Pixel Scroll 7/23/22 Filers, Tick Not, Now Or Ever, Where To Scroll Your Pixels Go

(1) AURORA AWARDS VOTING DEADLINE. Canadian Science Fiction and Fantasy Association members have only a few minutes left to vote for 2022 Aurora Awards. The deadline is 11:59 p.m. EDT, on Saturday, July 23.

The awards ceremony will be held as a YouTube and Facebook live streaming event at 7:00 p.m. EDT on Saturday, August 13 at When Words Collide. 

(2) BEAUTIFYING THE BRICKS. DreamHaven Books showed off the progress on their new outside wall mural to Facebook friends. There’s also this smaller peek on Instagram.

(3) HEAR HEAR. The Science Fiction and Fantasy Poetry Association (SFPA) resumes its series with 2022 Rhysling Long Poem Reading Series Part 2.

(4) THE SPIRIT OF ’46. First Fandom Experience links up with Chicon 8’s “1946 Project” (which they’re doing instead of Retro Hugos). “Science Fiction and Fantasy in the Pulps: 1946” is a bibliography of sff published in that year.

…Presented here for your perusal and possible amusement is a fiction bibliography for science fiction and fantasy pulps issued in 1946. The list includes magazines that primarily published new works. Excluded are reprints of works published in prior years (most of Famous Fantastic Mysteries, all of Strange Tales). Non-fiction articles and editorials are also omitted. For brevity, we didn’t cite specific issue dates. For richness, we’ve transcribed the introductory blurbs that appeared in the Table of Contents or masthead for each story….

(5) DOODLER. [Item by Michael Toman.] “In a world where Franza Kafka became one of the first Big Name Fan Artists…?” “Kafka’s Inkblots” by J.W. McCormack, behind a paywall at New York Review of Books.

…Such an active imagination—the fever for annotation, familiar from Pale Fire or Flaubert’s Parrot, that distorts the inner life of the artist even as it seeks to illuminate it—is required of any reader hoping to get their money’s worth from Franz Kafka: The Drawings, a volume of the writer’s archival sketches and ephemera edited by Andreas Kilcher and Pavel Schmidt. A bearded maestro presides from the back of a business card. A stick figure seems to throttle a mass of squiggles. A harlequin frowns under the chastisement of an irate lump. Two curvilinear ink blots pass each other on a blank-page boulevard. A bushy-browed Captain Haddock-type glowers in profile on a torn envelope and, in the margins of a letter, a wrigglesome delinquent is bisected by a torture device that seems to clearly reference the one from “In the Penal Colony.” Limbs jut out cartoonishly from bodies, loopedy-loop acrobats snake up and down the gutter of a magazine, figures of authority preside in faded pencil, and then there are the stray marks on manuscript pages, neither fully letters nor drawings….

(6) BRICK BY BRICK. “E. E. Cummings and Krazy Kat” by Amber Medland at The Paris Review site puts the famous strip in perspective as an inspiration to all manner of creators of modern 20th-century literature and art.

…The Kat had a cult following among the modernists. For Joyce, Fitzgerald, Stein, and Picasso, all of whose work fed on playful energies similar to those unleashed in the strip, he had a double appeal, in being commercially nonviable and carrying the reek of authenticity in seeming to belong to mass culture. By the thirties, strips like Blondie were appearing daily in roughly a thousand newspapers; Krazy appeared in only thirty-five. The Kat was one of those niche-but-not-really phenomena, a darling of critics and artists alike, even after it stopped appearing in newspapers. Since then: Umberto Eco called Herriman’s work “raw poetry”; Kerouac claimed the Kat as “the immediate progenitor” of the beats; Stan Lee (Spider-Man) went with “genius”; Herriman was revered by Charles Schulz and Theodor Geisel alike. But Krazy Kat was never popular. The strip began as a sideline for Herriman, who had been making a name for himself as a cartoonist since 1902. It ran in “the waste space,” literally underfoot the characters of his more conventional 1910 comic strip The Dingbat Family, published in William Randolph Hearst’s New York Evening Journal….

(7) ANTICIPATION. Rich Horton abhors a vacuum, which is why he keeps his series going with “Hugo Nomination Recommendations, 1951”.

As noted, I’m planning to finish up my posts on potential Hugo nominees for 1950s Worldcons, including those that didn’t award Hugos. This is a case (as with 1954) where stories from the eligibility year (i.e. 1950) had a shot at Retro-Hugos, as Milliennium Philcon, the 2001 Worldcon, chose to award them. (Appropriate, I suppose, as the 1953 Philcon originated the Hugo Awards.) And in fact I wrote a post back in 2001 giving my recommendations for Retro Hugos that year. This appeared in SF Site here I am bemused to find that my recommendations from back then are almost exactly the same as I came up with surveying 1950s SF just now.

The 1951 Worldcon was Nolacon I, in New Orleans, the ninth World Science Fiction Convention. As noted, they gave no Hugo awards. This was the first year of International Fantasy Awards, and both were given to books published in 1949: fiction went to George Stewart’s, Earth Abides (surely a strong choice) and non-fiction to The Conquest of Space, by Willy Ley and Chesley Bonestell….

(8) LATHE OF HEAVENS. [Item by Martin Morse Wooster.] Hack writers get hackier with AI! The Verge blabs about “How independent writers are turning to AI”.

… Lepp, who writes under the pen name Leanne Leeds in the “paranormal cozy mystery” subgenre, allots herself precisely 49 days to write and self-edit a book. This pace, she said, is just on the cusp of being unsustainably slow. She once surveyed her mailing list to ask how long readers would wait between books before abandoning her for another writer. The average was four months. Writer’s block is a luxury she can’t afford, which is why as soon as she heard about an artificial intelligence tool designed to break through it, she started beseeching its developers on Twitter for access to the beta test. 

The tool was called Sudowrite. Designed by developers turned sci-fi authors Amit Gupta and James Yu, it’s one of many AI writing programs built on OpenAI’s language model GPT-3 that have launched since it was opened to developers last year. But where most of these tools are meant to write company emails and marketing copy, Sudowrite is designed for fiction writers. Authors paste what they’ve written into a soothing sunset-colored interface, select some words, and have the AI rewrite them in an ominous tone, or with more inner conflict, or propose a plot twist, or generate descriptions in every sense plus metaphor. 

Eager to see what it could do, Lepp selected a 500-word chunk of her novel, a climactic confrontation in a swamp between the detective witch and a band of pixies, and pasted it into the program. Highlighting one of the pixies, named Nutmeg, she clicked “describe.”…

(9) UP FROM THE UNDERGROUND. [Item by Dann.] This Reason Podcast focuses on the early days of comix in an interview with Brian Doherty regarding his newly published book Dirty Pictures: “Brian Doherty Talks Dirty Pictures, Comix, and Free Speech”.

Dirty Pictures: How an Underground Network of Nerds, Feminists, Misfits, Geniuses, Bikers, Potheads, Printers, Intellectuals, and Art School Rebels Revolutionized Art and Invented Comix, by Reason Senior Editor Brian Doherty, tells the story of how people such as Robert Crumb, Trina Robbins, and Art Spiegelman redefined not just what comic books were capable of but what gets counted as art.

(10) NOSTALGIC X-MEN SERIES. Yahoo! Entertainment is at SDCC when “’X-Men ’97’ Gets First Nostalgic Look, Fall 2023 Release and Season 2”.

Nearly 30 years after “X-Men: The Animated Series” debuted, many of the beloved characters are returning for Marvel Studios’ upcoming show “X-Men ’97,” coming to Disney+ in fall 2023 with a second season already confirmed.

“X-Men ’97” will continue the story of the original “Animated Series,” which ran from 1992 to 1997 on Fox Kids Network. “X-Men: The Animated Series” helped usher in the popularity of the mutant superheroes before Fox made the first live-action take on the team in 2000.

The new series will include Rogue, Beast, Gambit, Jean Grey, Wolverine, Storm, Jubilee and Cyclops. Magneto, now with long hair and a purple suit, will lead the X-Men. The animation, revealed at Comic Con on Friday, stays true to the original animated series, but looks more modern, updated and sleek.

Cable, Bishop, Forge, Morph and Nightcrawler will also join the X-Men onscreen. Battling them will be the (non-“Stranger Things”) Hellfire Club with Emma Frost and Sebastian Shaw, plus Mr. Sinister and Bolivar Trask will appear.

(11) MEDIA BIRTHDAY.  

1995 [By Cat Eldridge.] It is said that God made man in His image, but man fell from grace. Still, man has retained from his humble beginnings the innate desire to create, but how will man’s creations fair? Will they attain a measure of the divine or will they, too, fall from grace? — The Control Voice

Twenty-seven years ago, The Outer Limits’ “I, Robot” first aired on HBO. 

This is a remake of “I, Robot” that aired thirty-one years earlier. Leonard Nimoy, who played the reporter Judson Ellis in that episode, plays attorney Thurman Cutler in this version, a role played by Howard Da Silva in the original. This remake was directed by Nimoy’s son Adam Nimoy. 

Now “I, Robot” was written by Eando Binder, the pen name used by the SF authors, the late Earl Andrew Binder and his brother Otto Binder. They created a heroic robot named Adam Link. The first Adam Link story, published in 1939, is titled “I, Robot”. Adam Link, Robot, a collection of those stories, is available from the usual suspects. 

Robert C. Dennis who wrote the screenplay here would go on to write multiple episodes of Wild, Wild West and Batman. He was also one of the primary writers for the earlier Alfred Hitchcock Presents.

(12) TODAY’S BIRTHDAYS.

[Compiled by Cat Eldridge.]

  • Born July 23, 1888 Raymond Chandler. He of the Philip Marlowe series who I hold in very high esteem is listed by ISFDB as doing some stories of a genre nature, to be exact, ”The Bronze Door”, “The King In Yellow”, “Professor Bingo’s Snuff” and “English Summer: A Gothic Romance”. I’ve neither heard of nor read these. So who here has read them? (Died 1959.) 
  • Born July 23, 1914 Virgil Finlay. Castle of Frankenstein calls him “part of the pulp magazine history … one of the foremost contributors of original and imaginative artwork for the most memorable science fiction and fantasy publications of our time.”  His best-known covers are for Amazing Stories and Weird Tales. “Roads”, a novella by Seabury Quinn, published in the January 1938 Weird Tales, and featuring a cover and interior illustrations by him, was originally published in an extremely limited numbers by Arkham House in 1948. It’s now available on from the usual suspects. (Died 1971.)
  • Born July 23, 1938 Ronny Cox, 83. His first genre role was in RoboCop as OCP President Dick Jones who comes to a very bad end. Later roles were Gen. Balentine in Amazon Women on the Moon in “The Unknown Soldier” episode, Martians Go Home as the President, Total Recall as Vilos Cohaagen, Captain America as Tom Kimball and a recurring role for a decade on Stargate SG-1 as Senator Robert Kinsey/Vice President Robert Kinsey. 
  • Born July 23, 1957 Gardner Dozois. He was founding editor of The Year’s Best Science Fiction anthology and was editor of Asimov’s Science Fiction magazine for twenty years. He won fifteen Hugos for his editing and was nominated for others. He also won the Nebula Award for Best Short Story twice, once for “The Peacemaker” and once for “Morning Child”. Stories selected by him for his annual best-of-year volumes have won, as of several years ago, 44 Hugos, 32 Locus, 41 Nebulas, 18 Sturgeon Awards and 10 World Fantasy. Very impressive! (Died 2018.)
  • Born July 23, 1982 Tom Mison, 40. He is best known as Ichabod Crane on Sleepy Hollow which crosses-over into Bones. He’s Mr. Phillips in The Watchmen. It’s barely (if at all) genre adjacent but I’m going to note that he’s Young Blood in A Waste of Shame: The Mystery of Shakespeare and His Sonnets. Currently he’s got a main role in second season of the See SF series on Apple TV which has yet to come out. Apple hasn’t put out any publicity on it. 
  • Born July 23, 1989 Daniel Radcliffe, 33. Harry Potter of course. Also Victor Frankenstein’s assistant Igor in Victor Frankenstein, Ignatius Perrish in Horns, a horror film, and Rosencrantz in Rosencrantz and Guildenstern Are Dead at the Old Vic in London.  

(13) THIS ICE CREAM DOESN’T CUT THE MUSTARD. Well, actually, it does, and that’s the problem.The Takeout’s Brianna Wellen declares “This Grey Poupon Ice Cream Needs More Mustard”.

…As described in a press release sent to The Takeout, the Grey Poupon with Salted Pretzels is “An unexpected yet delightful blend of sweet ice cream, honey-dijon swirl, and salted pretzels.” It’s part of Van Leeuwen’s line of summer limited edition flavors, which also includes Campfire S’mores, Summer Peach Crisp, Honey Cornbread with Strawberry Jam, and Espresso Fior di Latte Chip. All of these flavors are available at Walmart until the end of the season.

… Even the smell of the ice cream was slightly mustardy—I was prepared for a real dijon bomb.

But the first scoop left some things to be desired. First, the mustard flavor is a little muddled and lost amidst the creaminess….

(14) STAR WARS SANS CULOTTES. Yes, it’s what you think it is: “I saw a ‘Star Wars’ strip show in SF, and I’m forever changed” says SFGate’s Ariana Bindman.

…With each draw of the curtain, we saw a series of burlesque acts that were visually decadent and tonally unique. Aside from Jabba the Hutt and captive Leia, my other personal favorite was when Sheev Palpatine — who looked absolutely grotesque thanks to a wrinkled blue-and-white skin suit — fully stripped and swung on a massive disco ball to Miley Cyrus’ “Wrecking Ball.” Just before that, R2-D2, resident space pimp, made it rain by ejecting wads of cash into the air while a braggadocious Han Solo undulated to “Smooth Criminal,” making every goth and nerd in the audience scream like animals…. 

(15) IT’S ABOUT TIME. “Strange new phase of matter created in quantum computer acts like it has two time dimensions” at Phys.org.

By shining a laser pulse sequence inspired by the Fibonacci numbers at atoms inside a quantum computer, physicists have created a remarkable, never-before-seen phase of matter. The phase has the benefits of two time dimensions despite there still being only one singular flow of time, the physicists report July 20 in Nature.

This mind-bending property offers a sought-after benefit: Information stored in the phase is far more protected against errors than with alternative setups currently used in quantum computers. As a result, the information can exist without getting garbled for much longer, an important milestone for making quantum computing viable, says study lead author Philipp Dumitrescu….

(16) KEEP WALKING. Yahoo! introduces the trailer shown at SDCC: “’Tales of the Walking Dead’ Trailer Shows How the Zombie Apocalypse Is Kind of Like COVID”.

…The trailer features elements from several of the show’s standalone stories that all paint a very stark picture of how the world fell — and honestly we’re reminded of a ton of the drama from the COVID-19 era, particularly the denialism, rugged individualist posturing, and the scapegoating.

For example, we see Parker Posey as an apparently well-to-do woman who straight up refuses to believe reports of a zombie apocalypse… of course, until it runs right up and bites her. Crews meanwhile plays a survivalist who lives an isolated, paranoid life, until he (for an as-yet unrevealed reason) ends up sheltering with Olivia Munn and gets called out. Will he change? We’ll have to find out….

(17) VIDEO OF THE DAY. [Item by Martin Morse Wooster.] In “Honest Game Trailers:  The Quarry,” Fandom Games, in a spoiler-packed episode, say this game about teenagers getting munched on in the quarry by monsters “is a B movie with AAA production values that has “two hours of story and eight hours of wandering around like a stoned teen.”  But the CGI is so lifelike that the characters are actors you almost recognize, including “That guy who was in the thing you saw once.”

[Thanks to JJ, John King Tarpinian, Andrew Porter, Chris Barkley, Rob Thornton, Dann, Michael Toman, Cat Eldridge, Mike Kennedy, and Martin Morse Wooster for some of these stories. Title credit belongs to File 770 contributing editor of the day Kurt Busiek.]

2022 Elgin Award Finalists

Nominations for the Science Fiction and Fantasy Poetry Association’s Elgin Award have closed and Jordan Hirsch, the 2022 Elgin Award Chair reports the works named below are the nominees.

The award is named for SFPA founder Suzette Haden Elgin, and is presented in two categories, Chapbook and Book. Works published in 2020 and 2021 are eligible for this year’s awards. SFPA members will have from July 1-September 15 to vote for the winners.

Chapbooks (14 chapbooks nominated)
25 Trumbulls Road • Christopher Locke (Black Lawrence Press, 2020)
Borrowings of the Shan Van Vocht • Catherine Moore (Unsolicited Press, 2020)
Enkidu is Dead and Not Dead / Enkidu está muerto y no lo está • Tucker Lieberman (Glyph Torrent, 2021)
Field Guide to Invasive Species of Minnesota • Amelia Gorman (Interstellar Flight Press, 2021)
Good Boi • Jason B. Crawford (Neon Hemlock, 2021)
Horrific Punctuation • John Reinhart (Arson Press, 2021)
Lexicon of Future Selves • Gretchen Rockwell (Vegetarian Alcoholic Press, 2021)
The Miseducation of the Androids • William Landis (Hiraeth Publishing, 2020)
Shadow Box • Luiza Flynn-Goodlett (Madhouse Press, 2020)
Tug of a Black Hole • Deborah P Kolodji (Title IX Press, 2021)
The Undead • Luiza Flynn-Goodlett (Sixth FinchBooks, 2020)
Unearthed • Federica Santini (Kelsay Books, 2021)
Utopian Problems • Jean-Paul L. Garnier (Space Cowboy Books, 2021)
Visions at Templeglantine • John W. Sexton (Revival Press, 2020)
Full-length Books (45 books nominated)
Arthurian Things • Melissa Ridley Elmes (Dark Myth Publications, 2020)
blips on a screen • Joshua Gage (Cuttlefish Books, 2021)
Bramah and the Beggar Boy • Renée Sarojini Saklikar (Harbour Publishing, 2021)
Can You Sign My Tentacle? • Brandon O’Brien (Interstellar Flight Press, 2021)
Carpe Noctem • Robert Borski (Weird House Press, 2020)
Cradleland of Parasites • Sara Tantlinger (Strangehouse Books, 2020)
Cleave • Tiana Nobile (Hub City Press, 2021)
Dancing with Maria’s Ghost • Alessandro Manzetti (Independent Legions Publishing, 2021)
The Dictionary of Obscure Sorrows • John Koenig (Simon & Schuster, 2021)
Echoes From an Expired Earth • Allen Ashley (Demain Books, 2020)
Eclipse of the Moon • Frank Coffman (Mind’s Eye Publications, 2021)
Exposed Nerves • Lucy A. Snyder (Raw Dog Screaming Press, 2021)
For the Ride • Alice Notley (Penguin Books, 2020)
The Ghettobirds • Bryant O’Hara (Frayed Edge Press, 2021)
Grave Goods • Cardinal Cox (Demain Books, 2020)
Igor in Therapy • M. K. Garrison (Spuyten Duyvil, 2021)
The Journey • Anna Cates (Resource Publications, 2020)
Kraken Fever • Kyra Starr & Angela Yuriko Smith (Yuriko Publishing, 2021)
Maps of a Hollowed World • TD Walker (Another New Calligraphy, 2020)
The Martian’s Regress • J. O. Morgan (Jonathan Cape, 2020)
Midnight Comes Early • Marcie Lynn Tentchoff (Hiraeth Publishing, 2021)
Million-Year Elegies • Ada Hoffman (2021)
Monstrum Poetica • Jezzy Wolfe (Raw Dog Screaming Press, 2021)
Night Song • Daan Katz (2021)
notsleepyyet • Alexander Garza (Weasel Press, 2021)
Oblivion in Flux: A Collection of Cyber Prose • Maxwell I. Gold (Crystal Lake Publishing, 2021)
October Ghosts and Autumn Dreams • K. A. Opperman (Jackanapes Press, 2021)
Odyssey • John Urbancik (Dark Fluidity, 2021)
The Odyssey of Star Wars • Jack Mitchell (Abrams Image, 2021)
Past the Glad and Sunlit Season • K. A Opperman (Jackanapes Press, 2020)
Planet of the Zombie Zonnets • Juan Manuel Pérez (Hungry Buzzard Press, 2021)
A Predisposition for Madness • Aurelio Rico Lopez III (Hybrid Sequence Media, 2021)
A Ride Through Faerie and Other Poems • Clay Franklin Johnson (Gothic Keats Press, 2021)
Sacred Summer • Cassandra Rose Clarke (Aqueduct Press 2020)
The Saints of Capitalism • Benjamin Schmitt (New Meridian Arts Literary Press, 2021)
Saving Shadows • Eugen Bacon (NewCon Press, 2021)
Sci-Ku: Explorations into the Poetry of Science • Jay Friedenberg (2020)
The Smallest of Bones • Holly Lyn Walrath (CLASH Books, 2021)
Stone the Monsters, or Dance • Ken Poyner (Barking Moose Press, 2021)
Strange Nests • Jessica McHugh (Apokrupha, 2021)
Tortured Willows: Bent. Bowed. Unbroken. • Christina Sng, Angela Yuriko Smith, Lee Murray, & Geneve Flynn (Yuriko Publishing, 2021)
Unquiet Stars • Ann K. Schwader (Weird House Press, 2021)
Victims • Marge Simon and Mary Turzillo (Weasel Press, 2021)
who is owed springtime • Rasha Abdulhadi (Neon Hemlock, 2021)
The Withering • Ashley Dioses (Jackanapes Press, 2020)

2022 Dwarf Stars Finalists

The 2022 Dwarf Stars Anthology contents have been finalized, which constitutes the shortlist for the Science Fiction & Fantasy Poetry Association‘s Dwarf Stars award. The poems were selected by editors Adele Gardner and Greer Woodward.

The award recognizes the best speculative poem of 1–10 lines published in the previous year, and is designed to honor excellent scifaiku, tanka, cinquains, and other types of short poems that tend to be overshadowed in SFPA’s Rhysling Award competition.

Brief biographies of the contributing poets are here. A copy of the Dwarf Stars anthology is included with SFPA membership. It is also available for purchase here.

SFPA members have until August 31 to vote their favorite short-short poem from the anthology and determine who will receive the Dwarf Stars Award.

Some poems have a title, others are identified by a phrase from their first line placed in brackets:

ANTHOLOGY TABLE OF CONTENTS

(120 poems)

  • [across eons] • Barun Saha • Star*Line 44.4
  • [adding ellipses] • Hifsa Ashraf • Frogpond 44:3
  • [after a downpour] • Anatoly Kudryavitsky • Shamrock Haiku Journal 45
  • After All This Time • Robin Mayhall • Scifaikuest print, February
  • [all] • Michael J. Galko • The Heron’s Nest XXIII:4
  • [all this rain] • Christina Sng • Star*Line 44.1
  • —And They All Lived Together— • Andrew J. Wilson • Star*Line 44.1
  • [as galaxies form] • Wendy Van Camp • Eccentric Orbits: An Anthology of Science Fiction Poetry, Vol. 2, ed. Wendy Van Camp (Dimensionfold Publishing)
  • [between her breasts] • Tyler McIntosh • Scifaikuest print, November
  • [bewitching hour] • Francis W. Alexander • Otoroshi Journal 1:2
  • Black Beak (a Nonet) • B. Sharise Moore • Fantasy Magazine 65
  • Black Swan • Sharmon Gazaway • Octavos, January 28
  • Blow • Holly Day • Star*Line 44.4
  • [brother beamed] • Guy Belleranti • Scifaikuest print, August
  • the burning river • Hal Y. Zhang • Uncanny 43
  • Callisto Dreaming • Mariel Herbert • Star*Line 44.2
  • closer • Matthew Daley • Star*Line 44.3
  • The Closet • Jennifer Loring • Constraint 280, December 30
  • [cold soup] • Roland Packer • NOON: journal of the short poem 20
  • Colony • Jamal Hodge • Penumbric V:4
  • [cricket song] • Joshua Gage • Wales Haiku Journal, Summer
  • Damsel in Distress Redux • Marsheila Rockwell • Star*Line 44.3
  • [dark sky country] • Deborah P Kolodji • horror senryu journal, Oct. 6
  • [Down in the river] • Denise Dumars • Star*Line 44.2
  • [Earth fills the window] • Stephen C. Curro • Star*Line 44.1
  • Epitaph for the Old Ones • Maxwell I. Gold • Oblivion in Flux: A Collection of Cyber Prose (Crystal Lake Publishing)
  • [exoplanet fossil] • Greer Woodward • Scifaikuest print, February
  • Expect Them to Arrive with Song • Jordan Hirsch • Octavos, June 17
  • Exsanguination • Lena Donnarumma • The Sirens Call 56
  • Fatherless • Roger Dutcher • Star*Line 44.3
  • Feline Reinforcements • Adele Gardner • Scifaikuest print, August
  • Fetch • Gerri Leen • Departure Mirror 2
  • The Final Fairy • Anna Cates • Canary 52
  • [fingers stroking spines] • Joshua St. Claire • The Starlight Scifaiku Review 1:1
  • [freeze-dried] • sakyu • Scifaikuest print, August
  • Funeral for a Star • Yuna Kang • Strange Horizons, 6 September
  • fury • Lee Murray • Tortured Willows: Bent, Bowed, Unbroken by Christina Sng, Angela Yuriko Smith, Lee Murray, and Geneve Flynn (Yuriko Publishing)
  • Future Portrait of Dark Matter • Gene Twaronite • NewMyths.com 55
  • ghost writer • Hemapriya Chellappan • horror senryu journal, July 19
  • [Globules of light] • Katerina Bruno • The Starlight Scifaiku Review 1:1
  • A Haiku Howdunit Murder Mystery • John H. Dromey • Star*Line 44.4
  • [half-heard whispers] • Tracy Davidson • horror senryu journal, February 1
  • Hard Return • Michele Mekel • Eccentric Orbits: An Anthology of Science Fiction Poetry, Vol. 2, ed. Wendy Van Camp (Dimensionfold Publishing)
  • The Heart of the House • M. J. Holmes • The Horror Zine, August
  • [a hissing leak in the airlock] • LeRoy Gorman • Star*Line 44.2
  • Hitting the Red Line • Herb Kauderer • Scifaikuest print, February
  • [horror movie] • Mark Gilbert • horror senryu journal, June 23
  • [I’m trying to sleep] • Marcus Vance • Star*Line 44.2
  • [in a deserted garden] • Padmini Krishnan • Shamrock Haiku Journal 46
  • In Memoriam: Spring • Dan Bornstein • Star*Line 44.4
  • [Jonbar hinge] • Thomas Tilton • Scifaikuest print, February
  • [a kind of afterlife] • Roberta Beary • Haiku Dialogue, Ad Astra: star clusters
  • [kohl stick] • Vandana Parashar • Poetry Pea 4:6
  • [landing at the] • Brian Garrison • Star*Line 44.1
  • [left behind on Earth] • semi • Scifaikuest print, August
  • [left my late father’s] • David C. Kopaska-Merkel • Star*Line 44.1
  • [long-dead stars] • Lev Hart • Haiku Dialogue, Ad Astra: distant suns
  • [longest] • Julie Schwerin • Cold Moon Journal, June 13
  • Love on Halloween • DJ Tyrer • The Sirens Call 55
  • [magic mirror] • Susan Burch • Scifaikuest print, August
  • Mexico City, 2101 AD • Juan Manuel Pérez • Eye to the Telescope 41
  • [The modified plants] • Debby Feo • The Fifth Di…, June
  • [moon walk] • Valentina Ranaldi-Adams • Cold Moon Journal, June 24
  • [moonscape] • Kat Lehmann • Frogpond 44:3
  • Mother • Merie Kirby • Strange Horizons, 20 December
  • Narcissus Now • Diane Jackman • Octavos, March 11
  • Niche • Jason P. Burnham • Constraint 280, December 30
  • Night Spell • Deborah W. Sage • Eternal Haunted Summer, Winter Solstice
  • Nü Wa and Earth • Ellen Huang • K’in Literary Journal, June
  • [the octopus dreams] • Pippa Phillips • Cold Moon Journal, August 9
  • [the offworlders didn’t] • Roxanne Barbour • Medium.com, December 28
  • Older Red Riding Hood in the Woods Behind Her House • Carol Berg • Gingerbread House 47
  • [One touch] • Doug Gant • Scifaikuest print, February
  • Orbital Mechanics • Ian Goh • Star*Line 44.3
  • [pad 39] • Topher Dykes • Temple, ed. Iliyana Stoyanova (British Haiku Society)
  • Past Equinox • Ann K. Schwader • Unquiet Stars (Weird House Press)
  • [peaceful Halloween] • ayaz daryl nielsen • Haikuniverse, October 31
  • Penny Dreadful • Stephanie Staab • Ligeia, Spring
  • The Perils of Using Traditional Practices in Modern Cults • Marcie Lynn Tentchoff • Polar Starlight 2
  • Poem with Lines from my Son • Jen Stewart Fueston • Bracken VIII
  • [pouring rain] • Cherie Hunter Day • Acorn 47
  • Prince Charming Sleeps with the Fishes • Robert Borski • Octavos, February 17
  • Reflections on the Rescue of a Fawn • Shelly Jones • The Amphibian Literary Journal 1
  • Riding Down a Dream • Melissa Ridley Elmes • Star*Line 44.4
  • [riding lightning] • Akua Lezli Hope • Eccentric Orbits: An Anthology of Science Fiction Poetry, Vol. 2, ed. Wendy Van Camp (Dimensionfold Publishing)
  • Riverside • Avra Margariti • Octavos, March 4
  • Sasquatch Burial Ground • Raven Jakubowski • Star*Line 44.1
  • [scratched] • Kelli Lage • Haikuniverse, November 18
  • [seeking] • Lauren McBride • Eye to the Telescope 42
  • Slam • Jean Gallagher • Bowery Gothic V
  • Small Blue Poem • Lorraine Schein • Subterranean Blue Poetry IX:VI
  • [Something remains] • Rebecca Lilly • is/let, September
  • Straw Maidens • Meg Smith • Black Petals 94
  • Strings • Deborah L. Davitt • SFPA Poetry Contest
  • [sturgeon moon] • Nick Hoffman • Eye to the Telescope 42
  • Sunburn Affairs • Imogen L. Smiley • Lucent Dreaming 9
  • Sunita Soars • Tony Daly • Utopia Science Fiction 2:4
  • [superstring] • Helen Buckingham • NOON: journal of the short poem 20
  • [Take Your Child to Work Day] • Ngo Binh Anh Khoa • Scifaikuest print, November
  • [tattoo inked on your arm] • Matthew Wilson • Star*Line 44.2
  • Ten Squared • RK Rugg • Illumen, Summer
  • There Goes the Security Deposit • Sarah Cannavo • Star*Line 44.1
  • [theremin] • Debbie Strange • failed haiku: A Journal of English Senryu 6.65
  • Tracks • Bruce Boston • Asimov’s Science Fiction, November/December
  • [two belief zones are ahead] • Barbara Candiotti • Star*Line 44.2
  • Two Mountains • Brian Rosenberger • The Sirens Call 53
  • Typographical Error • John Kaprielian • Riddled with Arrows 4.1
  • [under the earth] • Tia Haynes • Otoroshi Journal 1:3
  • [the Universe] • Alan Summers • Haiku Dialogue, Ad Astra: impermanence
  • [unzipping] • John Hawkhead • horror senryu journal, September 10
  • Vampire Selfies • Alan Ira Gordon • Star*Line 44.1
  • Watchmaker • Carolyn Clink • Polar Starlight 2
  • [water lily …] • Francine Banwarth • The Heron’s Nest XXIII:1
  • [we flip through] • Colleen Anderson • Potter’s Field 7, ed. Tyree Campbell (Hiraeth Publishing)
  • what they left behind • Richard Magahiz • Star*Line 44.1
  • What Trees Read • Mary Soon Lee • Uppagus 48
  • [white balloons] • PS Cottier • AntipodeanSF 276
  • White Flag • Tim Gardiner • Otoroshi Journal 1:1
  • [widdershins] • Kirsten Cliff Elliot • horror senryu journal, May 10
  • [Zen garden] • Adjei Agyei-Baah • Shamrock Haiku Journal 46

2022 Rhysling Award Winners

Mary Soon Lee, Geoffrey A. Landis, and Linda D. Addison are the winners of the 2022 Rhysling Awards presented by the Science Fiction and Fantasy Poetry Association (SFPA).

The winners were chosen by SFPA members, with 114 votes cast.

SHORT POEM CATEGORY

First Place

  • “Confessions of a Spaceport AI” • Mary Soon Lee • Uncanny 43

Second Place

  • “Gravity (some things that fly)” • Geoffrey A. Landis • Space & Time Magazine 140

Third Place

  • “The Butterfly Affect” • Linda D. Addison • Were Tales: A Shapeshifter Anthology, eds. S. D. Vasallo & Steven M. Long (Brigids Gate Press)

Honorable Mentions

  • “our translucent bodies” • Devin Miller • Mermaids Monthly 6
  • “dry land” • Maria Zoccola • Strange Horizons, 7 June
  • “Exquisite” • Lee Murray• Tortured Willows: Bent, Bowed, Unbroken, collab. antho. (Yuriko Publishing)

The 2022 Rhysling Chairs are F. J. Bergmann and Brian U. Garrison.

The Rhysling Award is given in two categories. “Best Long Poem” is for poems of 50+ lines, or for prose poems, of 500+ words. “Best Short Poem” is limited to poems of no more than 49 lines, or prose poems of no more than 499 words. Voting continues on the Long Poem category until November 1.

SFPA will hold an official award ceremony and reading at LosCon in November 2022.

The 2022 Rhysling Anthology edited by F.J. Bergmann and Brian U. Garrison, with cover Image by Michal Kvác, can be purchased at the SFPA site.

Pixel Scroll 6/8/22 Goodness, Gracious, Great Scrolls Of Fur

(1) BIG RESPONSE. The “Send Oghenechovwe Donald Ekpeki to Worldcon” GoFundMe appeal passed its $7,000 goal in just over a day. A total of $7,460 has been raised from 156 donors at this writing.

(2) WHEN THE MOON HITS YOUR EYE. [By Mike Kennedy.] OK, so it wasn’t as big as the Moon (or even a pizza pie) but the “love tap” that the James Webb Space Telescope received was from an object bigger than expected. “NASA’s new powerful space telescope gets hit by larger than expected micrometeoroid” at The Verge.

NASA expected the JWST to be hit by quite a few micrometeoroids over its lifetime, but also expected them to be typically smaller than a grain of sand. One of the impacts received so far, though, was from an object bigger than that (though NASA hasn’t said just how big). It damaged one of the mirrors enough to cause a “marginally detectable effect in the data.“ Controllers are still working on it, but they feel they can make sufficient adjustments to the mirror to partially cancel the data distortion.

…Since its launch, JWST has already been hit by at least four different micrometeoroids, according to a NASA blog post, but all of those were small and about the size of what NASA expected the observatory to encounter. A micrometeoroid is typically a small fragment of an asteroid, usually smaller than a grain of sand. The one that hit JWST in May, however, was larger than what the agency had prepared for, though the agency didn’t specify its exact size. NASA admits that the strike, which occurred between May 23rd and May 25th, has caused a “marginally detectable effect in the data” and that engineers are continuing to analyze the effects of the impact….

(3) THE DECLARATION OF SWEETWEIRD. Charlie Jane Anders promulgated “The Sweetweird Manifesto” this week. The post names plenty of works she regards as examples and creates a retroactive history of the form.

…And here’s where I should admit that sweetweird isn’t actually a formal movement, and nobody except for me has been using that term. I wrote in my recent writing advice book Never Say You Can’t Survive that I’m burned out on “grimdark” storytelling that revels in nastiness and extreme violence, and instead I’m ready for “sweetweird.”… 

What is Sweetweird?

The core idea of sweetweird is: the world makes no sense, but we can be nurturing, frivolous and kind. We don’t have to respond to the ludicrous illogic of the world around us by turning mean and nasty, or by expecting everyone else to be horrible. At the very least, we can carve out friendly, supportive spaces in the midst of chaotic nonsense, and maybe help each other survive.

Instead of demanding that the universe stop being a farrago, we embrace the strangeness and make it our own. The unrealness of our consensus reality liberates us, because it undermines the fiction of “normality” and creates a space for us to be our authentic eccentric selves. Decency without conformity, joy that doesn’t depend on a false sense of stability. Affectionate silliness….. 

(4) FREE READS. Aliette de Bodard alerted fans that two of her short stories are available to read for free:

“Sword of Bone, Halls of Thorns” at The Sunday Morning Transport is a story about an exorcist, a talking sword, creepy vegetation and how the choices we make haunt us beyond death and rebirth. 

“The Scholar of the Bamboo Flute” is a reprint available in Uncanny Magazine. Basically it’s Utena-inspired sapphic shenanigans set in a 19th Century Vietnamese-esque academy. (if you don’t know the anime Utena, let’s just say it involves magical duelling, a princess and a whole hell of a lot of queerness, and it’s one of my absolute favourites–a formative watch for me). 

(5) ARTIST Q&A. The Science Fiction and Fantasy Poetry Association’s SPECPO blog posted “An Interview with Austin Hart, Star*Line 44.3 Cover Artist, by Jean-Paul Garnier (editor)”.

What led you into the visual arts, and what inspires you to create?

I just admired people that could draw from an early age. I had a couple of uncles that were good artists, and my dad is an architect and my mom is good at drawing even though she doesn’t do it much. I remember some kids in my classes in elementary school that were good artists early on and just trying to keep up with them. Marvel and Image comics and trading cards were very popular and I liked drawing characters and weapons from RPGs. I remember finding out about Robert Crumb, and later Frank Frazetta, early on and that raised the bar in my head for what was possible, but I could never be as good as they are. I am more impressed by pros who can do quick lose expressive sketches with very few lines than people who can make a fully rendered drawing or painting. I am very envious of those types of pros.

(6) SFF’S OWN LOST CAUSE MYTH. Camestros Felapton took notes on a 95-minute YouTube chat between host Ethan Van Sciver and guest Larry Correia: “Watching You Tube so you don’t have to: Larry & Ethan edition”.

…What sustained me through what was an extraordinarily dull experience was the question on whether the elephants in the room would get mentioned. Put these guys together and there are two elephants: one quite significant and based in Switzerland and one less so and based in California.

… In short, EVS and LC had a lot in common to talk about! You won’t be surprised to discover that they didn’t talk about it either…

…After that, we get a garbled history of the Puppy campaigns. Events get shoehorned together and the absence of Vox Day from the story looms ever larger. It becomes this big mysterious thing as to why people might think of the Sad Puppy 2 campaign as being racist and misogynistic (hint: Vox Day aside from anything else). The absence of Day from the narrative enables this spin that the pushback against the Sad Puppy campaign from a diversity perspective was wholly irrational…

(7) THE WORLD NEEDS A HERO. DC dropped this trailer for Black Adam today. Only in theaters October 21.

(8) MEDIA BIRTHDAY.

1984 [By Cat Eldridge.] Thirty-eight years ago on this day, Indiana Jones and The Temple of Doom, the sequel to the Hugo-winning Raiders of the Lost Ark, premiered. It’s actually a prequel to that film. Once again it’s directed by Steven Spielberg from a story by George Lucas. The screenplay was by the husband and wife team of Willard Huyck and Gloria Katz, best known for American Graffiti which yes involved both George Lucas and Harrison Ford. 

Harrison Ford was of course back along with Kate Capshaw, Amrish Puri, Roshan Seth, Philip Stone and Ke Huy Quan. Capshaw would marry Spielberg seven years later and yes they are still married, bless them! 

I’ll admit that Indiana Jones and The Temple of Doom was nearly not as fun for me as Raiders of the Lost Ark but critics loved it, with Roger Ebert in his Chicago Sun-Times review saying it was “the most cheerfully exciting, bizarre, goofy, romantic adventure movie since Raiders, and it is high praise to say that it’s not so much a sequel as an equal. It’s quite an experience.”  

And Kathleen Carroll of the New York Daily Postwas equally exuberant: “Indie, you will be happy to learn, hasn’t changed a bit. Played with gruff determination by the appealingly rugged Harrison Ford, he continues to set quite a pace for himself in Spielberg’s rip-roaring, boldly imaginative sequel to his blockbuster hit.” 

It’s worth noting that It did get banned in India which as one who spent considerable time in Sri Lanka is something I fully understand as there are truly disgusting Indian stereotypes in that film.

It was fantastically profitable as it cost just under thirty million in production and publicity costs and made ten times that at the box office in its initial run! 

Audience reviewers at Rotten Tomatoes are very fond of it, giving it an eighty-four percent rating. 

(9) TODAY’S BIRTHDAYS.

[Compiled by Cat Eldridge.]

  • Born June 8, 1910 – John W. Campbell, Jr.  Author of half a dozen novels, a score of shorter stories like “Who Goes There?” and “Forgetfulness.” For 34 years he edited Astounding, renamed Analog, and a short-lived fantasy companion, Unknown (see Fred Smith’s Once There Was a Magazine). Ushered in the Golden Age of SF. Won 17 Hugos, of which nine were Retrospective, all but one for editing (the exception: Retro-Hugo for “Who Goes There?”). On the other hand, in his ASF editorials he supported many forms of crank medicine, and promoted Dianetics, and specious views about slavery, race, and segregation, all of which was well-known in sf fandom. In the Sixties he rejected Samuel R. Delany‘s Nova for serialization saying that he did not feel his readership “would be able to relate to a black main character.” Focusing on his foundational contributions, his name was put on the John W. Campbell Award for Best New Writer, but after 46 years it was renamed the Astounding Award when a winner called him out for “setting a tone of science fiction that still haunts the genre to this day.” (Died 1971) [OGH]
  • Born June 8, 1915 Frank Riley. He’s best known for They’d Rather Be Right (co-written with Mark Clifton) which won a Hugo Award for Best Novel at Clevention (1955). Originally published in serialized form in Astounding unlike his eight short SF stories that were all published in If. Sadly he’s not made it into the digital realm yet except for scattered stories. (Died 1996.)
  • Born June 8, 1917 George D. Wallace. He’s here for playing Commando Cody in the early Fifties Radar Men from the Moon movie serial. He would later show up as the Bosun on Forbidden Planet, and had minor roles late in his career in MultiplicityBicentennial Man and Minority Report. He also played a Star Fleet Admiral in “The Man of the People” episode of The Next Generation. (Died 2005.)
  • Born June 8, 1926 Philip Levene. He wrote nineteen episodes of The Avengers including creating the Cybernauts which won him a Writer’s Guild Award, and served as script consultant for the series in 1968–69. He also has three genre acting credits, one as a Supervisor in “The Food” episode of Quatermass II; the second as a Security Guard in the X the Unknown film, and finally as Daffodil in Avenger’s “Who’s Who” episode. (Died 1973.)
  • Born June 8, 1928 Kate Wilhelm. Author of the Hugo–winning Where Late the Sweet Birds Sang. She also won a Hugo for Best Related Book and a Locus Award for Best Nonfiction for Storyteller: Writing Lessons and More from 27 Years of the Clarion Writers’ Workshop. SFWA renamed their Solstice Award the Kate Wilhelm Solstice Award. She established the Clarion Workshop with her husband Damon Knight and writer Robin Scott Wilson. (Died 2018.)
  • Born June 8, 1946 Elizabeth A. Lynn, 76. She is well known for being one of the first genre writers to introduce gay and lesbian characters as an aspect of her stories. So in honor of her, the widely known A Different Light chain of LGBT bookstores took its name from her novel of that name. Her best known work is The Chronicles of Tornor series. Her Watchtower novel won a World Fantasy Award as did “The Woman Who Loved the Moon” story. 
  • Born June 8, 1947 Sara Paretsky, 75. Best best known for her private detective novels focused on V.I. Warshawski, she has one genre novel in Ghost Country. It too involves V.I. Warshawski and may or may not involve things of supernatural nature. I haven’t encountered it, so I’d be interested in hearing from anyone who has. 
  • Born June 8, 1973 Lexa Doig, 49. Cowgirl the hacker on TekWar,the post-Trek Shatner series that he actually made sense in as opposed to Barbary Coast. She was also Andromeda Ascendant/Rommie on Andromeda and Sonya Valentine on Continuum, and the voice of Dale Arden in the animated Flash Gordon series. One-offs in Earth: Final ConflictThe 4400Stargate SG-1, Eureka, V, Smallville, Supernatural and Primeval: New World

(10) COMICS SECTION.

  • Mannequin on the Moon has a wonderful word processing gag.
  • Crankshaft is about someone who hasn’t kept up with the times. (Which it usually is, come to think of it.)

(11) HEAD OUT ON THE HIGHWAY. This bookseller delivers – the entire store! “Rita Collins Drives a Traveling Bookstore Around the United States” at Today.

From May to October, you can find Rita Collins, 70, in the front seat of a white Sprinter van, driving across America. In this era of RVs and #vanlife Instagram photos, Collins’ ride is set apart. Rattling around, in the back of her van, is a fully functional used bookstore.

While stopping in small towns and cities around the U.S., Collins relishes in the wonder that comes across people’s faces when they realize this van is not like any other. Whether she’s parked outside of a book festival, coffee shop or farmer’s market, Collins finds herself having the same conversation, encouraging people to climb the wooden steps and take a peek inside….

Like most traditional bookstores, St. Rita’s Traveling Bookstore and Textual Apothecary has floor-to-ceiling shelves organized by genre, overhead lighting and a carpet on the floor. The main difference, of course, is that it’s on wheels. The bookstores’ 600 volumes are set at a 15 degree angle to keep them from falling as Collins drives from state to state — so far, she’s been to 30, and has traveled cross-country three times. 

(12) HERE COMES THE PITCH. “’Ms. Marvel’ directors presented a PowerPoint to Kevin Feige to convince him to include animation, inspired by ‘Into the Spider-Verse’” at MSN.com.

…With past shows like “Moon Knight,” “Hawkeye,” “Loki,” and “WandaVision” taking on a more serious tone, here comes a standout show that’s refreshingly light.

You can give some of that credit to filmmaking duo Adil El Arbi and Bilall Fallah.

The Moroccan-Belgian filmmakers (known collectively as Adil and Bilall) instantly saw “Ms. Marvel” as a show that should be filled with color, life, and celebration of culture….

Adil and Billal felt animation would make the show pop. So they compiled a presentation with things that inspired them and headed to the Marvel Studios offices to pitch how they would direct the series to studio head Kevin Feige and his team.

“Kevin walked in and I have to admit, I was a little starstruck,” Bilall said. “We did this whole PowerPoint presentation and we told them that this is our influences for the show. ‘Into the Spider-Verse’ was a big one because of the animation.”

“For us, the animation was something we always wanted to put into it,” Adil added. “We wanted to portray that dream world of Kamala Khan and the comic book aspect to it. We were afraid that Kevin would say no because it’s different from the other shows of the MCU.”

(13) THEY ROCK TO THE TREES. A 2015 article at Hollywood.com involving Andy Serkis, The Imaginarium, motion capture, and animation — with a nod to 2001: A Space Odyssey — tells how an “Andy Serkis meeting inspired Coldplay’s chimp video”.

A chance meeting between British rocker Chris Martin and actor Andy Serkis inspired the band to embrace motion-capture technology for a new music video.

The musicians were transformed into chimps in the promo for their new single Adventure Of A Lifetime using techniques pioneered in Hollywood movies such as Avatar and The Lord of The Rings.

It has now been revealed the idea came about after frontman Chris bumped into Andy on a plane, and the pair discussed the actor’s experiences with motion-capture on films such as King Kong and the Planet of the Apes series.

The rockers spent six months making the short clip, and used “full motion performance capture rigs” to transform themselves….

Coldplay – Adventure Of A Lifetime (Making Of Video)

Coldplay – Adventure Of A Lifetime (Official Video) – YouTube

(14) HERMAN, LILY, & GRANDPA, OH MY. ScreenRant invites us to watch “’The Munsters’ Return in First Trailer for Rob Zombie Movie”. The Munsters will premiere this fall on Universal All Access.

…Today, Universal released the first teaser for the film, which is practically a shot-for-shot remake of the original Munsters opening credits, complete with the classic Munsters theme song. It makes it pretty clear that if you were expecting Zombie to turn The Munsters into a stereotypical Rob Zombie movie full of blood and guts, you were mistaken. (Zombie has already said, this is not an R-rated reimagining; it’s a PG-rated tribute.)…

(15) X MINUS TWO. Paramount Plus promises this is “the dumbest science fiction movie ever made!” Beavis and Butt-Head Do the Universe, streaming on June 23,

In perhaps the dumbest space movie ever made, Beavis and Butt-head are sentenced to Space Camp by a “creative” judge in 1998, leading to a trip on the Space Shuttle, with predictably disastrous results. After going through a black hole, they reemerge in our time, where they look for love, misuse iPhones, and are hunted by the Deep State. Spoiler: They don’t score.

(16) VIDEO OF THE DAY. [Item by Martin Morse Wooster.] Alasdair Beckett-King asks, “What happens if you merged King of the Hill and Lord of the Rings?” in “Return of the King of the Hill of the Rings”.

[Thanks to Michael Toman, Cora Buhlert, Cat Eldridge, Mike Kennedy, Martin Morse Wooster, JJ, John King Tarpinian, Chris Barkley, and Andrew Porter for some of these stories. Title credit belongs to File 770 contributing editor of the day Daniel Dern.]

2022 SFPA Poetry Contest Opens

The 2022 SFPA Speculative Poetry Contest is taking entries through August 31. The contest is open to all poets, including non-SFPA-members. Prizes will be awarded for best unpublished poem in three categories:

  • Dwarf (poems 1–10 lines [prose poems 0–100 words])
  • Short (11–49 lines [prose poems 101–499 words])
  • Long (50 lines and more [prose 500 words and up])

Line count does not include title or stanza breaks. All sub-genres of speculative poetry are allowed in any form. Winners will be announced October 1.

The prizes in each category (Dwarf, Short, Long) will be $150 First Prize, $75 Second Prize, $25 Third Prize. The first through third place poems will be published on the SFPA website. There is an entry fee of $3 per poem.

The contest judge is David Kirby, who teaches at Florida State University. His collection The House on Boulevard St.: New and Selected Poems was a finalist for both the National Book Award and Canada’s Griffin Poetry Prize. He is the author of Little Richard: The Birth of Rock ‘n’ Roll, which the Times Literary Supplement of London called “a hymn of praise to the emancipatory power of nonsense” and was named one of Booklist’s Top 10 Black History Non-Fiction Books of 2010. His latest books are a poetry collection, Help Me, Information, and a textbook modestly entitled The Knowledge: Where Poems Come From and How to Write Them.

The 2022 Contest Chair is Brittany Hause, whose speculative poetry has appeared in Asimov’s Science Fiction, Kaleidotrope, and many other places, and their Spanish-to-English verse translations can be read in Better Than Starbucks, Star*Line, and elsewhere. They’re not from the UK, but that’s where they currently live.

Entries are read blind. Unpublished poems only. Author retains rights, except that first through third place winners will be published on the SPFA website. Full guidelines here.

Pixel Scroll 5/18/22 Fili, Scrolli, Pixeli – I Liked, Scrolled And Pixeled — Fiulius Pixar

(1) ANIME CENTRAL RELAXES MASK POLICY. Anime Central is a convention taking place in Chicago from May 20-22. At the end of April the con committee was adamant that for ACen 2022 they’d be requiring all attendees to wear a mask and provide proof of vaccination or a negative Covid test result, and that this policy would not change.

However, their Covid policy has changed after all, reports Anime News Network: “Anime Central 2022 Reverses Mask Policy, No Longer Requires COVID-19 Vaccination or Negative Test”. ANN says, “An e-mail sent by and to Anime Central staff suggests that this was a decision made by the Midwest Animation Promotion Society (MAPS) following ‘lack of support from the venue’ and ‘last-minute communication.’”

Anime Central has changed its Covid policy to read:

…Our policies are based on current CDC Guidelines and align with the requirements of the Donald E. Stephens Conventions Center and state and local health authorities regarding large indoor events. Currently, verification of vaccination or proof of negative test are not required for admission to the Donald E. Stephens Convention Center or Anime Central. We will continue to monitor the requirements and guidance from state and local health departments….

Face Coverings Required in Select Areas

In our recent vaccine and mask policy change announcement, we stated that face coverings may be required in some areas of Anime Central or at the request of our guests of honor at their events. We’ve received a lot of feedback for clarification on which areas and events will require a face covering and which do not. Face coverings will be required to enter:

  • All guest and panelist events
  • The Dances
  • The Exhibit Hall
  • The Artist Alley
  • The Gaming and Entertainment Hall

We strongly recommend wearing masks in all lobbies, hallways, public spaces, and restrooms. Our team will continue to do the best we can to help enforce this in our spaces, we ask that you also join in in masking even where it’s not required.

(2) A WARNING. “’Have we not loved you? Have we not cared for you?’: The Plight of AI in the Universe of Douglas Adams” examined by Rachel Taylor at the Tor/Forge Blog.

…When we think of the dangers of AI, we normally think of Skynet, HAL or AM. And sure, there is a non-zero chance that any Super AI might spend five minutes on the internet and think “ah, I see the problem. Where are those nuclear codes?” But honestly, if I had to place money on the science fiction writer who will prove most prophetic in depicting our future relationship with AI? Not Philip K. Dick. Not Harlan Ellison. Not Asimov.

Douglas Adams, all the way.

In the universe of the Hitchhiker’s Guide to the Galaxy and its sequels across all media the relationship between humanity and the various computers and robots they’ve created is less apocalyptic warfare and more like a miserably unhappy marriage….

(3) ROSWELL VOICES. Here are the celebrity readers for this weekend’s 2022 Roswell Award event. Register for the free Zoom presentation.

The Roswell Award and Feminist Futures Award: Celebrity Readings & Honors recognizes outstanding new works of science fiction by emerging writers from across the United States and worldwide, including the winner of this year’s feminist themed sci-fi story. This thrilling show will feature dramatic readings by celebrity guests from some of today’s hottest sci-fi and fantasy shows and movies. Following the readings, the authors will be honored for their writing! 

(4) AURORA VOTERS PACKAGE. Canadian Science Fiction & Fantasy Association members can now download the 2022 Aurora Awards Voters Package. Login (or join) at www.prixaurorawards.ca. Downloads remain available until voting closes on July 23.  Voting for the 2022 awards will begin on June 11.

Have you started reading works by this year’s finalists? We are pleased to announce that this year’s voters’ package contains either e-versions or links for every single one of our 2022 nominated works and is open to all CSFFA members to download.

The electronic versions of these works are being made available to you through the generosity of the nominees and their publishers. We are grateful for their participation and willingness to share with CSFFA members. Please remember, all downloads are for CSFFA members only and are not to be shared.

The purpose of the voters’ package is simple–before you vote for the awards, we want you to be able to experience as many of the nominated works as possible so you can make informed decisions.

(5) HEAR RHYSLING NOMINEES READ ALOUD. The second of three readings of the short poems nominated for the Rhysling Awards will be held on May 20, 2022 from 7:00 to 8:15 p.m. Eastern, live on Facebook via Zoom. tinyurl.com/Rhysling2

The Science Fiction and Fantasy Poetry Association presents the annual Rhysling Awards, named for the blind poet Rhysling in Robert A. Heinlein’s short story “The Green Hills of Earth.” Apollo 15 astronauts named a crater near their landing site “Rhysling,” which has since become its official name.

Nominees for each year’s Rhysling Awards are selected by the membership of the Science Fiction and Fantasy Poetry Association. For 2022, 103 short poems and 78 long poems were nominated.

The last reading of the nominated short poems in the Rhysling anthology will be held on June 6, 2022 from 7 to 8 p.m. EDT. The readings, hosted by Akua Lezli Hope, are free and open to the public. 

(6) THE FIRST TRAILER FOR SHE-HULK. “You’ll like her when she’s angry.” She-Hulk: Attorney at Law, an Original series from Marvel Studios, starts streaming August 17 on Disney+.

(7) HIGHER LEARNING. In the Washington Post, Mary Quattlebaum interviews Dhonielle Clayton about The Marvellers, her YA magic-school novel. “’The Marvellers’ by Dhonielle Clayton features a diverse school of magic”.

… “So many people said it couldn’t be done,” said Dhonielle (pronounced don-yell) Clayton about a novel set in a school of magic. “How can anyone compete with Harry Potter?”

Well, Clayton proved them wrong. “The Marvellers,” the first book in her new middle-grade series, was launched this month.

The boarding school — called the Arcanum Training Institute for Marvelous and Uncanny Endeavors — is quite different from the Hogwarts of J.K. Rowling’s global publishing phenomenon. It’s located in the sky rather than a mystical land that resembles the Scottish Highlands. Young magic folks from around the world are invited to attend.

Clayton’s inspiration came from a real school, one in New York City’s East Harlem neighborhood, where she was a librarian.

“The kids there were from different countries, different cultures,” said Clayton, who lives in the city. “They didn’t see themselves in the fantasy books they wanted to read.”

So for the past five years, Clayton devoted herself to researching and writing a book that might reflect and connect with those students — and so many like them, around the world….

(8) THOUGHTS AND PREYERS. Giant Freakin Robot assures us, “The Predator Actually Looks Good Again In The Trailer For New Movie Set 300 Years Ago”.

…Prey will stream on Hulu starting Friday, August 5. While it will technically be a prequel to the rest of the Predator films, it will reportedly not directly reference any of their events. Besides, you know. Having someone from the same freaky alien species hunting people down and murdering them….

The YouTube intro says:

Set in the Comanche Nation 300 years ago, “Prey” is the story of a young woman, Naru, a fierce and highly skilled warrior. She has been raised in the shadow of some of the most legendary hunters who roam the Great Plains, so when danger threatens her camp, she sets out to protect her people. The prey she stalks, and ultimately confronts, turns out to be a highly evolved alien predator with a technically advanced arsenal, resulting in a vicious and terrifying showdown between the two adversaries.

(9) MEMORY LANE.

2013 [By Cat Eldridge.] Ok I cannot do this essay without SPOILERS, so you are warned. Go away now if you haven’t read Ancillary Justice

Just nine years ago, Ancillary Justice, Ann Leckie’s debut novel came out. And oh what a novel it is! It’s the first in her Imperial Radch space opera trilogy, followed by Ancillary Sword and Ancillary Mercy. Breq is both the sole survivor of a starship destroyed by treachery by her own people and the carrier of that ship’s consciousness. What an amazing job Leckie does differentiating between those two characters.

Doing space opera that feels original is damn hard but she pulls it off here amazingly well. The very personal and the grand political are present here, balanced in a way and tangled together as well that is rarely done so intelligently. Genevieve Valentine of NPR in her review agrees with me saying that it is “A space opera that skillfully handles both choruses and arias, Ancillary Justice is an absorbing thousand-year history, a poignant personal journey, and a welcome addition to the genre.” 

Everyone in our community liked it as not only did it win a most deserved Hugo at Loncon 4, but it effectively swept the awards season garnering an Arthur C. Clarke Award, a BSFA Award, a Kitschies Golden Tentacle for Best Debut Novel, Locus Award for Best First Novel, a Nebula Award for Best Novel and a Seiun Award for Best Translated Novel. And it got nominated for a Compton Crook Award, Otherwise Award and Philip K. Dick Award.

The next two novels in this trilogy are just as stellar. Ancillary Sword got nominated for a Hugo at Sasquan, and Ancillary Mercy would get a nomination at MidAmericaCon.

The audioworks are narrated by Adjoa Andoh who appeared on Doctor Who as Francine Jones during the Time of the Tenth and Eleventh Doctors. They are quite superb. 

(10) TODAY’S BIRTHDAYS.

[Compiled by Cat Eldridge.]

  • Born May 18, 1930 Fred Saberhagen. I’m reasonably sure I’ve read the entirety of his Berserker series though not in the order they were intended to be read. Some are outstanding, some less so. I’d recommend Berserker ManShiva in Steel and the original Berserker collection.  Of his Dracula sequence, the only one I think that I’veread is The Holmes-Dracula File which is superb. And I know I’ve read most of the Swords tales as they came out in various magazines.  His only Hugo nomination was at NYCon 3 for his “Mr. Jester” short story published in If, January 1966. (Died 2007.)
  • Born May 18, 1934 Elizabeth Rodgers. Yes, Nyota Uhura was the primary individual at the communications post but several others did staff it over the series. She appeared doing that as Lt. Palmer in two episodes, “The Doomsday Machine” and “The Way to Eden”.  She was The Voice of The Companion in a third episode, “Metamorphosis”. She would also appear in The Time Tunnel, Land of The Giants and Bewitched. (Died 2004.)
  • Born May 18, 1946 Andreas Katsulas. I knew him as the amazing Ambassador G’Kar on Babylon 5 but had forgottenhe played played the Romulan Commander Tomalak on Star Trek: The Next Generation. I’m reasonably sure that his first genre role on television was playing Snout in A Midsummer Night’s Dream and he had a recurring role in Max Headroom as Mr. Bartlett. He also had appearances on Alien NationThe Death of the Incredible HulkMillenniumStar Trek: Enterprise anda voice role on The Real Adventures of Jonny Quest. Screw the damn frelling Reaper for taking him far too soon.  (Died 2006.)
  • Born May 18, 1948 R-Laurraine Tutihasi, 74. She’s a member of LASFS and the N3F. She publishes Feline Mewsings for FAPA. She won the N3F’s Kaymar Award in 2009. Not surprisingly, she’s had a number of SJW creds in her life and her website here gives a look at her beloved cats and a lot of information on her fanzines. 
  • Born May 18, 1952 Diane Duane, 70. She’s known for the Young Wizards YA series though I’d like to single her out for her lesser-known Feline Wizards series where SJW creds maintain the gates that wizards use for travel throughout the multiverse. A most wonderful thing for felines to do! Her Tale of the Five series was inducted into the Gaylactic Spectrum Award Hall of Fame in 2003. She also has won The Faust Award for Lifetime Achievement given by The International Association of Media Tie-In Writers. 
  • Born May 18, 1958 Jonathan Maberry, 64. The only thing I’ve read by him is the first five or six novels in the Joe Ledger Series which has an extremely high body count and an even higher improbability index. Popcorn reading with a Sriracha sauce.  I see that he’s done scripts for Dark Horse, IDW and Marvel early on. And that he’s responsible for Captain America: Hail Hydra which I remember as quite excellent. Not surprisingly, he’s won Stoker Awards and nominated for at least a dozen more. 
  • Born May 18, 1969 Ty Franck, 53. Half of the writing team along with Daniel Abraham that s James Corey, author of the now-completed Expanse series. I’ll admit that I’ve fallen behind by a volume or two as there’s just too many good series out there too keep up with all of them, damn it, but now that it’s ended I intend to finish it. The Expanse won the Best Series Hugo at CoNZealand. The “Nemesis Games” episode of The Expanse is nominated at Chicon 8 for a Hugo as have two episodes previously. 

(11) FREE READ. “Grant Morrison Releases a Sci-Fi Comic He Made Back in the ’80s” and Gizmodo invites you to read it in a slideshow presented at the link.

Grant Morrison, multiple award-winning writer of acclaimed comic books like All-Star Superman, The Invisibles, Doom Patrol, New X-Men, Batman, and many many more, had a special gift released this past Free Comic Book Day. In wasn’t a new title; in fact, it was quite the opposite—a 40-year-old short story he’d written and drawn in the very early stages of his career. While Morrison originally posted it on their SubStack, we’re absolutely honored to be able to republish it on io9.

(12) A KALEIDOSCOPIC AUDIENCE. Charles Payseur, who now is reviewing short fiction for Locus and stepped away from his epic Quick Sip Reviews blog, speaks openly about how public expectations whipsaw critics. Thread starts here.

(13) ABANDONED LAUNDRY. The Guardian’s Lucy Mangan says, “Steven Moffat’s adaptation of Audrey Niffenegger’s 2003 bestseller is witty and well done, but it can’t overcome the novel’s depressingly old-fashioned and iffy implications.” – “The Time Traveler’s Wife review – far too much ick factor to be truly great”.

…He [The Time Traveler] learns to find his feet (and some clothes) a little faster each time. In the course of his many unchronological journeys, he meets his soulmate, Clare. They are wrenched repeatedly from each other’s arms to reunite weeks, months or years later in more or less romantic scenarios, depending on their ages at the time.

It is, in short, guff of a high order. But the new six‑part adaptation (Sky Atlantic) by Steven Moffat (a longtime fan of the book, which he used as inspiration for the Doctor Who episode The Girl in the Fireplace) does it proud. He takes the melodrama down a notch and salts the schmaltz with wit where he can.

Nonetheless, an emetic framing device remains….

(14) TELL NASA WHAT YOU THINK. “NASA Seeks Input on Moon to Mars Objectives, Comments Due May 31”.

As NASA moves forward with plans to send astronauts to the Moon under Artemis missions to prepare for human exploration of Mars, the agency is calling on U.S. industry, academia, international communities, and other stakeholders to provide input on its deep space exploration objectives. 

NASA released a draft set of high-level objectives Tuesday, May 17, identifying 50 points falling under four overarching categories of exploration, including transportation and habitation; Moon and Mars infrastructure; operations; and science. Comments are due to the agency by close of business on Tuesday, May 31. 

“The feedback we receive on the objectives we have identified will inform our exploration plans at the Moon and Mars for the next 20 years,” said Deputy Administrator Pam Melroy. “We’re looking within NASA and to external stakeholders to help us fine-tune these objectives and be as transparent as possible throughout our process. With this approach, we will find potential gaps in our architecture as well as areas where our goals align with those from industry and international partners for future collaboration.”   

(15) WEIRDO CEREAL NEWS. [Item by Martin Morse Wooster.] Not even kids stoked on sugar wanted to see creepy creatures staring at them from the cereal bowl, so I bought a box on the half-price shelf today. “Minecraft” at Kellogg’s.

(16) VIDEO OF THE DAY. [Item by Martin Morse Wooster.] The Blue Peter gang drive a full-scale Thunderbirds Fab-1 complete with a rotating license plate, machine gun, and a closed-circuit TV set in this 1968 BBC clip that dropped yesterday.

Blue Peter presenters Valerie Singleton, John Noakes and Peter Purves bring a fully-functioning life-size replica of Lady Penelope’s iconic Rolls-Royce, FAB 1 into the studio.

[Thanks to Martin Morse Wooster, JJ, John King Tarpinian, Chris Barkley, Olav Rokne, Andrew Porter, Michael Toman, Cat Eldridge, and Mike Kennedy for some of these stories. Title credit belongs to File 770 contributing editor of the day Ingvar.]

2022 Rhysling Award Candidates

The Science Fiction Poetry Association has finalized its 2022 Rhysling Award candidates. A record 113 members nominated.

The Rhysling Award is given in two categories. “Best Long Poem” is for poems of 50+ lines, or for prose poems, of 500+ words. “Best Short Poem” is limited to poems of no more than 49 lines, or prose poems of no more than 499 words.

SFPA members will begin casting their ballots for the winners on April 1.

SHORT POEMS (103 poems)
“The Butterfly Affect” • Linda D. Addison • Were Tales: A Shapeshifter Anthology, eds. S. D. Vasallo & Steven M. Long (Brigids Gate Press)
“The Conqueror Worm(Hole)” • Linda D. Addison • The Magazine of Fantasy & Science Fiction, September/October
“Hallucinations” • Amirah al Wassif • Silver Blade 51
“Forbidden Haibun: Expand” • Francis W. Alexander • Scifaikuest, February 1
“The Forbidden Path to Forgetting” • Daniel Ausema • Fantasy Magazine 71
“Tons of Liquid Oxygen Buckle Too Late Under Strain” • Eugen Bacon • Saving Shadows (NewCon Press)
“Curiosity Kills” • Alison Bainbridge • The Minison Zine 12
“The Other Crusoe” • David Barber • The Flying Saucer Poetry Review 1
“What The Time Travellers Stole” • L. X. Beckett • Uncanny 38
“Radiance” • F. J. Bergmann • Dreams and Nightmares 118
“Even Surrounded by Light, She Disappears” • Lisa Creech Bledsoe • Anti-Heroin Chic 23
“In the Library Annex” • Bruce Boston • Asimov’s SF, September/October
“SustainaCrock” • Rhian Bowley • Triangulation: Habitats
“Alice” • Anna Cates • Drifting Sands 11
“Little Black Box” • Anna Cates • Liquid Imagination 49
“Field Trip to See the Mermaid” • Beth Cato • Mermaids Monthly, November
“How to Find Yourself Again” • Beth Cato • Fantasy Magazine 69
“Dragonslayer” • Priya Chand • Fantasy Magazine 65
“Musée Dupuytren, Paris” • Carolyn Clink • Polar Starlight 2
“Watchmaker” • Carolyn Clink • Polar Starlight 2
“Sport on Mars” • PS Cottier • The Crow, December
“As We Were Saying Goodnight” • Henry Crawford • Rattle, Poets Respond October 31
“Psychopomp” • M. J. Cunniff • The Deadlands 1
“The Conglomerant” • David Davies • Granfalloon, Fall
“Gris-gris” • Deborah L. Davitt • Selene Quarterly 4:1
“Snails” • Denise Dumars • Spectrum 28
“the empires of old” • Robin Wyatt Dunn • Dissident Voice, December 19
“Witch Flesh” • Stephanie Ellis • Visual Verse 9:1
“Chernobyl Litany” • Gemma Files • The Deadlands 3
“Inheritance” • Geneve Flynn • Tortured Willows: Bent, Bowed, Unbroken, ed. Angela Yuriko Smith (Yuriko Publishing)
“Warrior over Washington” • Adam Ford • Star*Line 44.1
“Sylvan Succubus” • Joshua Gage • Star*Line 44.1
“No More Prying Eyes” • Maxwell I. Gold • Shadow Atlas, eds. Carina Bissett, Hillary Dodge & Joshua Viola (Hex Publishers)
“In Memory Yet Green” • Alan Ira Gordon • Star*Line 44.4
“Aswang Mango: Santiago’s Fantasia” • Vince Gotera • MiGoZine, Summer
“Blood Spells” • Neile Graham • Polar Starlight 1
“find me” • féi hernandez • Nombono, ed. Akua Lezli Hope (Sundress Publications)
“Unexpected Malfunction in the Xenobiology Monitoring System at Arcturus-IV, or Sonnet #1” • Jordan Hirsch • Utopia Science Fiction, December
“Prologue: The Late Heavy Bombardment” • Ada Hoffmann • Million-Year Elegies
“Stratospherics 2” • Akua Lezli Hope • Eccentric Orbits vol. 2, ed. Wendy Van Camp (Dimensionfold Publishing)
“Michelangelo Carves David into Medusa” • Ellie Howard • beestung 9
“The Problem with the Bottling of Troublesome Spirits” • Juleigh Howard-Hobson • The Lost Librarian’s Grave, ed. Ann Wycoff (Redwood Press)
“Home’s Threnody” • Olaitan Humble • FIYAH 19
“Fragment of an Elegy” • Clay Franklin Johnson • A Ride Through Faerie & Other Poems (Gothic Keats Press)
“Interrupted Journey” • Tim Jones • Up Flynn Road, across Cook Strait, through the Magellanic Cloud, ed. Norman Franke (Orplid Press)
“In the Future We Will Live In Broken Houses” • Sandra Kasturi • Triangulation: Habitats
“Failed Space Colonists” Herb Kauderer • Asimov’s SF, July/August
“Little Red Loves Her Grandma” • Pankaj Khemka • Moon Tide Press, March 2021
“Stress Level Test” • Pankaj Khemka • Star*Line 44.2
“Ingenuity” • Deborah P Kolodji • Modern Haiku 52:3
“Lights Over the Midnight Desert” • David C. Kopaska-Merkel • Eye to the Telescope 40
“Swipples” • Craig Kurtz • Eye to the Telescope 39
“Gravity (some things that fly)” • Geoffrey A. Landis • Space & Time Magazine 140
“Confessions of a Spaceport AI” • Mary Soon Lee • Uncanny 43
“Daedalus’s Daughter” • Mary Soon Lee • Star*Line 44.4
“Sea Gods” • Mary Soon Lee • Eye to the Telescope 42
“Home Gravity Physics” • Sandra J. Lindow • Triangulation: Habitats
“What the Weed Whip Wanted” • Sandra J. Lindow • Dreams and Nightmares 119
“Anthony of Egypt, Professional Recluse and Patron Saint of Boneyards” • LindaAnn LoSchiavo • Drifting Sands Haibun 10
“Ode” • P. H. Low • Strange Horizons, 30 August
“shedding photons” • Richard Magahiz • Dreams and Nightmares 119
“Extrasolar Faeryland” • Avra Margariti • Utopia Science Fiction, June
“When the Martian Wind Blows” • Lauren McBride • Scifaikuest, August
“A Monstrous Life Well Lived” • Elizabeth R. McClellan • Girls Who Love Monsters, collaborative anthology
“Thanks to Stanislav Petrov for Fairytales About Birds” • Elizabeth R. McClellan • Utopia Science Fiction, February
“Under a Pale Moon” • Mark Meyer • White Enso day 58
“our translucent bodies” • Devin Miller • Mermaids Monthly 6
“Flying Horses” • Debasish Mishra • Spaceports & Spidersilk, June
“Ways of the Multiverse” • Vincent Miskell • The Magazine of Fantasy & Science Fiction, November/December
“In Corfu” • Irina Moga • The Flying Saucer Poetry Review 1
“Crossroads” • Tiffany Morris • Nightmare 110
“There can only be one Soul Princess” • Michelle Muenzler • Penumbric 5:2
“exquisite” • Lee Murray• Tortured Willows: Bent, Bowed, Unbroken, ed. Angela Yuriko Smith (Yuriko Publishing)
“orchid moon” • Lee Murray• Tortured Willows: Bent, Bowed, Unbroken, ed. Angela Yuriko Smith (Yuriko Publishing)
“Dystopia” • Aminath Neena • Eccentric Orbits vol. 2, ed. Wendy Van Camp (Dimensionfold Publishing)
“A Martian Contemplates Earthrise” • KB Nelson • Polar Starlight 1
“Dracula Among the Ruins” • Mari Ness • Kaleidotrope, July
“Futuristic Funerals” • Dante Novario • Jersey Devil Press 112
“Sonnet of the South American Sphinx” • Katherine Quevedo • Honeyguide Literary Magazine 2
“Heart Tree” • John Reinhart • Taproot Magazine 43
“How Date Nights Bring You Ever Closer (A Forbidden Haibun)” • Terrie Leigh Relf • HWA Poetry Showcase VIII, ed. Stephanie M. Wytovich
“our stitching and unstitching” • Hester J. Rook • Liminality 28
“One of Us” • Louis Rosenberg • One of Us (Outland Publishing)
“Post Massacre Psyche Evaluation” • Abu Bakr Sadiq • Uncanny 43
“Extremophile” • Lauren Scharhag • Anvil Tongue Books, February
“The Galaxies Have Reversed Their Course and Are Hurtling Towards One Another” • Andrea Schlecht • Polar Starlight 3
“Cherry Blossoms (On Mourning a Distant Mother)” • E. F. Schraeder • HWA Poetry Showcase VIII, ed. Stephanie M. Wytovich
“Sepulcher of Saints” • Ann K. Schwader • Unquiet Stars (Weird House Press)
“A Banquet of Sugar & Tea” • Marge Simon • Silver Blade 50
“Graffiti Goddess” • Noel Sloboda • Abyss & Apex 79
“The Frozen North” • Marcie Lynn Tentchoff • Polar Starlight 4
“Cosmic Cooking” • Gretchen Tessmer • Kaleidotrope, Autumn
“Summer Encroaching, Winter Yielding” • Jean-Louis Trudel • Little Blue Marble, December 24
“Dragonrider” • Marie Vibbert • Simultaneous Times 20
“Princess Cat Robot Space Pirate” • Marie Vibbert • Utopia Science Fiction 2:4
“Pa and the Devil” • Susan E. Wagner • Apehelion 267
“The Reality of Ghosts” • Yilin Wang • Fantasy Magazine 70
“Wardrobe Malfunction” • Kyla Lee Ward • Infectious Hope: Poems of Hope & Resilience from the Pandemic, ed. Sylvia Canton Rondon (IFGW Publishing Australia)
“Reasons to Leave the Path” • Jacqueline West • Star*Line 44.1
[deep space Elvis] • Greer Woodward • Star*Line 44.3
“The Tiny Goblin” • Ann Wuehler • Eternal Haunted Summer, Winter
“Adam-Ondi-Ahman” • Audrey Zheng • Strange Horizons, 5 July
“dry land” • Maria Zoccola • Strange Horizons, 7 June
LONG POEMS (78 poems)
“Astynome, After” • Mike Allen • The Deadlands 2
“Dispelling the Arcana” • Mike Allen • Roanoke Rambler, October 6
“Cinnabar” • Colleen Anderson • Shadow Atlas, eds. Carina Bissett, Hillary Dodge & Joshua Viola (Hex Publishers)
“Topsy Turvy” • Colleen Anderson • Shelter of Daylight, Summer
“they came to new mexico” • Arachelle • Eye to the Telescope 41
“Spell 17” • Tristan Beiter • Mirror Dance, Spring
“The Bog Witch’s Brew” • R. Jean Bell • New Myths 54
“The Catfish Sisters” • Lisa M. Bradley • Mermaids Monthly 12
“The Mariner and the Sacred Foal” • Catherine Brogdon • Eccentric Orbits vol. 2, ed. Wendy Van Camp (Dimensionfold Publishing)
“The Revenge of Henrietta Lacks” • Cecilia Caballero • Star*Line 44.3
“Dinner at Wolf’s” • Anna Cates • Otoliths, June 9
“The Bookstore” • Beth Cato • New Myths 56/57
“Follow the Meandering Path” • Beth Cato • Abyss & Apex 80
“Echidna” • Donyae Coles • Fantasy Magazine, June
“Galaxy’s Heir to Forgotten Dreams” • Christopher Collingwood • Carmina Magazine, September
“Year’s Walk” • Scott J. Couturier • Eternal Haunted Summer, Winter
“Liminality in the Seafoam” • Koji A. Dae • Eye to the Telescope 42
“Among the Scythians” • Deborah L. Davitt • Heroic Fantasy Quarterly 49
“Feeding the Dead” • Deborah L. Davitt • Polu Texni, January 10
“Selachimorphosis” • Deborah L. Davitt • Eye to the Telescope 42
“Totems” • Deborah L. Davitt • Polu Texni, May 2
“When the Girls Begin to Fall” • Geneve Flynn • Tortured Willows: Bent, Bowed, Unbroken, ed. Angela Yuriko Smith (Yuriko Publishing)
“Mermaid as Lover: A Definition” • Joshua Gage • Dream of Rust and Glass
“Laughter out of the Sea” • Maxwell I. Gold • Spectral Realms 15
“Medusa Gets a Haircut” • Theodora Goss • Uncanny 38
“Babaylan” • Vince Gotera • Muddy River Poetry Review, Fall
“Obsidian Blade” • Scott E. Green & Herb Kauderer • Beneath the Misty Surface, eds. Rachel Crawford, Shannon Kauderer, Andy Lee & Lizette Strait
“Nine Lives” • Brittany Hause • Kaleidotrope, Autumn
“Loving Venus” • Jamal Hodge • Nombono, ed. Akua Lezli Hope (Sundress Publications)
“Dream Logic” • Ada Hoffmann • Climbing Lightly Through Forests: A Poetry Anthology Honoring Ursula K. Le Guin, eds. Lisa M. Bradley & R. B. Lemberg (Aqueduct Press)
“Epilogue: Memento Mori” • Ada Hoffmann • Million-Year Elegies
“Child Price” • Akua Lezli Hope • Gramarye 20
“The Queen of the Night” • Clay Franklin Johnson • Chlorophobia, ed. A. R. Ward (Ghost Orchid Press)
“Space Traveler” • John Philip Johnson • Altered Reality Magazine, October 8
“Specializing in the Prehistory of Whales” • Sandra Kasturi • The New Quarterly 160
“The Last Dragon” • Herb Kauderer • Altered Reality Magazine, December 28
“Scone Dragon” • Herb Kauderer • Altered Reality Magazine, December 28
“Dark Phoenix” • Luke Kernan • The Silent World in Her Vase 9
“In the Male Utopia” • Geoffrey A. Landis • Dreams and Nightmares 119
“The Corvid-Human Alliance” • Gerri Leen • Liquid Imagination 48
“Tributes” • Gerri Leen • Polu Texni, 27 June
“What of Me, Goose Girl? (Or Hard Questions from The Horse Still on the Wall)” • Gerri Leen • Dreams and Nightmares 119
“The House of Ill Waters” • R. B. Lemberg • The Deadlands 2
“Wendigo” • Trevor Livingston • Eye to the Telescope 40
“Biting Sarcasm” • Lori R. Lopez • Spectral Realms 14
“Searching for the Cottingley Fairies” • Kim Malinowski • The Metaworker, September 17
“The Time Travel Tourism Bureau” • Chris Marchello • Rattle 71
“Amphitrite Finds a Confidante” • Elizabeth R. McClellan • Water: Selkies, Sirens, & Sea Monsters, ed. Rhonda Parrish (Tyche Books)
“Field Notes, Found Later” • Elizabeth R. McClellan • Chrome Baby 98
“How The Rose Princes Came to Life” • Elizabeth R. McClellan • Heroic Fantasy Quarterly 98
“The Wild Bunch” • Kate Meyer-Currey • Liquid Imagination 49
“Becoming” • Miguel O. Mitchell • Eye to the Telescope 42
“A Descendant’s Gift” • Miguel O. Mitchell • Dreams and Nightmares 117
“Ghost Town” • Sarah Fawn Montgomery • Split Lip Magazine, October 14
“Nyankopoxyican Breath of Fresh Air” • Andrew Geoffrey Kwabena Moss • Nombono, ed. Akua Lezli Hope (Sundress Publications)
“Interview with a Goddess” • Lee Murray• Tortured Willows: Bent, Bowed, Unbroken, ed. Angela Yuriko Smith (Yuriko Publishing)
“Deep Diving” • Kurt Newton • Eye to the Telescope 42
“Tiny House” • Kurt Newton • Triangulation: Habitats
“Hastur Asks for Donald Glover’s Autograph” • Brandon O’Brien • Can You Sign My Tentacle? (Interstellar Flight Press)
“Hoop Dance” • Bryant O’Hara • The Ghettobirds (Frayed Edge Press)
“Haddonfield, New Jersey, 1980” • Cindy O’Quinn • Attack from the ’80s, ed. Eugene Johnson (Raw Dog Screaming Press)
“The Wreck of the Vigilance” • Michael H. Payne • Silver Blade 49
“Inescapable Personality Disorders of Supernatural Creatures” • P. Aaron Potter • Star*Line 44.3
“Erasing Myself from the Narrative” • Marsheila Rockwell • The Lorelei Signal, October
“Reservation Fairy Tales 101—Final Exam” • Marsheila Rockwell • Augur Magazine 4:1
“Priestess” • Lauren Scharhag • Lothlorien Poetry Journal, February
“The Captain Flies” • Avi Silver • Uncanny 42
“Alexander’s Babylon” • Marge Simon & Mary Turzillo • Victims (Weasel Press)
“Inseparable” • Hamant Singh • Illumen, Summer
“The Third Law” • Justin T. O’Conor Sloane• The Flying Saucer Poetry Review 1
“Snow Child” • Christina Sng • Ladies of Horror Flash Project
“Whales” • Christina Sng • Eye to the Telescope 42
“Pepie of Lake Pepin” • Richard Stevenson • Polar Starlight 3
“Woman in Black, Girl in Pink” • Richard Stevenson • The Flying Saucer Poetry Review 1
“Death Opus” • Romie Stott • The Deadlands 1
“The Retirement of Mechagirl” • Cathrynne M. Valente • Patreon, August
“Dispatch from a Ruin in Mitla, the Town of Souls” • Morgan L. Ventura • Strange Horizons, 12 April
“Toward Solstice Station” • Steven Withrow & Frank Coffman • The Exorcised Lyric (Mind’s Eye Publications)

2021 SFPA Poetry Contest Winners

The Science Fiction and Fantasy Poetry Association announced the winners of SFPA Poetry Contest on October 24.

Speculative poets from around the world sent Contest Chair Josh Brown 249 entries (76 dwarf-length, 133 short, and 40 long poems). From those blind entries, Judge Sheree Renée Thomas selected the winning poems in each length category.

All placing poems have been published on the SFPA website along with the judge’s comments. Winning poets receive $150, $75, and $25 cash prizes for first, second, and third place respectively.

DWARF CATEGORY

1st Place:  “Strings” by Deborah L. Davitt
2nd Place:  “The Health Benefits of Gardening” by Jerri Hardesty
3rd Place:  “Restitution” by Morgan L. Ventura

SHORT CATEGORY

1st Place: “We, Dust” by Blaize Kelly Strothers
2nd Place: “Double-Slit Experiment” by Bradley Earle Hoge
3rd Place: “engagement party” by Aiesha Muhammed

LONG CATEGORY

1st Place: “The Last Special Day” by Donald Raymond
2nd Place: “Docking on Phobos” by Clarabelle Miray Fields
3rd Place: “Fireflies in Retrograde” by Clarabelle Miray Fields 

Sheree Renée Thomas is an award-winning fiction writer, poet, and editor. Josh Brown is a writer of fiction, non-fiction, and poetry.

2021 Elgin Awards

The Science Fiction and Fantasy Poetry Association’s Elgin Award winners have been announced by Jordan Hirsch, the 2021 Elgin Award Chair.

The award is named for SFPA founder Suzette Haden Elgin, and is presented in two categories, Chapbook and Book. Works published in 2019 and 2020 were eligible for this year’s awards.

CHAPBOOK CATEGORY

Winner: Otherwheres by Akua Lezli Hope (ArtFarm Press, 2020)

Second place: Twelve by Andrea Blythe (Interstellar Flight Press, 2020)

Third placeManifest by Terese Mason Pierre (Gap Riot Press, 2020)

FULL-LENGTH BOOK AWARD WINNERS

Winner: The Sign of the Dragon by Mary Soon Lee (JABberwocky Literary Agency, 2020)

Second place: A Collection of Dreamscapes by Christina Sng (Raw Dog Screaming Press, 2020)

Third place (tie): 

Mary Shelley Makes a Monster by Octavia Cade (Aqueduct Press, 2019)

A Route Obscure and Lonely by LindaAnn LoSchiavo (The Wapshott Press, 2020)

There were 19 chapbooks nominated and 64 full-length books; 62 SFPA members voted.

2021 Elgin Chair Jordan Hirsch writes speculative fiction and poetry in Saint Paul, Minnesota.  Her work has appeared with Apparition Literary Magazine, The Dread Machine, Daily Science Fiction, and other venues.