Pixel Scroll 7/12/21 Your Pixel Will Be Transferred To The Next Available Scroll

(1) CADIGAN’S GOOD NEWS. Pat Cadigan put out two health updates in May. The first discussed her apprehension about her forthcoming usual blood test: “Guess What? You’re Scared!”

Life in Cancerland: no matter how well-adjusted you may think you are, you’re not. Pro tip: that’s okay. It’s not your job to be well-adjusted. Your job is to stay alive. Trust me; I‘m experienced.

The second was about the good report: “Okay. Okay. Okay, Yes, Okay!”

If you heard something you thought was a crazy banshee on party drugs, that was me.

The Macmillan Cancer Centre told me they were going to call me this afternoon. Instead, they called this morning and it’s taken me a while to calm down enough to type.

The level of cancer in my body has dropped a whole bunch of points. Everything else is okay, except I have to stop taking calcium supplements because I’ve got a little too much.

So I’m off calcium supplements and I don’t get another oncology appointment for another six months. Just as well. I need a couple of days to pull myself together after this one.

So now I know. Cancer is afraid of me. It should be.

(2) SCREEN TIME. James Davis Nicoll recommends “Five SF Stories About Raising the Children of the Future” at Tor.com. And his footnotes are not to be missed.

In the years following World War II, Americans celebrated the end of a global war and a recovery from a previous decade of economic crisis by producing an astounding number of children, with consequences that are still unrolling to this day. It was a veritable explosion in birthrates—someone should invent a snappy term for it. Maybe the Big Bang Theory?

This focus on children was reflected in the American science fiction of the day….

“The Veldt” by Ray Bradbury (1950)

Unlike Merril’s vision of the future, the America that Bradbury’s Hadley family calls home is a peaceful, prosperous nation. The parents use their impressive incomes to provide their children with the best of all possible childhoods in a fully automated Happylife Home.

Primitive Americans might have settled for plunking their kids down in front of ten-inch black-and-white TV sets showing Howdy Doody. Happylife Houses offer what we would probably call virtual reality suites. Every setting the children could possibly desire is available. The realism of the settings is astounding. Mr. and Mrs. Hadley are duly astounded…albeit very briefly….

(3) RECOVERY WORK. Erin Underwood says, “I finally wrote a blog post that should have been written 10 years ago about what it is like to be a new fan who is marginalized at a convention.” — “The Overpowering Power of Men at Conventions”.

…I was invisible. I was an obstacle that he pushed aside in order to have his more important conversation with Jack. I think about this now and I know that I am not the only person who has had something like this happen at a convention. Yes, it’s a small thing, but it is an example of how women have been treated in society for far too long, including convention society. The fact that it has taken me 10 years to publicly post about this also speaks to social issues of embarrassment and fear of condemnation by some members of our society….

(4) HOURGLASS. Abigail Nussbaum breaks down Black Widow at Asking the Wrong Questions. BEWARE SPOILERS.

… But the thing is, Natasha Romanoff is not James Bond. Her emotional reserve isn’t counteracted by the outsized place she takes in the world, and by the attention and obsequiousness of everyone she encounters. On the contrary, the character has always been defined by her ability to disappear into the crowd, to be whatever people need her to be without them ever stopping to wonder why that is. Her signature move—which is repeated in Black Widow, in the climactic showdown between Natasha and Dreykov—is to get overconfident men to spill the beans about their secret plans by pretending to be weaker and more vulnerable than she actually is. Scarlett Johansson’s genius in interpreting the role was in nevertheless finding hints of personality and humor in this reserved, centerless person. But Black Widow was an opportunity to peer beneath that façade, to let the person Natasha is when she isn’t performing for anyone take center stage (or, conversely, to grapple with what it means that that person doesn’t exist). Instead, it chooses to double down on its heroine’s chameleon quality, even in the presence of the people she considers family. The result is that Natasha might be her own film’s chief mover, but not its protagonist….

(5) THE SUSPENSE BEHIND THE CAMERA. In the Washington Post, Michael Cavna, in a piece with a spoiler warning, interviews Black Widow director Cate Shortland and star David Harbour about the “family dinner” scene that has revelations about the family Natasha Romanoff grew up in. BEWARE SPOILERS. “How ‘Black Widow’ nailed its moving family dinner scene — where no action was involved”.

There are no pyrotechnic effects. The dramatic tension does not revolve around swooping aircraft or lethal hand-to-hand combat. Yet it is the most enlightening “Black Widow” scene — one that screenwriter Eric Pearson “had the most panic about.”…

 “That was our biggest scene — a megillah,” Pearson says by phone. In a Marvel movie packed with action, the dialogue-rich Family Dinner ran nine pages. Every exchange, every emotional beat had to deepen the film while explaining the personal stakes for each of these psychologically warped characters….

(6) SOUNDS FAMILIAR. Enjoy this short parody video on “How Women Are Written In Sci-Fi Movies”.

(7) FULL CIRCLE. [Item by Cat Eldridge.] Not genre but worth noting. Well, they did occasionally delve into Thing Supernatural.“Bryant & May author Christopher Fowler: ‘Writing the end was really emotional’” in The Guardian.

… This month London Bridge Is Falling Down, Fowler’s 20th Bryant & May crime novel, will be published, bringing to a close a much-loved series that started in 2003 with Full Dark House. The books feature the unconventional detective duo Arthur Bryant and John May of London’s Peculiar Crimes Unit, who solve arcane murders whose occult significance baffles more traditional detectives. Crime fiction aficionados can amuse themselves by spotting references to classics of the golden age, whose plots and twists Fowler ingeniously projects on to the era of computers and mobile phones. Everyone else can enjoy the endlessly bantering and discursive dialogue between the pair as they break all procedural rules, and the uniquely droll narrative voice with its sharp-eyed slant on modern life.

…Of course London has moved on inexorably since Fowler began his writing career, and co-founded his film marketing company the Creative Partnership at the age of 26. Soho is not the international film hub it once was, in the heady days when the company was working on 15 films a month, including marketing campaigns for Reservoir Dogs and Trainspotting. One of Fowler’s claims to fame from the time is mentioned in Film Freak. “Asked to provide poster straplines for Alien, I wrote several pages of them, including ‘In space no one can hear you scream’. I assume I wasn’t the only person to think of this – it’s an obvious line,” he writes.

“Someone else laid claim to it this month, I noticed,” he says now. “I love it! But we worked on it first, because it was shooting in the UK. Ridley Scott came to see us and gave us a drawing of an egg and said: ‘That’s really all I can tell you – and it’s going to be very frightening.’ We used to get paid £20 per page of copylines and that was the one they went with.”

(8) SEASON’S READINGS. Former President Obama continues his tradition of sharing his summer reading list, which includes some genre works:

(9) ROCHA OBIT. DC Comics artist Robson Rocha has died. The announcement came two weeks after a colleague tweeted an appeal for blood donors because the artist was hospitalized with COVID-19.

CBR.com listed the highlights of Rocha’s career:

Rocha is known for his work on titles such as Birds of PreyBatman/SupermanBatman: Arkham KnightSuperboy and more. He has also provided cover art for Aquaman (in addition to being the series’ main artist), Supergirl and Teen Titans, among other major DC books. Rocha became a breakout star following DC Rebirth in 2016, though he had worked with the publisher before that on other projects.

SYFY Wire rounded up tributes from Rocha’s colleagues in social media: “Robson Rocha: Comics world mourns passing of DC Comics artist”.

(10) MEDIA BIRTHDAY.

  • July 12, 1969 — Fifty-two years ago on this date, BBC 1 aired  the “Where No Man Has Gone Before” episode of Star Trek. It was the third episode of the first season and the second pilot shown. It was directed by James Goldstone and written by Samuel A. Peeples whose only other Trek script was for the pilot episode of the animated series, “Beyond the Farthest Star”.  (He would later write the scripts for the first six episodes for Jason of Star Command which was when James Doohan was involved.)  The primary guests were Gary Lockwood  as Lt. Cmdr. Gary Mitchell and Sally Kellerman as Dr. Elizabeth Dehner. It is notable for the absence of the series regulars of McCoy, Uhura , and Chekov.  Reception, now and then, was universally superb for the episode with it being considered one of the finest ones across all of the series.  The episode would be adapted into a short story by James Blish for his Star Trek 8 anthology, and it also became the second in Bantam’s Fotonovels series.

(11) TODAY’S BIRTHDAYS.

[Compiled by Cat Eldridge.]

  • Born July 12, 1895 — Buckminster Fuller. Genre adjacent and I don’t believe that he actually wrote any SF though one could argue that Tetrascroll: Goldilocks and the Three Bears, A Cosmic Fairy Tale is sort of genre. You will find his terminology used frequently in genre fiction. (Died 1983.)
  • Born July 12, 1923 — James Gunn. Writer, editor, scholar, anthologist. Hugo winner at ConStellation for Isaac Asimov: The Foundations of Science Fiction. He won another Hugo at MidAmeriCon for Alternate Worlds: The Illustrated History of Science Fiction. Not surprisingly, he won a First Fandom Hall of Fame Award. He’s extremely well stocked at the usual suspects. (Died 2020.)
  • Born July 12, 1933 — Donald E. Westlake. Though he specialized in crime fiction, he did dip into the genre on occasion such as with Transylvania Station which you could think of as a Clue-style novel he wrote with his wife Abby. On the horror end of things was Anarchaos. And he wrote a lot of genre short fiction, some fifty pieces by my count. Meteor Strike: Science Fiction Triple Feature which has three of his SF stories is available from the usual suspects for ninety-nine cents. (Died 2008.)
  • Born July 12, 1947 — Carl Lundgren, 74. He co-founded ASFA (Association of Science Fiction & Fantasy Artists of America), and won 4 Chesleys, including Artistic Achievement. At the tender age of eighteen, he was co-chairman of the first media SF convention, The Detroit Triple Fan Fair which featured comics, movies and various things of a SF nature. At Chicon IV, he was nominated for Best Professional Artist but lost out to Michael Whelan.
  • Born July 12, 1961 — Scott Nimerfro. He had an impressive production list of genre films and series he did, to wit Tales From The CryptTrekkiesX-MenPerversions Of ScienceThe GatesPushing Daisies, and the Once Upon A Time series which he produced three seasons of. He has one genre acting credit in “Let the Punishment Fit the Crime” story of Tales From The Crypt in which he was Fouser. (Died 2016.)
  • Born July 12, 1968 — Sara Griffiths, 53. She appeared as Ray in the Seventh Doctor story “Delta and the Bannermen”.  She was being considered as a companion to the Doctor, a role however taken by Sophie Aldred as Ace.
  • Born July 12, 1975 — Phil Lord, 46. Shared a Hugo for Spider-Man: Into the Spider-Verse at Dublin 2019. With co-director Christopher Miller, he’ll be doing the sequel to it. They also co-produced The Last Man on Earth series, and he executive produced Solo: A Star War Story.
  • Born July 12, 1976– Gwenda Bond, 45. Writer, critic, editor. She’s written a prequel to the Stranger Things series, Suspicious Mind, and I’m very fond of the two novels (The Lost Legacy and The Sphinx’s Secret) so far in her Supernormal Sleuthing Service which she wrote with her husband Christopher Rowe.  And she penned the Dear Aunt Gwenda section of Lady Churchill’s Rosebud Wristlet that Small Beer Press published in the early part of this millennium. 

(12) BRANDING. The Conversation details how “China is using mythology and sci-fi to sell its space programme to the world”.

…China’s construction of its own space station stems from the nation’s exclusion from the International Space Station, a result of US concerns over technology transfers that could enhance China’s military capabilities. Undeterred by this, China has forged ahead with its own space programmes and alliances. Since, the country has demonstrated that the Chinese “brand” of space technology is reputable and can hold its own in the international arena.

An impressive track record of remarkable space endeavours is not the only thing that distinguishes China’s space brand from other national players. The government and related organisations have made concerted efforts to establish a unique “Chinese space culture” alongside the country’s advances in space technology. While the target audience for many of these cultural creations remains domestic, China’s space ambitions are directed at global audiences in a variety of ways.

Legendary beginnings

Perhaps the most obvious example of this is the naming of these programmes after China’s traditional roots.

The name Tiangong translates as “Heavenly Palace”. This was the residence of the deity who holds supreme authority over the universe in Chinese mythology, the Celestial Ruler. The name is particularly fitting for a Chinese space station, which acts as a home in the heavens for the country’s taikonauts. The meaning of Shenzhou, the missions that take taikonauts to space, is “Divine Vessel”, which is also a homophone for an ancient name for China, “Divine Land”.

China’s lunar exploration missions, meanwhile, are named after the legendary Moon goddess Chang’e. The tale goes that Chang’e flew from Earth to the Moon after stealing the elixir of immortality from her husband, Hou Yi….

(13) ENCANTO. A trailer dropped for Disney’s Encanto. The movie will be out in November.

Walt Disney Animation Studios’ “Encanto,” is the tale of an extraordinary family, the Madrigals, who live hidden in the mountains of Colombia in a magical house, in a vibrant town, in a wondrous, charmed place called an Encanto. The all-new original film features the voice of Stephanie Beatriz as Mirabel, an ordinary 15-year-old who’s struggling to find her place in her family.

(14) HELLO, DOLLIES. “It’s Hollywood Barbie’s Moment (and She’s Bringing Her Friends)” reports the New York Times.

[In addition to BARBIE, in which Margot (Harley Quinn) Robbie was recently announced as starring in,] The dozen other films in Mattel’s pipeline include a live-action Hot Wheels spectacle; a horror film based on the fortunetelling Magic 8 Ball; a wide-audience Thomas the Tank Engine movie that combines animation and live action; and, in partnership with Sony Pictures Entertainment, a big-screen Masters of the Universe adventure about the cosmos that includes He-Man and his superheroic sister, She-Ra.

Mattel, Universal and Vin Diesel are collaborating on a live-action movie based on Rock ’Em Sock ’Em Robots, a tabletop game introduced in 1966. Lena Dunham (HBO’s “Girls”) is directing and writing a live-action family comedy based on Mattel’s Polly Pocket line of micro-dolls. Lily Collins (“Emily in Paris”) will play the title role and produce; Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer is the distribution and financing partner.

Mattel has also announced movies based on View-Master, American Girl and Uno, the ubiquitous card game. (If you think an Uno movie sounds like a satirical headline from The Onion, consider this: There are non-Mattel movies in development in Hollywood that are based on Play-Doh and Peeps, the Easter candy.)

(15) IT’S A MYSTERY. [Item by Martin Morse Wooster.] In the spoiler-filled ‘Black Widow Pitch Meeting” on Screen Rant Ryan George reminds us the reason Black Widow came out now instead of several years ago was a comment (made before Wonder Woman) by deposed Marvel CEO Ike Perlmutter that “superhero movies starring women don’t make money.”  But who is the mysterious character who shows up at the end credits and tells everyone to subscribe to Disney Plus?

(16) QUOTES AND SOCIAL MEDIA. This version of Groucho Marx’s quote is the best known:

I find television very educational. Every time someone switches it on, I go into the other room and read a book.

Somebody sent it to File 770 today and lest any commenter prove it really originated with Abraham Lincoln, Voltaire, or some other TV watcher, I ran a Google search. Quote Investigator assures us Groucho said it first – phrased as follows:

I must say I find television very educational. The minute somebody turns it on, I go into the library and read a good book.

That’s a pretty cynical attitude for “the leer”—that’s me, Groucho—and now that I’m a part of television, or “TV” as we say out here on the Coast, I don’t mean a word of it.

It was in a short article he wrote to promote his own soon-to-debut TV show.

(17) VIDEO OF THE DAY. [Item by Martin Morse Wooster.] This video, written by Ryan George, features Brandon Calder as Donald McDonald, Professional Audio Movie Consultant, who explains that he used to capture sounds in movies by actually duplicating scenes in movies but after breaking his ankles to provide the sound for that scene in Misery he found it safer to create sound effects! “THE Sound Effects Tutorial — Pro Tips By Pitch Meeting”.

[Thanks to JJ, Michael Toman, John King Tarpinian, Daniel Dern, StephenfromOttawa, Jennifer Hawthorne, Cat Eldridge, Mike Kennedy, Andrew Porter, and Martin Morse Wooster for some of these stories. Title credit belongs to contributing editor of the day StephenfromOttawa.]

33 thoughts on “Pixel Scroll 7/12/21 Your Pixel Will Be Transferred To The Next Available Scroll

  1. Paul Weimer says First today?

    Indeed you are. Feel honoured.

    Now reading Hellboy and B.P.R.D. 1956. I’ve been listening to Faith Hunter’s Junkyard Cats which is turning out to be a quite decent SF story. Not Hugo worthy but still quite good and the first of a series.

  2. Re Westlake: Done some of his SF and some of his crime for SFF Audio. Enjoyed it.

  3. Westlake’s hardboiled caper novels published under the Richard Stark pseudonym and featuring the Parker character are among my favourites in any genre. I’m not generally much for rereading but I return to these books again and again. They aren’t exactly “comfort reading” but something about them seems to really satisfy me as a reader.

  4. StephenfromOttawa says Westlake’s hardboiled caper novels published under the Richard Stark pseudonym and featuring the Parker character are among my favourites in any genre. I’m not generally much for rereading but I return to these books again and again. They aren’t exactly “comfort reading” but something about them seems to really satisfy me as a reader.

    Interestingly, Audible includes a number of the Stark novels for free with the monthly membership, to be precise, The Hunter, Ask The Parrot, Dirty Money and Firebreak, plus lots of Westlake novels. Which are worth listening to?

  5. regarding the Parker novels by “Richard Stark” — “The Hunter” is the first one, published in 1962 and filmed a few years later as “Point Blank” with Lee Marvin. Some would say it’s the best. Westlake/Stark published 16 Parker novels from 1962-1974, then picked up the character again with “Comeback” in 1997 and published 8 more. The last 2 were “Ask the Parrot” (2006) and “Dirty Money” (2008), connected stories in a sequence of 3 novels that also included “Nobody Runs Forever” (2004). “Firebreak” is another of the last 8 books. I think they’re all highly readable and entertaining, albeit violent, somewhat amoral and in some cases quite dated. The world has changed. I don’t do audiobooks so I can’t comment on that aspect of the matter.

  6. StephenfromOttawa says regarding the Parker novels by “Richard Stark” — “The Hunter” is the first one, published in 1962 and filmed a few years later as “Point Blank” with Lee Marvin. Some would say it’s the best. Westlake/Stark published 16 Parker novels from 1962-1974, then picked up the character again with “Comeback” in 1997 and published 8 more. The last 2 were “Ask the Parrot” (2006) and “Dirty Money” (2008), connected stories in a sequence of 3 novels that also included “Nobody Runs Forever” (2004). “Firebreak” is another of the last 8 books. I think they’re all highly readable and entertaining, albeit violent, somewhat amoral and in some cases quite dated. The world has changed. I don’t do audiobooks so I can’t comment on that aspect of the matter.

    Thanks much. I’ve downloaded The Hunter and will give it a listen soon as it sounds interesting. All of the Stark novels are available on Audible if I decide to listen to them which I may as they’ll be quick listens, a morning apiece.

  7. (1) Hurray, Pat! (Yeah, I read my blood test results. They’re now quarterly.)

  8. P J Evans says Hurray, Pat! (Yeah, I read my blood test results. They’re now quarterly.)

    You get blood work quarterly? Huh. I get blood work damn ever time up I’m at my PCP office which is twice a month as my primary care team is always checking something. The phlebotomist knows me so well she calls me in by going, “Meow”. Right now among other things, they’re monitoring a deep vein thrombosis that developed in the lower right leg post-surgery.

  9. Yeah, but all I have to deal with is the remains of cancer. (It’s count, chemistry, and the two antigen markers. I send the results to my primary-care guy, so he doesn’t need to run those tests.) I remind them to use a butterfly, and don’t fuss when it takes more than one try to hit the teeny-but-reliable vein. Usually it doesn’t hurt.

  10. P J Evans says Yeah, but all I have to deal with is the remains of cancer. (It’s count, chemistry, and the two antigen markers. I send the results to my primary-care guy, so he doesn’t need to run those tests.) I remind them to use a butterfly, and don’t fuss when it takes more than one try to hit the teeny-but-reliable vein. Usually it doesn’t hurt.

    Yeah I don’t mind giving blood as the staff phlebotomists there have drawn blood from me well over several hundred times at this point so they know how to do it perfectly. I think one month alone I had it drawn four times. And I’ve got great veins for it fortunately.

    Right now the Eliquis for the clots is making me bleed like a stuck pig as I discovered when my personal service assistant shaved me morning and nicked me. So it’s doing what it’s supposed to do.

  11. It was every three weeks during chemo, so some months twice. And then there was the port, twice every three weeks, plus getting it flushed (maintenance!) every couple of months after chemo was over.
    Vaccines? Not a problem….

  12. I started reading The Witness for the Dead last night.

    Its pace is RELENTLESS. After being unable to put it down at during any waking hours since, I finished it early this afternoon, and then wandered around the house adrift because suddenly there was no more of it and I didn’t know what to do with my eyeballs.

    It was very good. It’s several murder mysteries, and also it reads a bit like a direct “oh yeah?!” aimed at the type of critic who said that The Goblin Emperor hardly counted as fantasy because its goblins and elves were just humans with funny ears and of the two brief incidents of magic one of them might not even have been real…

    Yeah. That speaking to the dead thing? It’s real. We’ll be doing a LOT of it, thanks. And so we did.

    Also I just want to know that Thara Celehar is going to be OK. I think he’s gonna be OK, but I want to know.

  13. 11) Both GURPS and Traveller (many flavors of) like to use flattened icosahedra for planetary maps, a theme I wouldn’t be surprised traced back to Bucky (though his version for Earth sliced and glued a few triangles to keep as many discontinuities as possible over water).

  14. What Nicole J Leboeuf-Little said! Celebrate comes out of the book with some new friends, at least.

    Thanks for (3) and (5).

  15. Not dead! Just really sick. C. Diff.

    Lowell General Main Campus. ICU Ground. Room 102.

    They’re very nice, but, nevertheless, would NOT RECOMMEND for your next vacation.

    Have managed to connect to the guest wifi.

  16. (14): As a species, we’re crazed, and we’re effed.

    Can’t wait for the Major Matt Mason (& Sgt. Storm) movie – Mint in Box – No Broken Wires.

  17. Lis, sending best wishes your way!

    I found Speaker to the Dead a solid novel. I liked The Goblin Emperor better, but I think I needed The Goblin Emperor more at the time, if that makes any sense….

  18. @ Lis

    Recovery vibes for you. 🙂

    Found out about the Small Beer Press warehouse on the last day and I had to limit myself to on-sale books by Delia Sherman (Young Woman In A Garden – first short story collection), Sean Carroll (Mockingbird, Perfect Circle) and John Crowley ( And Go Like This – short story collection, Endless Things – A Part of Aegypt).

  19. Wishing the best, Lis!

    I thought that “Speaker for the Dead” was kind of a comfort novel. And also very very good. (I didn’t expect ghouls like that. Interesting kind of monster.)

  20. 11) my sister had the opportunity to study in a graduate design class under Buckminster Fuller, where she designed a Bucky- dome cottage that Mr. Fuller complemented her on. She showed us the plans, which we all oohd and aahd over- except for my mother, who had helped design our home. She took one look and asked “Where is the kitchen sink?”

    Both my sister and Mr. Fuller had passed over that detail. Of course at the time my sister didn’t cook so…

  21. Sending wishes for good health to Lis, Cat and PJ!

    I’m glad to see the comments on The Witness for the Dead as it has just arrived from my library. Now I’m really looking forward to reading it!

  22. P J Evans on July 13, 2021 at 8:00 am said:

    I thought that “Speaker for the Dead” was kind of a comfort novel. And also very very good. (I didn’t expect ghouls like that. Interesting kind of monster.)

    I remember Speaker for the Dead but from thread context suspect you (and Cassy B.) mean Witness for the Dead .

  23. @Cat

    You can’t back off from that story to the magazine itself, so I’ve given the main page here. It’s quite a stellar magazine, so thanks!

    Thank you for the direct link.

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