Pixel Scroll 8/3/20 Undeserved Loss And Inaccessible Healing

(1) MAKE ROOM, MAKE ROOM! The 2020 Hugo voting report, which begins with a short list of works that got enough votes to be finalists but were disqualified or withdrawn by the author, showed that Ann Leckie declined her nomination for The Raven Tower. In a blog entry today she explained why: “The Hugos and The Raven Tower”.

…I’ve had a taste of that cookie quite a few times now. It is, let me tell you, one delicious cookie. And when the email came telling me that The Raven Tower was a finalist for the Hugo Award, I thought of the books in that longlist, how often I’d had a bite of this cookie, and how many of the amazing books from 2019 were debuts, and/or were books that, when I’d read them, my first thought was, Oh, this should be on the Hugo ballot. More books than there were spots, for sure. And I realized that I could do something about that, at least in a small way.

And so I withdrew The Raven Tower from consideration.

Let me be perfectly clear–I was overwhelmed at the thought that so many readers felt The Raven Tower deserved to be a Hugo finalist. I have been treasuring that for months. And as I’m sure we all know, these have been months during which such treasures have become extremely important.

I also want to be clear that this is not any sort of permanent decision on my part. I make no promises about withdrawing anything in the future. If I am ever so fortunate as to have a work reach the shortlist again, and I see what seems to me a good reason to withdraw, I will. If I don’t, I won’t. It is, after all, one of the sweetest, most delicious cookies around!

(2) A WEE JOKE. From the August issue of Ansible:

The Retro Hugo Statistics reveal that a single Fan Writer nomination for 1944 work (it took three to get on the final ballot and no one had more than six) went to some chap called David Langford. Ho ho, very satirical….

(3) WHO BENEFITS. Much truth in this.

(4) NOW PLAYING. “The Ballad of Ursula K. Le Guin.”

(5) ALWAYS TO CALL IT RESEARCH. “John Boyne accidentally includes Zelda video game monsters in novel”The Guardian has his confession.

John Boyne, the award-winning author of The Boy in the Striped Pyjamas, has acknowledged that a cursory Google led to him accidentally including monsters from the popular video game The Legend of Zelda: Breath of the Wild in his new novel.

Boyne’s A Traveller at the Gates of Wisdom opens in AD1 and ends 2,000 years later, following a narrator and his family. In one section, the narrator sets out to poison Attila the Hun, using ingredients including an “Octorok eyeball” and “the tail of the red lizalfos and four Hylian shrooms”….

Dana Schwartz rounded up some graphics to support the story. Thread starts here.

(6) HARD TO KEEP UP. David Gerrold concludes a Facebook post about sff awards with this sentiment:

…Personally, I am delighted that we are suffering from the challenges of success instead of the problems of failure. The level of mediocrity has risen and the level of excellence has truly surpassed the past. So the challenges in front of any author must look insurmountable, even to the long-time practitioners.

As difficult as all this may seem to anyone who writes, it’s still a good thing. Because it’s no longer about the awards — in fact, it never was about the awards. It has always been about the quality of the work.

That there is so much good work being created these days is a victory for the field, and especially for the readers.

I just wish I had enough time to keep up with it all.

(7) ONE MORE TAKE. Robert J. Sawyer has his own issue with George R.R. Martin’s choices while hosting the Hugo ceremony.

…But let me elucidate one category of Martin’s microaggressions that cut across the entire spectrum of humanity by subtly excluding anyone not part of his old guard: his use of nicknames for writers and editors whose prominence was in days gone by, signaling that no matter who you might be, if you weren’t part of the inner circle back in the day, you’ll never really be a true fan (or pro) now.

In Martin’s very, very long commentaries during yesterday’s Hugo Awards ceremony, Robert Silverberg was “Silverbob,” George Alec Effinger was “Piglet,” and the editor Robert A.W. Lowndes was “Doc.” I think Martin also called Isaac Asimov “Ike” during his trips down memory lane, although I’m not going to sift through the hour and forty-five minutes of his rambling again (fully half of the total running time of the Hugo ceremony) to be sure.

You see? Even someone like me — 40 years a selling author in this field, and now 60 years of age — was never part of that ancient, early prodom. I’ve known Robert Silverberg since 1989 and knew Asimov and Effinger, too, but was never close enough to call them by cutesy nicknames.

And if someone like me feels left out after all these decades in the field, imagine how the newer writers, or the writers whose literary background wasn’t the American SF magazines, felt during the Hugo ceremony.

… Yes, it’s a small thing — that’s why it’s called a MICROaggression — and it’s usually done without consciously intending to exclude or put down someone else, but microaggressions ARE pervasive and exclusionary in effect. We’d all do well to guard against committing them.

(8) JOIN THE BOB & DOUG SHOW. Back in their home theater after taking their show on a bit of a road trip, NASA astronauts Robert Behnken and Douglas Hurley will discuss their flight to the International Space Station and back aboard the inaugural crewed voyage of SpaceX’s Crew Dragon craft. This press release — “NASA Astronauts to Discuss Historic SpaceX Crew Dragon Test Flight” – tells how to access their news conference.

NASA astronauts Robert Behnken and Douglas Hurley will discuss their recently completed SpaceX Demo-2 test flight mission to the International Space Station during a news conference at 4:30 p.m. EDT Tuesday, Aug. 4.

The news conference from NASA’s Johnson Space Center in Houston will be broadcast live on NASA Television and on the agency’s website.

This will be a virtual event with no media present, due to the safety restrictions related to the ongoing coronavirus (COVID-19) pandemic. Reporters who wish to participate by telephone must call Johnson’s newsroom at 281-483-5111 to RSVP no later than 2:30 p.m. Tuesday, Aug. 4. Those following the briefing on social media may ask questions using the hashtag #AskNASA.

(9) DRESSING UP PITTCON. The International Costumers Guild did a roundup of contemporary photos and reports about a Worldcon sixty years ago: “Convention Costuming History – 1960”.

The 1960 Worldcon, known as Pittcon (Pittsburgh, PA) promoted their masquerade as a “Costume Cabaret”. Following the show, there would be a glee club performance, a “minstrel show of science fiction flavor”, and then a dance (music provided by a “hi-fi”, rather than a live band like some past years)…

(10) ROBERTA POURNELLE OBIT. Roberta Pournelle, widow of Jerry, passed away last night at the age of 85. Her son Frank Pournelle announced services are planned in the coming week. The Chaos Manor page on Facebook saluted her:

An educator for 30 years at the Dorothy Kirby Center in Commerce, Mother of 4, Grandmother, a friend to many; she made order out of Chaos.

Born Roberta Jane Isdell, she married Jerry Pournelle in 1959. ISFDB shows she wrote a nonfiction piece for Analog in 1988, “High-Tech for the Little Red Schoolhouse.”

(11) SUSAN ELLISON OBIT. HarlanEllisonBooks.com announced today that Susan Ellison (1960-2020) died over the weekend at home, the “Lost Aztec Temple of Mars.” No other details were given. Susan and Harlan married in 1986 and were together 32 years until his death in  2018.

(12) BUARD OBIT. It was recently learned that Patricia Anne Buard died in May 2017 reports the International Costumers Guild. Photos of her masquerade entries at the link.

Patricia Anne Buard. Patricia was a person of several interests, including theater and theology. In addition to having created works of both original fantasy and historical recreations, her short story “Devil’s Advocate” was published in the Marion Zimmer Bradley anthology book “Red Sun of Darkover”, released in 1987.

(13) IVEY OBIT. David Ivey succumbed to his battle with cancer on July 24. The International Costumers Guild describes one of his memorable entries.

David was a Michigan area costumer. His best known creations were Krakatoa, the Volcano God, and St. Helen. Krakatoa appeared at several venues, including Worldcon: Chicon V, in 1991 (photo below). It was quite innovative for its time, featuring several special effects.

(14) ENGLISH OBIT. “Bill English: Computer mouse co-creator dies at 91” – BBC pays tribute.

The co-creator of the computer mouse, William English, has died aged 91.

The engineer and inventor was born in 1929 in Kentucky and studied electrical engineering at university before joining the US Navy.

He built the first mouse in 1963, using an idea put forward by his colleague Doug Engelbart while the pair were working on early computing.

…Bill English became the first person to use a mouse when he built the prototype at Mr Engelbart’s research project at the Stanford Research Institute.

The idea was Mr Engelbart’s, which he described as only being “brief notes” – but the creation was down to Bill English.

His first version was a wooden block with a single button – and underneath, two rolling wheels at 90-degree angles that would record vertical and sideways movement.

“We were working on text editing – the goal was a device that would be able to select characters and words,” Mr English told the Computer History Museum in 1999.

(15) MEDIA BIRTHDAY.

  • August 3, 1951 — The Tales of Tomorrow series premiered with “Verdict From Space”. The series was performed and broadcast live on ABC from 1951 to 1953. There were eighty-five episodes, each twenty-five minutes in length. The series came about through the efforts of Theodore Sturgeon and Mort Abrahams, together with the membership of the Science Fiction League of America. The League who included Theodore Sturgeon, Anthony Boucher, and Isaac Asimov made their work available to the producers.  The screenplay was written by Sturgeon and is based on his own story “The Sky Was Full of Ships” first published in the June 1947 issue of Thrilling Wonder. You can watch it here.

(16) TODAY’S BIRTHDAYS.

[Compiled by Cat Eldridge and John Hertz.]

  • Born August 3, 1841 – Juliana Ewing.  Thirty short stories for us; a score of books with our and other stories, plays, book-length fiction, for children.  Roger G. Lancelyn Green (1918-1987), one of the Inklings, who suggested the name Chronicles of Narnia to C.S. Lewis, called JE’s the first outstanding child-novels in English literature.  Kipling said he knew her novels Jan of the Windmill and Six to Sixteen almost by heart; of Six “here was a history of real people and real things.”  From her novelette “The Brownies” (1865) the Baden-Powells got the idea and name for junior Girl Guides.  Here is a Caldecott cover for Jackanapes (1884).  (Died 1885) [JH]
  • Born August 3, 1904 Clifford Simak. I was trying to remember the first novel by him I read. I’m reasonably sure it was Way Station though it could’ve been City which just won a well-deserved Retro Hugo. I’m fond of Cemetery World and A Choice of Gods as well. By the way I’m puzzled by the Horror Writers Association making him one of their three inaugural winners of the Bram Stoker Award for Lifetime Achievement. What of his is truly horror? (Died 1988.) (CE)
  • Born August 3, 1920 P. D. James. Author of The Children of Men which she wrote to answer the question “If there were no future, how would we behave?” Made into a film which she said she really liked despite it being substantially different than her novel. (Died 2014.) (CE)
  • Born August 3, 1922 – Ron Turner.  Some sources say his birthday is the 22nd.  Twelve dozen covers (I’d say “one gross”, but look what trouble that made for Bilbo Baggins), more if you count posthumous uses.  Tit-Bits SF ComicsSpace AceRick RandomStingrayThe DaleksThunderbirds.  Here is Operation Venus.  Here is a John Russell Fearn collection.  Here is Rick Random and the Terror from Spacehere is its opening interior.  (Died 1998) [JH]
  • Born August 3, 1926 —  John Gardner. Author of more Bond novels that one would think possible. He’d write fourteen original James Bond novels, more than Fleming wrote, and the novelized versions of two Bond films. He also dip into the Sherlock universe, writing three novels around the character of Professor Moriarty. Rights to film them were optioned but never developed. (Died 2007.) (CE)
  • Born August 3, 1940 Martin Sheen, 80. So that was who that was! On Babylon 5: The River of Souls, there’s a Soul Hunter but the film originally didn’t credit an actor who turns out to be Sheen. Amazing performance. He’s been in a number of other genre roles but that’s the ones I like most. Though I will single him out for voicing Arthur Square in Flatland: The Movie. (CE)
  • Born August 3, 1946 – John DeChancie, 74.  Best known for nine Castle Perilous and three Skyway books, he’s published ten besides, two dozen shorter stories; if you know he has written as Raul Cabeza de Vaca, and entitled a poem “The Refusal to Mourn the Rejection, by Printed Form, of a Hopeful Writer in Pittsburgh, February, 1992”, you’ll know he can read, and smile, and has been with SF a while.  Some fans become pros; some pros become fans, as he did; some are both, as he has been.  Plays piano, likes the American Songbook and Rachmaninoff; paints, including a portrait of Rachmaninoff.  See this, which includes portraits of Marty Cantor and Chip Hitchcock.  [JH]
  • Born August 3, 1950 John Landis, 70. He’d make this if all he’d done was An American Werewolf in London, but he was also Director / Producer / Writer of the Twilight Zone movie. And wrote Clue which was the best Tim Curry role ever. And Executive Produced one of the best SF comedies ever, Amazon Women on the Moon. (CE)
  • Born August 3, 1953 – Margaret Bechard, 67.  Reed College woman (as an Antioch boy, I think of these things).  Children’s fiction, translated into French, Korean, Swedish.  Two novels, one shorter story for us; Star Hatchling about first contact won a Golden Duck.  Six other novels.  [JH]
  • Born August 3, 1971 – Yoshitoshi ABe, 49.  Graphic artist.  Usually writes his name in Roman letters, with capitalized for the sake of early works he signed “AB”.  Known to sketch with just his finger and an iPad.  Thirty self-published books; artbooks; covers; half a dozen each of animé and manga.  Here is his cover for Sakurazaka’s All You Need Is Kill (A. Smith tr. 2009; hello, Pete Young).  Here is Walking the Dragon from YA’s artbook Gaisokyu (“Palace”; 2007).  [JH]
  • Born August 3, 1972 Brigid Brannagh, 48. Also credited as Brigid Brannagh, Brigid Brannah, Brigid Brannaugh, Brigid Walsh, and Brigid Conley Walsh. Need an Irish redheaded colleen in a genre role? Well she apparently would do. She shows up in Kindred: The EmbraceAmerican GothicSliders, Enterprise (as a bartender), RoarTouched by an AngelCharmedEarly EditionAngel (as Virginia Bryce in a recurring role), GrimmSupernatural and currently on Runaways in the main role of Stacey Yorkes. (CE)
  • Born August 3, 1979 – Evangeline Lilly, 41.  Actress, author.  She was in LostReal Steel, two Peter Jackson hobbit films, three Marvel superhero films – to misquote Winston Churchill, who said a Wasp couldn’t sting thrice?  So far two Squickerwonker short stories for children have appeared, one translated into Portuguese.  [JH]

(17) A TOTAL SURPRISE. After Hastings author Steven H Silver tells Lawrence Shoen about eating reindeer steak in Stockholm as part of “Eating Authors: Steven H Silver”. However, the cuisine is overshadowed in this great anecdote about something that happened at dinner —

SHS: Honestly, there are a lot of things I don’t remember about my most memorable meal because it sticks out not because of the food or the company or even the location, but rather because of an incident that occurred during the meal….

(18) KAIJU KIA. Does ScreenRant have enough fingers and toes to answer the question? “How Many Times Godzilla Has Died (All Movies)”. (And I wonder if it’s more or less than the number of times John Wayne got killed?)

He’s starred in over 30 movies but how many of those has Godzilla actually died in? The first movie is a somber monster movie with the title creature is intended to be a walking metaphor for nuclear weapons. The movie’s huge success led to a franchise that is still running nearly 70 years later, with the monster appearing in sequels, reboots and remakes, in addition to comics, novels and video games where he’s battled against all sorts of creative monsters.

(19) MAD, I SAY. Could it be that Dave Freer’s message in “F-IW” at Mad Genius Club is “When you’re in your time machine on the way back to kill baby Hitler, don’t forget to stop off in the Sixties and take over traditional publishing”?

…Both of these [old] books had a huge effect on my young mind. Yes, I can see the Woke and modern left rubbing their hands (and other parts, never mentioned) in glee, saying ‘Yes! We were RIGHT that we had to capture publishing and exclude any badthink. Just think if we’d had the dominance we have now over traditional publishing, back in 1960, even evil people like Freer would have been won (Hi: I’m Dave the Divider. If it wasn’t for me, so we are told by the self-elected authorities,  sf/fantasy would be united and singing Kumbaya. See what a fate I saved you from!).

(20) CANON FIRED. Meg Elison says you’re excused from reading the SFF “canon.”

Thread starts here. A couple of excerpts —

(21) APOLLO POLITICS. At The Space Review, Dwayne Day discusses an interesting radio program about space history. “Sending Washington to the Moon: an interview with Richard Paul”.

The radio show “Washington Goes to the Moon” two decades ago shed new light on the political battles around the Apollo program, and provided a wealth of material for later historians. Dwayne Day interviews the man who wrote and produced the show.

(22) FANTASY NETWORK FREEBIES. Some of us encountered The Fantasy Network for the first time watching CoNZealand events. They also have lots of free content. For example, the 2017 movie Magellan:

When NASA picks up three signals of extraterrestrial origin coming from within our own solar system, the space agency expedites a mission to investigate the sources. As Earth’s lone emissary, they send Commander Roger Nelson, the test pilot for an experimental spacecraft call the Magellan, assisted by an onboard A.I. named Ferdinand.

(23) MORE, PLEASE. James Davis Nicoll is sure these are “Five Stories That Make You Wish For a Sequel”. But rest easy – none of them involve the megaselling series that have made sff news this week.

Many books function perfectly as standalones; many series end well. Plots are resolved, characters are given their reward or punishment. But there are also books that seem to cry out for a sequel and series that are never finished, leaving readers frustrated. We want more!

Alexis Gilliland’s Rosinante series is on this list —

… I discovered the series is funnier than one would expect from plotlines that feature banking crises, union negotiations, and the sudden collapse of the dominant government in North America. There were just three books in the series—Revolution from Rosinante (1981), Long Shot for Rosinante (1981), The Pirates of Rosinante (1982)—but the setting was expansive and interesting enough that more stories were possible, perhaps elsewhere in Gilliland’s Solar System. Thus far, none have materialized.

(24) DIY. “New ‘Quar-Horror’ Films Show Staying At Home Is Scary Too”.

It’s no exaggeration to say this year feels like a horror movie. And now, a few filmmakers are making it official.

All over YouTube, you can find inventive homemade horror shorts taking the pandemic as inspiration. (They come from Brazil, from Canada and from, well, Funny or Die.) And a new movie Host, filmed over twelve weeks in quarantine and entirely on Zoom, debuted on the horror channel Shudder last week.

Call it “quar-horror.”

Among the most chilling of the YouTube offerings is Stay At Home, part horror movie and part PSA from a filmmaker in New Orleans.

“I literally just grabbed a box, and I set up the camera on a tripod and gave myself a scenario,” says Kenneth Brown, a former Uber driver turned horror auteur. “And the story started to build and build and build.”

Brown went to film school, and you can tell. Based on the myth of Pandora’s Box and the evening news, Stay At Home is elegantly lit and crafted. As of this writing, it’s racked up nearly 200,000 views on YouTube.

Part of what makes Stay At Home so effective — and heartfelt — is the insistent drone of news anchors discussing the mounting carnage. “That’s everything I need to say as far as reaching African Americans, which is the population most vulnerable to this virus,” says Brown, who is Black himself.

But escapism is also the point, say Nathan Crooker and James Gannon. Their upcoming quar-horror, called Isolation, just wrapped principal photography. The two produced the film; Crooker is also its director. Isolation is an anthology; nine interconnected shorts by different directors who filmed their movies using only resources immediately available to them.

(25) PIECEMEAL. According to BBC, “Other mammals lose out in panda conservation drive”.

Saving the giant panda is one of the big success stories of conservation.

Decades of efforts to create protected habitat for the iconic mammal has pulled it back from the brink of extinction.

But, according to a new study, while many other animals in the same landscape have benefited from this conservation work, some have lost out.

Leopards, snow leopards, wolves and Asian wild dogs have almost disappeared from the majority of protected areas.

Driven to near extinction by logging, poaching and disease, their loss could lead to “major shifts, even collapse, in ecosystems”, said researchers in China.

Without the likes of leopards and wolves, deer and livestock can roam unchecked, causing damage to natural habitats, with knock-on effects for other wildlife, including pandas themselves.

By protecting the panda’s forests, conservationists believed they would be protecting not only the charismatic black-and-white animal, but the many other species roaming the same habitat.

But while that has worked for some other wildlife, the efforts do not appear to have worked for large carnivores, such as the leopard and wolf.

A team of researchers now says a broader – holistic – approach is needed to manage the ecosystem in which the panda lives – one that ensures key species don’t lose out.

(26) SHORT LEAPS FORWARD. In the Washington Post, Bethonie Butler interviews Catherine Hardwicke, whose new Quibi series “Don’t Look Deeper” is set “15 minutes into the future” and has a teenage girl as a protagonist who may or may not be an android.  Hardwicke discusses what it was like to direct a story delivered in 10-minute chunks and why star Helena Howard is a “strong and vulnerable” actor Hardwicke enjoyed working with. “Can Catherine Hardwicke get you to watch Quibi?”

Why Quibi? Were the shorter episodes appealing?

Actually, the script was written for short episodes. It was written in chapters. I thought that was quite interesting when I first read the script. I was like, “Wow, that’s fascinating,” because the short format does tie in — it weaves in directly with what’s going on with [Aisha’s] memory. We tell the story in a non-linear way as her memories are being erased and restored. The technology that we’re exploring, showing it on a new technological platform with the vertical and horizontal, it all seemed to kind of work together in an interesting way. So this leap of faith — that [Quibi founder Jeffrey] Katzenberg said let’s try this format — I thought that was an interesting challenge to dive into it and see what happens.

(27) VIDEO OF THE DAY. In “Dragonball Evolution Pitch Meeting” on ScreenRant, Ryan George explains that when the hero of the film has to collect seven dragonballs to make a wish that dragonballs are as powerful as “blowing out candles on a birthday cake.”

[Thanks to Cat Eldridge, Mike Kennedy, John King Tarpinian, Martin Morse Wooster, JJ, Michael Toman, John Hertz, Chip Hitchcock, Cliff, Madame Hardy, and Andrew Porter for some of these stories. Title credit goes to File 770 contributing editor of the day Anna Nimmhaus.]

148 thoughts on “Pixel Scroll 8/3/20 Undeserved Loss And Inaccessible Healing

  1. 3) Of course Jeannette Ng is correct. However the reputation exchange goes both ways: they benefit from the prestige gathered by the Hugo Awards over the years.

  2. I am still reeling from the the announcement of the death of Susan Ellison. We met only a few times but she was a beautiful and effervescent person. I have no further words, just utter sorrow upon hearing of her passing…

  3. Rob Thornton notes Of course Jeannette Ng is correct. However the reputation exchange goes both ways: they benefit from the prestige gathered by the Hugo Awards over the years.

    It’s worth noting the Hugo awards are little known outside of our community. A news search I just did showed exactly two articles done on the 2020 ones. One was simply a listing of the Awards; the other was an article detailing the story of GRRM being accused of racism for how he did them.

    Yes I know they’ll be used by publicists to sell the books.

  4. @ Cat Eldredge:

    A news search I just did showed exactly two articles done on the 2020 ones. One was simply a listing of the Awards; the other was an article detailing the story of GRRM being accused of racism for how he did them.

    Unfortunately, my Google search found GRRM-related 2020 con articles from Vulture, CBR, Mary Sue, The Daily Dot, indy100, and Comic Years. I think GRRM’s higher profile combined with the genre’s higher profile made it more attractive to the media.

  5. Rob Thornton follows up on my Hugo search: Unfortunately, my Google search found GRRM-related 2020 con articles from Vulture, CBR, Mary Sue, The Daily Dot, indy100, and Comic Years. I think GRRM’s higher profile combined with the genre’s higher profile made it more attractive to the media.

    Yeah the Hugo search only got the Vulture and Wired. It’s still not a lot of coverage and none of the major papers such as the Washington Post did anything.

  6. 20) I’ve tried to read some of the things from the canon. I had trouble with a lot of it– some of it was enjoyable enough, but I never connected with any of it in the way I connected with Mercedes Lackey or Tamora Pierce or Patricia C. Wrede. And because I didn’t connect with it at all I could never bring myself to keep reading it. (Though I came to fandom through Arisia and the SCA, which all things considered gave me a much gentler introduction than the sort of boys’ club she describes– I hear about the boys’ club a lot, and I imagine I will encounter it more if I succeed in my writing career, but so far I haven’t run into it headlong.)

  7. @Cat
    I think they didn’t cover it because NZ. If it had been in DC, they’d have sent someone to cover the “costumed weirdos”, and maybe the Hugos.

  8. The Hugos gains more legitimacy, more relevance, more clout from the participation of marginalised writers than we do from them.

    Without us, they stop being the future.

    I greatly appreciate the successes of marginalized creators in the Hugos, but I’m not sure how this “without us” idea would work. Anyone can choose to exclude themselves from the awards, as Ann Leckie did with her best novel nomination this time around, and another quality nominee takes their place.

  9. @Cat: Not appearing very often in the mainstream news is not exactly the same as being “little known”. The Hugos do every so often appear in mainstream media. For instance, “Hugo Award” has been the subject of a Jeopardy clue every so often.

  10. I’ve tried to read some of the things from the canon. I had trouble with a lot of it– some of it was enjoyable enough, but I never connected with any of it in the way I connected with Mercedes Lackey or Tamora Pierce or Patricia C. Wrede.

    Aside from Kurt Vonnegut, I have trouble going back to the SF/F canon and feeling that they compete with the best of today. The old classics are mostly of nostalgic value to me rather than being the lodestone of excellence they were to me back in the 1980s.

  11. @ Kit Harding. It’s interesting you say that since for me Mercedes Lackey and Tamara Pierce are part of the canon. Defined as older famous authors I haven’t read.

  12. P J Evans notes I think they didn’t cover it because NZ. If it had been in DC, they’d have sent someone to cover the “costumed weirdos”, and maybe the Hugos.

    I was actually expecting that it was virtual to pique their interest. Obviously it didn’t. Of course I don’t know what the ConZealand media office did for outreach, so I don’t know how aware the press was of it being virtual.

  13. (16) Slight clarification, if I may: John Landis was a producer of Twilight Zone: The Movie but wrote and directed (notoriously) only one of the four main segments. The other three were all remakes of episodes of the TV series and were directed by Spielberg, Dante, and George Miller. I’m glad Landis never got his hands on A Confederacy of Dunces as he once wanted to, as reported at the end of Outrageous Conduct: Art, Ego, and the Twilight Zone Case.

    Sorry to hear about Susan Ellison.

  14. (16) Take all the bad things said by John Campbell. Add to them the bad things said by H. P. Lovecraft. Throw in recent remarks by George R.R. Martin and Robert Silverberg. Taken together, they are paltry compared to what John Landis did on the night of July 23, 1982, when his recklessness got Vic Morrow, Myca Dinh Le (age 7) and Renee Shin-Yi Chen (age 6) killed.

  15. @16 (DeChancie): ?portraits? I see only comments.

    @bill: excellent demonstration of irrelevance. Also, we don’t know how many people were “inspired” to monstrous acts by screeds from Campbell (at least).

  16. @Cat E: and, not recent but significant I think: when Nora Jemisin was writing reviews for the NY Times, her Hugo sweep was mentioned in her bio (and may have been contributory to her getting that gig).

    also – how soon we forget the international mainstream coverage the Hugo’s received during the puppy wars.

    As was pointed out, they have appeared numerous times on Jeopardy. A prime time game show? That’s mainstream cultural penetration.

  17. (7) ONE MORE TAKE

    As a non-fandom person, I get the impression that it is a super-cliquey scene. I’m not surprised that people feel unwelcome.

  18. @Rich Lynch:
    The British Quiz Show “University Challenge” had a set of three questions on the Hugos, BDP Short, just yesterday.

    The Episode is available on BBC IPlayer or here.

  19. Like many-a-conrunner i have Harlan Ellison stories, and like many-a-conrunner they all feature Susan prominently.

    DeathBirdStalk ;(

  20. @Steve Davidson

    As was pointed out, they have appeared numerous times on Jeopardy. A prime time game show? That’s mainstream cultural penetration.

    I remember in 1976 or so seeing a “Star Trek” question on an arcade trivia game (Triviaria?) and being thrilled that something mainstream acknowledged “my thing.”

  21. bill says Take all the bad things said by John Campbell. Add to them the bad things said by H. P. Lovecraft. Throw in recent remarks by George R.R. Martin and Robert Silverberg. Taken together, they are paltry compared to what John Landis did.

    And he, and the other folks charged, were acquitted in Court. It was tragic but there was enough blame to go around that California (which gets blame too) tightened up its child labour laws.

    Not sure why you’re making the comparison. What he did is criminal, what these folk did and said is clearly not.

  22. Cat Eldridge: Not sure why you’re making the comparison.

    something something pissed off that those men are being criticized, so will engage in irrelevant whataboutism”

  23. rcade: John Landis was brought up by Bill because he was one of the birthdays in this post.

    Well, yes, but what does that have to do with Campbell, Lovecraft, Silverberg, and Martin? *cough*irrelevantwhataboutism*cough*

  24. rcade says John Landis was brought up by Bill because he was one of the birthdays in this post.

    Given that there’s around a total of three thousand individual Birthdays every year, making spurious connections is easy. Too easy apparently.

  25. After the French Revolution, came the Terror, when reform was followed by fanatics pursuing ever more radical agendas and Robespierre and his circle calling for purges of anyone not ideologically pure enough. Anyone who spoke up to question his motives or his methods or to call into question his drawing up lists of people to be eliminated “became his enemy. He exerted his influence to suppress the Girondins to the right, the Hébertists to the left and then the Dantonists in the centre” The same thing happened after the Russian Revolution. And-remember “Requires Hate”? A reasoned, well meaning reconsideration of what science fiction has been and may be has turned into frenzied ideological civil war and a would-be purge that will not end until it blows up fandom and pro groups leaving them in a shambles. The end result will not be pretty. And it will not strengthen SF, but make it an object of scorn. In talking to other fans, I find that people are expressing the same feelings about SF that people in the mundane world are expressing about society, politics, and culture: that fanatics from BOTH ends of the spectrum and people with chips on their shoulders looking to have them knocked off to start fights have taken control of the public square. Rational, polite people who really want to solve problems in a civil manner don’t dare express opinions or solutions because they’ll be viciously trashed. That’s sadly true of general society; what’s it going to do to a hobby like fandom, that’s supposed to be fun? An old fan (“oh, no, another old fart!”) and I were talking about how as recently as 15 years ago, you could walk into any convention’s fan party room and people would come up to you smile, introduce themselves, and make you feel like a friend or even a long-lost relative. Now, when you walk into that room, people ignore you, or look at you like kids from an enemy clique’s high school cafeteria table, or at best, come up to you like smarmy salespeople trying to get you to do something they need, like buy their con memberships or books. I really believe that social media is responsible for the change. Fans fought before, perhaps in feuds-by-fanzine, but that was a slow motion thing by postal service. Now, people notoriously poorly socialized to begin with sit alone behind their keyboards and brood over perceived agressions, real of not. Their frustrations fester and build up to paranoid levels in this loner’s self-made hell, and they can strike out instantly and repeatedly online without having to face actual human beings in person to whom they would otherwise feel compelled to deal with civilly. By the time they do show up at conventions and conferences, they are primed for battle. The long lonely brooding behind the keyboard and screen has conditioned them to not see other people as people but as the cartoon caricatures built up in their minds and the group-minds of the online echo chambers they self-isolate into. Every study has shown that the more time people spend on social media, the less happier and more depressed they are. Who spends more time on social media than lonely, poorly socialized SFF fans and writers? I dip into File 770 every now and then for news about my hobby, and instead am appalled and disgusted to find that its not about people enjoying a common interest or hobby cheerfully in good fellowship, but angry snarky people quarreling and denouncing one another. I then check out the sites of people and groups mentioned here, and find similar or different opinions, many different or in opposition. Whether or not I agree with everything they have to say,or even revile, each one may have interesting or useful, often shrewd insights that even people like myself might not have thought of. Unfortunately, from far left to far right, and along every other axis that people exist on, the ever accelerating rate of tribalistic regimentation and fury is making the SFF world a damned unpleasant place to be. Unfortunately, Mr. Glyer, your site is only helping this trend. – K

  26. Well, yes, but what does that have to do with Campbell, Lovecraft, Silverberg, and Martin?

    I don’t know what Bill meant by the comparison. Perhaps it’s just a critique about recognizing Landis for career achievements on his birthday without noting that he intentionally broke child labor laws in a dangerous nighttime film stunt that caused the deaths of Vic Morrow and a 6- and 7-year-old child. His role in that tragedy was heinous and it’s galling that his career suffered no significant negative consequences, judging by the fact he directed 13 more films in the following 15 years.

  27. rcade asks I don’t know what Bill meant by the comparison. Perhaps it’s just a critique about recognizing Landis for career achievements on his birthday without noting that he intentionally broke child labor laws in a dangerous nighttime film stunt that caused the deaths of Vic Morrow and a 6- and 7-year-old child. His role in that tragedy was heinous and it’s galling that his career suffered no significant negative consequences, judging by the fact he directed 13 more films in the following 15 years.

    He and his fellow defendants were acquitted of the charges. When I put that Birthday note together, I read enough to realise that everyone involved including the parents of the children killed were massively stupid and/or willing to look the other way.

    And I’m still that not convinced it was his responsibility for safety on the set. Where was the Union representing the child actors Who let them work illegal hours? Where was the safety folk For the City and the state of California? The Court reporting shows that his lawyers brought these very questions up.

  28. JJ says quite aptly “something something pissed off that those men are being criticized, so will engage in irrelevant whataboutism”

    He’s going to be more pissy next time as I’m going to rework each of those Birthdays to include the rightful criticisms that have been raised about them. My Birthday notes, my wording.

  29. The book I’d mentioned – Outrageous Conduct: Art, Ego, and the Twilight Zone Case – is long out of print and difficult to locate these days, but it makes a detailed argument that despite the outcome of the trial, Landis was the primary person responsible for the lack of planning that preceded the accident. Not only that, but Spielberg (as producer with Landis) shares a portion of the blame although he was protected from being charged.

  30. And I’m still that not convinced it was his responsibility for safety on the set.

    I’m a bit boggled by that notion. If you as a director knowingly violate child labor laws by illegally hiring child actors, use them in a dangerous nighttime stunt without permits and they are killed by the stunt, you are responsible. So are other people hired to look out for their welfare (and their parents who reportedly were told to hide the fact that these laws were being broken), but the culpability of others doesn’t negate your own.

    Second assistant director Anderson House, per New York Times:

    A week before filming of this scene began, Mr. House said, he expressed his concern to the movie’s first assistant director within earshot of Mr. Landis. Anxiety on Labor Laws

    ”I expressed my concern that by using the children, we were violating the labor laws,” he testified, ”and not only would the child labor permits be revoked from John Landis, but from Warner Bros. as well.”

    ”John asked me to repeat what I had said,” Mr. House testified. ”Then I was kind of speechless.” ”I wasn’t up to questioning John Landis,” he continued. ”I was intimidated.”

    Yes, Landis and others were acquitted, but serious doubt has been cast on the strategy and performance of the prosecution. I think the outcome is more about that than their lack of criminal wrongdoing (though obviously no one should be found guilty if the prosecutors bungle the case as much as these did).

    He’s going to be more pissy next time as I’m going to rework each of those Birthdays to include the rightful criticisms that have been raised about them. My Birthday notes, my wording.

    I greatly appreciate the birthday compilation, which I always make a point of reading.

  31. Cat Eldridge: My Birthday notes, my wording.

    Then you’ll be leaving them out. The birthday listings are for honoring people. Not for shaming them, or setting the record straight, or some other kind of moral revenge.

  32. Mike says Then you’ll be leaving them out. The birthday listings are for honoring people. Not for shaming them, or setting the record straight, or some other kind of moral revenge.

    Fine with me. In that case, it’ll be the Birthday note that already exists.

  33. If we’re still in the traditional airing of grievances period after the Hugo Awards, I wish we could stop putting things that happen at the awards ceremony on the ballot. They have an inherent advantage over everything else in their category because such a large portion of the electorate saw them happen. Even with the Hugo packet it’s unlikely any other nominee got anything close to that exposure.

    This isn’t a slight on the great things that are said from the podium — N.K. Jemisin’s acceptance speech after going three-for-three is one of my favorite moments ever in SF/F — but I vote these Hugo moments last.

  34. 7) In the case of George Alec Effinger, if he’d had his way, we’d all know him as “Piglet,” because he wanted to have his fiction published under that name. Wiser heads prevailed. (Assuming that we remember him at all. I do, as some of you do, but I wonder if he’s known outside of my age bracket – my first exposure to cons and fanzines was 1966. Hands up if you’re under fifty and have read his work. Prove me wrong.)

  35. What does Cat Eldridge have against writers named “John Gardner”? Last year I commented on the birthday note for John Champlin Gardner, and quite a few commenters, including at least one who knew him personally, echoed my feelings about the note’s inadequacy. The note ran again, unchanged, a few months later, on the birthday of British thriller writer John Edmund Gardner, which I again commented on for its inaccuracy. The same note ran again, unimproved, on the birthday this year of the John Gardner it actually referred to. And now we have a reasonable correct “birthday” note for John Edmund Gardner, running not on his birthday, but on the anniversary of the day he died.

  36. I am (sigh) not quite younger than 50 any more. I do recognize Effinger’s name, but couldn’t say for certain at this point whether I’ve actually read anything by him.

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