Pixel Scroll 2/20/16 It’s Like My Body’s Developed This Massive Pixel Deficiency

(1) CROTCHETY GOES TO TOWN. Amazing Stories’ Steve Davidson gets his Boskone report off to a fast start with a post about Day 1.

I’m at Boskone this weekend, hanging out with the fans, loquaciously displaying my intimate knowledge of arcana  on several panels and availing myself of various perks offered by this long-running (53rd year) convention that was launched as a bid for the 1967 Worldcon.

It’s operated by the New England Science Fiction Association (NESFA), one of the longest running fan clubs in the country.

One of the things NESFA does is clear out their library and make the clearances available on a freebie table.  Last year, someone snagged a bunch of large-size Analogs out from under my reaching hand (‘sigh’).  This year I was one of the first ‘gleaners’ to hit the table and was rewarded with:

several D series Ace Doubles; a good-sized stack of early Locus fanzines;  same for File 770; a handful of Groff Conklin paperback anthologies (filling in a couple of gaps.  The paperbacks are shortened versions of the hardback anthologies Conklin produced over the years.); a couple of Lee & Miller hardbacks; a NESFA anthology of Lester Del Rey shorts (edited by our own Steven H. Silver); the remaining issues of Galileo magazine that I didn’t have (complete run now!). (Galileo was a “semi-prozine” from back in the late 70s); a few issues of Infinity digest magazine, and a smattering of this and that interesting looking items.

I’m thinking a loquacious displayer would be a great subject for an Audobon drawing.

(2) HARTWELL REMEMBERED. Boskone ran a David Hartwell memorial panel.

(3) THE NEW WAY TO BE HAPPY. Authors shared their excitement over the Nebula Award announcement.

(4) WOULDN’T YOU LIKE TO PWN IT TOO? David Brin leads off “Science Fiction and Freedom” with  this book deal —

While in San Francisco for a panel on artificial consciousness, I had an opportunity to stop by the headquarters of the Electronic Frontier Foundation — dedicated to preserving your freedom online and off.  As part of their 25th year anniversary celebration, EFF released Pwning Tomorrow, an anthology of science fiction stories by Bruce Sterling, Ramaz Naam, Charlie Jane Anders, Cory Doctorow, David Brin, Lauren Beukes, and others. You can download it for a donation to this worthy organization.

(5) TODAY IN HISTORY

UPI-Almanac-for-Saturday-Feb-20-2016

  • February 20, 1962 — A camera onboard the “Friendship 7” Mercury spacecraft photographs astronaut John H. Glenn Jr. during the Mercury-Atlas 6 space flight.

(6) TODAY’S BIRTHDAY BOY

  • Born February 20, 1926 – Richard Matheson

Matheson

(7) MUSICAL MISSION. In San Diego on March 31, the Star Trek: The Ultimate Voyage 50th Anniversary Concert will be performed by a symphony orchestra.

Star Trek: The Ultimate Voyage brings five decades of Star Trek to concert halls for the first time in this galaxy or any other.

This lavish production includes an impressive live symphony orchestra and international solo instruments. People of all ages and backgrounds will experience the franchise’s groundbreaking and wildly popular musical achievements while the most iconic Star Trek film and TV footage is simultaneously beamed in high definition to a 40-foot wide screen.

The concert will feature some of the greatest music written for the franchise including music from Star Trek: The Original Series, Star Trek: The Motion Picture, Star Trek II: The Wrath of Khan, Star Trek IV: The Voyage Home, Star Trek: Insurrection, Star Trek: The Next Generation, Star Trek: Deep Space Nine, Star Trek: Voyager, Starfleet Academy and much more. This never-before-seen concert event is perfect for music lovers, filmgoers, science-fiction fans and anyone looking for an exciting and unique concert experience.

(8) PERCEPTIONS ABOUT DISABILITY. At The Bias, Annalee Flower Horne covers a lot of ground in “The Geeks Guide To Disability”.

I want the science fiction community to be inclusive and accessible to disabled people. I want our conventions and corners of the internet to be places where disabled people are treated with dignity and respect. I’m hoping that if I walk through some of the more common misconceptions, I can move the needle a little–or at least save myself some time in the future, because I’ll be able to give people a link instead of explaining all this again.

What is Disability?

This may seem like starting from first principles, but a lot of the misconceptions I’ve encountered within the science fiction community have been rooted in a poorly thought-out model of what the term ‘disability’ means….

(9) THE “TO BE HEARD” PILE. Escape Pod has done a metacast about the stories they ran that are eligible for the Hugos.

(10) LONG FORM EDITOR. George R.R. Martin, in “What They Edited, The Third”, posts an impressive resume from Joe Monti of Saga Press, the new science fiction imprint of Simon & Schuster/ Pocket Books.

(11) PRIVATE LABEL. From the Worldcon in the city where everything’s up to date….

(12) FINNISH SNACKS. Things are up to date in Helsinki, too, but there’s a reason you don’t see reindeer roaming the streets….

(13) AND SPEAKING OF EATING. Scott Edelman says a second episode of his podcast Eating the Fantastic has gone live, with guest Bud Sparhawk.

Bud Sparhawk

Bud Sparhawk

I chatted with Bud—a three-time Nebula finalist and Analog magazine regular—about how Harlan Ellison’s Dangerous Visions anthology inspired him to become a writer, what it was like to write for three different Analog editors over four decades, the plotters vs. pantsers debate, and more.

Edelman ends, “If all goes well, Episode 3 will feature writer, editor, and Rosarium Publishing owner Bill Campbell.”

[Thanks to John King Tarpinian, Rose Embolism, and Gerry Williams for some of these stories. Title credit goes to File 770 contributing editor of the day Soon Lee.]

158 thoughts on “Pixel Scroll 2/20/16 It’s Like My Body’s Developed This Massive Pixel Deficiency

  1. Yeah, time is really tight for them. I assume it was a bit of a last minute decision.
    They seem to be dealing with the eligibility issue by tying it strictly to being listed on the writertopia Campbell page.

  2. ETA: They’ve turfed the responsibility for determining eligibility onto the moderators at Writertopia. Oy. Based on what Blake said last year, Writertopia may end up very sorry about that.

    AETA: Ninja’ed.

  3. @Laura Resnick:

    And the story is even weirder when you get to the part where one of them had taken off her clothes the previous year, too… and now she’s a GUEST? She was ASKED BACK?

    Of all the mind-boggling things in Mr. Oshiro’s post, this was the quote that caused a brain reboot:

    I texted Keri O’Brien, the Vice Chair for the convention, and told her that Selina had taken off her pants again. (She had done so at ConQuesT 45.)

    …which actually says something considering this is after recounting his appalling treatment at the “Guest of Honor dinner”.

    (Guests of Honor should be seated at the Guest of Honor table. Clothing should not be optional at a panel unless clearly specified. There should be a process for (GoH!!!!!) complaints other than “ignore them and hope they go away”. This is one big bucket full of wrongity wrong wrong.)

  4. I think we should own what Mark went through.

    Maybe everyone ought to find the most obnoxious boxer shorts they can find and then wear them outside their pants as a demonstration of support.

    Then again….

    Not making light of it./ I’d not want to be anywhere near that kind of thing; would feel compelled to speak out (wondering why no one else did) and am sorry that the recounting took so long to become public as correction is best delivered immediately after the fact.

    My sympathies to Mark and his partner.

  5. About the 1941 Retro-Hugos:

    I uploaded the latest version of the 1941 novelette volume, with 50 of them in the thematic table of contents, 47 of which have been thoroughly proofread.

    Only the EPUB2 and Kindle version were updated.

    Below are some comments on the novelettes and following that some comments on the short stories. Keep in mind I am just some dude and not any kind of Authority on anything. My informal, unplanned ranking system goes All Right, OK, Good, Very Good, I’m Nominating This for Sure! If I say I liked or enjoyed something, that probably equates to Good or Very Good. If I don’t rate it, it has to at least be OK-Good or I wouldn’t have bothered to mention it. All Right=meh, not 0 stars.

    I still have to read 23 of the novelettes, but the one that really stands out so far is Howard Wandrei’s “The Black Farm.” It is very well-crafted and has a depth that most of the other stories from 1940 lack. In fact, I initially hated the story, since I could not understand why the characters were behaving so strangely. But once I figured out what the story was about, I was like, “Duh! I should have noticed that sooner.” At times, the style of “The Black Farm” seemed like a slightly choppy, less funny Raymond Chandler. The style, like every little thing in the story, serves the story. Every time I thought I had found some detail that was extraneous, after a moment’s consideration, I realized why it was there. I had never heard of Howard Wandrei before, but I’ll definitely read more by him once I finish proofreading the 1941 Retro-Hugo stuff.

    There are quite a few stories and novelettes that imitate Chandler to one degree or another. Either his first novel in 1939 was a big hit or a lot of the SF writers of the day had Black Mask and Dime Detective subscriptions and had read his short stories. “Sabotage on Mars” by Duclos is probably the most over-the-top example and enjoyable for that very reason.

    “The Invisible World” by Ed Earl Repp is the first story that fits my preconceived notion of what SF stories from 1940 were like. I think it is by far Repp’s best story, though I haven’t read “Martian Terror” yet. Unless there are a bunch of great novelettes in the 23 I haven’t read yet (which is possible, since I have read mostly the novelettes with fewer than 10,000 words and most of them feel like short stories that just dragged on a couple of thousand words too long), I’ll nominate it.

    Some other noteworthy novelettes:
    “Sea Born” by Hamilton. Guy not at home in this world seeks another.

    “Two for a Bargain” by Quick. Woman in colonial Massachusetts decides to become a Sith, I mean a witch. Very sad story.

    “White Mutiny” by Jameson. By the book resistance to new by the book captain, with MacGuyverized space battle from crashed space navy ship. I like Jameson and may nominate his short story, “Train for Flushing,” but it is not in these volumes.

    “Heart of Atlantan” by Dyalhis. Doomed priestess/princess from Atlantis. Hubris punished severely enough to keep a Greek playwright happy.

    “Oscar, Detective of Mars” by Norman. Magician pulls a Martian out of his hat and I don’t think it ever gets explained.

    “Blue Tropics” by Norman reminded me of “Martian Odyssey,” but with soldiers in the antarctic.

    “Exiles of the Three Red Moons” by Selwyn. Journalist purposely gets imprisoned on Pluto and the only person who can free him dies… But the travelogue part was good.

    “The Girl from Infinite Smallness” by Cummings. Travelogue to the microworld, but like way too many of the stories from 1940, everything is solved with a fist fight.

    “Space Double” by Schachner. I guess android dopplegangers have been around since at least 1940.

    Most of the 1940 SHORT STORIES were all right to good. Some were very good. Some I quite liked. I didn’t really care for the ghosts getting revenge stories, but only one story made me feel I had completely wasted my time by reading it, and that was because I found the story absolutely pointless and it was an “idiot plot” to boot. (I won’t name it.)

    Bedford-Jones. Can’t go wrong with him. “Outlawed” is my favorite, but it is a real stretch to call it SF or fantasy. The Shipman and Crews stories have kick-ass female protagonists. “Dance of Life” is good and the movie within the story is fantasy. Professional Corpse ones were my least favorite of his.

    Hannes Bok stories are surreal and kind of cool.

    It seems like the main narrator (the bachelor uncle) in Bousfield’s “Impossible Adventure” is about as openly gay as one could be in 1940. Another story with some depth to it.

    Bradbury’s are good. I really like “Flight of the Good Ship Clarissa,” but it is more of a shaggy-dog joke than a story.

    You can’t go wrong with Nelson Bond.

    Brackett’s “Stellar Legion” is brutal enough to be an episode of Metalocalypse.

    “The Reward” by Clancy seems very familiar. It must have been the basis for a Twilight Zone episode or something.

    Anything by Cummings is OK to pretty good. “When the Werewolf Howls” is my favorite of the short stories, but more horror, which I normally don’t care for, than SF. I find Cummings to be a much better stylist than whoever wrote his bio at SF Encyclopedia does. Almost all of his stories have a passage or two that flare beautifully across the page before sinking back into his normal style, which is slightly more formal than the invisible style of the average SF writer from 1940.

    The beginning of Gallun’s “Eyes That Watch” so much made me think of Sturgeon’s “The Man Who Lost the Sea,” that I began to think of it as an alternate reality sequel to that story which was published 20 years later. It also reminded me of Simak so much that I now see Simak and Gallun as obvious influences on Sturgeon. But I am not familiar enough with any of those writers to make that claim with any confidence.

    The two Hamilton stories are OK.

    “Tickets to Paradise” by James was well written and either an original or forgotten (or just unknown to me) take on some common tropes.

    I like Kaletsky and really enjoyed “Revolt of the Ants.” Based on the title, I was expecting mutant 20 foot ants like in a 1950s movie, but there were none. A better title might have been “Suffrage of the Ants.”

    Kuttner’s stories are consistently above average. “No Man’s World” is like “Ants of Flanders” by Robert Reed. “Pegasus” is different enough from the other 9 Kuttner short stories that I assume Moore helped write it, even though ISFDB doesn’t say so.

    I loved Moore’s “Song in a Minor Key.” The one story I will nominate for sure.

    “Space Flame” by Phillips really reads like Star Trek TNG episode.

    I liked “The Green Invasion” by Plimmer enough that I sought out other stuff by him only to discover he never published anything else. Same with Ruedinger’s “Wind in the Moonlight.”

    I’d never read anything by E. Hoffman Price before and was impressed with “Khosru’s Garden,” though I think the ending seems out of character and kind of spoils the story.

    Quick’s “Turn Over” is OK.

    I liked Howard Wandrei’s“The African Trick,” maybe because of the bizarre ending I still can’t sort out. Is it some myth I am unaware of, random weirdness, or the origin of us all?

    “The Girl in the Whirlpool” by Wilcox was all right, but the main character is so different it made it worth reading. He either has the driest sense of humor ever or is an example of a protagonist with a non-normative mentality. Sorry, can’t think of a better way to say that and google didn’t help.

    “Trouble in Avalon” by Williams seems like a Kuttner story. I preferred the imitation to the real thing.

    Wollheim’s “The Planet that Time Forgot” was structurally different from anything else from 1940 and may be the inspiration for Star Trek’s Prime Directive.

    Not in the collection, but “Tlön, Uqbar, Orbis Tertius” by Borges will be on my nominating ballot.

  6. Oh, and for anyone who like me is a victim of the dreaded “duplicate PIN” issue I just saw a promising update given to someone with the same issue

    @Paul_Cornell @LeeAHarris hey folks. The Hugo Admin team tells me they had a bug, which is fixed and your new PINS will be sent within 48hrs

    Fingers crossed. I know it’s a way off but I’d quite like to pencil a few things in.

    @JJ

    My ninja skills are fifth to none. Yeah, that’s probably a necessary pragmatic tactic for them given the time constraints but could well cause some last-minute chaos elsewhere. I’ll cross my fingers for them as it’s a worthy thing to attempt.

  7. Mark: Yeah, that’s probably a necessary pragmatic tactic for them given the time constraints but could well cause some last-minute chaos elsewhere. I’ll cross my fingers for them as it’s a worthy thing to attempt.

    I’m glad it’s being done, and I’ll read it if it comes out in time.

    I just hope that novice writers will behave themselves and not submit unless they really are eligible; otherwise it will be a nightmare for the Writertopia guys, given that verifying the TOC in any issue of all the Qualifying Markets would be a gargantuan task.

  8. von Dimpleheimer: I had never heard of Howard Wandrei before, but I’ll definitely read more by him once I finish proofreading the 1941 Retro-Hugo stuff.

    I learned about him when researching his brother Donald for something. Howard’s genre work was greatly overshadowed by that of Donald, who was a recipient of the World Fantasy Award for Life Achievement (which he refused to accept, for some reason, that might be an interesting story).

    Thanks for the tip on his story. I’ll make a point of getting at least that one read.

    And thanks for all your hard work gathering these works to make things much easier for nominators.

  9. Sure thing.

    It is (sad? funny? just the way things are?) that a guy who published 200 stories is so forgotten that even ISFDB only lists about 50 of them.

  10. Also part of the duplicate PIN problem. I’ve been really impressed by how helpful the people at MidAmeriCon II have been, particularly in how friendly and prompt they are in their responses to queries.

    @von Dimpleheimer, without your incredible work on the Retro works, I’d have declared defeat and left my ballot blank. Now, there’s a good chance that I’ll find a number of things to nominate, which is a happy thing.

    FINNISH SNACKS – One of my children is a really picky eater and while in Sweden last year, found reindeer heart to be delicious. Given the history of picky eating, I’ve been assuming reindeer must be the food of the gods.

  11. Eh, the Writertopia folks have been answering eligibility questions for months already, and I believe they check before they add anyone to the list on their site. Hopefully this collection won’t add too much to their burden in the short term.

  12. Kyra: My daughter raves about Rainbow Rowell. I’m going to read her three favorite Rowell books starting this week.

  13. von Dimpleheimer: It is (sad? funny? just the way things are?) that a guy who published 200 stories is so forgotten that even ISFDB only lists about 50 of them.

    It’s understandable, though. I imagine that ISFDB is missing a lot of the early stories. Given that serious tracking of them, with the aid of computers, would not have started ’til the 80s (more likely it started in the 90’s), at that point it was probably exceedingly difficult to have/get TOC for all of the issues of the different magazines going back 50 years.

    Now that there are official university SF collections which include Golden Age SF magazines, it’s possible that someone will engage in more thorough cataloguing.

    And it’s my understanding that a lot of the stories during that time were very formulaic and were churned out very quickly (I seem to remember hearing that all/most of the stories in one issue of a magazine were written by the same guy under 3 or 4 different names), and that most of them were very forgettable. I’m sure that contributes to the problem.

  14. I enjoy Rainbow Rowell’s books. Of her adult novels, I prefer Attachments to Landline, but that could just be personal preference. Eleanor and Park has what has to be the absolutely hottest hand-holding scene I’ve ever read. I realize that probably sounds ridiculous, but those who’ve read it know exactly what I’m talking about. 🙂

    Fangirl is great, too, and I enjoyed Carry On more than I expected to.

  15. > “I’m going to read her three favorite Rowell books starting this week.”

    Awesome. 🙂

    I think Eleanor & Park has been my favorite so far. I also quite liked Fangirl, and Carry On was definitely interesting and memorable.

    What are her favorites?

  16. Johan P:

    I’ve had “Hungry daughters …” on my Kindle for a while after someone recommended it here. After the Nebula announcement I finally got around to read it this morning. And by dog, it’s good.

    Agreed. This was the year I discovered feminist horror; I know I’m behind the curve compared to those who’ve been reading horror longer, but I found it quite exciting. (I did know of the likes of Käthe Koja before, but it hadn’t quite dawned on me that clearly feminist horror was athe thing.) At any rate, I think any year that produces stories like this one, “Little Men with Knives”, “And This Is the Song It Sings”, or “A Residence for Friendless Ladies” is a good one.

  17. @JJ, Yeah, I didn’t mean to imply ISFDB had dropped the ball, but that if even they, who are so thorough that they let us know how many times Heinlein sneezed whiled writing the first draft of “The Roads Must Roll,” don’t have all of H. Wandrei’s stories listed, then that is about as forgotten as can be. I don’t think I could have put together the volumes without ISFDB.

    In the 1940 magazines, many issues had two stories by one author and I think I came across a few with three stories by one author (probably John Russell Fearn and H. Bedford Jones.) Kuttner, Bond, Cummings, among others, all had multiple pseudonyms for this reason.

    @Cheryl S., I’m happy to contribute to a happy thing.

  18. Kyra: The three titles you named are her favorites, and the ones I will be reading. Small world!

  19. Guests of Honor should be seated at the Guest of Honor table.

    Well…in theory. In practice, some GoHs are more equal than others. Hell, I’ve been told straight out that the GoH dinner was only for the writer guest and not really FOR me, so I shouldn’t show up–and when I mentioned that incident on the blog, ages ago, I had people speak up who were fan/filk GoHs, who had horror stories about being told at cons not to eat the appetizers at the reception, because those were for the REAL GoHs.

    Which makes me see all different shades of red.

    There is something about denying food to people that is a javelin straight to my hindbrain–I can read about all manner of horrible incidents with detached sympathy, but violating the rules of hospitality is just…deep-seated HOW DARE YOU THIS IS NOT DONE. If the Devil came to dinner at the house, he’d leave the table too stuffed to do more than waddle. It’s…just…you don’t DO that.

    If I was a GoH and later found out con staff had been denying the filk guests food so I could eat, I would seriously have to fly to their home town and take them out to a three-course meal or I wouldn’t be able to live with myself. That particular food taboo is so deeply seated that I couldn’t get it out with dynamite.

  20. Mark on February 21, 2016 at 2:06 pm said:
    Oh, and for anyone who like me is a victim of the dreaded “duplicate PIN” issue I just saw a promising update given to someone with the same issue

    What’s this? The third set of pins going out? I never even got one, there’s no love for this sasquan member who should have nominating privileges. Guess I have to decide if digging through old emails for my sasquan info is worth adding to the hurt feelings.

  21. Driving up and down the freeway and at many stoplights today, I was endlessly amused at the thought of revving a Tesla. Every time I heard someone going vroom in their tiny car, every time I did NOT rev my Prius, hee. I often see a Tesla along that route, but didn’t today — that’s all it would have taken to be perfect. Thanks for making my commute better, Filers!

    I think it’s too bad we can’t nominate von Dimpleheimer for a Hugo for his sterling work in gathering the Retro-Hugo volumes. I hope he’s at least mentioned at the ceremony. Maybe an asterisk could be awarded?

    Also, I think, sadly, we may need a new rule: Panelists and audience must keep trousers on at all times (Skirts, kilts, sarongs, etc. also).

  22. lurkertype: Also, I think, sadly, we may need a new rule: Panelists and audience must keep trousers on at all times (Skirts, kilts, sarongs, etc. also).

    The idea that we would need to have a rule for that just… I don’t… even…

  23. Re eligibility: I was boggled to discover Aquaduct Press does not make the cut, so Sarah Tolmie cannot be considered for the Campbell. More oddly, when checking the SFWA qualifying market list I saw Meisha Merlin still qualifies.

  24. RedWombat: I’ve been told straight out that the GoH dinner was only for the writer guest and not really FOR me, so I shouldn’t show up – and when I mentioned that incident on the blog, ages ago, I had people speak up who were fan/filk GoHs, who had horror stories about being told at cons not to eat the appetizers at the reception, because those were for the REAL GoHs. Which makes me see all different shades of red.

    Oh, wow. This just makes me so angry I can’t see straight.

    If a con cannot afford to treat a Guest of Honor with full hospitality, then they should not have a Guest of Honor. If this means that they look like a totally lameass convention because they have only an Author Guest of Honor, and no Artist or Fan or Filk Guests of Honor, well, they’ll just have to look like a lameass convention.

    Or if they want to have all those Guests of Honor, then they need to budget for FULL hospitality for all of them.

    Wow… what a concept… actually budgeting for required expenses.

  25. @Kendall Woah, check out next year’s ConQuest Guest of Honor list.

    Yeah I looked over the list and wondered if they’ll have a few GoH cancelling. I also noticed the concom isn’t listed anywhere on the site. Well I couldn’t find it. I even tried Google search. All I could find was a list to the board of the nonprofit which oversees the con. Out of 6 board members 4 are on MidAmerica ll concom.

    @RedWombat Well…in theory. In practice, some GoHs are more equal than others. Hell, I’ve been told straight out that the GoH dinner was only for the writer guest and not really FOR me

    I’d be ticked off if I found out cons I support were behaving this way. It’s wrong.

    @JJ Or if they want to have all those Guests of Honor, then they need to budget for FULL hospitality for all of them. Wow… what a concept… actually budgeting for required expenses.

    This.

  26. I can’t speak for any other convention, and every convention has its own way of doing things, but Windycon doesn’t have one Guest of Honor table at the banquet; at least in the last several years (which is all I can speak to from personal experience) they deliberately have the guests spaced out as evenly as possible amongst ALL the tables so that every table has at least one guest, and the conrunners are guaranteed to be seated with somebody interesting. And people (guests and conrunners both) are encouraged to mix and mingle. So there is (I hope and trust) no back-of-the-room to be consigned to. (Ursula, I truly hope that when you were a GoH at a recent Windycon you felt welcomed; I was the middle-aged woman with long brown hair who shamelessly fangirled at you at the banquet…)

    The thought of consigning one GoH and his guest to the Outer Darkness just makes my head hurt. Who would do that? And WHY? That’s just so, so wrong I can’t honestly comprehend it. As several folks said upthread, that profoundly violates every rule of hospitality. If you’re a Guest, we should *want* you there. We want you to have a good time. We want to see you and talk to you and hear you speak. We want you to leave with a good feeling about our convention. Why else would we have invited you?

  27. By the by – is it just me, or has the File 770 header image become a steampunk con photo for everybody?

  28. In practice, some GoHs are more equal than others.

    That gets a ‘WTF??’ reaction from me.
    If you-the-con are going to have more than one GoH, then recognize all of them with the same privileges. Don’t give some of them ‘second-class guest’ status, because that’s going to get you a rep down the road that you won’t enjoy.

  29. @Tasha Turner: I was thinking that some of those people may not wait 9 months if something goes awry. They may speak up loud and clear at-con, on-twitter, and in-blog as things happen.

    @Various: A con that can’t treat its Guests of Honor as such, and/or can’t afford them, should call them Special Guests or something else, or just admit they can’t handle more than a certain # of GoHs. A con I went to for years had a semi-permanent Special Guest, but clearly not one of their Guests of Honor (I don’t know what they did for her, other than the title; I think they paid some stuff; this con had no banquet BTW). I’ve seen this phrase used elsewhere, too, to denote someone above the regular guest level, but not a full GoH – this seems fair as it sets expectations (which of course also should be set when inviting the guest!).

    It sounds like the problem at ConQuesT was how they treated the guests – not affording them. Someone commented on Mark’s Facebook page about cons (specifically ConQuesT or not? I forget) not treating Fan GoHs like other GoHs. Opinions vary on whether to have a Fan GoH, and many cons don’t, but if you call someone a GoH . . . treat them like it, with all the same RESPECT and perks you provide the other GoHs!

  30. Is that John Chu I see in the reindeer pate photo? *waves madly*

    Mike G., thank you for the signal boost (giving it its own thread) on Mark O.’s horrendous experience and ConQuesT’s appalling failure to give a fuck about it. Knowing that there is significant overlap between that con’s committee and that of MidAmeriCon II makes me feel less urgent about finding out whether I can feasibly attend. 🙁

    Honestly, the fact that Rosen took her pants off bothers me less than that she proceeded to physically and sexually assault Oshiro under the panel table. The latter strikes me as the much bigger offense, but it’s the “bare” fact of the pants-removal that seems to get all the commentary.

    And if I never hear again something along the lines of “You need to know he’s a nice guy despite how very un-nice he was to you! And you’re not allowed to opt-out of this so-called apology!!!” I’d consider that a rare and wondrous gift. All together now: You may owe an apology, but the harmed party doesn’t owe you their attention, and the harmed party certainly doesn’t owe you their agreement that the person who harmed them is actually “nice.” ARGH.

  31. @Cassy B- No, WindyCon was great! Not any kind of issue!

    Honestly, I’ve only had that level of Total Snub the once personally–it’s other people who’ve filled me in on the regrettable Hierarchy of GoH, which seems to go Author-Artist-Comic-Fan-Filk or thereabouts. Being Artist/Comic, I…may get snubbed less than others, which is a depressing thought.

    I don’t know if the budget is even the main issue. Maybe it is, but I mean, I think we’ve all had the experience of the con who has very little money but is trying very hard, and you get the ride in with the barefoot guy in the ancient Civic and a couple of the panel rooms are just hotel rooms with the furniture yanked out. And I don’t mind that at all–they’re trying super hard and they’re usually lovely, and if the GoH dinner is served in the con suite on paper plates with somebody trying desperately to keep your plastic cup filled, that’s FINE. We’re all in this together.

    It’s when people make it clear that we’re NOT all in this together that it gets really unpleasant.

    I don’t expect luxury, just that people be glad to see me…

  32. @Nicole J. LeBoeuf-Little Is that John Chu I see in the reindeer pate photo? *waves madly*

    Looks like it to me. I got to have lunch with him once because I was tagging along with Crystal Huff. I had a great time talking with him. One of the topics we talked about was the all Asians look alike problem he has at many cons where he’s asked to autograph other people’s books.

  33. In case anyone is not caught up to the dedicated thread:

    From a message to MidAmeriCon 2 staff, with permission to make the info public: “The Chairs announce that Kristina Hiner [last year’s ConQuesT Chair] has resigned from MidAmeriCon II staff. Her contributions have been greatly valued and we wish her all the best in her future endeavors.” (Thanks to Tom Galloway for asking for and getting the permission.)

  34. @Hampus
    I will be at PenguiCon in April, where Ann Leckie is GoH. If you want signed books, we can work something out… Happy to stand in line for you and ship them, even to Sweden!

    Also, both Leckie and Catherynne M. Valente will be at PenguiCon. If you can make it to SE Michigan this spring, it should be worth your while! Err, also you could see the bad movie award show that Kevin Hogan and I work on, The Smithee Awards. If laughing at terruble B movies is your thing.

    https://2016.penguicon.org

  35. RedWombat:

    Good news! They have masks in the town I am also. Haven’t found Mask of Demon of Parasitic Worms yet, but there are several other disease demons. Also, searched the internet and found some kind of list of existing demons:

    1. Deva Sanniya – causes measles, mumps, small pox, typhoid fever and cholera.
    2. Vata Sanniya – causes diseases caused by air in the body, also paralyses.
    3. Pith Sanniya – causes diseases of the bile.
    4. Amukku Sanniya – causes stomach pain vomiting.
    5. Naga Sanniya – the vision of the demon causes poison like cobra poison in the body blister, swellings.
    6. Ginijala Sanniya – causes heat similar to fire in the body and burning sensation.
    7. Selesma Sanniya – causes headache, overproduction.
    8. Kapala Sanniya- causes phlegm, cough, sneezing.
    9. Maru Sanniya – causes the fear of the death, also death.
    10. Kadawata Sanniya – is trying to break down the barriers which separate him from the patient.
    11. Kora Sanniya – causes lame limbs, swollen joints.
    12. Buhutu Sanniya – causes temporary madness.
    13. Kana Sanniya – causes temporary blindness.
    14. Jala Sanniya – causes unbearable cold and shivering.
    15. Bihiri Sanniya – causes temporary deafness.
    16. Golu Sanniya – causes temporary dumbness.
    17. Vevulum Sanniya – causes shivering and fits.
    18. Gedi Sanniya – causes Furuncles.

    It is a bit confusing as everyone agrees on there being 18 demons, but can’t decide on which ones. The Parasitic Worm-one is called Bihiri Sanniya. I’ll see which one of these I can find. They had a few ugly ones I saw this evening, so I will pick one of those.

  36. LunarG:

    I used to be quite a follower of bad movies when I was younger, bought the encyclopedias of The Golden Turkey Award and The Encyclopedia of Psychotronic Films. This is absolutely my thing and I quite often organize movie nights where I try to pick some really weird stuff.

    Sorry to say, I’m stuck at work in April. Thank you for your offer, but I’ll see if she’s at MidAmericon2 first.

  37. It’s six per category, but ties are common (unsurprisingly when the nominating body is quite small).

  38. @Hampus –

    Okey-doke. Let me know if you ever want to talk bad movies; always glad to hear about other people’s favorites!

  39. @Tasha Turner:

    Looks like it to me. I got to have lunch with him once because I was tagging along with Crystal Huff. I had a great time talking with him.

    He is among the awesomest of peeps. We were at Viable Paradise in the same year. I haven’t had a chance to say hi since ChiCon7 though.

    One of the topics we talked about was the all Asians look alike problem he has at many cons where he’s asked to autograph other people’s books.

    *facepalm* That has got to be so many levels of painful.

  40. @Hampus Eckermann:

    We used to have a big collection of cheesy movie books. Then one day I thought, “Man, these are meanspirited” and sold off most of them. We still have a few books, like Roger Ebert’s hilarious “I Hated Hated hated This Movie”.

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