Pixel Scroll 6/30/22 Pixel Scroll Them From Orbit, It’s The Only Way To Be Sure

(1) PKD IS READY FOR HIS CLOSEUP. A movie will be made about the life of Philip K. Dick announces The Hollywood Reporter: “Blade Runner Author Philip K. Dick Gets ‘Only Apparently Real’ Biopic”. It will be based in part on the book written by Paul Williams, the one-time literary executor of Dick’s estate and friend of the author. 

…His own life was just as mind-bending as his work, filled with drug use and hallucinations, a suicide attempt and letters to the FBI, paranormal experiences and believing he was living parallel lives in two different time periods, one in the present and the other in the Roman Empire.

Only Apparently Real centers on a break-in at Dick’s house that took place in the early ’70s. He was in the midst of his fourth divorce, trying to give up amphetamines, battling writer’s block and possibly being spied on by the United States government. Then his house was ransacked, his safe blown open and his manuscripts were stolen. But then again, maybe they weren’t and maybe there was never a break-in.

“His life was as surreal as his books,” says Shestack. “He was a high-level functioning person and you never know, even when reading his journals, what is real and what isn’t.”

The story also tackles what Dick himself described as a tragic theme that pervaded his life: the death in infancy of his twin sister, Jane, and the reenactment of it over and over again. Dick attributed many of his psychological issues and personal life challenges to her death, including his attachment anxieties….

(2) BRANCHING OUT. Lois McMaster Bujold received some major league help in expanding her family tree she told Facebook readers.

A while ago, I was invited to be a guest subject on a website called WikiTree, which is an online association of dedicated genealogy enthusiasts. https://www.wikitree.com/ They run a group effort called WikiTree Challenge, in which they turn their skills loose upon the guest’s family tree for one week, and compete to see who can find out the most previously unknown information about the guest’s ancestors; sort of a cross between Roots and Time Team, crowdsourcing genealogy research.

The link to the Bujold entry on WikiTree is: Lois (McMaster) McMaster Bujold (b. 1940s)

The Bujold page is linked to WikiTree’s page which collects information about a number of well-known sf writers – “Which Science Fiction author are you most closely connected to?”

The experience inspired Bujold to assemble the diaries of three Civil War era family members and make them available for sale: The Gerould Family of New Hampshire in the Civil War: Two Diaries and a Memoir.

“When family history meets history…

“This chapbook is a collection of eyewitness historical documents from the American Civil War handed down through descendants of the Gerould family. Two transcribed pocket diaries for the year 1864 describe the day-by-day tribulations of young Union navy surgeon Dr. Martin Gerould, assigned to the ill-fated ironclad Eastport in the Red River Campaign; and his aging mother Cynthia Locke Gerould, the wife of a clergyman, back home in New Hampshire. The increasingly gripping cross-illumination of the paired accounts is further rounded out by the later-written memoir of Martin’s eldest brother Reverend (soon to be Private) Samuel L. Gerould, detailing his experiences in the Fourteenth New Hampshire Volunteers: three voices from the past speaking directly, in their own words.

“Editor Lois McMaster Bujold is a well-known science fiction and fantasy writer, and the great-granddaughter of Samuel L. Gerould.”

With my added introductions and other material, it ended up running about 42k words, about the size of a long novella. Really, it was a lucky intersection of stimulus, time, technology, and ebook skillset, most of which I’d not had until recently.

(3) THOSE THRILLING DAYS OF YESTERYEAR. You can now see video of the “Fandom through the Generations Panel” from the recent Star Wars Celebration Anaheim 2022.

Which era did you enter into Star Wars fandom – classic, prequel, The Clone Wars/Rebels, sequels? Join fandom tour guides Richard and Sarah Woloski from Skywalking Through Neverland as they take you through four decades of fandom. Featured guests include Craig Miller (Former Director – Fan Relations for Lucasfilm), Dan Madsen (Founder – Star Wars Insider), and Matt Martin (current Lucasfilm Senior Creative) who share stories of the ever-evolving fan communities.

(4) CLARION WEST UPDATE. In Clarion West’s Six-Week Summer Workshop, the class is finishing up Week 2 with P. Djèlí Clark. Listen to him read from A Master of Djinn for the Summer of Science Fiction & Fantasy Reading Series on YouTube.

They’re now heading into Week 3 with instructor Fonda Lee. She will be reading on July 5th at the Seattle Public Library; register here to attend either in-person or online.

(5) INTERZONE MIGRATES. TTA Press has announced that the UK prozine “Interzone Has A New Publisher”

From issue #294 Interzone will be edited by Gareth Jelley and published by MYY Press.

Buy a 6-issue print subscription to Interzone and get a high-quality full-colour magazine packed full of mind-expanding fiction and nonfiction delivered directly to your door bimonthly, all for just €47 (price includes VAT and free delivery worldwide).

New subscriptions begin with issue #294.

If you are renewing or extending a TTA Press subscription, we will combine them to ensure you don’t miss out on an issue.

SUBSCRIBE TO INTERZONE

Many thanks to all the collaborators, contributors, readers, and everybody else who helped and supported us through the past one hundred issues. Interzone #292/293, our 100th and final issue, should be purchased as normal from the TTA Shop.

(6) INTERZONE DIGITAL. Meanwhile, Ansible Links alerted readers to the creation of Interzone Digital – mind-bending fantastika from all over the planet, and a web page that concisely explains, “Interzone Digital is like Interzone, but digital.” They’re open for story submissions.

(7) IN THE BLACK FANTASTIC. The Guardian’s Aindrea Emelife visits an Afrofuturism exhibit at a London gallery: “In the Black Fantastic review – reaching for tomorrow’s art world”

Hayward Gallery, London
Eleven contemporary artists inspired by Afrofuturism consider possible futures with a hopeful, fizzing energy

Of the many themes addressed by In the Black Fantastic, a new exhibition inspired by Afrofuturism at the the Hayward Gallery, the negotiations of the Black body is perhaps the most resonant.

Take Chain Reaction, a dramatic new commission by the American sculptor Nick Cave, which sees casts of the artist’s arm, joined together in both unity and struggle, hang from the ceiling, fingers grasping for each other. Elsewhere, Cave’s Soundsuits – colourful costumes that cover the wearer’s face and body – loom with unsettling yet celebratory fervour. When in movement, as part of Cave’s performances, they ensure that the Black male body is seen. It is no coincidence that Cave’s first Soundsuit was made in 1992 following the Rodney King beating in Los Angeles. Soundsuit 9:29, the latest iteration on display here, is a homage to George Floyd and the duration of time former Minneapolis police officer Derek Chauvin knelt on his neck. For Cave, taking up space and sound is a form of protest and a means of envisioning new realities.

With its hopeful, fizzing energy, this collection of work by 11 contemporary artists from the African diaspora is important because it offers a glimpse of the way ahead…. 

(8) A HOLE NEW WORLD. Gizmodo nominates these as “The 8 Worst Apocalypse Bunkers in Science Fiction”. BEWARE SPOILERS.

If the world were to end, you’d probably want to be as sequestered as possible—preferably underground with a freshly stocked pantry, your loved ones close by, and plenty of stuff to distract you from the fiery inferno outside your door….This list compiles some of the worst, most grotesque, and eeriest bunkers in recent years, with shelters that tried everything from draining people of their blood to experimenting with cryogenics….

(9) IF YOU KNOW WHERE THEY ARE, THAT’S ALL THAT MATTERS. The Atlantic’s Leslie Kendall Dye contends that “The Organization of Your Bookshelves Tells Its Own Story”.

….Now I use “The Library of Babel” as a metaphor for the landscape of my own library. My books are not organized alphabetically, or, for the most part, by genre. The arrangement seems to have been made entirely at random, unless you know the quirk by which it was conceived. Books are placed next to one another for companionship, based on some kinship or shared sensibility that I believe ties them together. The Little Prince is next to Act One, by Moss Hart, because I think Hart and Antoine de Saint-Exupéry convey, in their respective works, a similar purity of heart and openness of expression. The Little Prince is a French fable set primarily in the Sahara; Act One is a memoir of a poor Jewish boy’s journey to Broadway. But to me, they are about the same thing: finding what matters in life, and shutting out all that is of no consequence….

(10) NOT ELEMENTARY AT ALL. At CrimeReads, Erika Kobayashi discusses what it was like having parents who were determined to translate all of the Sherlock Holmes stories into Japanese. “My Poison Snake: Erika Kobayashi on Growing Up in a Household of Sherlock Translators”.

…Papa and Mama would sit in the kitchen munching senbei crackers.

They were peering intently at foreign-language books spread out before them: the stories of Sherlock Holmes, written by Sir Arthur Conan Doyle.

Papa had once been a doctor, and Mama had once worked at a bank.

But with the arrival of their fourth daughter—that is, me—they decided to quit their jobs and devote themselves full time to translating the stories of Sherlock Holmes.

Their dream was to translate all sixty works—the entire Canon….

(11) MEMORY LANE

2011 [By Cat Eldridge.] On this date, Men in Black: The Series (also known as, depending on where you were watching it, as MIB: The SeriesMIB: The Animated Series, and Men in Black: The Animated Series) ended its four year run. The date hereafter refers to its run on KId’s WB. 

The animated series was developed by Duane Capizzi, Jeff Kline and Richard Raynis. Cappizzi was the writer/producer of the animated The Batman, a series I really liked. Kline was co-executive producer of Roughnecks: Starship Troopers Chronicles, and Raynis was the same. 

The show is set in an alternate timeline to the Men in Black reality with  the major differ differences being that Agent K is still active, and Agent J is still regarded as a rookie. It has a more than new characters and considerably new technology, something you can do with an animated series.

Charles Napier is Zed and Keith Daimondc as Jay are the only voice performers that are in almost every episodes. Patrick Fraley and Patrick Pinney as the Wormguys voice their characters in all but a handful of episodes. George Berger and Ed O’Ross both play K. 

It lasted for fifty- three episodes over four seasons. 

Yes, I’ve seen more than a handful of episodes. No, it doesn’t have the energy of the films, particularly the first film, but it is reasonably done. The closest comparison I can make to another series is the animated Beatlejuice. You really aren’t going to catch the feel of the original performers, are you? 

Audience reviewers at Rotten Tomatoes give it a stellar eighty six percent rating.

(12) TODAY’S BIRTHDAYS.

[Compiled by Cat Eldridge.]

  • Born June 30, 1905 — Nestor Paiva. Sometimes it only takes one film or series for a performer to get a Birthday write-up from me. Paiva makes it for Lucas the boat captain in The Creature from the Black Lagoon and its oft-forgotten sequel Revenge of the Creature. Though they were hardly his only genre roles, as his first role was in the early Forties as an uncredited prison guard in Tarzan’s Desert Mystery, and he’d be in many a genre film and series over the decades as Prof. Etienne Lafarge in The Mole People, as the saloon owner in (I kid you not!) Jesse James Meets Frankenstein’s Daughter, Felicity’s Father in The Spirit Is Willing, Captain Grimby in “The Great Treasure Hunt” of The Addams Family and a Doorman in the “Our Man in Leotards” episode of Get Smart. (Died 1966.)
  • Born June 30, 1920 — Sam Moskowitz. SF writer, critic, and historian. Chair of the very first World Science Fiction Convention held in NYC in 1939. He barred several Futurians from the con in what was later called the Great Exclusion Act. In the Fifties, he edited Science-Fiction Plus, a short-lived genre magazine owned by Hugo Gernsback, and would edit several dozen anthologies, and a few single-author collections, most published in the Sixties and early Seventies. He was the “mystery guest of honor” at Clevention in 1955. His most enduring legacy was as a historian of the genre with such works as The Immortal Storm, Under the Moons of Mars: A History and Anthology of “The Scientific Romance” in the Munsey Magazines, 1912–1920 and Hugo Gernsback: Father of Science Fiction. (Died 1997.) 
  • Born June 30, 1938 — Jeri Taylor, 84. Scriptwriter and producer who wrote many episodes of the Next Generation and Voyager series. To say she was a scriptwriter is a bit of an understatement — she wrote one hundred and sixty-eight of the Voyager episodes, all but four that aired. She only wrote thirteen episodes of Next Gen and three of Deep Space Nine.
  • Born June 30, 1959 — Vincent D’Onofrio, 63. His long running role is Detective Goren on Law and Order: Criminal Intent which is in no way genre. He was Kingpin in that very good Daredevil series, Edgar the Bug in the only truly great Men in Black film to date and Vic Hoskins in Jurassic World. He also was Jason Whitney / Jerry Ashton in The Thirteenth Floor, loosely based upon Simulacron-3, a early Sixties novel by Daniel F. Galouye.
  • Born June 30, 1961 — Diane Purkiss, 61. I’ve not read her Corydon Trilogy she wrote with Michael Dowling, her son, but I can say that At the Bottom of the Garden: A Dark History of Fairies, Hobgoblins, Nymphs, and Other Troublesome Things is as splendid as the title suggests it is. She’s also written Fairies and Fairy Stories: A History
  • Born June 30, 1966 — Peter Outerbridge, 56. Dr. David Sandström in what I think is the underrated ReGenesis series as well being Henrik “Hank” Johanssen in Orphan Black anda recurring role on Millennium as Special Agent Barry Baldwin. He’s also in two series, The Umbrella in a recurring role as The Conductor, and as Calix Niklosin in V-Wars, yet another Netflix SF series. 
  • Born June 30, 1972 — Molly Parker, 50. Maureen Robinson on the current Lost in Space series. One-offs in Nightmare Cafe, The Outer Limits, The SentinelHighlander: The SeriesPoltergeist: The Legacy,  Human Target and she appeared in The Wicker Man asSister Rose / Sister Thorn. 

(13) COMICS SECTION.

  • Lio gets a big reaction when it’s his turn on “Story Sharing Day.”
  • Hagar The Horrible shows a couple with conflicting priorities.
  • Pearls Before Swine shows a possible reason why some writers become recluses.

(14) MS. MARVEL ASSESSMENT. An NPR roundup shows “Many Pakistanis dig the cultural nods on ‘Ms. Marvel’ but are mixed on casting”.

…”The portrayal of a Pakistani household is just right,” wrote Ozan Khan, a lifestyle editor for The Correspondent PK, a digital news organization in Pakistan, on Twitter. “Some references [are] very relatable.”

At home, Kamala’s father watches TV highlights of old cricket matches, a sport that people are fanatical about in Pakistan. Aunties (or as Kamala and Nakia call these nosy community women, “illumin-aunties” — because they see and know everything) gossip about family members and spy on their neighbors. And a cover of the 1966 Pakistani pop hit, “Ko Ko Korina” plays in the background while Kamala and her mom shop for her clothes and jewelry for her brother’s engagement in Jersey City’s South Asian markets.

Many Muslim Pakistanis love the religious touches on the show, too. “It’s the most positive representation of Pakistanis and Muslims out there right now,” wrote Zunaira Inam Khan, a Pakistani social media influencer, on Twitter.

…But our sampling of interviewees did voice criticisms. Some wish that more of the cast had Pakistani heritage. While many of the actors identify as Pakistani (Iman Vellani, the actor who plays Kamala, is Pakistani Canadian, while Nimra Bucha, Samina Ahmed, Mehwish Hayat are regulars in Pakistani TV and film) — the actors who play Kamala’s parents, Zenobia Shroff and Mohan Kapur, are Indian.

Shroff and Kapur “don’t seem like Pakistani parents, quite honestly. And the fact that they are Indian actors is indicative of that,” says Rehman.

“When Shroff spoke, I could hear inflections of a Mumbai accent. She didn’t sound like a Pakistani mother.”

Indian actors from the Bollywood industry dominate South Asian representation in TV and film, wrote @ShabanaMir1 on Twitter. So why did the parents have to be played by Indian actors? “[Disney+], we have a ton of great Pakistani actors,” she tweeted.

(15) DC, THE NEXT GENERATION. DC dropped this trailer about the son of Superman and the son of Batman teaming up. “Batman and Superman: Battle of the Super Sons”.

(16) DREDD ARTIST. The Guardian looks at the “Dredd zone: the anarchic world of comic-book artist Steve Dillon”.

…Dillon’s adopted home town of Luton is currently running an exhibition at the Hat House’s Basement Gallery, featuring work from the artist’s early days through to his illustrations for the satirical dystopian lawman Judge Dredd from British weekly comic 2000AD. There are also pages from Preacher and Warrior, the magazine that launched the careers of a number of British comics luminaries in the 1980s.

“Steve has a special place in this town,” says Samuel Javid, creative director at the Culture Trust Luton. “We have roads called Preacher Close and Cassidy Close, some of his ashes are buried here, and his local pub has a picture of him behind the bar, sticking his middle finger up … ”

Ennis, who also collaborated with Dillon on Judge Dredd and Marvel’s gun-toting antihero the Punisher, first got to know the artist in the early 90s. “I recall sitting up with him one night in the spring of 1990, long after everyone else had crashed, and killing off a bottle of Jameson while we talked about what we thought we could do in comics,” Ennis says. “There was an almost audible click as we realised we’d make a good creative partnership. Each of us simply trusted the other to do the job. I didn’t ask him for the impossible – no 10-panel action-packed pages loaded with dialogue – and he turned in perfect storytelling every time.”…

(17) LIVE LONG AND MODEL. Gigi and Bella Hadid have become Vulcans. Photos at the link: “Gigi and Bella Hadid stun runway with partially ‘shaved’ heads” at CNN Style.

Supermodels Gigi and Bella Hadid debuted bold new looks Monday, storming a New York runway with bleached eyebrows, short bangs and — what appeared to be — half-shaved heads.

But the sisters’ dramatic transformation was soon revealed to be the work of prosthetics artists, who had altered their appearance with the help of bald caps, wigs and makeup.

(18) YE KEN NOW. NME is agog: “Ryan Gosling wore a Ncuti Gatwa ‘Doctor Who’ t-shirt on ‘Barbie’ set”. And Russell T Davies joked that he’s going to sue the actor over the “illegal” merchandise.

Ryan Gosling has been pictured wearing a t-shirt depicting actor Ncuti Gatwa as Doctor Who while filming on the set of Barbie.

Gatwa, who stars alongside Gosling in director Greta Gerwig’s upcoming film, shared the picture of the t-shirt (designed by fan Matthew Purchase) on Instagram….

(19) AIN’T THIS THE PITS. La Brea creator and showrunner David Appelbaum discusses the “La Brea Season 2 teaser trailer” with SYFY Wire.

“This season will still largely take place in 10,000 BC. However, we will no longer be telling a concurrent story in modern-day Los Angeles. Instead, we will be telling a story in 1988 Los Angeles,” Appelbaum continued. “We think this will add a new layer of fun and intrigue to the episodes. It’s also a story I don’t think anyone in the audience would have expected when they first started watching the show. We love the idea of keeping our viewers on their toes and never knowing what’s around the next corner.”

The summary that accompanies the trailer says:

La Brea follows an epic family adventure after a massive sinkhole opens in Los Angeles pulling people and buildings into a mysterious and dangerous primeval land where they have no choice but to band together to survive. In season two, the Harris family remains separated as Eve is reeling from her son, Josh, having mistakenly gone through a portal to 1988. What she doesn’t know yet is that her ex-husband, Gavin, and their daughter, Izzy, have landed in prehistoric Seattle and now must brave the elements and animals to make their way to L.A.

(20) VIDEO OF THE DAY. [Item by Martin Morse Wooster.] Ryan George, in the spoiler-packed “Obi-Wan Kenobi Pitch Meeting,” has the producer ask the writer if he has “Star Wars milk…so we can milk the franchise we’ve spent billions of dollars on.”  The writer says that Obi-Wan has lost his powers but all he has to do is “think about stuff” and he becomes a Jedi master.  The writer also explains that there’s a really logical place in this series for Obi-Wan to kill Darth Vader but doesn’t “because it’s a contract thing.  Vader has to be in all the other movies.”

[Thanks to Chris Barkley, Andrew Porter, Michael Toman, Daniel Dern, rcade, Rich Horton, Steven French, Cat Eldridge, Mike Kennedy, Martin Morse Wooster, JJ, and John King Tarpinian for some of these stories. Title credit belongs to File 770 contributing editor of the day Rob Thornton.]

29 thoughts on “Pixel Scroll 6/30/22 Pixel Scroll Them From Orbit, It’s The Only Way To Be Sure

  1. (12) Vincent D’Onofrio was Kingpin in the very good Daredevil series (and he played a character mistaken for Thor in Adventures in Babysitting).

  2. Andrew (not Werdna) says Vincent D’Onofrio was Kingpin in the very good Daredevil series (and he played a character mistaken for Thor in Adventures in Babysitting).

    Sigh. You do know how much those videos bleed together in me brain after awhile? I’ll have Mike fix it.

    It’s too late in the day for coffee so that means I obviously need dark chocolate. Preferably Trader Joe’s dark chocolate peanut butter cups. So I’m off to the kitchen now.

  3. Thanks for the title credit!

    BTW, Paul Williams was not just PKD’s literary executor and biographer. He created legendary 60s music magazine Crawdaddy and helped invent the “popular music critic.”

  4. Andrew (not Werdna) on June 30, 2022 at 6:15 pm said:

    (12) Vincent D’Onofrio was Kingpin in the very good Daredevil series (and he played a character mistaken for Thor in Adventures in Babysitting).

    He also reprised the role of Kingpin in Hawkeye.

  5. Rob Thornton: Definitely! That’s why I made a point to mention Paul Williams. Thanks for drilling down to the deeper level!

  6. The reason I dropped from the FB group Concellation is that it was overrun with franchise fans, not real fans who cover all of sf&f. And before you attack, let me say that I literally saw a post from some poor person asking if people would attack them if they “jumped fandoms”.
    Given the apartments overfull of books of my parents, my library is in order. For example, the sf&f is: 1. collections by the editor; 2. books by a single author, and 3. the Ace doubles by the author of the blue side.

  7. mark: It’s been too long since I owned some Ace Doubles. Was the blue side like the A side of a 45 record, or did you just decide that for consistency?

  8. Crawdaddy has just been brought from, err, the dead. The New York Post has all the details here. JJ Kramer, the son of of the late Barry Kramer who founded it, is they individual behind the relaunch.

  9. Exhausted.

    Please send sleep and soft pillows (no chicken feathers, please. Goose feathers okay.)

    Reading some de Lint.

  10. Vincent D’Onofrio also played Robert Howard in the quite good “The Whole Wide World” with Renée Zellweger.

  11. (2)
    Hmm, I have some of those people in my very-much-extended family. (It’s on the computer. Heck, it’s why I got a computer in the first place. Once you hit three or four hundred people, you need one.)

  12. @Mike – the binding had either red and blue – one for each side, or white and blue… but they all hat a blue. So, got to organize somehow.

    Why, yes, I was a library page twice before I started working professionally, why do you ask?

  13. Oh, and for those who never read the Flying Saucerers, the God of Winds on the planet was… Moskwitz.

  14. (12) Though very few people saw Emerald City, I rather liked it in general and D’Onofrio’s work as The Great and Powerful Oz. Well, they called the character The Wizard.

  15. (12) The first Vincent D’Onofrio role in an SF film that comes to mind for me was Carl Stargher in The Cell. He was really scary!

  16. @Mark. Yeah, I wrote an editorial on that subject, essentially finding this relatively new practice of dividing Fandom into discrete “Fandoms” to be divisive, historically inaccurate and strictly from marketing influences: they’d much rather stick individual fans into a pigeonhole and feed them the same regurgitated pap over and over, rather than encouraging the removal of boundaries and the chaos of self-discovery.

    “There are no “Fandoms”, there is only “Fandom”. Involvement is not a zero sum game that requires you to give up one franchise in favor of another, it is entirely possible to engage with both, and as many others as one wishes. We’re supposed to be about embracing the “new”, of seeking it out, even. Definitions must be open-ended or they do not serve us well. If what we espouse is diversity and inclusiveness, why do we seem so hell bent on erecting barricades?

    As one famous character from a story that is a perfect exemplar of what is being discussed here once wrote in real life “A house divided can not stand.”

    9) My sorting scheme is

    I. Genre (SF/F/H)
    A. Genre Non-Fiction
    1. Hardback
    a. Alphabetical by Author
    i. Alphabetical by Title
    (A). Sequential by Series
    2. Paperback
    a. Alphabetical by Author
    i. Alphabetical by Title
    (A). Sequential by Series
    3. Over-Sized
    a. Alphabetical by Author
    i. Alphabetical by Title
    (A). Sequential by Series
    B. Genre Fiction
    1. Hardback
    a. Alphabetical by Author
    i. Alphabetical by Title
    (A). Sequential by Series
    2. Paperback
    a. Alphabetical by Author
    i. Alphabetical by Title
    (A). Sequential by Series
    3. Over-Sized
    a. Alphabetical by Author
    i. Alphabetical by Title
    (A). Sequential by Series
    II. Non-Genre
    A. Non-Genre Non-Fiction
    1. Hardback
    a. Alphabetical By Subject
    i. Alphabetical by Author
    (A). Alphabetical by Title
    (I). Sequential by Series
    2. Paperback
    a. Alphabetical By Subject
    i. Alphabetical by Author
    (A). Alphabetical by Title
    (I). Sequential by Series
    3. Over-Sized
    a. Alphabetical By Subject
    i. Alphabetical by Author
    (A). Alphabetical by Title
    (I). Sequential by Series
    B. Non-Genre Fiction
    1. Hardback
    a. Alphabetical By Subject
    i. Alphabetical by Author
    (A). Alphabetical by Title
    (I). Sequential by Series
    2. Paperback
    a. Alphabetical By Subject
    i. Alphabetical by Author
    (A). Alphabetical by Title
    (I). Sequential by Series
    3. Over-Sized
    a. Alphabetical By Subject
    i. Alphabetical by Author
    (A). Alphabetical by Title
    (I). Sequential by Series

  17. Six Degrees of Pixel Scroll: Birthday boy Vincent D’Onofrio did several voices for the Men in Black animated series: Edwin Bug, Dune Bug, Moe Bug, Geen Bug, and Moffat. Haven’t seen them but all those bugs gotta be connected to Edgar, his role in the Men in Black movie.

  18. My sorting scheme is the stuff on top of the stacks are books I bought more recently.

  19. rcade says Six Degrees of Pixel Scroll: Birthday boy Vincent D’Onofrio did several voices for the Men in Black animated series: Edwin Bug, Dune Bug, Moe Bug, Geen Bug, and Moffat. Haven’t seen them but all those bugs gotta be connected to Edgar, his role in the Men in Black movie.

    They’re all related to the original Bug played by him so it’s natural that he voices all of them. He is Edgar the Bug’s identical twin brother, serving as the main antagonist of “The Big Bad Bug Syndrome” episode.

    Though I didn’t touch upon it in my essay, the Bugs are advanced alien inteeligence and we get to see their ships and a fair amount of their civilisation in the series.

  20. To say she [Jeri Taylor] was a scriptwriter is a bit of an understatement — she wrote one hundred and sixty-eight of the Voyager episodes, all but four that aired.

    I’ve not dug out recordings, but how sure are you of this remarkable achievement? Wikipedia does not support this. By my count she is credited 14 times, mainly in the first three seasons. Which is still not to be sneezed at, but is not a JMS style single writers vision as suggested.

  21. Paul Williams has many other notable achievements in his s-f fan/pro career. In addition to being the literary executor for Phil Dick, he played the same role for Theodore Sturgeon, editing the multi-volume Complete Stories of Theodore Sturgeon.

    Paul got into s-f fandom at age 14 after meeting and visiting with David Hartwell at Harvard. He then proceeded to publish a fanzine called Within that was widely acclaimed in fanzine fandom. He was also famous as a rock critic after publishing Crawdaddy. Outlaw Blues (https://www.abebooks.com/book-search/title/outlaw-blues/author/williams-paul/) is a collection of his critical essays on various rock groups including the Byrds and the Beach Boys. And he was a columnist for Rolling Stone.

    In the 1990s, he continued his exploration of Phil Dick with The Philip K. Dick Society Newsletter, a fanzine that provided details about Dick’s 20 or so unpublished literary novels — among other things.

    He was fascinated by Bob Dylan (writing several books about Dylan’s music) and John Lennon (you can see him singing along in the background on Lennon’s famous “Give Peace A Chance” video).

  22. I had to dig a bit to confirm that Paul Williams =/= Paul O. Williams.

  23. I had to dig a bit to confirm that Paul Williams =/= Paul O. Williams.

    Nor is he the Paul Williams who was a minor rock star, appearing in Brian De Palma’s “The Phantom of the Paradise.”

  24. Nichpheas says I’ve not dug out recordings, but how sure are you of this remarkable achievement? Wikipedia does not support this. By my count she is credited 14 times, mainly in the first three seasons. Which is still not to be sneezed at, but is not a JMS style single writers vision as suggested.

    No, you’re right, the way lists is damn confusing. My bad. I pulled up writing credits and that’s what they showed, but that’s now what they meant.

  25. Late addition but the first genre role I saw Vincent D’Onofrio in was “Blood of Heroes” a surprisingly entertaining sports movie set in a dystopia starring Rutger Hauer and Joan Chen.

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