Pixel Scroll 7/1/23 Yes, There Be Pixels And Where There Be Pixels There Be Birthdays

(1) WILL FANS ENCOUNTER PICKET LINES AT LA CONVENTION? Anime Expo started today in LA under the cloud of a threatened strike by hotel workers. The union has not said when they will walk off the job: “Anime fans face hotel strike threat” in the Los Angeles Times. (An NBC Los Angeles post updated an hour ago does not show that the strike has begun.)

The largest U.S. hotel workers’ strike in recent memory and the largest anime convention in North America are both set to kick off this weekend in the same downtown Los Angeles spot — with all the attendant agitation playing out on social media.

More than 15,000 union workers are seeking higher pay and better benefits and working conditions at 62 hotels in Los Angeles and Orange counties.

They could walk off the job as early as Saturday after their contracts expire.

On Thursday, the largest hotel, the Westin Bonaventure Hotel & Suites, announced it had reached a tentative deal with the union representing its more than 600 employees.

The deal is the first among many that would be needed to avert the planned strike.

Meanwhile, thousands of fans of Japanese pop culture will gather Saturday for the start of Anime Expo, a four-day convocation of people interested in manga art, cosplay and video games with exhibitions and panels at the Los Angeles Convention Center and nearby hotels. Many have spent months hoarding vacation days and cash to trek to Southern California and commune with like-minded people.

The two passionate interest groups met up virtually in recent days, and the results weren’t pretty.

On Reddit, a union organizer with hotel workers’ Unite Here Local 11 kicked off the Ask-Me-Anything discussion by asking, “Did you know hotel workers at many of the properties you might be staying at for AX, such as the JW Marriott Downtown LA, Westin Bonaventure, Downtown Los Angeles Courtyard, Residence Inn Downtown LA, the Ritz Carlton and more, might be on strike?

“This could mean pickets, protests and other actions at hotels that could impact and potentially disrupt the Anime Expo,” wrote AnimeJustice11, the unnamed organizer.

“When workers go on strike, they stop work and walk off the job. If workers go on strike, there might not be anybody taking out the trash, cooking the food or cleaning the rooms. There also may be loud 24-hour picket lines right outside the property. How do you think this would affect the quality of the Anime Expo if you are attending / planning?”

AnimeJustice11 wrapped up with a plea: “I hope most/all of you will stand in solidarity with the potential striking workers and don’t cross picket lines!” The poster also asked those planning to attend Anime Expo to “contact the management and ask if they would negotiate a new contract that meets what workers are asking for.”

Unite Here Local 11 also has reached out to Anime Expo attendees, as well as other groups, with a targeted anime-style advertisement featuring a pink-haired worker carrying a sign reading: “Anime is cool! Disrespecting workers is not!”

Reddit users had many thoughts, including anger at the union for disrupting an expensive and cherished tradition, anger at hotel owners for not giving raises, and anger at one another for attacking the union organizer. Others debated what it meant to cross the picket line…

(2) LIKE SAND THROUGH THE HOURGLASS. Warner Bros. dropped a second Dune: Part Two Official Trailer.

The saga continues as award-winning filmmaker Denis Villeneuve embarks on “Dune: Part Two,” the next chapter of Frank Herbert’s celebrated novel Dune, with an expanded all-star international ensemble cast. The film, from Warner Bros. Pictures and Legendary Pictures, is the highly anticipated follow-up to 2021’s six-time Academy Award-winning “Dune.”

(3) GRIST FOR THE RUMOR MILL. “Denis Villeneuve Wants To End His Dune Trilogy With A Dune Messiah Adaptation” according to GameSpot.

Fans got a hearty helping of Dune: Part Two yesterday with a wild new trailer, showing everything from Feyd (Austin Butler) in action, to Paul Atreides (Timothee Chalamet) delivering his iconic speech to the Freman. Even though there are only two parts to the Paul and House Atreides narrative, director Denis Villeneuve wants to fans to get a taste of the larger mythos at play with a third Dune film.

Deadline has reported that Villeneuve intends to cap off his Dune trilogy with a much deeper dive into Frank Herbert’s lore of the world of Dune with an adaptation of Dune Messiah. This film would be co-written by Villeneuve and screenwriter Jon Spaihts. Obviously, Warner Bros. Discovery has not yet officially announced active development for Part Three but should Part Two find success like its predecessor, a conclusion should be a no-brainer.

Dune Messiah was the second novel in the Dune Chronicles released in 1969. The book was adapted in the 2003 miniseries Children of Dune–the name of the actual third novel–which included parts of both “Messiah” and “Children.”…

(4) THE CIRCULAR FILE. Camestros Felapton fails to explain “Why did people read The Wheel of Time?” In that he probably has a lot of company.

… I’m happy to dunk on Robert Jordan’s Wheel of Time books because I too read them, each and every one. I bought some of them as big chunky trade paperbacks as well *AND* I thought they were badly written at the time *AND* realised that the story was going nowhere somewhere around the middle. So really I could rephrase this question as “Why did I read the Wheel of Time?”…

(5) NOT THE SPITTING IMAGE.  [Item by Cora Buhlert.] Since I got some new figures, I also made a new Masters-of-the-Universe toy photo story called “Artistic License” to address the question of why Skeletor and his Evil Warriors created the least convincing He-Man doppelganger ever: “Masters-of-the-Universe-Piece Theatre: ‘Artistic License’”.

… As for why Faker looks the way he does, the real world reason is that some Mattel designer forty years ago thought a blue and orange He-Man looked cool. As for the in universe reason, well, here is one potential answer…

… “Behold my new robot doppelganger of He-Man, Lord Skeletor. Those accursed Masters of the Universe will never know what hit them, when we plant this Faker in their midst. And now arise, my Faker.”

“I Am He-Man.”

“Is he not glorious, Lord Skeletor? I daresay he is my best invention yet.”

“Why is he blue?”

“Excuse me, boss?”

“He-Man is not a Gar. So why is he blue?”…

(6) GENRE GENESIS. A paper by Helen de Cruz titled “Cosmic Horror and the Philosophical Origins of Science Fiction” is online at Cambridge Universe Press.

We now live in a universe composed of billions of galaxies. And, for the most part, we rarely give this any thought. We go about our lives as people have done in the past. Still, you might have reflected on the vastness of the universe: perhaps when you visited a planetarium, or watched a documentary, or even looked up at the (probably light-polluted) night sky and felt a dizziness, a vertigo. That experience is cosmic horror, a sense of the sublime that makes you feel both small and insignificant and a part of a huge, interconnected whole. Once we realize the universe is enormous, and that we’re but a tiny speck in that vast world, we need to recalibrate ourselves. We need to find meaning and significance in being the tiny speck we are. As I’ll argue here, science fiction helps us to come to terms with cosmic horror, as the history of philosophy shows. As a literary form, science fiction originated in philosophical speculation about the universe and our place within it….

(7) G.O.A.T. FANTASY MOVIES. You might not be surprised by what’s at the very top of TimeOut’s list of “The 50 best fantasy movies of all time”, but I, for one, was surprised to see what made number three:

3. Onward (2020)

A pair of grieving elf brothers turn to magic to reanimate, for 24 emotional hours, the dad they never really knew. But the spell is broken halfway through, leaving them with, well, half a dad. With only the legs operational and the missing top half flopping around under layers of clothes, the three bluff their way through a quest to find a magical gem and finish the job. Set in a fantastical land populated by evolved cyclops, fauns, mages and all manner of mythical fauna who have switched from magic to mod cons, ‘Onward’ is a cometh-of-age tale that makes playful capital from our habit of turning the past into touristy kitsch. 

Magic moment: When Ian listens to a tape of the dad he never knew and you wish you’d remember to bulk-buy tissues.

(8) RR DOES NOT STAND FOR RAILROAD. Dominic Noble is “Talking to George RR Martin About HIS Favorite Book”.

GRRM joins me for this very special episode of Reginald’s Book Club to talk about Nine Princes in Amber by Roger Zelazny, which is currently being adapted for TV by Robert Kirkman and Stephen Colbert. I was so nervous doing this I got the name of the book, the name of the author and the name of MY OWN PODCAST wrong, but George was so friendly and chill the whole time I think it came out pretty well.

(9) MEMORY LANE.

2022 [Written by Cat Eldridge from a choice by Mike Glyer.]

Mike chose Ray Nayler’s The Mountain in the Sea, which came out last year as our Beginning this Scroll. It’s his only novel, published by MCD. 

He’s published considerably more short fiction, most of it in the past three years, though his first published sff story came out in 1996. And he’s written one wonderfully-titled essay, “Not Prediction, But Predication: The True Power of Science Fiction”, which ran in Asimov’s Science Fiction, the May-June 2023 issue.

Our choice was a finalist for the Nebula Award, the Locus Award, and for the LA Times Book Awards’ Ray Bradbury Award for Science Fiction, Fantasy, and Speculative Fiction…

NIGHT. DISTRICT THREE of the Ho Chi Minh Autonomous Trade Zone. 

The plastic awning of the café streamed with rain. Under its shelter, wreathed in kitchen steam and human chatter, waiters wove between tables with steaming bowls of soup, glasses of iced coffee, and bottles of beer. 

Beyond the wall of rain, electric motorbikes swept past like luminescent fish. Better not to think of fish. 

Lawrence concentrated his attention instead on the woman across the table, wiping her chopsticks with a wedge of lime. The color-swarm of the abglanz identity shield masking her face shifted and wavered.

Like something underwater … 

Lawrence dug his nails into his palm. “I’m sorry—does that thing have another setting?” 

The woman made an adjustment. The abglanz settled to a bland construct of a female face. Lawrence could make out the faint outline of her real face, drifting below the surface. 

Drifting …

“I don’t usually use this setting.” The oscillations of the abglanz flattened the woman’s inflection. “The faces are uncanny. Most people prefer the blur.” 

She brought her chopsticks to her mouth. The noodles sank into the glitchy surface of the digital mask’s lips. Inside was the shadow of another set of lips and teeth.

(10) TODAY’S BIRTHDAYS.

[Compiled by Cat Eldridge.]

  • Born July 1, 1891 Otis Adelbert Kline. Early pulp writer and literary agent whose great claim to fame was a possibly apocryphal feud with fellow author Edgar Rice Burroughs, in which he supposedly raised the latter’s anger by producing close imitations of Burroughs’s Mars novels. Wollheim and Moskowitz would believe in it, Lupoff did not. (Died 1946.)
  • Born July 1, 1934 Jean Marsh, 89. She was married to Jon Pertwee but it was before either were involved in Dr. Who. She first appeared alongside The First Doctor in “The Crusade” as Lady Joanna, the sister of Richard I (The Lionheart). She returned later that year as companion Sara Kingdom in “The Daleks’ Master Plan”. And she’d return yet again during the time of the Seventh Doctor in “Battlefield” as Morgana Le Fay. She’s also in Unearthly Stranger Dark PlacesReturn to OzWillow as Queen Bavmorda and The Changeling
  • Born July 1, 1935 David Prowse. The physical embodiment of Darth Vader in the original Star Wars trilogy. Ok, it’s been a very long time since I saw Casino Royale but what was Frankenstein’s Creation doing there, the character he played in his first ever role? That he played that role in The Horror of Frankenstein and Frankenstein and the Monster from Hell, Hammer Films a few later surprises me not. He shows up in Gilliam’s Jabberwocky according to IMDB as Red Herring and Black Knights (and no I’ve no idea what that means). Finally he’s the executioner in The People That Time Forgot, a film that’s very loosely based off of several Burroughs novels. (Died 2020.)
  • Born July 1, 1942 Genevieve Bujold, 81. We would have had a rather different look on Voyager if things had played out as the producers wished, for Bujold was their first choice to play Janeway. She quit after a day and a half of shooting, with the public reason being she was unaccustomed to the hectic pace of television filming. What the real reason was we will never know.
  • Born July 1, 1955 Robby the Robot, 68.Yes, this is this official birthday according to studio of the robot in Forbidden Planet which debuted a year later. He would later be seen is such films and series as The Invisible Boy,Invasion of the Neptune MenThe Twilight ZoneLost In SpaceThe Addams Family, Wonder Woman and Gremlins.  He was also featured in a 2006 commercial for 2006 commercial for AT&T.
  • Born July 1, 1964 Charles Coleman Finlay, 59. His first story, “Footnotes”, was published in 2001 in The Magazine of Fantasy & Science Fiction where many of his other stories were published, and which he edited for several years. The Traitor to the Crown series is his best-known work.
  • Born July 1, 1981 Genevieve Valentine, 42. Author of the superb Persona novel and also she scripted a Catwoman series, working with artists Garry Brown and David Messina. Her first novel, Mechanique: A tale of the Circus Tresaulti, won the Crawford Award for a first fantasy novel. She scripted a run of Xena: Warrior Princess, and scripted Batman & Robin Eternal as well. 

(11) CAN YOU HEAR THE DRUMS FERNANDO? The Guardian’s Tim Dowling writes, “The board game is back out, and I’m losing again”.

…“We can have a takeaway for supper, but you’ll have to hang around.”

“In that case,” says the youngest, “shall we play this?” He is pointing to a box containing a complicated board game to do with medieval dynasties.

“Yeah, all right,” says the oldest.

“And Dad,” says the youngest, “you’re definitely playing.”

When this box was first opened a few weeks ago, I wrote about two fears: that it may be one of the last times I watched my grown sons sit down to play a board game in our house; and that I had accidentally raised three nerds.

At the time I did not realise the board game would become a Sunday fixture, and that I would be roped into playing against my will. I still don’t know which outcome is preferable.

“I’m new to this,” I say, sitting down. “So this is a practice round.”

“It’s easier if we just play,” says the middle one. “You’ll pick it up.”

I am supplied with a character, Fernando; some territory – the Iberian peninsula; and a number of plastic knights. I am then obliged to select an abiding trait at random.

“Chaste,” I say.

“Chaste is good,” says the middle one, “but it makes it hard to marry.”

He’s not kidding. By the start of the Second Era the middle one has launched a sustained attack on the Papal States – much to the consternation of the youngest one, who reigns there – but, critically, I have still not found a spouse….

(12) THE SMART SET. [Item by SF Concatenation’s Jonathan Cowie.] This item will be appearing in next season’s (September) SF² Concatenation news page’s science and SF interface section…

Smart clothing – that is, not ‘neat’ but, ‘clever’ clothing – is a minor SF trope.  In terms of SFnal clothing, space-suits are positively mundane, but the genre offers much more from the techno-suits of super-heroes to the stillsuits of Dune.  Now there is a new, electrically-controlled fabric that can vary its heat – infra-red – transmission that could be used to create clothing with abilities not too dissimilar to, say, those found in Iain Banks’ ‘Culture’.  US engineers and applied physicists have created this fabric they call Wearable Variable-Emittance (WeaVE).  To make the material flexible, the authors used kirigami principles, which entail cutting a 2D surface and then folding it into 3D patterns. The polymer can either emit heat or provide insulation depending on the voltage applied to it. Here, the voltage needed is really small, less than one volt, so no large batteries are required.  The material enables wearers to experience the same skin temperature at ambient temperatures from 17.1°C to 22.0°C: that’s almost a 5°C range. No doubt we will get even better smart fabrics in the future… A brief summary of this research appears in Nature and the primary research is Chen, T-H. et al (2023) A kirigami-enabled electrochromic wearable variable-emittance device for energy-efficient adaptive personal thermoregulationPNAS Nexus, vol. 2, p1-10.

(13) VIDEO OF THE DAY. From a year ago, the opening scene of The Batman.

[Thanks to Chris Barkley, Michael Toman, Cat Eldridge, SF Concatenation’s Jonathan Cowie, Jennifer Hawthorne, N., Francis Hamit, Mike Kennedy, Andrew Porter, and John King Tarpinian for some of these stories. Title credit belongs to File 770 contributing editor of the day Cat Eldridge.]

37 thoughts on “Pixel Scroll 7/1/23 Yes, There Be Pixels And Where There Be Pixels There Be Birthdays

  1. Otis Adelbert Kline. Early pulp writer and literary agent whose great claim to fame was a possibly apocryphal feud with fellow author Edgar Rice Burroughs, in which he supposedly raised the latter’s anger by producing close imitations of Burroughs’s Mars novels.

    Tarzan, Venus and Moon series, also. (I have several of his books.) They’re fun, but definitely borrowing Burroughs’ playgrounds.

  2. Like Scrolls thru the Hourglass, so are the Pixels of our lives…

  3. (1) Given the reports of the rents and such in the LA area, they have every reason to strike. (And no, I’d not cross the picket line.)
    (4) Never got into it, but it did give me a line that I use when I’m speaking to someone about my novels (to include upcoming ones), I usually get a pleased response when I tell them all of mine are complete in one book, that I am never writing the first book of an 18 book trilogy.
    (7) I never got my father to talk about his view of a preferred future. That’s a question to ask your folks while they’re still here.

  4. (9) The Mountain in the Sea has some great book covers but I like that particular one the best. It’s weird and abstract but actually very revealing about the story.

  5. John Lorentxpz notes that I missed listing a few Tarzan, Venus and Moon series, also. (I have several of his books.) They’re fun, but definitely borrowing Burroughs’ playgrounds.

    Yeah I noticed that. Several sources weren’t clear just many series of his riffed offed Burroughs’ playgrounds.

  6. 1) I would never cross a picket line, any more than I would injure a child or steal food from a homeless person. And yes, I consider the first to be unvarnished evil, though not as evil as the others. — President of AFSCME Local 91, in the house

    (Most people don’t remember that Wilson “Bob” Tucker was not only an IATSE member but president for a time of his local.)

  7. @mark
    My father never said anything much about that. He did once say, looking at Viking’s pictures of Mars, that if they got the bugs out of the life-support systems, he’d like to go.

  8. Camestros Felapton says The Mountain in the Sea has some great book covers but I like that particular one the best. It’s weird and abstract but actually very revealing about the story.

    I agree.

    As always, it’s the first edition which is what I always use except when the novel or short story had a magazine publication first. Then that gets used.

  9. Looks like I was wrong about one thing–Kline wrote his Venus books before Burroughs wrote his own series set there. (By the time I read Kline’s books in the 60s & 70s, it was many years after I’d first read Burroughs’ books–so I assumed that Kline had copied Burroughs all along.)

    But Burroughs was first in the other three venues.

  10. David Prowse was also the manservant Julian in A Clockwork Orange, and Hotblack Desiato’s bodyguard in the television version of The Hitchhiker’s Guide to the Galaxy.

  11. 4) People are allowed to like things that you don’t. There are many legitimate critiques of the Wheel of Time. “I don’t understand why you like this” is not one of them. I like the Wheel of Time enough to found a convention for it, so my opinion is pretty clear. But there’s plenty of popular and beloved things that I just don’t like. I’ve never been able to finish an episode of Doctor Who, doesn’t matter what era. It doesn’t speak to me. I have also never managed to finish any novel by Tolkien, but I do like the original Peter Jackson movies. But I don’t go around proclaiming that people who like these things are have somehow been duped. Art speaks to people in different ways. Sometimes it doesn’t speak to you. And there’s absolutely nothing wrong with that.

  12. Jennifer Liang: Camestros said he bought and read every book in the Wheel of Time series. He’s not exactly someone standing on the outside throwing stones.

  13. This review of Dining on the Diner by Randy Armstrong nearly a quarter of a century ago earned Green Man its first serious legal threat.

    I got an email from Armstrong saying he would sue if I didn’t immediately remove the review as it personally maligned him by saying his recipes included with the CD for cookies and such were bad according to reviewer. Actually Big Earl said they couldn’t be baked at all.

    I pointed out 1) that the reviewer was a professional baker, and 2) he could kiss my ass as you can’t sue a review publication for expressing an opinion over such a subject. I never heard another peep.

  14. Jennifer Liang on July 1, 2023 at 8:46 pm said:

    4) People are allowed to like things that you don’t. There are many legitimate critiques of the Wheel of Time. “I don’t understand why you like this” is not one of them.

    I agree – and clearly one answer to my rhetorical question is that many people read it because they enjoyed the whole thing. Which is fine and normal.

    However, there’s also a lot of people who read it (all of it) who didn’t like it. Which is really weird! That’s what I’m curious about. I read all the main books and I moaned about each one of them and then bought another and I don’t think I’m alone in that. Which is weird. So obviously, in some way I did actually like reading those books but it is really hard to pin down what I did like!

  15. 10) One of the takes with Bujold is a bonus feature of the first season DVDs. She came across like a schoolteacher with a headache.

  16. Jean Marsh was also the host of a PBS program called, “The International Animation Festival,” which had some amazing selections, most of which were fantasy works.

    Re: #7, every list has something we agree or disagree with. “La Belle et la Bete,” Cocteau’s magnum opus, is as popular in France as “The Wizard of Oz” is to Americans. Glad George Melies was included. He was one of the first film makers to do film a Jules Verne story. His work inspired, not only Jean Cocteau, but also Willis O’Brien and Ray Harryhausen, who, in turn inspired George Lucas and Peter Jackson, as well as Guillermo del Toro. (Small world, isn’t it?)

  17. Dave Prowse’s genre resume is immense – any time a script needed a heavy, he was there, from the Minotaur in the Doctor Who story “The Time Monster”, to that least super-powered of superheroes, the Green Cross Code Man. I remember writing in a review of The Tomorrow People, in which he appeared as a silent android wearing nothing but a loincloth and silver body paint: “Exercise in speculation: what would British TV SF have been like, if Dave Prowse had had any shame?”

    And – all due respect for James Earl Jones – but I still think they should have used his voice for Darth Vader; that distinctive Somerset burr would have added so much to the lines. “Oi foind your laack of faith dizzturrbing, dang Oi if Oi doan.”

    Oh, and Jean Marsh was in UFO – she played an operative who lured Michael Billington’s character Paul Foster into joining SHADO, and – given the catsuits that female SHADO operatives wore – she lured him pretty effectively.

  18. (9) Yes, great book with great cover art (and my cover has art on the page edges too).

    “A Group of Bots Voted to Name this Scroll “Scrolly McScrollFace”

  19. @Camestros

    You did a really poor job of getting that point across. I can list out what I find compelling about the series, but those are the things you disliked.

    I usually find your essays interesting and well reasoned even if I disagree with your conclusions. But this just seems lazy.

  20. 8
    That is indeed a terrific book, and fun to reread. One could wish more note had been taken of its length.

    2
    I hope he gets to do Messiah. My favorite of them all.

  21. @Jennifer Lang–

    You did a really poor job of getting that point across. I can list out what I find compelling about the series, but those are the things you disliked.

    It’s stated pretty clearly in the excerpt here. Stop feeling so defensive about liking…something that’s pretty dang popular, even though not critically acclaimed.

  22. Lis Carey says It’s stated pretty clearly in the excerpt here. Stop feeling so defensive about liking…something that’s pretty dang popular, even though not critically acclaimed.

    On another list I hang out on, we’ve been discussing the Nero Wolfe series. Not once has the critical acclaim of that series been an issue. Whether the later novels are as good as the earlier books, if the mysteries works, if the two characters are interesting… You get idea, but no one apparently cared about the critics opinion of the series.

  23. (2) Dune 2 Trailer
    I’d love to see a remix/mashup of this trailer with this using Randy Newman’s theme song(s) for Toy Story (You’ve Got A Friend In Me) and perhaps some Monsters Inc (If I Didn’t Have You)…

  24. Daniel Dern: Sure, that would be fun. And makes more sense than what I immediately thought when I saw “Randy Newman” which was “I Love LA”.

    Come to think of it, what about “Rock the Casbah”?

  25. “You’ve got a Fremen – me!,
    You’ve got a Fremen – me!
    When the Worm-sign’s up ahead,
    And you’re miles and miles
    from your own sietch bed
    You just remember what Stilgar said,
    Paul, you’ve got a Fremen – me!”

  26. @Brown Robin: He’s not the Messiah, he’s a very naughty boy!

  27. @Camestros Felapton –

    However, there’s also a lot of people who read it (all of it) who didn’t like it. Which is really weird! That’s what I’m curious about. I read all the main books and I moaned about each one of them and then bought another and I don’t think I’m alone in that. Which is weird. So obviously, in some way I did actually like reading those books but it is really hard to pin down what I did like!

    Occasionally, I will come across a book, or a series of books, that, as I read it/them, I will realize I am actively disliking the experience of reading but I can’t seem to stop. There is something compelling there, but I’m not enjoying it. It’s like a certain kind of junk food where I feel more and more ill as I consume more and more and yet can’t seem to put the dratted bag down without a concerted mental effort.

    A book I simply dislike enough to put down and never pick up again may elicit anything from a “meh” or a “wow this was a bad enough book to make me angry” from me, but a book I am not enjoying but find page-turningly compulsive I will resent.

    I mean, I guess the author is doing something right, to cause even people actively hating the book to keep turning the pages, but only in the same way as the makers of those sorts of junk food too.

    And speaking of feeling ill: I quite enjoyed #7 but I had to turn on an image-blocking browser add-on to get through it, because having each of the movie stills ZOOM IN as it approached the center of the page and ZOOM OUT again as I scrolled past started to have an effect on me not unlike motion sickness.

  28. Strange women lying in catchbasins distributing crysknives is no basis for a system of government.

  29. Mm re Jean Marsh, she was also in an early B+W Twilight Zone episode (“The Lonely”) and was one of the two co authors of the acclaimed BBC drama “Upstairs and Downstairs”..

  30. Jonathan: SF2 Concatenation produces three issues a year, right? I remember when File 770 kept a schedule like that — as a paperzine.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.