2017 Audiobook of the Year Audie Award Finalists

The Audio Publishers Association announced the finalists for 2017 Audiobook of the Year, as well as for Excellence in Design, Excellence in Marketing, and Excellence in Production on March 22. These are in addition to the individual nominees posted in February.

Genre works are up for Audiobook of the Year and all three Excellence categories, including audiobooks of novels by Kameron Hurley, John Scalzi, and Colson Whitehead.

Audiobook of the Year

  • Boys in the Trees, written and narrated by Carly Simon, published by Macmillan Audio
  • The Girl with the Lower Back Tattoo, written and narrated by Amy Schumer, published by Simon & Schuster Audio
  • Hamilton: The Revolution, by Lin-Manuel Miranda and Jeremy McCarter, narrated by Mariska Hargitay, with the authors, published by Hachette Audio
  • The Underground Railroad, by Colson Whitehead, narrated by Bahni Turpin, published by Penguin Random House Audio / Books on Tape
  • Year of Yes, written and narrated by Shonda Rhimes, published by Simon & Schuster Audio

Excellence in Design

  • The Adventures of Tom Sawyer, by Mark Twain, design by David Drummond, published by Audible Studios
  • Alice’s Adventures in Wonderland, by Lewis Carroll, design by Levente Szabo, published by Audible Studios
  • Alien: Out of the Shadows: An Audible Original Drama, by Tim Lebbon and Dirk Maggs, design by James Jackson, published by Audible Studios
  • Geek Feminist Revolution, by Kameron Hurley, design by Jessica Daigle, published by HighBridge/Recorded Books
  • Grimm’s Fairy Talesby the Brothers Grimm, design by Divya Srinivasan, published by Listening Library

Excellence in Marketing

  • Alien: Out of the Shadows: An Audible Original Drama, by Tim Lebbon and Dirk Maggs, narrated by Rutger Hauer, Corey Johnson, Matthew Lewis, Kathryn Drysdale, Laurel Lefkow, Andrea Deck, and Mac McDonald, published by Audible Studios
  • Battlefield Earth: A Saga of the Year 3000, by L. Ron Hubbard, narrated by Josh Clark, Scott Menville, Jim Meskimen, Phil Proctor, Stefan Rudnicki, Fred Tatasciore and a full cast, published by Galaxy Audio
  • Bob Honey Who Just Do Stuff, by Pappy Pariah, narrated by Sean Penn, published by Audible Studios
  • The Dispatcher, by John Scalzi, narrated by Zachary Quinto, published by Audible Studios
  • Hamilton: The Revolution, by Lin-Manuel Miranda and Jeremy McCarter, narrated by Mariska Hargitay, with the authors, published by Hachette Audio

Excellence in Production

  • Alien: Out of the Shadows: An Audible Original Drama, by Tim Lebbon and Dirk Maggs, narrated by Rutger Hauer, Corey Johnson, Matthew Lewis, Kathryn Drysdale, Laurel Lefkow, Andrea Deck, and Mac McDonald, published by Audible Studios
  • Battlefield Earth: A Saga of the Year 3000, by L. Ron Hubbard, narrated by Josh Clark, Scott Menville, Jim Meskimen, Phil Proctor, Stefan Rudnicki, Fred Tatasciore, and a full cast, published by Galaxy Audio
  • Beric the Briton, by G.A. Henty. narrated by Brian Blessed, Brian Cox, Tom Baker, Honeysuckle Weeks, John Rhys-Davies, and a full cast, published by Heirloom Audio Productions
  • The Oedipus Plays: An Audible Original Drama, by Sophocles, narrated by Jamie Glover, Hayley Atwell, Michael Maloney, Samantha Bond, Julian Glover and David Horovitch, published by Audible Studios
  • The Secret History of Twin Peaks, by Mark Frost, narrated by a full cast, published by Macmillan Audio
  • A Wild Swan, by Michael Cunningham, narrated by Lili Taylor and Billy Hough, published by Macmillan Audio

2016 Australian Shadows Awards Shortlist

The Australian Horror Writers Association announced the finalists for the  2016 Australian Shadows Awards on March 19. The Shadows celebrate the finest in horror and dark fiction published by an Australian or New Zealander.

Best Short Fiction (Up to 7,500 words)

  • PROTEGE, BY ANTHONY FERGUSON (In ‘Monsters Among Us’ – Oscillate Wildly Press)
  • SELFIE, BY LEE MURRAY (In ‘SQ Magazine’ – IFWG Publishing)
  • D IS FOR DEATH, BY PETE ALDIN (In ‘Poise and Pen’)
  • WHAT THE SEA WANTS, BY DEB SHELDON (In ‘SQ Magazine’ – IFWG Publishing)
  • ALL ROLL OVER, BY KAARON WARREN (In ‘In Your Face’ – Fablecroft Publishing)
  • FADE TO GREY, BY JANEEN WEBB (In ‘Dreaming in the Dark’ – PS Publishing)
  • MIDNIGHT IN THE GRAFFITI TUNNEL, BY TERRY DOWLING (In ‘Dreaming in the Dark’ – PS Publishing)
  • UNCONTAINABLE, BY HELEN STUBBS (In ‘Apex Magazine’ online)
  • NO OTHER MEN IN MITCHELL, BY ROSE HARTLEY (In ‘Nightmare Magazine’ online)

Best Collected Works (3 or more short stories by a single author)

  • CROW SHINE BY ALAN BAXTER (Ticonderoga Publications)
  • EVERYTHING IS FINE BY GRANT STONE (Racket House)
  • CONCENTRATION BY JACK DANN (PS Publishing)

Best Edited Work (3 or more short stories by two (2) or more authors; edited by one or more editors:)

  • DEAD OF NIGHT, EDITED BY SHANE JIRAIYA CUMMINGS (Published by AHWA)
  • DREAMING IN THE DARK, EDITED BY JACK DANN (PS PUBLISHING)
  • AT THE EDGE, EDITED BY DAN RABARTS & LEE MURRAY (PAPER ROAD PRESS)

Best Novel (At least 40,000 words)

  • INTO THE MIST, BY LEE MURRAY (Cohesion Press)
  • THE DEVIL’S PRAYER, BY LUKE GRACIAS (Australian eBook Publisher)
  • UNBIDDEN, BY TJ PARK (Harper Collins)
  • HOLLOW HOUSE, BY GREG CHAPMAN (Omnium Gatherum)
  • PRESUMED DEAD, BY RICK KENNETT (Createspace Independent Publishing Platform)
  • DEVIL DRAGON, BY DEBORAH SHELDON (Severed Press)
  • THE GRIEF HOLE, BY KAARON WARREN (IFWG Publishing)

Paul Haines Award For Long Fiction (Between 7,501 to 39,999 words)

  • TIPUNA TAPU, BY DAN RABARTS (Clandestine Press)
  • BOX OF BONES, BY JEREMY BATES (Ghillinnein Books)
  • BURNT SUGAR, BY KIRSTYN MCDERMOTT (In ‘Dreaming in the Dark’ – PS Publishing)
  • THE HEART OF THE MISSION, BY MATTHEW R DAVIS (Oz Horror Con)
  • THE ESCHATOLOGIST, BY GREG CHAPMAN (Voodoo Press)
  • SERVED COLD, BY ALAN BAXTER (In ‘Dreaming in the Dark’ – PS Publishing)

Due to insufficient entries, the 2016 awards dropped the Comics/Graphic Novels category and The Rocky Wood Award for Non-Fiction and Criticism.

The Shadows are a juried award. This year’s jurors are:

  • The Paul Haines Award For Long Fiction: William Cook, Brett McBean, Lee Pletzers
  • Edited Works: Dmetri Kakmi, Piper Medjia, Craig Hughes
  • Collected Works: Lee Murray, Michael Pryor, Tracie McBride
  • Short Fiction: David Hoenig, William Cook, Lucy A. Snyder, Silvia Brown
  • Comics/Graphic Novels: Gareth Macready, Lee Pletzers, Steve Herczeg
  • The Rocky Wood Award for Non-Fiction and Criticism: Piper Mejia, Maree Kimberley, David Kernot
  • Novels: Chris Pulo, Lee Pletzers, Steven Casey, Robert N Stevenson

Jim Fiscus to Receive Kevin O’Donnell, Jr. Service to SFWA Award

Jim Fiscus

Congratulations to Jim Fiscus, winner of the 2017 Kevin O’Donnell, Jr. Service to SFWA Award for his outstanding work on behalf of the organization.

Jim Fiscus’ long service to the Science Fiction and Fantasy Writers of America began when he volunteered to host hospitality events at Westercons in the early 1990s. Later he began writing a column for the SFWA Bulletin looking at the business and legal aspects of the publishing industry, including an explanation of the Tasini case, contracts which were hostile to writers, and other aspects of the law.  Fiscus oversaw a review of the SFWA Handbook from 2002-3.

In 2008, SFWA President Russell Davis appointed Fiscus to succeed him in the position of Western Regional Director, a position Fiscus held until the California re-incorporation, at which time he became a Director-at-large until 2015.  While serving as a Director, Fiscus served as Chair of the Orphan Works Committee.  When the Orphan Works Committee was re-formed as the Legal Affairs Committee, Fiscus remained on board as co-Chair with Michael Capobianco.  Fiscus also joined the Contracts Committee in 2014 and became Chair when the former chair stepped down.

Past winners of the Kevin O’Donnell, Jr. Service to SFWA Award include Victoria Strauss, George Zebrowski and Pamela Sargent (jointly), Michael Capobianco and Ann Crispin (joint awards), Keith Stokes, Vonda McIntyre and John E. Johnston III.

The award will be presented during the annual Nebula Award Conference, which will run from May 18-21 in Pittsburgh. On May 19, a mass autograph session will take place at the Pittsburgh Marriott City Center and is open to the public.

2017 Jim Baen Memorial Short Story Contest Winner

Philip A. Kramer of Seattle, WA has won the grand prize in the 2017 Jim Baen Memorial Award competition for his short story “Feldspar.”

The Jim Baen Memorial Short Story Contest has been held annually since 2007 and is focused on stories of space exploration and discovery, with an optimistic spin on those activities for the human race.

GRAND PRIZE

“Feldspar” by Philip A. Kramer

FIRST RUNNER-UP

“Bullet Catch” by Stephen Lawson (Louisville, KY)

SECOND RUNNER-UP

“An Economy of Air” by M. T. Reiten (Los Alamos, NM)

Judges for the award were the editors of Baen Books and special guest judge, author David Drake. Stories were judged anonymously. The Jim Baen Memorial Award will be presented May 26, 2017 in a ceremony at the annual International Space Development Conference held this year in St. Louis, MO. The winner receives a distinctive award and professional publication of the story in June 2017 at the Baen.com web site.

“The National Space Society and Baen Books applaud the role that science fiction plays in advancing real science and have teamed up to sponsor this short fiction contest in memory of Jim Baen, Baen Books founder,” said William Ledbetter, contest administrator. “It’s a wonderful opportunity for the winner to meets scientists and space advocates from around the world.”

What the Jim Baen Memorial Short Story Award looks like.

This Is Horror Awards 2016

The winners of the 2016 This Is Horror Awards were announced on March 20. They were chosen by vote of the UK website’s readers.

Novel of the Year

  • Winner: The Fisherman by John Langan
  • Runner-up: Mongrels by Stephen Graham Jones

Novella of the Year

  • Winner: The Ballad of Black Tom by Victor LaValle
  • Runner-up: X’s For Eyes by Laird Barron

Short Story Collection of the Year

  • Winner: Furnace by Livia Llewellyn
  • Runner-up: Greener Pastures by Michael Wehunt

Anthology of the Year

  • Winner: Autumn Cthulhu, edited by Mike Davis
  • Runner-up: Gutted: Beautiful Horror Stories, edited by Doug Murano and D. Alexander Ward

Fiction Magazine of the Year

Publisher of the Year

Fiction Podcast of the Year

Nonfiction Podcast of the Year

[Thanks to Mark-kitteh for the story.]

2017 CILIP Carnegie and Greenaway Medal Shortlists

The 2017 shortlists for the CILIP Carnegie Medal and the CILIP Kate Greenaway Medal were announced March 16.

There is one finalist on each list of genre interest – which I have flagged with the book’s cover art.

The CILIP Carnegie Medal Shortlist for 2017

Sputnik’s Guide to Life on Earth

Frank Cottrell-Boyce

The Bone Sparrow

Zana Fraillon

The Smell of Other People’s Houses

Bonnie-Sue Hitchcock

The Stars at Oktober Bend

Glenda Millard

Beck

Peet with Meg Rosoff

Railhead

Philip Reeve

Salt to the Sea

Ruta Sepetys

Wolf Hollow

Lauren Wolk

The CILIP Kate Greenaway Medal Shortlist for 2017

Wild Animals of the North

Dieter Braun

Tidy

Emily Gravett

Wolves of Currumpaw

William Grill

Harry Potter and the Philosopher’s Stone

Jim Kay

A Great Big Cuddle

Chris Riddell

The Journey

Francesca Sanna

The Marvels

Brian Selznick

There is a Tribe of Kids

Lane Smith

The winners will be announced June 19.

Horror Writers Association 2016 Lifetime Achievement Awards

Dennis Etchison and Thomas F. Monteleone are the Horror Writers Association’s 2016 Lifetime Achievement Award winners.

Etchison, a former President of HWA, said “It’s a great honor to be recognized by my peers.” Monteleone responded, “I am humbled and honored to receive such recognition.”

Dennis Etchison

Etchison is the author of 12 novels and 7 collections, and has edited 9 anthologies. He won the World Fantasy Award three times, for his short story “The Dark Country” (1982) and for the anthologies MetaHorror (1993) and The Museum of Horrors (2002). He has been nominated for the Bram Stoker Award four times. He has won the British Fantasy Award three times for his short fiction “The Dark Country,” “The Olympic Runner” (1987) and “The Dog Park” (1994).

Thomas F. Monteleone in the 1990s.

Thomas F. Monteleone has written over 24 novels, more than 100 short stories, and has edited the Borderlands anthologies with his wife Elizabeth Monteleone. Their Borderlands Press won the HWA Specialty Press Award in 2016.

His non-fiction column “The Mothers and Fathers Italian Association (MAFIA),” featured over the decades in Knights, Horrorstruck, The Horror Show, Mystery Scene, Cemetery Dance, Gaunlet, and Dancing with the Dark, and the award citation says it “has earned him a reputation of honesty and bluntness unsurpassed.”

He is the winner of four Bram Stoker Awards for the novelette “Looking for Mr. Flip” (1996), his collected columns The Mothers and Fathers Italian Association (2004), the anthology Borderlands 5 (2004), and his fiction collection Fearful Symmetries (2005). He is also the author of The Complete Idiot’s Guide to Writing a Novel.

Both authors will be present to receive their awards at StokerCon (April 27-30) in Long Beach, CA.

Update: I have undone an earlier correction to the award title so I can follow the organization’s own usage. In an answer to my email they explained: “HWA presents a number of awards each year that are not considered part of the Bram Stoker Award categories. The Lifetime Achievement Award is not a Stoker Award, but rather a Horror Writers Association award, similar to the Specialty Press Award and Mentor of the Year Award.”

2017 Lambda Award Nominees

The nominees for the 29th Annual Lambda Literary Awards (“Lammys”) have been announced. The awards celebrate achievement in lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender (LGBT) writing. Winners will be announced at a ceremony on June 12.

The categories with nominees of genre interest are reported below. The full list is here.

LGBTQ Children‘s/Young Adult

  • Beast, Brie Spangler, Alfred A. Knopf [Called a “reimagining of Beauty and the Beast”]
  • Girl Mans Up, M.E. Girard, Harper Teen
  • Gravity, Juliann Rich, Bold Stroke Books
  • Highly Illogical BehaviorJohn Corey Whaley, Dial Books [Includes Star Trek references, though story is probably not sff]
  • Not Your Sidekick, C.B. Lee, Duet [Set hundreds of years in the future, where disappointingly not everything has changed.]
  • Our Chemical Hearts, Krystal Sutherland, G.P. Putnam’s Sons Books for Young Readers
  • Symptoms of Being Human, Jeff Garvin, Balzer + Bray
  • The Midnight Star, Marie Lu, G.P. Putnam’s Sons Books for Young Readers [Finale of the Young Elites trilogy]

LGBTQ SF/F/Horror

  • All Good Children, Dayna Ingram, Lethe Press
  • The Devourers, Indra Das, Del Rey
  • Irish Black, David Lennon, Blue Spike Publishing
  • Kissing Booth Girl, A.C. Wise, Lethe Press
  • Lily, Michael Thomas Ford, illustrated by Staven Andersen, Lethe Press
  • A Little Queermas Carol, Sassafras Lowrey, PoMo Freakshow
  • Style of Attack Report, By Ras Mashramani, Rasheedah Phillips, Alex Smith, and M. Eighteen Téllez, Metropolarity
  • Will Do Magic for Small ChangeAndrea Hairston, Aqueduct Press

Stalking the Rampant Manticore

Two awards were started in reaction to the Puppy controversy about the Hugos, the Dragon Awards and the Rampant Manticore Awards. They were given for the first time last year. They had one winner in common. Can you guess? It was Larry Correia’s 2015 novel Son of the Black Sword. Remarkably, considering why these awards were started, there was no other overlap at all. And that will still be true whenever we find out all the Rampant Manticore winners, which for some reason has been practically impossible.

The Dragon Awards winners in all 15 categories were announced September 4 at Dragon Con. The Rampant Manticore Awards were presented October 29 at HonorCon in Raleigh, North Carolina but to this day I have been unable to discover three of the seven winners.

The Rampant Manticore Awards (and the H. Beam Piper Memorial) are given for the best Military Science Fiction and Fantasy published in the preceding year. They are sponsored by The Royal Manticoran Navy: The Official Honor Harrington Fan Association, founded a decade ago by fans of David Weber. The group runs two cons a year, MantiCon every May in Minnesota and HonorCon each October in North Carolina. Nominations are taken at MantiCon, and voting on the finalists happens at HonorCon.

Under the rules, not only the award winners but all the voting information should have been published online. That never happened.

TRANSPARENCY

To ensure this is all done in a transparent manner, the vote tallies will be posted publically at MantiCon for the nominees, and at HonorCon for the finalists. They will also be posted the webpage http://www.rampantmanticore.com which will be set up for the Rampant Manticore Award. Full names of voters will be removed, but the vote counts will be posted and the weight of each vote, for the nomination phase, will be shown.

This award is about the quality of the work, and not the politics of the author. Should politics become an issue, further voting restrictions may be enacted to ensure the apolitical quality of the Rampant Manticore remains intact.

Larry Correia and Marko Kloos publicly thanked fans for the awards and from them we know the results in four categories – the three they won, and another Kloos mentioned offhand in his post.

Here are the 2016 nominees with the four known winners in bold.

Best Author – Fantasy Short Story

  • “Rules of Enchantment” by Klecha & Buckell
  • “The Way Home” by Linda Nagata
  • “Look at Me Now” by Sarah Norman

Best Author – SciFi Short Story

  • “Horus Heresey #31” by Graham McNeill
  • “Blue Knight” by Carol Pedroso
  • “Yes! Yes! Yes!” by Lily Velden

Best Author – Fantasy Novella

  • Tallaran: Ironclad by John French
  • Bounty Hunter by Samantha Harvey
  • Tiger’s Paw by Kimberly Rogers

Best Author – SciFi Novella

  • Riding Redemption by Jolie Mason
  • Draxius Redeemed by Brian Dorsey
  • Burnsides Killer by Timothy Ellis

Best Author – Fantasy Novel

  • Son of the Black Sword by Larry Correia
  • The Aeronaut’s Windlass by Jim Butcher
  • Cold Iron by Stina Leicht

Best Author – SciFi Novel

  • Angles of Attack by Marko Kloos
  • Oncoming Storm by Christopher Nuttall
  • An Ancient Peace by Tanya Huff

H. Beam Piper Memorial Award

  • Angles of Attack by Marko Kloos
  • Riding Redemption by Joile Mason
  • Son of the Black Sword by Larry Correia

Unable to find the rest of the winners anywhere online, I wrote to several people who might know. The chair of MantiCon courteously answered my email and said she would try to track down the information. When I followed up a couple of weeks later she still hadn’t located anyone who knew.

Just the same, MantiCon is already publicizing the second round of awards. The con is coming up on May 26-28.

Also, join us for the second annual nominations of the Rampant Manticore Award for Literary Military Fiction, Science Fiction and Fantasy, featuring the H. Beam Piper Memorial Award for Best Author in the Category of Literary Military Fiction, Science Fiction, and Fantasy!

If nothing else, we know the Rampant Manticore is a handsome little award in the shape of a crystal book, bearing the crest of the Royal Manticoran Navy.

photo by Marko Kloos

2016 Tiptree Award Winner Is McLemore

The James Tiptree, Jr. Literary Award Council has announced that the winner of the 2016 Tiptree Award is Anna-Marie McLemore for her novel When the Moon Was Ours.

The James Tiptree Jr. Award is presented annually to works of science fiction or fantasy that explore and expand the understanding of gender and gender roles. The winner receives $1,000 in prize money, a specially commissioned piece of original artwork, and chocolate.

Tiptree winner McLemore, along with authors and works on the Honor List, will be celebrated at WisCon over Memorial Day (May 26-29) Madison, Wisconsin. McLemore will attend the award ceremony.

The Tiptree is a juried award. The 2016 judges were Jeanne Gomoll (chair), Aimee Bahng, James Fox, Roxanne Samer, and Deb Taber.

The Council provided a description of the winning work, and an honor list of recommended works.

About the Winner

When the Moon Was Ours by Anna-Marie McLemore (Thomas Dunne Books/St. Martin’s, 2016)

This novel is a fairytale about Samir, a transgender boy, and Miel, an orphan girl who grows roses from her wrists and is bullied as a result. In fact, there is a fairytale within the fairytale, the first chapter telling us the version of the story that mothers would tell children for years after — before also telling us what that story leaves out. Then the book takes us through all of it, step by step, exploring the heartache and frustration that being and loving differently generates. Beautifully, the novel never lets go of its unique magical realism framework. While the thoughts and emotions these characters share are incredibly familiar to anyone who is queer or trans or has loved someone who is queer or trans, the imagery and particular scenarios the characters encounter are also completely bright and new.

In the author’s note at the end of the book, Anna-Marie McLemore tells us that when she was a teenager she fell in love with a transgender boy who would grow into the man she married. This is their story, reimagined as legend.

Honor List

In addition to selecting the winners, the jury chooses a Tiptree Award Honor List. The Honor List is a strong part of the award’s identity and is used by many readers as a recommended reading list. These notes on each work are excerpted and edited from comments by members of this year’s Tiptree Award jury.

Eleanor Arnason, Hwarhath Stories (Aqueduct Press, 2016) — This is a wonderful collection of stories that examine the ways that culturally, deep-rooted assumptions around gender restrict vocation and recognition of skills. Arnason tells of a culture with significantly different gender assumptions and customs that lead to a number of subtly shifted societal impacts — both positive and negative.

Mishell Baker, Borderline (Saga Press, 2016) — A fascinating whodunit with wonderful characters, Borderline spotlights diversity and intersectionality. Most of the characters in this novel are viewed as disabled by others, even by each other. But the characters’ so-called disabilities give them advantages in certain situations. Understanding this helps the characters love each other and themselves. Almost every character can be described as having attributes that are both disabilities and advantages. What builds us up can bring us down. Or put another way: our imperfections are openings to beautiful achievements.

Nino Cipri, “Opals and Clay” (Podcastle, 2016) — A beautiful love story about solidarity. With just three major characters, this story does a lot with gender, demonstrating how gendering can be something one does to control or out of love.

Andrea Hairston, Will Do Magic for Small Change (Aqueduct Press, 2016) — A beautiful story of magic and love that spans two centuries and three continents, moving between times and places through a book-within-a-book structure. Its 1980s protagonists are a family who has been torn apart by an act of homophobic violence. Through a discovery of their past, they are able to reconnect and find love again. Among other things, this novel depicts an amazing range of queer characters. Importantly, the book de-colonizes these representations, making queerness not a white or American thing, but something that emerges in different shapes and structures at different times and places, particular to individuals as well as the cultures and communities that they are a part of.

Rachael K. Jones, “The Night Bazaar for Women Becoming Reptiles” (Beneath Ceaseless Skies, 2016) — A moving story set in a world where people live separate lives by night and day, with an opposite-sex lover by day and same-sex lover by night as the standard family structure. The theme of being trapped in one’s body and circumstances and in the customs of one’s times is dealt with well. The metaphor of a city/body that traps people in prisons of identity was very powerful. A surprising (yet well set up) twist to the story broadens its scope.

Seanan McGuire, Every Heart a Doorway (Tor Books, 2916) — This is a lovely YA novel about teenagers who return to our world, against their wishes, from magical lands that they entered through secret pathways — a magic door, an impossible stairway at the bottom of a trunk, a mirror. Their parents cannot understand their pain and misinterpret the stories their children tell and send their children to Miss West’s Home for Wayward Children. Miss West, herself a returned child, helps them deal with their separation or return to what they all think of as their real homes. This novel came to the attention of the Tiptree jury because of the reasons the children are taken from or rejected by their magical worlds. The protagonist, Nancy, is asexual, and finds an ideal world through her door. A character named Kade was born Katie, and discovers he is a boy, not a girl. He is thrown out of Fairyland as punishment for his transition. Two twin girls named Jack and Jill take up identities opposite from those their parents imposed upon them. There are beautiful lessons here about the importance of finding one’s home–that place where one can be one’s self. An emotionally engaging novel.

Ada Palmer, Too Like the Lightning (Tor Books, 2016) — This book will start conversations about gender, philosophy, religion, government, even war. The judges perceived contradictions within this book that may be resolved in the sequel, but these only serve to spark interest. In the future in which it is set (the twenty-fifth century of our world), gendered language is considered taboo in most circles and gender/sex-related cues are minimized and overlooked in clothing, vocation, and all other public areas of life. However, the book slowly reveals that gender stereotypes, sexism, and sexual taboos still remain strong despite the century’s supposed enlightenment and escape from such notions.

Johanna Sinisalo, The Core of the Sun (Grove Press/Black Cat, 2016)This emotional, moving and thought-provoking novel, set in an alternate present in Finland, provides a critique of heteronormativity, eugenics, and all forms of social control, done uniquely and with humor. In this alternate present, the government values public health and social stability above all else. Sex and gender have been organized as the government sees fit, much to the detriment of women, who are bred and raised to be docile. All .drugs, including alcohol and caffeine, have long been banned. Capsaicin from hot peppers is the most recent substance to be added to the list. Our protagonist, Vera/Vanna, is a capsaicin addict. Consuming peppers provides an escape from a world that has treated her horribly. Most chapters are from Vera/Vanna’s perspective, but others relate the history, laws, fairytales, and other literature of this fictional Finland.

Nisi Shawl, Everfair (Tor Books, 2016)In this gorgeous steampunk revisionist history of anticolonial resistance, a coalition of rebels defeat King Leopold and transform the former Belgian Congo into Everfair: a new nation whose citizens comprise Africans, European settlers, and Asian laborers. Told from many different perspectives, the story switches among the viewpoints of a dozen protagonists. This novel shows how relationships can grow over time between people of different races, classes, and religions as they build community together. Characters work through their internalized racisms and demonstrate how this is necessary for those in interracial relationships.

Long List

In addition to the honor list, this year’s jury also compiled a long list of twelve other works they found worthy of attention.

  • All the Birds in the Sky, Charlie Jane Anders (Tor, 2016)
  • The Waterdancer’s World, L. Timmel Duchamp (Aqueduct Press, 2016)
  • Lily, Michael Thomas Ford (Lethe Press, 2016)
  • King of the Worlds, M. Thomas Gammarino (Chin Music Press, 2016)
  • “Vesp: A History of Sapphic Scaphism,” Porpentine Charity Heartscape (Terraform, 2016 – an online interactive story),
  • Cantor for Pearls, M.C.A. Hogarth (De La Torre Books, 2016)
  • The Obelisk Gate, N.K. Jemisin (Orbit, 2016)
  • An Accident of Stars, Foz Meadows (Angry Robot, 2016)
  • Sleeping Under the Tree of Life, Sheree Renée Thomas (Aqueduct Press, 2016)
  • Suddenly Paris, Olga & Christopher Werby (CreateSpace, 2015)
  • The Arrival of Missives, Aliya Whiteley (Unsung Stories, 2015)
  • The Natural Way of Things, Charlotte Wood (Europa Editions 2016)

Reading for 2017 will soon begin. The panel consists of Alexis Lothian (chair), E.J. Fischer, Kazue Harada, Cheryl Morgan, and Julia Starkey.

The Tiptree Award invites everyone to recommend works for the award through the recommendation page at the website, where donations are welcomed to help fund the award, and where accounts of past winners and works, with much other information, can be found.