Pixel Scroll 7/7/22 What We Scroll In The Pixels

(1) THREE STORIES. Connie Willis is angry “Regarding the Roe V. Wade Decision”, and uses three stories to explain why.

Although in my private life, I’m intensely (some would say obsessively) interested in politics, I try to keep my website focused on writing. There are times, though, when it’s impossible because it’s just too personal. And I’m just too angry. This is one of those times.

In spite of what some on the right are trying to tell us is “just a distraction” and “no big deal,” two weeks ago the Supreme Court consigned every woman in America to living in a brave new world—or a bad old one. It’s one I—and my mother and grandmother—used to live in, and here are three stories to show you what it was like.

The first story is about college. I had four different friends in college (and knew several other girls in high school) who got pregnant and had to drop out of school to get married. Three wanted to be teachers and the other wanted to be a nurse. A couple of them were able to finish school and get their degrees later, but the others weren’t, and who knows if they would have ended up marrying the guys they did if they hadn’t gotten pregnant?

I do know that one spent HOURS running up and down the stairs in our dorm because someone had told her that would cause a miscarriage. She obviously wasn’t too enthused about the marriage she eventually went through with. I also don’t know if they wanted the babies—they didn’t have any choice….

(2) PAST MASTERS. With Tor.com operational again, that means you can read James Davis Nicoll’s assessment of “Five SF Stories About Long-Vanished Forerunners”.

Stories about precursors and forerunners appear frequently in science fiction (and fantasy). Why? For one thing, it’s just way cool to think that ancient civilizations and species might have risen and vanished long before we arrived on the scene. This is true in our real world. Why wouldn’t it be true of galactic civilizations? Also, relics of otherwise extinct civilizations play well in plots….

(3) MORE ABOUT WHAT’S OPERA, DOC?. [Item by Craig Miller.] Back in the ’70s, I met Chuck Jones, the cartoon’s director, and, among other things, we talked about “What’s Opera, Doc?”  During the conversation, I told him I thought Elmer should have sung “Smite da wabbit!!” instead of “Kill da wabbit!!”  Chuck stared at me for a moment, smiled and nodded, and said, “Where were you in 1957?”

 Then he drew this and gave it to me.

(4) LAW WEST OF THE INTERNATIONAL DATELINE. Australia’s Aurealis Awards have put out a “Call for Judges”. See full details and the application form at the link.

We are seeking expressions of interest from Australian residents who would like to judge for the 2022 Aurealis Awards. Judges are volunteers and are drawn from the Australian speculative fiction community, from diverse professions and backgrounds, including academics, booksellers, librarians, published authors, publishing industry professionals, reviewers and enthusiasts. The only qualification necessary is a demonstrated knowledge of and interest in their chosen category – good time management skills and an ability to work in a team in an online environment are also essential….

(5) FRENCH AWARD JURY. Meanwhile, the Prix Utopiales have already picked their judges: “Le jury du Prix Utopiales 2022 est désigné!”

Congratulations to Sébastien Dislair, Benjamin Le Saux, Céline Pohu and Helena Schoefs. And this year the President of the Jury is… Merwan (winner of the Utopiales Prize BD 2020 with “Celestly Mechanic” published in Dargaud editions).

(6) ILM. Disney+ dropped this trailer for a six-part series on Industrial Light and Magic, directed by Lawrence Kasdan.

(7) MEDIA BIRTHDAY

2009 [By Cat Eldridge.] This is more an appreciation of Warehouse 13. It first aired this evening on what was then Sci Fi or possibly SyFy. I never could keep track its name. It was created by Jane Espenson, best known for her work on Buffy the Vampire Slayer, and D. Brent Mote, who other doing creating and writing this series, did nothing other than writing two episodes of Atomic Train, a series I very vaguely remember.

I loved Warehouse 13 fromthe very first opening episode where we meet U.S. Secret Service Agents Myka Bering as played by Joanne Kelly and Pete Lattimer as played by Eddie McClintock when they are assigned as punishment to the virtually unknown Warehouse 13 that holds a near infinity of supernatural artifacts.

The premise, not unlike that of the later Librarians series which also had a lot of strange artefacts, held delicious possibilities which for the most were delivered upon in each story.  And the chemistry was rather stellar between Myra and Pete.

The series would over the course of time add more characters such as the ever delightful Saul Rubinek as Artie Nielsen is the Special Agent in Charge at Warehouse 13 and CCH Pounder as Irene Frederic, one of the Regents who’ve overseen the Warehouses for millennia.

I love the artefacts — be they Lewis Carroll’s looking glass, which contained an evil entity called Alice which possessed Myka, or the fact that all of the artefacts react with electricity and can be neutralized by dunking them  in a never explained  purple goo after being placed inside a reflective bag, both from by Global Dynamics. Yes this series is in the Eureka continium.  Cool, very cool indeed. 

It was allowed a proper wrapping up in which the team deals with the news that Warehouse 13 is moving to a new location, so Mrs. Frederic has them load their greatest memories of their missions into an artefact for future generations.

I will rewatch it at some point as it’s streaming on Peacock. 

(8) TODAY’S BIRTHDAYS.

[Compiled by Cat Eldridge.]

  • Born July 7, 1907 — Robert Heinlein. So let’s have Paul Weimer tell about his favorite Heinlein works: “If I had to pick one favorite Heinlein novel, and that’s a tough road to hoe, I am going to go with the novel I’ve re-read the most and it’s probably not going to be the one you think.  It’s Glory Road. Yes, Glory Road. The back matter once the quest is done can be overcooked, but Heinlein had a keen eye for epic fantasy quests, the good and the bad, long before the rise of Tolkien clones. It was an early Heinlein for me, and the novel has stuck with me since, with a number of audio re-reads. I survived a boring drive across the flatness of the Great Plains by listening to the adventures of Oscar Gordon.” // If I had to pick one Heinlein story, I have a strong fondness for All You Zombies, which encapsulates all the potential paradoxes of time travel in a way that has been done at greater length, but not, I’d argue, with better effect. (The movie Predestination with Ethan Hawke is pretty darned good by the way). Oh, and my favorite book ABOUT Heinlein is Farah Mendelsohn’s The Pleasant Profression of Robert Heinlein. (Died 1988.)
  • Born July 7, 1919 — Jon Pertwee. The Third Doctor and one that I’ll admit I like a lot. He returned to the role of the Doctor in The Five Doctors and the charity special Dimensions in Time for Children in Need. He also portrayed the Doctor in the stage play Doctor Who – The Ultimate Adventure.  After a four-year run there, he was the lead on Worzel Gummidge where he was, errr, a scarecrow. And I must note that one of his first roles was as The Judge in the film of Toad of Toad Hall by A. A. Milne. (Died 1996.)
  • Born July 7, 1931 — David Eddings. Prolific and great. With his wife Leigh, they authored several best-selling epic fantasy series, including The BelgariadThe Malloreon and The Dreamers to name but three of their series. They’ve written but one non-series novel, The Redemption of Althalus. A note of warning: it’s extremely likely that both omnibus editions of his works for The Belgariad and The Malloreon available currently at the usual suspects are pirated. (Died 2009.)
  • Born July 7, 1936 — Lisa Seagram. I’m noting her here because she was in the Batman episode “Louie, the Lilac” as Lila in which Milton Berlin played the title character. She also had one-offs in both The Man from U.N.C.L.E. and The Girl from U.N.C.L.E., plus My Favorite Martian and Bewitched. Impressive genre creds indeed! (Died 2019.)
  • Born July 7, 1959 — Billy Campbell, 63. There are some films so good in my memory that even the Suck Fairy can’t spoil them and The Rocketeer in which he played stunt pilot Cliff Secord is one of them. (IDW did a hardcover edition called Dave Stevens’ The Rocketeer: The Complete Adventures which Amazon has it for a mere twenty bucks! And the ePub is available from the usual suspects for a mere five dollars and ninety nine cents.) Yes, he did other work of genre interest including the main role of Jordan Collier on The 4400, Quincey Morris on Bram Stoker’s Dracula, Captain Thadiun Okona in “The Outrageous Okona” episode of Next Gen, the Maine Dr. Alan Farragut on Helix and he’s currently voicing Okona once again on Prodigy.
  • Born July 7, 1968 — Jeff VanderMeer, 54. Ok I’ll admit that I’m ambivalent about the Southern Reach Trilogy and am not sure if it’s brilliant or not though it is I’ll say quite disturbing. (Haven’t seen the film and have no desire to so.) I will say the pirate anthology he and his wife Anne did, Fast Ships, Black Sails, is quite tasty reading.  Now let’s see what the Hugos would hold for him. At Noreascon 4 for The Thackery T. Lambshead Pocket Guide to Eccentric & Discredited Diseases which I truly, madly love, he got a Hugo. He along with his Ann picked up at Anticipation up one for Best Semiprozine: for Weird Tales. It would be nominated the next year at Aussiecon 4 but Clarkesworld would win as it would the Renovation losing out again to ClarkesworldThe Steampunk Bible: An Illustrated Guide to the World of Imaginary Airships, Corsets and Goggles, Mad Scientists, and Strange Literature which he co-edited with  S. J. Chambers was nominated at Chicon 7, the year The Encyclopedia of Science Fiction won. Another Best Related Work was nominated at Loncon 3, Wonderbook: The Illustrated Guide to Creating Imaginative Fiction, the year Kameron Hurley’s “We Have Always Fought: Challenging the Women, Cattle and Slaves Narrative” won. Finally the film Annihilation based off the Southern Reach trilogy was nominated for Best Dramatic Presentation Hugo at Dublin 2019 it list to Spider-Man: Into the Spider-Verse
  • Born July 7, 1969 — Cree Summer, 53. Voice performer in myriad series such as as Spider-Man: The New Animated SeriesJustice League UnlimitedStar Wars: The Clone Wars, and Marvel’s Guardians of the Galaxy. She’s playing a number of the cast in the current Young Justice series including Madame Xanadu and Aquagirl.
  • Born July 7, 1987 — V. E. Schwab, 35. I’m very pleased with her A Darker Shade of Magic which explores magicians in a parallel universe London. It’s part of her Shades of Magic series which is quite stellar. Highly recommended. Her Cassidy Blake series is also good provided you’re a Potter fan as she makes a lot of references to that series. She’s very well stocked at the usual suspects.

(9) THE END IS NOT AS NEAR. Although Stranger Things is expected to end with Season 5, that will not necessarily be the last encounter with the Upside Down. “’Stranger Things’ Spinoff, Stage Play in the Works at Netflix”Variety has the story.

…Under their overall deal with Netflix, the Duffers — Matt and Ross — have established the production company Upside Down Pictures, bringing on Hilary Leavitt to run the company.

Among the new projects they have in development, the Duffers are officially working on a “Stranger Things” spinoff series, though exact plot details remain under wraps. The show will be based on an original idea by the Duffers with Upside Down Pictures and 21 Laps producing. The Duffers have previously said that the show would not focus on characters like Eleven or Steve Harrington.

In addition, a stage play set within the world and mythology of “Stranger Things” is in the works. It will be produced by Sonia Friedman, Stephen Daldry, and Netflix. Daldry will also direct. Kate Trefry will write. 21 Laps serves as associate producer….

(10) OCTOTHORPE. Episode 61 of the Octothorpe podcast is up! “That Little Voice in Your Head”.

John Coxon has a hat on, Alison Scott is taking the baton, and Liz Batty twirls. We discuss COVID policies a bit, before we get into Olav Rokne’s proposal to scrap the 25% rule in the Hugo Awards and then talk quite a lot about robots.

(11) KNIT PICKING. Electra Hammond on Facebook shared a screenshot of tonight’s Jeopardy! category “The Scarf.” Says Hammond, “They had to have created the category just so they could have *this* clue. I’m sure of it.”

(12) JUST THROW IT OUT THE WINDOW. Well, not quite. Gizmodo watches as “Nanoracks Performs First Test of ISS Waste Disposal Technology”.

…On July 2, a highly-engineered trash bag holding 172 pounds (78 kilograms) of ISS garbage was jettisoned from the space station and sent to its fiery doom in Earth’s atmosphere. It’s one small step for Nanoracks, but a giant leap for the future of celestial waste disposal. The test, conducted in partnership with NASA’s Johnson Space Center, could represent a more efficient way for ISS astronauts to keep their house in order.

“Waste collection in space has been a long standing, yet not as publicly discussed, challenge aboard the ISS,” said Cooper Read, Nanoracks’ Bishop Airlock program manager, in a press release. “This was the first open-close cycle of the Bishop Airlock, our first deployment, and what we hope is the beginning of new, more sustainable ISS disposal operations,” said Nanoracks CEO Amela Wilson.

(13) VIDEO OF THE DAY. [Item by Martin Morse Wooster.] Of course Superman and Batman have to show up in this How It Should Have Ended video, which dropped today. “How Doctor Strange in the Multiverse of Madness Should Have Ended”.

[Thanks to John King Tarpinian, Andrew Porter, Chris Barkley, Craig Miller, John Coxon, Daniel Dern, Michael Toman, Cat Eldridge, Mike Kennedy, Martin Morse Wooster, and JJ for some of these stories. Title credit belongs to File 770 contributing editor of the day Tom Becker.]

Prix Utopiales 2020 and 2021

The winners of the Prix Utopiales, Prix Utopiales Jeunesse, and Prix Utopiales BD (BD = Bande Dessinée = Comic Strip) for 2020 and 2021 were announced at Utopiales, the International Science Fiction Festival of Nantes, on October 31.

The Prix Utopiales recognizes a novel, or a collection, published in French during the eligibility period by a European author. The prize has a cash value of 2000 euros.

PRIX UTOPIALES 2021

• After® by Auriane Velten (France), (Mnémos)

PRIX UTOPIALES 2020

 Rosewater by Tade Thompson (Grande-Bretagne), J’ai lu.

The Prix Utopiales Jeunesse (Utopiales Youth Award) recognizes a novel or a collection of short stories by a European author, published or translated into French during the eligibility period. The winner is chosen by a jury of readers aged 13-16. The prize has a value of 2000 euros.

PRIX UTOPIALES JEUNESSE 2021

• Félicratie by H. Lenoir (France) (France), (Sarbacane)

PRIX UTOPIALES JEUNESSE 2020

• Et le désert disparaîtra by Marie Pavlenko (France), Flammarion Jeunesse.

The Prix Utopiales BD (BD = Bande Dessinée = Comic Strip), worth 2000 Euros, is awarded by the sci-fi comics readers club of the Nantes municipal library.

PRIX UTOPIALES BD 2021

  • Carbone & Silicium by Mathieu Bablet (Ankama)

PRIX UTOPIALES BD 2020

  • Mécanique Céleste by Merwan (France), Dargaud.

PRIX EXTRAORDINAIRE DES UTOPIALES 2021

  • Joëlle Wintrebert

Prix Utopiales 2021 Shortlists

Finalists have been announced for the Prix Utopiales and the Prix Utopiales Jeunesse 2021, two of the awards that will be presented at  Utopiales, the International Science Fiction Festival of Nantes planned for October 29-November 1.)

PRIX UTOPIALES

The Prix Utopiales recognizes a novel, or a collection, published in French during the eligibility period by a European author. The prize has a cash value of 2000 euros. This year, five books are in competition:

• After® by Auriane Velten (France), (Mnémos)
• Esther by Olivier Bruneau (France), (Le Tripode)
• Le chant des glaces by Jean Krug (France), (Critic)
• Quitter les Monts d’Automne by Émilie Querbalec (France – Japon), (Albin Michel Imaginaire)
• Ru by Camille Leboulanger (France), (L’Atalante)

PRIX UTOPIALES JEUNESSE 

The Prix Utopiales Jeunesse (Utopiales Youth Award) recognizes a novel or a collection of short stories by a European author, published or translated into French during the eligibility period. The winner is chosen by a jury of readers aged 13-16. The prize has a value of 2000 euros. These five books are the finalists:

• Après nous, les animaux by Camille Brunel (France), (Casterman)
• Félicratie by H. Lenoir (France) (France), (Sarbacane)
• La honte de la galaxie by Alexis Brocas (France), (Sarbacane)
• L’été des Perséides by Séverine Vidal (France), (Nathan)
• N.É.O. T1 : La chute du soleil de fer by Michel Bussi (France), (PKJ)

The Prix Utopiales award jurors are Marine Guégan, Julien Croguennec, Solène Laurent-Lemur, Marion Guiter, and Philippe Leray. Utopiales selects the jury from four readers who apply to serve.

Prix Utopiales 2020 Shortlists

Finalists have been announced for two of the awards that will be presented by Utopiales, the International Science Fiction Festival of Nantes, celebrating its 20th year. (The event is still planned for October 29-November 1.)

PRIX UTOPIALES

The Prix Utopiales recognizes a novel, or a collection, published in French during the eligibility period by a European author. The prize has a cash value of 2000 euros. This year, five books are in competition:

• Chiens de guerre [Dogs of War] by Adrian Tchaikovsky (Grande-Bretagne), Denoël.
 Inkarmations by Pierre Bordage (France), Leha.
• Les Furtifs by Alain Damasio (France), La Volte.
• Les machines fantômes by Olivier Paquet (France), L’Atalante.
 Rosewater by Tade Thompson (Grande-Bretagne), J’ai lu.

PRIX UTOPIALES JEUNESSE 

The Prix Utopiales Jeunesse (Utopiales Youth Award) recognizes a novel or a collection of short stories by a European author, published or translated into French during the eligibility period. The winner is chosen by a jury of readers aged 13-16. The prize has a value of 2000 euros. These five books are the finalists:

• Boxap 13-07 by Amalia Anastasio (France), ScriNéo.
• Et le désert disparaîtra by Marie Pavlenko (France), Flammarion Jeunesse.
• Lou, après tout. Tome 1 : Le Grand Effondrement by Jérôme Leroy (France), Syros.
• Sortie 32.b by Antonio Da Silva (Portugal), du Rouergue.
• Survival Game by Nicky Singer (Grande-Bretagne), PKJ.

2019 Utopiales Awards

The winners of the Utopiales Awards were announced November 2 at the Utopiales International Science Fiction Festival of Nantes.

PRIX UTOPIALES

  • Helstrid by Christian Léourier (Le Béllial)

The Prix Utopiales recognizes a novel, or a collection, published in French during the eligibility period by a European author. The prize has a cash value of 3000 euros.

PRIX UTOPIALES JEUNESSE

  • In real life – T.1 Déconnexion by Maiwenn Alix (Milan)

The Prix Utopiales Jeunesse 2019 (Utopiales Youth Award) recognizes a novel or a collection of short stories by a European author, published or translated into French during the eligibility period. The winner is chosen by a jury of readers aged 13-16. The prize has a value of 2000 euros.

PRIX UTOPIALES BD (BD = Bande Dessinée = Comic)

  • Un gentil orc sauvage by Théo Grosjean

The prize, worth 2000 Euros, is awarded by the sci-fi comics readers club of the Nantes municipal library.

PRIX EXTRAORDINAIRE

  • Alejandro Jodorowsky

Also presented at Utopiales:

Prix Joel-Champetier

  • Chloé Jo Bertrand for “Chasseuse de soleil”

The prize is for unpublished short fiction in French by non-Canadian writers. The winner receives € 1000. The winning work will be published in the Winter 2017 issue of the Canadian prozine Solaris.

2019 Utopiales Awards Shortlists

Finalists have been announced for two of the awards that will be presented at Utopiales, the International Science Fiction Festival of Nantes.

The Prix Utopiales recognizes a novel, or a collection, published in French during the eligibility period by a European author. The prize has a cash value of 3000 euros. This year, five books are in competition:

  • La trilogie Trademark – T.1 Bonheur TM by Jean Baret (Le Bélial)
  • Colonies by Laurent Genefort (Le Bélial)
  • Dans la toile du temps by Adrian Tchaikovsky (Denoël)
  • Helstrid by Christian Léourier (Le Béllial)
  • Les derniers jours du Nouveau-Paris by China Miéville (Au diable vauvert)

The Prix Utopiales Jeunesse 2019 (Utopiales Youth Award) recognizes a novel or a collection of short stories by a European author, published or translated into French during the eligibility period. The winner is chosen by a jury of readers aged 13-16. The prize has a value of 2000 euros. These five books have are the finalists:

  • In real life – T.1 Déconnexion by Maiwenn Alix (Milan)
  • La Voie Verne by Jacques Martel (Mnémos)
  • Le Cirque interdit by Célia Flaux (Scrineo)
  • Marqués by Alice Broadway (Pocket Jeunesse)
  • Rêves scientifiques, 8 nouvelles de science-fiction by J.-N. Blanc, J. Benameur, P. Favaro, Gudule, J. Héliot, C. Thiebert (Thierry Magnier)

The award ceremony will take place during the  Utopiales International Science Fiction Festival of Nantes, October 31-November 4.

2018 Utopiales Awards

These literary awards were presented November 3 at Utopiales, the International Science Fiction Festival of Nantes.

Prix Utopiales 2018

  • L’âme des horloges [The Bone Clocks], David Mitchell (de l’Olivier)

The award recognizes a novel, or a collection, published in French during the eligibility period by a European author. The prize has a cash value of 3000 euros.

Prix Utopiales Jeunesse 2018 (Utopiales Youth Award)

  • Les Puissants, tome 1: Esclaves [Dark Gifts book 1: Gilded Cage], Vic James (Nathan)

Prix Extraordinaire

  • Elisabeth Vonarburg

Prix Utopiales BD 2018 (for Best Comic Book)

Prix Utopiales BD 2018 (for Best Comic Book) Special Mention

And this award was presented yesterday —

Prix Julia Verlanger

  • Patrick K. Dewdney for L’enfant de poussière

2018 Utopiales Awards Shortlists

Finalists have been announced for two of the awards that will be presented at Utopiales, the International Science Fiction Festival of Nantes.

The nominees for the Prix Utopiales 2018 are:

  • L’Or du diable, Andreas Eschbach (L’Atalante)
  • Espace Lointain, Jaroslav Melnik (Agullo)
  • L’âme des horloges, David Mitchell (de l’Olivier)
  • Station: La chute, Al Robertson (Denoël)
  • Amatka, Karin Tidbeck (La Volte)

The award recognizes a novel, or a collection, published in French during the eligibility period by a European author. The prize has a cash value of 3000 euros.

The nominees for the Prix Utopiales Jeunesse 2018 (Utopiales Youth Award) are:

  • The Rain, Virginia Bergin (Bayard)
  • Les Puissants, tome 1: Esclaves, Vic James (Nathan)
  • Nouvelle Sparte, Erik L’Homme (Gallimard Jeunesse)
  • Star Trip, Éric Senabre (Didier jeunesse)
  • Le Mort du Temps, Aurélie Wellenstein (Scrineo)

The award ceremony will take place during the  Utopiales International Science Fiction Festival of Nantes, October 31-November 5.

[Via Locus Online.]