NYRSF Readings on 5/4/2010

On May 4 the New York Review of SF Readings offer Gregory Frost and Jon Armstrong.

Perennial award-contender Gregory Frost currently has short fiction appearing in Full Moon City, an anthology of werewolf tales; the YA anthology The Beastly Bride edited by Ellen Datlow and Terri Windling; and the Lovecraftian anthology Chtulhu Reigns.  He also directs the fiction workshop at Swarthmore College in Swarthmore, PA.

Jon Armstrong’s first novel, Grey, was published in 2007. A sequel, Yarn, is due out in December from Night Shade Books.

Guest curator for the evening is writer and editor Paul Witcover. 

The full press release follows the jump.

[Thanks to Jim Freund for the story.]

For immediate release
Contact: Jim Freund
jfreund@hourwolf.com
718-395-7458

The New York Review of Science Fiction Readings

present
Jon Armstrong
Gregory Frost
Paul Witcover — Guest Curator

     Tuesday, May 4th — Doors open 6:30 PM
     SoHo Gallery for Digital Art
     138 Sullivan Street  (directions and links below)
     $5 suggested donation 
 

The last ongoing curator before the current administration (c’est moi!) was writer and editor Paul Witcover.  This May 4th he brings his not inconsiderable talents to make this an apt and fine occasion.

Gregory Frost is a writer of fantasy, science fiction, and thrillers who decided to write fiction many years ago as the result of an apartment fire.  He has been a finalist for every major award in sf and fantasy.  His latest work is the duology Shadowbridge and Lord Tophet, voted one of the best fantasy novels of the year by the American Library Association, and a finalist for the James Tiptree Jr. Award in 2009.  It received starred reviews from Booklist and Publishers Weekly.  His previous novel was the historical thriller Fitcher’s Brides, a finalist for both the World Fantasy and International Horror Guild Awards for Best Novel.  He has published over fifty short stories as well.  Publishers Weekly called his Golden Gryphon short story collection, Attack of the Jazz Giants and Other Stories, “one of the best of the year.” Currently, his short fiction appears in Full Moon City, an anthology of werewolf tales; the YA anthology The Beastly Bride edited by Ellen Datlow and Terri Windling; and the Lovecraftian anthology Chtulhu Reigns.  He also directs the fiction workshop at Swarthmore College in Swarthmore, PA.

Jon Armstrong grew up outside Seattle, WA, State College, PA, and Columbia, MD. His parents both have fine art and art education degrees and life was often like an extended art class. At an early age, Jon read and admired Buckminster Fuller and spent countless afternoons listening to his parents’ Jack Benny albums.

In 1986, after earning a Liberal Arts degree at the University of Pittsburgh, he moved to New York and worked at a Japanese travel agency for several years, and later had a short stint with Pan Am before the airline went bankrupt.  Subsequently, he became a temp and gradually taught himself graphic design.  As a graphic designer, he worked for such companies as United Media, Young & Rubicam, Archie Comics, HBO, and many others.  He currently lives in Queens, NY with his wife and child.

Grey, his first novel, was published in 2007.  The sequel, Yarn, will come out December 2010.  Both are published by Night Shade Books.

Paul Witcover is the author of the novels Waking Beauty, Tumbling After, and Dracula: Asylum.  His short-story collection, Everland, was released last spring.  Although it was with considerable misgivings that Paul assumed the curatorship of the NYRSF Readings some years ago, the experience turned out to be both fun and rewarding, thanks to the writers who gave so generously of their time.  Since then, he has reprised his role on occasion with pleasure.

The New York Review of Science Fiction Reading Series is celebrating its 20th season of providing performances from some of the best writers in science fiction, fantasy, speculative fiction, etc. The series usually takes place the first Tuesday of every month, but maintains flexibility in time and place, so be sure to stay in touch through the mailing list and the Web.

Admission is by a $5 donation. If circumstances make this a hardship, let us know and we will accommodate you.

Jim Freund is Producer and Executive Curator of The New York Review of Science Fiction Readings. He has been involved in producing radio programs of and about literary sf/f since 1967. His long-running live radio program, “Hour of the Wolf,” broadcasts and streams every Saturday morning from 5:00 to 7:00. Past shows are available “‘on-demand” for about 6 months after broadcast. (Check http://hourwolf.com for details.)

The SoHo Gallery for Digital Art  (www.sohodigart.com)  is dedicated to re-establishing SoHo as an international center for the development of new artistic forms, concepts and ideas.  A screens-instead-of-canvases approach allows a wide selection of art from around the world which would otherwise never make it to the City.  The SGDA is availible for private gatherings and events of all kinds.  For bookings call (800) 420-5590 or visit http://sohogallerynyc.com .

WHEN:
Tuesday, 5/4/10
Doors open at 6:30 — event begins at 7

WHERE:
The SoHo Gallery for Digital Art
138 Sullivan Street  (between Houston & Prince St.)

http://maps.google.com/maps?q=138+Sullivan+St.+New+York+NY+10012

 

HOW:

By Subway
6, C, E to Spring St.; A, B D or F to West 4th; 1 train to Houston St; or R, W to Prince St.

There are many convenient bus lines that come within a couple of blocks of the gallery.  Use the link above for an interactive transit map.

LINKS:

http://hourwolf.com/nyrsf
http://nyrsf.com

 


Coming up:

6/1: Gala!   Details TBA.

The New York Review of Science Fiction magazine is celebrating its 21st year!

Subscribe or submit articles to the magazine!

  New York Review of Science Fiction
  PO. Box 78, Pleasantville, NY, 10570
  NYRSF Magazine: http://nyrsf.com


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