Pixel Scroll 1/18/22
21 Jaunt Street

(1) RED WOMBAT EXTRA! Ursula Vernon has launched a newsletter: Wombat Droppings – Issue #1.

Hello, friends and subscribers! I’m starting a newsletter, because Twitter is like drinking from a firehose, Patreon costs you money, and I rarely have the braincells to blog these days. (Plus, when all your presence is on someone else’s platform, they can delete you at any time and leave you floundering in the social void.)

I promise that if you subscribe, I will not bother you too much. Also, I have no intention of charging for this thing, although apparently “newsletter” now means “thing you charge money for” and I don’t know what to call a thing that used to be a newsletter but now isn’t? (Free newsletter? I dunno. May need to workshop that.)

Anyway, let’s give this a try and see what happens!

The theme of Issue #1 is “So I’ve Started GMing…”

…Our game hook is that all the players are interns from the Church of the Good Boy, an all-dog temple established in our previous campaign. So they are all dogs, except for the rogue, who has paperwork stating that he is a dog, despite suspiciously cat-like ears…

(2) PUBLISH LIKE A PIRATE DAY. This might be the topic of Red Wombat’s next newsletter:

(3) CSI SKILL TREE. The CSI Skill Tree series examines how video games “envision possible futures, build rich and thought-provoking worlds, and engage people as active participants in unfolding and interpreting stories.”

The next event in the CSI Skill Tree series will be on Wednesday, February 23, from 1:00-2:15 p.m. Eastern and feature Cloud Gardens, a 2020 gardening game about using plants to overgrow and transform abandoned post-industrial landscapes. The guest speakers are SFF author and translator Ken Liu and game designer Liz Fiacco, who has worked on titles including The Last of Us 2 and Pillars of Eternity. The event is virtual, free, and open to everyone. Here is the registration page.

The event is cohosted with Orion Magazine, a quarterly publication working at the convergence of ecology, art, and social justice, and attendees will receive a code for 20% off a subscription to Orion.

Join the Center for Science and the Imagination and Orion Magazine, an ad-free, quarterly print publication at the convergence of ecology, art, and social justice, for our latest event, featuring “Cloud Gardens,” a 2020 gardening game about using plants to overgrow and transform abandoned post-industrial landscapes. At once soothing and cryptic, “Cloud Gardens” uses pastel colors and calming music to raise questions about the boundaries we construct between organic and built environments, the human and the nonhuman, the sublime and the dystopian.

(4) RENEWED AND PRENEWED. “’Star Trek: Discovery,’ ‘Lower Decks’ Renewed at Paramount Plus”Variety has the story.

“Star Trek: Discovery,” “Star Trek: Lower Decks,” and “Star Trek: Strange New Worlds” have all been renewed at Paramount Plus.

For “Discovery,” that means it will return for a fifth season. The show is due to resume its fourth season on Feb. 10. “Lower Decks” will now be back for a fourth season, with Season 3 of the animated comedy set to debut this summer.

“Strange New Worlds” has yet to debut its first season, which will drop on Paramount Plus on May 5. 

(5) MINUTES OF THE WORLD SQUEECORE CONGRESS. Sure, you could run your own Twitter search for the latest “squeecore” tweets – but these are curated tweets. You know, like a cooking show where the chef does marvels by adding pancetta or Calabrian chiles. (People are now looking around, asking, “So why don’t I see anything Mike added?”)

CAT RAMBO

LAURA DIAZ DE ARCE

SILVIA MORENO-GARCIA

NICK MAMATAS

DR. AMANDA DILLON

PAUL M. CRAY

3DPARTYINTERNET

MARIE BRENNAN

ANNA NICGIOLLAMHUIRE

ANDREW NETTE

(6) FOWL BAWL. Was it a slow news week? Having nothing more pressing to do, TIME Magazine ripped Donald Duck as one of the “Top 10 Worst Awards-Show Hosts” for his work on the 1958 Oscars.

We love classic cartoons as much as the next kid disguised as a grownup, but given the star power of the glittering 1950s, Donald Duck probably didn’t need to co-host the 30th Academy Awards. Bob Hope, Jack Lemmon, David Niven, Rosalind Russell and James Stewart also ran the 1958 show. Donald appeared on film rather than, as is preferable for most hosts, in person. Still, he wasn’t completely out of his element: 15 years earlier, his short Der Fuehrer’s Face won an Oscar.

(7) CHUCK SHIMADA OBIT. LASFS member Charles Shimada passed away peacefully in his sleep on December 26, 2021, Calvin Ogawa reported on Facebook. LA-area fans remember Chuck for doing a lot of the Audio/Video technical setup for many conventions over the years – including the 1996 Worldcon I chaired.

Much earlier, at the 1975 EquiCon, Chuck let me run the projector as we showed Star Trek episodes. These were Gene Roddenberry’s personal 16mm prints. And while I was rewinding one of them, I noticed to my horror that I had not closed the reel lock — the reel was starting to do a high-frequency wobble. What would happen when it reached the end? OMG! Was it going to fly off and unspool irreplaceable film all over the fans sitting in front of the projection stand? What would happen to my hand if I grabbed the reel to stop it spinning? I found out. Nothing, fortunately; film saved; I lived to volunteer another day.

(8) MEDIA BIRTHDAY.

1973 [Item by Cat Eldridge.] Forty-nine years ago, The Six Million Dollar Man premiered this evening on ABC. It was based on Martin Caidin’s Cyborg. Executive Producer was Harve Bennett, who you will recognize from the Star Trek films. It was produced by Kenneth Johnson who would later do The Bionic Woman spin-off and the Alien Nation film. 

Its primary cast was Lee Majors,  Richard Anderson and Martin E. Brooks. Majors had a successful second series shortly after this series was cancelled, The Fall Guy, about heart-of-gold bounty hunters. The Six Million Dollar Man would run for five seasons consisting of ninety-nine episodes and five films. The Fall Guy would run five seasons as well. 

Reception by media critics is generally positive. Phelim O’Neil of The Guardian says, “He was Superman, James Bond and Neil Armstrong all rolled into one, and $6M was an almost incomprehensibly large amount of money: how could anyone not watch this show?” And Rob Hunter of Film School Reviews states “The story lines run the gamut from semi-believable to outright ludicrous, but even at its most silly the show is an entertaining family friendly mix of drama, humor, action, and science fiction.”

(9) TODAY’S BIRTHDAYS.

[Compiled by Cat Eldridge.]

  • Born January 18, 1882 A.A. Milne. Talking fat bears obsessed with honey. Bouncing tigers, err, tiggers. Morose, well, what is he? It’s certainly genre. And though it isn’t remotely genre, I wholeheartedly recommend Milne’s The Red House Mystery, a Country House Mystery that’s most excellent! (Died 1956.)
  • Born January 18, 1932 Robert Anton Wilson. I think I first encountered him in something Richard E. Geis wrote about him in Science Fiction Review in the Eighties. Schrödinger’s Cat Trilogy is just weird and might or might not be a sequel to Wilson’s The Illuminatus! Trilogy co-authored with Robert Shea. But the absolutely weirdest thing he did might be an interview titled Robert Anton Wilson On Finnegans Wake and Joseph Campbell. (Died 2007.)
  • Born January 18, 1933 John Boorman, 89. Director who’s responsible for one of the best SFF films ever done, Excalibur, and one of the worst, Zardoz. (He wrote the novel for that one as well.)  (I know some Filers like Zardoz. Oh well.)  He also directed the rather nifty Emerald Forest which Holdstock did a far better than merely good job of novelizing.
  • Born January 18, 1937 Dick Durock. He was best known for playing Swamp Thing in Swamp Thing and The Return of Swamp Thing and the following television series which ran for three seasons. His only other genre appearances were in The Nude Bomb (also known as The Return of Maxwell Smart) and “The First” of The Incredible Hulk. He shows up in Die Hard with a Vengeance in a subway scene. No, it’s not genre, I just like that film. (Died 2009.)
  • Born January 18, 1953 Pamela Dean Dyer-Bennet, 69. Her best novel is I think Tam Lin though one could make an argument for Juniper, Gentian, and Rosemary which Windling calls her favorite fantasy novel. Her Secret Country trilogy is also a great deal of fun to read. Much of her short stories are set in the Liavek shared universe created by Emma Bull and Will Shetterly. All of the Liavek anthologies are now available on all major digital platforms. According to the files sitting in my Dropbox folder, there’s eight volumes to the series. They’re wonderful reading. End of plug.
  • Born January 18, 1955 Kevin Costner, 67. Some of his genre films are Robin Hood: Prince of ThievesWaterworldThe Postman and the recent Dragonfly, but I really like his Field of Dreams — his acting in it as Ray Kinsella is quite excellent. Not quite as superb as he was as “Crash” Davis in Bull Durham but damned good. Bull Durham is one of my go-to films when I want to feel good. He also was Jonathan Kent in both Man of Steel and Batman v Superman: Dawn of Justice.
  • Born January 18, 1964 Jane Horrocks, 58. Her first SFF genre role was Pattern in The Wolves of Willoughby Chase, scripted off the Joan Aiken novel. A year later, she showed up in the most excellent The Witches, scripted off the Raoul Dahl novel playing Miss Susan Irvine. She voices Black Widow / Mrs. Plum in Tim Burton’s The Corpse Bride, and voiced Hannah in the late Ninties Watership Down.

(10) IRISH COMIC NEWS AWARDS SHORTLISTS. Congratulations to James Bacon who has been nominated for the Irish Comic News’ ICN Awards 2021 in the Best Irish Writer (Non-Fiction) category for his work on File 770. (James also edits and writes for Journey Planet.) The complete list of nominees is here.

BEST IRISH WRITER (NON-FICTION)

As I mentioned in a year-end roundup, James uses his descriptive abilities and camera to allow Filers to accompany him to exhibits and events in vivid and enjoyable reports. 

His round table interview with N.K. Jemisin about her work on Green Lantern was great fun to read. And he constantly reviews comics from off the beaten track which deserve our attention. His work last year on File 770 was considerable —

I wish him and all other nominees the best of luck. 

(11) EFFICIENCY EXPERT. I can see that Michael Carroll’s sense of humor is part of his appeal – here’s how he introduces his list of Rusty Staples’ “Most Popular Posts of 2021!”

…As I promised in last year’s look back at the previous year, I ditched my plan to post at least one entry every week: doing so freed up a lot of time that I was able to divide between idly daydreaming about winning imaginary arguments with jerks, and needlessly wallowing in unwarranted self-pity. So, time well-spent, I think….

(12) MOON KNIGHT. Disney+ dropped a trailer for their new streaming series with Oscar Isaac yesterday. The series will premiere on March 30.

(13) THAT’S A LOT OF QUARTERS. “Microsoft acquires gaming giant Activision Blizzard for nearly $70 billion” reports CNN.

Microsoft on Tuesday announced plans to acquire Activision Blizzard in a blockbuster deal worth nearly $70 billion. It’s one of the biggest acquisitions in the tech industry in recent years, one that will boost Microsoft’s standing in the growing gaming industry but could be complicated by recent concerns about Activision’s toxic culture.

The all-cash transaction is valued at $68.7 billion, and Microsoft says it will make the company the third-largest gaming company by revenue, after Tencent and Sony.

Bobby Kotick, the controversial CEO of Activision Blizzard, will continue in his role, according to a press release detailing the announced acquisition. Activision employees had previously staged walkouts and called on Kotick to step down for having allegedly been aware of widespread harassment and discrimination problems at the company for years….

(14) DOCKING MANUVER. Here we are outside 104 E. Providencia Ave in Burbank in 1964. I hope somebody explained parallel parking to Mr. Sulu later!

(15) A ROBERT PICARDO APPEARANCE. Jonathan Cowie reports that at the last Novacon they screened a short film based on a story by Chris Priest – here is a trailer for it: The Stooge.

(16) A REAL INCENTIVE. JDA truly understands the audience for his comics.

(17) VIDEO OF THE DAY. [Item by Cath Jackel.] Here’s a BBC Reel about How to ride a pterosaur, according to science. Includes a saddle mockup inspired by How to Train Your Dragon.

[Thanks to Andrew Porter, Michael Toman, Cat Eldridge, Jamoche, Joey Eschrich, SF Concatenation’s Jonathan Cowie, Chris Barkley, Mike Kennedy, Martin Morse Wooster, JJ, and John King Tarpinian for some of these stories. Title credit belongs to File 770 contributing editor of the day Daniel Dern.]

51 thoughts on “Pixel Scroll 1/18/22
21 Jaunt Street

  1. (1) Wombat Droppings! Best title ever!

    (2) Combat Wombat!

    The chat queues on the ghostwriting site are slower than my ISP’s technical support. Yikes. By the way, a similar site was claiming that their ghostwriters wrote “Robinson Crusoe” plus several books by John Dee. Nice trick.

    (5) If you’re going to read “squeecore” tweets, the curated ones are better.

    (8) Gulp! That was so long ago I watched it on a black-and-white TV. “He’s breaking up! He’s breaking up!”

  2. a similar site was claiming that their ghostwriters wrote “Robinson Crusoe” plus several books by John Dee.

    Those ghosts have been dead a long time.

  3. (8) An addendum to the primary cast of Six Million Dollar Man. Martin E. Brooks took over the role of Rudy Wells in 1975, also playing the part on The Bionic Woman. Alan Oppenheimer first played Rudy Wells in the TV series, while Martin Balsam played him in the original TV movie pilot.

    (9). Sean Connery was not in Excalibur. He did play Arthur in the horrible movie First Knight, but was not in Excalibur. That was Nigel Terry. Connery was also the Green Knight in Sword of the Valiant. I think that’s about it for him and the Arthurian Legends.

  4. 9) Jane Horrocks also played Edina Monsoon’s much put upon assistant, Bubble, who seemed epically incompetent, until she wasn’t. In the episode “France” Eddy was shocked to find out that Bubble spoke fluent French.

    Zardoz, come on Sean Connery in what is essentially a leather diaper for the run of the movie, what’s not to like?

  5. (14) It’s okay, he just paused to line up with the docking bay.

    (It’s at the end of a driveway.)

    (2) Legal twitter picked up on this, and word has been passed to Norah Roberts. Since they’re also claiming ghost-writership of at least on Marvel comic, that gets the Mouse involved.

  6. Troyce says Sean Connery was not in Excalibur. He did play Arthur in the horrible movie First Knight, but was not in Excalibur. That was Nigel Terry. Connery was also the Green Knight in Sword of the Valiant. I think that’s about it for him and the Arthurian Legends.

    Huh? I didn’t say he was. I said Boorman was responsible for both films. I don’t even name check Connery in that Birthday.

    Ahhh I see I did it after checking my notes originally but our ever so OGH caught it. Thanks Mike!

  7. Cat Eldridge: After reading Troyce’s comment I corrected the Boorman birthday. There no longer being any Connery parallel, I got rid of both mentions of his name.

  8. Mike Glyer says to me: After reading Troyce’s comment I corrected the Boorman birthday. There no longer being any Connery parallel, I got rid of both mentions of his name.

    Yeah it was an unfortunate mistake. Thanks for editing it out.

  9. P J Evans said:

    (14) It’s okay, he just paused to line up with the docking bay.
    (It’s at the end of a driveway.)

    Nah, Sulu knows exactly what he’s doing. Yaw to port 90* and it’ll be perfect.

    P J also said:

    Since they’re also claiming ghost-writership of at least one Marvel comic, that gets the Mouse involved.

    On the one tentacle, I normally don’t abide siccing The Mouse on anybody but for this bunch I’m OK with it.
    On the other tentacle, given #DisneyMustPay I wonder what their pack of barely-domesticated lawyers will do.

    On the gripping hand:
    Since Clint Eastwood basically plays the same character in his SF movies, would his genre be called “DoyoufeelluckyPunk”?

  10. (9) Zardoz is a masterpiece. It is legitimately a great movie, and more daring and innovative than any SF movie in the past five years.

  11. (5) A well-curated set, but I confess my main takeaway is that I now want something with pancetta and Calabrian chiles.

  12. (9) Milne wrote a quite excellent fantasy novel, Once on a Time, which receives far less genre attention than it merits, and a stage adaptation of a genre classic, Toad of Toad Hall.

  13. Squeecore is what my cat does when petted. “Core-core-core” goes the kitten.

  14. I was watching something fairly recently – pretty sure it was animated, but can’t remember what – and they used the sound effect that meant Steve’s bionics had kicked in to indicate the character was doing something especially strenuous.

  15. Wow, squeecore, huh? I would suggest, though, that the people getting annoyed might want to listen to the actual podcast episode first, instead of drawing from secondary sources. Doesn’t read to me like many do.

  16. 8) Johnson also created the wonderfully terrible V.

    9) Schroedinger’s Cat has instances of some of the characters from Illuminatus!, but appears to take place in a bundle of closely related but different universes, a decade or so later.

    9bis) If Zardoz had gotten the attention it deserved, cyberpunk could have been prevented.

    (The novel is billed “John Boorman with Bill Stair”, which makes me suspect the Stair chap did the heavy lifting.)

    The Scroll is good. The Pixel is evil.

  17. (8) My favorite Six-Million-Dollar-man-episode was an episode of “misfits of science” that was a thinly-veiled stab in that direction.

  18. My favorite Robert Anton Wilson is Masks of the Illuminati, which, despite the name, is unrelated to the Illuminatus trilogy. It is a standalone mystery starring James Joyce and Albert Einstein. It is much more of a, well, a story than most of his other works, though it still certainly has plenty of the weirdness he’s known for.

    Also, he once used a joke of mine (with permission) in one of his books, although it’s been so long that I no longer remember for sure which book or which joke.

  19. It’s 9343, and the number of occasions I’ve had strangers in my apartment this past week reached the “straw that broke the camel’s back” level on Tuesday.

  20. Markus: I would suggest, though, that the people getting annoyed might want to listen to the actual podcast episode first, instead of drawing from secondary sources. Doesn’t read to me like many do.

    Look, I read the Reddit commenter’s summary, which Benedict says is spot-on. That’s a primary source. But that summary doesn’t describe the vast majority of recent Hugo Finalists. So you tell me, what am I missing here?

    This made-up term is the result of podcasters throwing a bunch of random shit at the wall and hoping that some of it sticks, in order to get attention for their podcast. It doesn’t actually mean anything.

  21. 8) Talk about the passage of time invoking the suck fairy. That show has been rendered completely unbelievable given present day facts.

    6 million would get you my triple bypass surgery and a cup of coffee these days.

    If that show had wanted to be accurate, it would have taken place in Thailand, or Belize or some other medical-tourism country and the script writers could have made a big deal about the main characters failing to get visas allowing travel to the US

  22. @OlakRokne

    ZARDOZ is two-thirds of a great, visionary SF movie, I agree.

    It totally jumps the shark at the point when Sean Connery says, “Stay within my aura.” Sadly, Boorman didn’t have a better ending for his movie than to have Zed turn psionic superman — always a bad move, sinking almost everything from that point on to the level of Frank Herbert’s THE EYES OF HEISENBERG and uncountable similar pieces of skiffy dreck.

    However, IMO, a musical remake of ZARDOZ — with chorus lines of Zardoz-mask-wearing, orange-diapered Exterminators doing unison kicks in Rockette-style dance routines — would be a great, great thing.

  23. There are some wacky ideas in Zardoz, and I think it tries to get where it’s going, but man, it really can’t quite make it, IMO. I do think that no one else, except maybe David Lynch in his prime, could have made a go of it.

  24. @JJ

    I read the Reddit commenter’s summary, which Benedict says is spot-on. That’s a primary source.

    ???
    The podcast is the primary source. Another party’s description of the podcast is a secondary source. This is standard historiography.

  25. @ Mark Pontin

    However, IMO, a musical remake of ZARDOZ — with chorus lines of Zardoz-mask-wearing, orange-diapered Exterminators doing unison kicks in Rockette-style dance routines — would be a great, great thing.

    Just seeing the Times Square billboards for Zardoz: The Musical would be a substantial blow for justice and against the forces of evil.

  26. @JJ:
    Come, be fair. It’s not exactly random shit, so much as Insufficientideologicalpuritycore doesn’t trip off the tongue.

    Honestly, this almost feels like someone who favors the humorless message-fiction the puppies swore they were campaigning against but missed the whole SP/RP saga, or totally had the wrong takeaway.

  27. (16) isn’t there a specific word for inserting a real person into a work of fiction for whatever reason? Lost a bet, raising money for charity, sheer cussedness, etc.

  28. @bill:

    “amazing that some random Redditor was able to understand and summarize the squeecore episode while a decade’s worth of Hugo winners decided it was impossible to parse”

    Source: R.S. Benedict

  29. bill: The podcast is the primary source.

    Yes, and Benedict is the podcaster. She’s the primary source.

  30. PhilRM: That hyperbole shows that Benedict may be a source, but how reliable a source needs to be considered.

  31. @JJ — Okay, so the podcast is primary, and Benedict’s comments indicate that the redditor is reliable. But the redditor is still secondary (unless he or she was part of the podcast).

  32. I still don’t know how someone looks at recent Hugo winners (or the latest SF stories or whatever) and makes claims like “Whedonesque” and “pop culture references” (etc.).

    Then you have the claims that the stories have no real character growth, “huge discomfort with intense emotions,” etc. How do you even measure that? It’s easy to quantify whether or not a story has pop culture references. But the other things? Not so much. (You can claim those things, but it’s harder to get agreement because those are hard to define.)

    And now, redemption arcs mean that the author has some kind of neoliberal agenda. That they are trying to convert the enemies into allies. Has anyone forgotten the rather odd redemption arc original Fuzzy books? In the second book, Victor Grego, one of the villains from the first book, becomes the protagonist? That neoliberal H. Beam Piper! Snort… (Yet in John Scalzi’s Fuzzy Planet, there were no such redemption arcs. The bad guys remained BAD.)

    It’s normal to dislike a certain type of story. But that doesn’t mean that a story you don’t like meets certain set criteria. Or that those stories are pushing an agenda. Maybe people just want to write the type of story they want to read (a la C. S. Lewis.)

    I see a lot of people trying to push square pegs into round holes. Maybe they want to replace the board so that all the holes are square now. But that ignores all the readers who want stories for other reasons.

    Or gosh, people who want to be able to more than one type of story.

  33. 1.) Yeah, haven’t made it over to Twitter yet. Keep in mind that Nora Roberts/J.D. Robb is involved in the claims. And, shortly after the Tweets started, Courtney Milan announced that she had emailed Roberts. It’s pretty well-known that you don’t mess with Nora Roberts when it comes to things like this.

    This is well worth getting the popcorn out. Roberts. Neil Gaiman is also involved and aware. Disney. Marvel. I can just see the lawyers rubbing their hands gleefully.

  34. I’d wondered about the chorus at Discon Opening Ceremonies, since all I’d heard was rather vague descriptions.

    So the video was available, and I watched it.

    It was a great deal worse than I could have imagined– not mere Christian triumphalism. I was expecting O Holy Night, which is arguably over the top, but is also a fine song that I would be glad to hear.

    No, something like half of the performance was repetition of “fall on your knees before Him, something something adore Him, Emmanuel”. I’m sure no one meant any ill, but it was wildly inappropriate.

  35. Cath Jackel: Thanks for the link to the BBC story about pterosaurs. That was a fun science story.

  36. Re Benedict’s benediction of the Reddit quote:

    amazing that some random Redditor was able to understand and summarize the squeecore episode while a decade’s worth of Hugo winners decided it was impossible to parse

    I assume in JJ’s comment above, “That’s a primary source,” “that” refers to Benedict, the podcaster, giving the primary source’s seal of approval to the reddit summary (which yes, is a secondary source).

    Although arguably the secondary sources writing in response to the podcast are primary sources showing how fandom is responding (which is what I’m interested in thinking about/analyzing). Summaries can be more or less accurate (and the fact that it’s miserably hard for me to summarize something I’ve only heard without listening to it multiple times or creating a transcript is why I’m not about to engage with the podcast), but reading a number of summaries about the same primary source and seeing what gets emphasized or not (and how similar some of the discussion is to earlier incidents in fandom about “the death/destruction of pure sf”) is something I enjoy doing.

    What really struck me in the tweet was the claim that TEN years’ worth of Hugo winners (ALL the Hugo winners for ten years? really) have been unable “to parse” it which seems an inflationary claim at best (downright dishonest at worst). I mean, unless I’ve missed a lot of posts/comments, there hasn’t been that much discussion by that many Hugo winners (as opposed to other fans). And that makes me think, as others have noted, that the original podcast was clickbait, or trolling for a response, more than engaging in good faith. Since it’s a backhanded slap at the poor “unable to parse” Hugo winners as well, it also seems more evidence of prejudice against (some) Hugo winners as motivation.

  37. @ Patrick Miller —

    Many thanks! I am humbled — greater minds than mine have already made ZARDOZ; THE MUSICAL a reality. Nice breasts on the Exterminators.

  38. When Camestros first blogged about that podcast, my reaction was a roll of the eyes and a muttered “RSB gonna RSB.” As the squeecore discourse progresses, I only see that impression confirmed. The Queen of Bad SFF Takes retains hold of her crown.

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