good bit before the release date. Publishers Weekly wants the books three months ahead of time, for example, as does Locus. With YST, the book was originally supposed to come out in September; physical ARCs started going out about three months before that, I believe, and it’s been available on NetGalley even longer. (This is, in fact, one of the joys of reviewing – you get the books early.)

  5. People’s favorite booksellers are ready with recommendations. Amazon’s editors gin those up in assorted ways.

  6. Absolutely! Earlier today I simply went over to Amazon to find out more about their editors and BAM! Out $14.99 for a book I can’t resist.

  7. Melanie Stormm says Ah jeez. And here I am having already blown my book buying budget for the…well, year.

    You have a budget? I keep operating on the theory of impulsive buying is a Good Thing… though so far I’ve resisted buying the just released Gargoyles Goliath figure.

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