2022 Theakston Old Peculier Crime Novel of the Year

The 2022 Theakston Old Peculier Crime Novel of the Year is Slough House by Mick Herron.

The prize was created to celebrate “excellence, originality, and the very best in crime fiction from UK and Irish authors” whose novels were published in paperback during the eligibility period. The winner receives £3,000 and a handmade, engraved beer barrel provided by Theakstons Brewery.

Also named as “Highly Commended” was True Crime Story by Joseph Knox.

Michael Connelly received the Theakston Old Peculier Crime Writing Festival Outstanding Contribution to Crime Fiction Award.

2022 Theakston Old Peculier Crime Novel of the Year Shortlst

The shortlist for the 2022 Theakston Old Peculier Crime Novel of the Year has been announced.

The prize was created to celebrate “excellence, originality, and the very best in crime fiction from UK and Irish authors” whose novels were published in paperback during the eligibility period.

 The winner receives £3,000 and a handmade, engraved beer barrel provided by Theakston Old Peculier. 

The public are now invited to vote for the winners here; voting closes July 8. The prize winner will be revealed July 21.

The shortlist:

  • The Night Hawks by Elly Griffiths (Quercus Fiction)
  • True Crime Story by Joseph Knox (Doubleday)
  • Daughters of Night by Laura Shepherd Robinson (Mantle/Pan)
  • Slough House by Mick Herron (Baskerville)
  • Midnight at Malabar House by Vaseem Khan (Hodder & Stoughton)
  • The Last Thing to Burn by Will Dean (Hodder & Stoughton)

2022 Theakston Old Peculier Crime Novel of the Year Longlist

The longlist for the 2022 Theakston old Peculier Crime Novel of the Year has been announced.

The prize was created to celebrate “excellence, originality, and the very best in crime fiction from UK and Irish authors” whose novels were published in paperback during the eligibility period.

 The winner receives £3,000 and a handmade, engraved beer barrel provided by Theakston Old Peculier. 

The public are now invited to vote for a shortlist of six titles here; voting for that closes May 26. Then the shortlist will be posted and winner voting will open June 14. The prize winner will be revealed July 21.

The Longlist in full:

  • Girl A by Abigail Dean (HarperFiction)
  • Tall Bones by Anna Bailey (Doubleday)
  • The Heron’s Cry by Ann Cleeves (Pan Macmillan)
  • Blood Ties by Brian McGilloway (Constable)
  • The Cut by Chris Brookmyre (Little, Brown)
  • The Less Dead by Denise Mina (Harvill Secker)
  • The Night Hawks by Elly Griffiths (Quercus Fiction)
  • Watch Her Fall by Erin Kelly (Hodder & Stoughton)
  • I Know What I Saw by Imran Mahmood (Raven Books)
  • True Crime Story by Joseph Knox (Doubleday)
  • Daughters of Night by Laura Shepherd Robinson (Mantle/Pan)
  • Rabbit Hole by Mark Billingham (Little, Brown)
  • Slough House by Mick Herron (Baskerville)
  • Dead Ground by M. W. Craven (Constable)
  • The Devil and the Dark Water by Stuart Turton (Raven Books)
  • Midnight at Malabar House by Vaseem Khan (Hodder & Stoughton)
  • The Last Thing to Burn by Will Dean (Hodder & Stoughton)
  • The Trawlerman by William Shaw (riverrun)

2021 Theakston Old Peculier Crime Novel of the Year

The 2021 Theakston Old Peculier Crime Novel of the Year is Chris Whitaker’s We Begin At The End.

We Begin At The End, a New York Times bestseller, has been optioned for film and is currently in development. Whitaker was interviewed here when his book made the shortlist.

Whitaker’s earlier book Tall Oaks was honored with the CWA John Creasey New Blood Dagger Award.

The prize was created to celebrate “excellence, originality, and the very best in crime fiction from UK and Irish authors” whose novels were published in paperback during the eligibility period. The winner receives £3,000 and a handmade, engraved beer barrel provided by Theakstons Brewery.

March of Crime Fiction Awards

The weed of crime bears award-winning fiction!

THEAKSTON OLD PECULIER CRIME NOVEL OF THE YEAR SHORTLIST

The six shortlisted books for the Theakston Old Peculier Crime Novel of the Year 2021 were named on June 15:

  • The Lantern Men by Elly Griffiths (Quercus, Quercus Fiction)
  • Three Hours by Rosamund Lupton (Penguin Random House UK, Viking)
  • The Last Crossing by Brian McGilloway (Little, Brown Book Group, Constable)
  • Death in the East by Abir Mukherjee (VINTAGE, Harvill Secker)
  • We Begin At The End by Chris Whitaker (Bonnier Books UK, Zaffre)
  • The Man on the Street by Trevor Wood (Quercus, Quercus Fiction)

The public is invited to vote for the winner here. The award will be announced Thursday July 22. The author will receive £3,000, and a handmade, engraved beer barrel provided by Theakston Old Peculier.

MCILVANNEY PRIZE LONGLIST

The McIlvanney Prize recognizes excellence in Scottish crime writing, and includes a prize of £1,000 and nationwide promotion in Waterstones.. Here is the McIlvanney Prize 2021 longlist:

  • The Cut, Chris Brookmyre (Little,Brown)
  • The Silent Daughter, Emma Christie (Wellbeck)
  • Before the Storm, Alex Gray (Little, Brown)
  • Dead Man’s Grave, Neil Lancaster (HarperCollins, HQ)
  • The Coffinmaker’s Garden, Stuart MacBride (HarperCollins)
  • Still Life, Val McDermid (Little,Brown)
  • Bad Debt, William McIntyre (Sandstone)
  • The Less Dead, Denise Mina (Vintage)
  • How To Survive Everything, Ewan Morrison (Saraband)
  • Edge of the Grave, Robbie Morrison (Macmillan)
  • The April Dead, Alan Parks (Canongate)
  • Hyde, Craig Russell (Constable)
  • Waking the Tiger, Mark Wightman (Hobeck Books)

MACAVITY AWARDS FINALISTS

Mystery Readers International announced the finalists for the 2021 Macavity Awards on June 1.

The Macavity Award is named for the “mystery cat” of T.S. Eliot (Old Possum’s Book of Practical Cats). Each year the members of Mystery Readers International nominate and vote for their favorite mysteries in five categories.

Best Mystery Novel:

  • Caroline B. Cooney: Before She Was Helen (Ecco)
  • S.A. Cosby: Blacktop Wasteland (Flatiron Books)
  • Matt Coyle: Blind Vigil (Oceanview Publishing)
  • Louise Penny: All the Devils Are Here (Minotaur)
  • Ivy Pochoda: These Women (Poisoned Pen Press)
  • Michael Robotham: When She Was Good (Scribner)

Best First Mystery:

  • Deepa Anappara: Djinn Patrol on the Purple Line (Random House)
  • Nev March: Murder in Old Bombay (Minotaur)
  • Richard Osman: The Thursday Murder Club (Pamela Dorman Books)
  • David Heska Wanbli Weiden: Winter Counts (Ecco)
  • Stephanie Wrobel: Darling Rose Gold (Berkley)

Best Mystery Short Story:

  • Barb Goffman: “Dear Emily Etiquette” (Ellery Queen’s Mystery Magazine, Sept/Oct 2020)
  • Art Taylor: “The Boy Detective & The Summer of ‘74” (Alfred Hitchcock’s Mystery Magazine, Jan/Feb 2020)
  • Gabriel Valjan: “Elysian Fields” (California Schemin’: The 2020 Bouchercon Anthology, edited by Art Taylor; Wildside Press)
  • Elaine Viets: “Dog Eat Dog” (The Beat of Black Wings: Crime Fiction Inspired by the Songs of Joni Mitchell, edited by Josh Pachter; Untreed Reads Publishing)
  • James W. Ziskin: “The Twenty-Five Year Engagement” (In League with Sherlock Holmes : Stories Inspired by the Sherlock Holmes Canon, edited by Laurie R. King; Pegasus Crime)

Best Mystery Critical/Biographical:

  • Leslie Brody: Sometimes You Have to Lie: The Life and Times of Louise Fitzhugh, Renegade Author of Harriet the Spy (Seal Press)
  • Martin Edwards, editor: Howdunit: A Masterclass in Crime Writing by Members of the Detection Club (HarperCollins)
  • Erin E. MacDonald: Ian Rankin: A Companion to the Mystery Fiction (McFarland)
  • Sheila Mitchell: H.R.F. Keating: A Life of Crime (Level Best Books)
  • Craig Sisterson: Southern Cross Crime: The Pocket Essential Guide to the Crime Fiction, Film & TV of Australia and New Zealand (Oldcastle Books)

Sue Feder Memorial Award for Best Historical Mystery:

  • Rhys Bowen: The Last Mrs. Summers (Berkeley)
  • Elsa Hart: The Cabinets of Barnaby Mayne (Minotaur)
  • Catriona McPherson: The Turning Tide (Quercus)
  • Ann Parker: Mortal Music (Poisoned Pen Press)
  • Ovidia Yu: The Mimosa Tree Mystery (Constable)
  • James Ziskin: Turn to Stone (Seventh Street Books)

BONY BLITHE WINNER

The 2021 Bony Blithe Light Mystery Award, an annual Canadian award celebrating traditional, feel-good mysteries, has been given to —

  • Iona WhishawA Match Made for Murder (Touchwood Editions)

This will be the last ever Bony Blithe Award, because the award is being retired.

[Thanks to Cora Buhlert for the story.]

2021 Theakston Old Peculier Crime Novel of the Year Longlist

The longlist for the 2021 Theakston old Peculier Crime Novel of the Year has been announced.

The prize was created to celebrate “excellence, originality, and the very best in crime fiction from UK and Irish authors” whose novels were published in paperback during the eligibility period.

 The winner receives £3,000 and a handmade, engraved beer barrel provided by Theakston Old Peculier. 

The longlist was selected by an academy of crime writing authors, agents, editors, reviewers, members of the Theakston Old Peculier Crime Writing Festival Programming Committee, and representatives from T&R Theakston Ltd, the Express, and WHSmith. 

The public are now invited to vote for a shortlist of six titles here, which will be announced in June.

The Longlist in Full:

  • Cry Baby by Mark Billingham (Little, Brown Book Group, Sphere)
  • The Other Passenger by Louise Candlish (Simon & Schuster)
  • The Cutting Place by Jane Casey (HarperCollins, HarperFiction)
  • Fifty Fifty by Steve Cavanagh (The Orion Publishing Group, Orion Fiction)
  • Black River by Will Dean (Oneworld Publications, Point Blank)
  • Between Two Evils by Eva Dolan (Bloomsbury Publishing, Raven Books)
  • The Guest List by Lucy Foley (HarperCollins, HarperFiction)
  • The Lantern Men by Elly Griffiths (Quercus, Quercus Fiction)
  • The Big Chill by Doug Johnstone (Orenda Books)
  • Three Hours by Rosamund Lupton (Penguin Random House UK, Viking)
  • Still Life by Val McDermid (Little, Brown Book Group, Sphere)
  • The Last Crossing by Brian McGilloway (Little, Brown Book Group, Constable)
  • Death in the East by Abir Mukherjee (VINTAGE, Harvill Secker)
  • Our Little Cruelties by Liz Nugent (Penguin, Sandycove)
  • A Song For The Dark Times by Ian Rankin (Orion, Orion Fiction)
  • Remain Silent by Susie Steiner (HarperCollins Publishers, The Borough Press)
  • We Begin At The End by Chris Whitaker (Bonnier Books UK, Zaffre)
  • The Man on the Street by Trevor Wood (Quercus, Quercus Fiction)

2020 Theakston Old Peculier Crime Novel of the Year

The winner of the 2020 Theakston old Peculier Crime Novel of the Year award is Belfast-born Adrian McKinty for his thriller The Chain, that sees parents forced to abduct children to save the lives of their own. The prize celebrates the very best in crime fiction and is open to UK and Irish crime authors whose novels were published in paperback during the eligibility period.

McKinty said: “I am gobsmacked and delighted to win this award. Two years ago, I had given up on writing altogether and was working in a bar and driving an uber, and so to go from that to this is just amazing. People think that you write a book and it will be an immediate bestseller. For twelve books, my experience was quite the opposite, but then I started this one. It was deliberately high concept, deliberately different to everything else I had written – and I was still convinced it wouldn’t go anywhere… but now look at this. It has been completely life changing.”

The news was revealed in a virtual awards ceremony on what would have been the opening night of Harrogate’s legendary Theakston Old Peculier Crime Writing Festival, which was cancelled due to the pandemic. Instead, the announcement marked the launch of the HIF Weekender, Harrogate International Festival’s free virtual festival.

The winner receives £3,000, and a handmade, engraved beer barrel provided by Theakston Old Peculier.

[Thanks to Cora Buhlert for the story.]

2020 Theakston Old Peculier Crime Novel of the Year Shortlist

The shortlist for the 2020 Theakston old Peculier Crime Novel of the Year was unveiled today. The prize was created to celebrate the very best in crime fiction and is open to UK and Irish crime authors whose novels were published in paperback during the eligibility period.

  • My Sister the Serial Killer by Oyinkan Braithwaite (Atlantic Books)
  • Worst Case Scenario by Helen Fitzgerald (Orenda Books)
  • The Lost Man by Jane Harper (Little, Brown Book Group, Little, Brown)
  • Joe Country by Mick Herron (John Murray Press)
  • The Chain by Adrian McKinty (Orion Publishing Group, Orion Fiction)
  • Smoke and Ashes by Abir Mukherjee (VINTAGE, Harvill Secker)

The public has until July 17 to vote for the winner at https://harrogatetheakstoncrimeaward.com/vote/.  

The winner is ordinarily announced at the Theakston Old Peculier Crime Writing Festival, hosted in Harrogate each July, however, the 2020 event has been cancelled because of he COVID-19 epidemic. This year, the winner will be revealed at a virtual awards ceremony on July 31, and receive £3,000, and a handmade, engraved beer barrel provided by Theakston Old Peculier.

2020 Theakston Old Peculier Crime Novel of the Year Longlist

The longlist for the 2020 Theakston old Peculier Crime Novel of the Year has been announced.

The prize was created to celebrate the very best in crime fiction and is open to UK and Irish crime authors whose novels were published in paperback during the eligibility period.

The administrators received a record number of submissions, and the longlist of 18 titles includes 10 by women, four former winners (Denise Mina, Chris Brookmyre, Tony Hill, and Lee Child), and a Booker Prize contender (Oyinkan Braithwaite).

The public are now invited to vote for a shortlist of six titles on www.harrogatetheakstoncrimeaward.com, which will be announced on June 8.

The Longlist in Full:

  • My Sister the Serial Killer by Oyinkan Braithwaite (Atlantic Books)
  • Fallen Angel by Chris Brookmyre (Little, Brown Book Group, Abacus)
  • Nothing Important Happened Today by Will Carver (Orenda Books)
  • Cruel Acts by Jane Casey (HarperCollins, Harper Fiction)
  • Blue Moon by Lee Child (Transworld, Bantam)
  • The Long Call by Ann Cleeves (Pan Macmillan, Macmillan/Pan)
  • Red Snow by Will Dean (Oneworld, Point Blank)
  • Platform Seven by Louise Doughty (Faber & Faber)
  • Worst Case Scenario by Helen Fitzgerald (Orenda Books)
  • The Lost Man by Jane Harper (Little, Brown Book Group, Little, Brown)
  • Joe Country by Mick Herron (John Murray Press)
  • How the Dead Speak by Val McDermid (Little, Brown Book Group, Little, Brown)
  • The Chain by Adrian McKinty (Orion Publishing Group, Orion Fiction)
  • Conviction by Denise Mina (VINTAGE, Harvill Secker)
  • Smoke and Ashes by Abir Mukherjee (VINTAGE, Harvill Secker)
  • The Whisper Man by Alex North (Penguin Random House, Michael Joseph)
  • Blood & Sugar by Laura Shepherd-Robinson (Headline Publishing Group, Wildfire)
  • Blood Orange by Harriet Tyce (Pan Macmillan, Mantle/Pan)

The winner is ordinarily announced at the Theakston Old Peculier Crime Writing Festival, hosted in Harrogate each July, however, the 2020 event has been cancelled because of he COVID-19 epidemic. This year, the winner will be revealed at a virtual awards ceremony on July 31, and receive £3,000, and a handmade, engraved beer barrel provided by Theakston Old Peculier.

2019 Theakston Old Peculier Crime Novel of the Year

The winner of the 2019 Theakston Old Peculier Crime Novel of the Year was announced at the on July 18.

  • Thirteen by Steve Cavanagh – Hachette

The prize celebrates the very best in crime fiction — UK and Irish crime authors whose novels were published in paperback from May 1, 2018 to April 30, 2019 were eligible.

Thirteen, a legal thriller,is scheduled for release in the U.S. in August by Flatiron Books.

It’s the murder trial of the century. And Joshua Kane has killed to get the best seat in the house – and to be sure the wrong man goes down for the crime. Because this time, the killer isn’t on trial. He’s on the jury.

The  award was presented at the Theakston Old Peculier Crime Writing Festival in Harrogate, an event co-founded in 2003 by Val McDermid, agent Jane Gregory, and arts charity Harrogate International Festivals.