More About ArmadilloCon 41 Code of Conduct Violation

Yesterday the ArmadilloCon 41 committee published an “ArmadilloCon Incident Report” about their disposition of a code of conduct violation by “a program participant who had gone significantly off-topic on a panel subsequently laid hands on another attendee.”

K. Tempest Bradford, one of the convention’s Regional Guests, today wrote that she was on the panel and witnessed what happened there. Bradford also gives an account of the “laid hands on” part which she gathered secondhand. The thread starts here.

Update 08/09/2019: Bradford subsequently tweeted that her identification of the Twitter URL for Burkheart is wrong:

All Bradbury All The Time

I’m overdue for one of these roundups!

RAY’S ARROYO. The Lake County News-Sun informs readers that “Literary Landmark status coming to Ray Bradbury Park and its storied ravine”.

While many great American writers have had personal property honored with a Literary Landmark — locations include Ernest Hemingway’s birthplace in Oak Park and Mark Twain’s boyhood home in Missouri — the choice in Bradbury’s case was appropriate: Ray Bradbury Park, which sits just west of downtown Waukegan on the section of ravine he played in and walked to school through during his daydreaming boyhood.It is true that two of the buildings connected to Bradbury before his family moved to California are still standing — his family home on St. James Street and the Carnegie Library on Sheridan Road. But the home is a nondescript private residence, and the library is dormant and has an uncertain future existence.

Ray Bradbury Park, by contrast, is more of a living, breathing thing that was reflected in his “Green Town” books that paid homage to his Waukegan upbringing — “Dandelion Wine,” “Something Wicked This Way Comes” and “Farewell Summer,” in which he referred to “the ravine that cut across my life.”

THERE’S SOMETHING IN MY EYE. Chuck Roberts at the Wonderbook blog has a sweet story about the author of “Dandelion Wine”.

…Somehow word got from those SciFi specialists to Ray Bradbury’s bibliographer. Back then many collectors were “completists.” Completists would seek out any work by an author in any medium. Magazine appearances, radio or TV interviews … Ray and his bibliographer were completists. AND they had never heard that his TV series had been put on video. I suppose the Canadian company that produced the tapes went out of business. Maybe their mostly unsold tapes got destroyed. For whatever reason, for all any of the Bradbury experts knew I had the only copies of The Ray Bradbury Theatre extant.

I was contacted by Ray’s agent as well as his bibliographer. Would I be willing to sell them? Ray wanted to see them and have them for his own collection. [Back then, videotape was the only way to watch things “on demand.”]

Of course I said yes. I was honored to have something a hero of mine wanted. I shipped them off to Manhattan or California. I sent them either gratis or at a very low price. Probably a low price. I couldn’t afford to give stuff away back then.

“The envelope? Have ye lost it?”

If I recall correctly, I included a fan letter to Ray. The tapes were sent to his agent. I was too shy to ask Ray directly, but I included a note to his agent telling him I collected first editions of Ray’s and it would be cool if I could get a dozen or so slips of paper with Ray’s signature which I could tip into those books….

SURROUNDED BY HISTORY. The Indianapolis Star outines the ambitious plan for all the stuff that used to be in Bradbury’s basement office: “Unusual Indianapolis museum will house $6+ million of treasures from ‘Fahrenheit 451’ author”.

Marrying science fiction, space exploration, intellectual freedom and the human heart is no simple feat. But 30,000 pounds of letters, photos, manuscripts, books and paraphernalia at the Center for Ray Bradbury Studies offer insight into how the “Fahrenheit 451” author accomplished it.

Part of the Indiana University School of Liberal Arts at IUPUI, the collection is jammed into 1,600 square feet of space on the first floor of Cavanaugh Hall. Its aisles allow only one person to pass through at a time. Movie posters and photos of Bradbury with Steven Spielberg, Joe Mantegna and Edward James Olmos line white cinderblock walls with mere inches separating them. The staff has to set out on filing cabinets his National Medal of Arts and Pulitzer Prize Special Citation for inquiring visitors.

Considering the collection started in a 500-square-foot basement room, the current space is a step up. But its proprietors want more for what has grown into the largest collection of Bradbury’s personal and career effects. They want a national museum and archive that ideally would open in 2020, the centennial of Bradbury’s birth year.

… Additionally, another endeavor devoted to the author, called the Ray Bradbury Experience Museum, is pursuing fundraising to open in his hometown of Waukegan. It will include interactives dedicated to exploring expression, creativity and censorship through “Fahrenheit 451” and “The Martian Chronicles.”

ILLINOIS READS. And the folks in Waukegan trying to create the Ray Bradbury Experience Museum (RBEM) are publicizing a local event which includes “A Tribute to Ray Bradbury”.  

Save the date for the Illinois Reads Book Festival, March 16, at Waukegan High School, 2325 Brookside Ave, Waukegan. Visit the RBEM table at this free event to promote the joy of reading and to celebrate Illinois authors.

Everyone Invited!

Ray Bradbury Park

4:51 P.M. Saturday, March 16

Celebrate in Green Town!

  • The unveiling of the Bradbury Literary Landmark plaque in Green Town
  • Prominent Bradbury speakers, including Dr. Jonathan R. Eller, Director, Center for Ray Bradbury Studies, Indiana
  • Special performance of Bradbury’s short play, “The Whole Town’s Sleeping” by Waukegan High School students

RBEM is proud to partner with the Illinois Center for the Book for this dedication in Bradbury’s hometown. We’re thrilled to celebrate Ray Douglas Bradbury, the Waukegan boy who became the author of “Fahrenheit 451” and “The Martian Chronicles” as the American Library Association’s United for Libraries network pays tribute by dedicating a Literary Landmark to Bradbury in Waukegan.

TWILTONE CLIPPINGS. David Doering transcribed a piece from Imagination! #7 (April 1938) with Uncle Ray’s ingredients for a “success-fool” SF story. Hmmm…. “ffooti-pusses”?? “Ackermaniac”??

FORMULA FOR A SUCCESSFOOL STF STORY 

By Ray Bradbury 

Ingredients: 

  • 1 scientist well frayed, grayed & bent
  • About 60 years old, he has invented some supercolossal machine that can warp time or destroy matter–take your choice.
  • Then add a gob of mathematical equations & problems, 100 large words such as ultraforrest jackermanerless & lagoobrious.
  • Then bring in a theory by the heels. Any theory will do.
  • The date should be around 2067 or 3098 AD (Ackerman’s Demise). [Okay, so 2008 is a little off…ed]
  • Then add a lovely daughter for the professor to shoo out of the laboratory
  • (business of twirling moustache & raising eyebrows as the mad genius raves: “it will revolutionize the world, it is Colossal!”) 
  • Also a son for the scientists to work side by side with, forging thru the innermost secrets of Science with heads proudly bent in meditation.
  • Then bring in an athletic young reporter who has been summoned from the city by a mysterious message something like this: “Dear Dick: Come at once. Great experiment. Has gotten away from me. Danger to the world. Hurry for G–‘s sake! Your friend. Frank.”
  • Let the lug solve the mystery immediately upon his arrival. Even tho he never had taken the higher mathematics he was a whiz at adding & subtracting as a kid…so let him solve the mystery that the prof, who has been searching for 60 years, has overlooked. This is what is called “human interest.”
  • Then have the foul ffooti-pusses arrive from Rigel, breathing poison! The scientist combats the incredible Monstrosities with artificial creatures of his own.

Go thot-variant:

  • Have earth fall to the moon–
  • have dinosaurs crawl over the hero’s tummy–
  • let him rassle a lion as the earth cracks in 2 pieces..!
  • Then drag in a few dead bodies (preferably Forrest J Ackerman or such stuffs) & let them play the parts of ghouls (on 2d thought, HanKuttner would be better suited to such roles–the Ackermaniac may be reserved for characterizations requiring dead heads) endeavoring to endanger the Sweet Young Thing.
  • Have the sun explode or die.
  • Have the girl be very muscular: she can toss a “hind-end-oh-no” over her shoulder as the hero dances on the head of some dodo from Jupiter…

This is the end. Are you glad? Has this inspired you with an idea? If it has, write it down (or up) & airmail it to the dead letter office with the side off a barnacle, a Pogo stick & a manhole & we shall instruct Santa Claus to bring you a composite picture of all famous science fiction writers.

Warning! The Karlottans among the kiddies will adore the toto…but keep it away from nervous adults! One glance will give your girlfriend a permanent wave!!

BRADBURY RE-ANIMATED. A 2015 classic from Brain Pickings: “Ray Bradbury on Storytelling, Friendship, and Why He Never Learned to Drive: A Lost Vintage Interview, Found and Animated”.

In the fall of 2012, Lisa Potts discovered a cassette tape behind her dresser. On it was a long-lost interview she had conducted with Ray Bradbury (August 22, 1920–June 5, 2012) — regimented writer, creative idealist, list-maker, space-lover, sage of life and love — exactly four decades earlier, when she was a journalism student in 1972. Potts and her classmate Chadd Coates were driving Bradbury — a resolute, lifelong nondriver — from his home in West Los Angeles to their university, Orange County’s Chapman College, where he was about to deliver a lecture. The informal conversation that ensued emanates Bradbury’s unforgettable blend of humor, humility, and wholeheartedness to the point of heroism.

[Thanks to John King Tarpinian, John A Arkansawyer, and David Doering for these stories.]

Here’s Something For Your Own Stocking

Cat Rambo is running a three day sale

We are wrapping up the end of the year with a special promotion for THREE DAYS ONLY, December 24-26, by offering all Rambo Academy for Wayward Writers on-demand classes, including the ones from Ann Leckie, Rachel Swirsky, and Juliette Wade, for $5 or less.

Yep, that’s right. For less than $50 you can, in fact, buy access to every class we currently offer. Did I mention it’s only through the 27th, aka three days (well, a little more since this is going out Sunday evening) only?

Click on the links to access the sale coupons:

Goodreads Extinguishes FIYAH

FIYAH Executive Editor Justina Ireland discovered Goodreads has deleted the Series entry for her magazine:

FIYAH Magazine of Black Speculative Fiction is a quarterly literary magazine.

An attempt to discuss the decision in the Goodreads Librarians Group was answered with “a literary magazine is not a series by GR standards,” which apparently is Goodreads’ policy. However, that did not explain why FIYAH’s Series entry was singled out for enforcement while entries for many other genre magazine Series remain undisturbed. Put pretty much any spec fic magazine in the search bar, and they’re all on Goodreads: Clarkesworld, Lightspeed, Nightmare, Asimov’s, Analog, F&SF, Uncanny, Apex, Beneath Ceaseless Skies, Strange Horizons, Fireside Magazine, Shimmer, Interzone, Forever Magazine, even all four issues of the new Pulphouse and the single issue of the new Amazing Stories.

When someone raised the challenge in the Goodreads Librarians Group that the decision to delete FIYAH might be motivated by racism, a Librarian Moderator closed the thread to further comments.

The FIYAH Series entry can still be seen via a Google cache file (while that lasts.) Here’s a screencap — click for larger image.

The entire Goodreads Librarians Group comment thread is screencapped in this tweet (click through to see all three pages of images).

Justina Ireland is understandably angry —

Shimmer Program Taking Applications for a “Science Fiction Adventure in China”

Fans have until April 1 to apply to the Shimmer Program for a travel grant to visit the sff community in China:  “To Come on A Science Fiction Adventure in China ——Application guidelines for The Shimmer Program’s First Two-way Exchange Fund”.

They will pick one or two recipients who already “have a certain presence in [their] local or an international science fiction community” and are not citizens of China.

Familiarity with the Chinese language is not a requirement. All application documents and the interview will be in English.

The chosen travelers will visit China later in 2018 or 2019, and meet the sff community in at least two of these four cities: Shanghai, Beijing, Chengdu, and Shenzhen. In each city, the traveler will make a presentation about their science fiction community. They will report on the trip in social media, and agree to carry out other responsibilities once the trip is over —

After you return from the exchange project, you should host at least one presentation event where you share your experience in China, experience with Chinese science fiction and your experience with The Shimmer Program with your local (international) science fiction community. If possible, we would like for you to serve as an ambassador for Chinese science fiction, and spread the words about Chinese science fiction in other international communities.

Full guidelines are at the linked article.

[Thanks to Darnell Coleman for the story.]

Foz Meadows on Other Prospective Apologies

Foz Meadows, who readily accepted Lou Antonelli’s apology for claiming Camestros Felapton is a pseudonym for Foz Meadows’ husband, Toby, said today she has a different policy and expectation for any apologies and retractions that might come from Dave Freer and others who ran with the story because of all the abuse they packaged with it.

A Collection of Contrary Opinions

Compiled by Carl Slaughter:

ANTI-MARVEL

  • 10 people who hated working on Marvel movies

  • 10 actors who said no to Marvel

CINEMA SINS

  • Cinema Sins takes on the most beloved science fiction movie of all time

  • Cinema Sins takes on Your Friendly Neighborhood Spiderman

  • Cinema Sins takes on a science fiction movie favored by critics

ALIENS

  • Michio Kaku on the alien mega structure

Zoo theory:  aliens may know we’re here, but not want to disturb us. From Newsweek, “Where Are All the Aliens? Zoo Theory Has Creepy Explanation for Why We Haven’t Made Contact Yet”

One popular theory to explain why aliens have not made open contact with humans is the “Zoo Theory.” John A. Ball, an MIT radio astronomer, proposed the theory in 1973, suggesting that aliens may purposely be avoiding contact with humans so they don’t interfere with our activity, similar to zookeepers at a zoo or nature preserve, Science Alert reported.

“ETI (extraterrestrial intelligence) may be discreetly and inconspicuously watching us but not dabbling,” Ball wrote in his paper on the subject.

According to this theory, we are too unevolved and uncivilized to be a threat or burden to alien life, but rather than interfere with our natural evolution, they monitor us from afar. Of course, they aren’t completely perfect in their effort to stay out of human affairs, which is why we have several thousand alleged sightings each year.

Alternate and Non-canonical Star Trek Roundup

Compiled by Carl Slaughter: (1) Deadline reports “Quinton Tarantino’s Star Trek will be R rated”:

After Deadline this week revealed that Quentin Tarantino pitched a Star Trek film to JJ Abrams and Paramount, the whole thing is moving at warp speed. Tarantino met for hours in a writers room with Mark L. Smith, Lindsey Beer, Drew Pearce and Megan Amram. They kicked around ideas and one of them will get the job. I’m hearing the frontrunner is Smith, who wrote The Revenant. The film will most certainly go where no Star Trek has gone before: Tarantino has required it to be R rated, and Paramount and Abrams agreed to that condition. Most mega budget tent poles restrict the film to a PG-13 rating in an effort to maximize the audience. That was the reason that Guillermo Del Toro’s $150 million At The Mountains of Madness didn’t go forward at Universal, even though Tom Cruise was ready to star. The exception to this rule was Fox’s Deadpool, but that film started out with modest ambitions before it caught on and became the biggest R rated film ever.

(2) Most lethal Star Trek captains

(3) ScreenRant tells about “17 Canceled Star Trek TV Shows And Movies We Never Got To See”:

(4) Dodged the bullet: ScreenRant tells “15 Ways Star Next Generation Was Almost Completely Different”.

  1. Gene Roddenberry Super Did Not Want Captain Picard Or Patrick Stewart

Star Trek creator Gene Roddenberry did not like Patrick Stewart. Actually, that’s putting things pretty lightly. Star Trek creator Gene Roddenberry hated Patrick Stewart.

He didn’t want Stewart to play Captain Picard, he didn’t even want him to audition for the part. The creator famously described Stewart as both “too old and too bald” to play the iconic captain.

Roddenberry pushed heavily for Yaphet Kotto to play the ship’s captain. While we can’t imagine The Next Generation without Stewart’s devilish smile and never-ending sense of fun, but it’s hard to actually argue with Roddenberry on this one.

Had Kotto been cast in the role, he would have given the Star Trek franchise their first black captain decades earlier. There’s just nothing wrong with that.

(5) Trek online game: “Bridge Crew drops its VR headset requirement”

There’s no question that Star Trek: Bridge Crew benefits from VR — it helps fulfill that fantasy of helming a starship. Most people don’t have the VR headset you need to play the game, however, which makes gathering a crew rather difficult. Red Storm and Ubisoft’s solution? Make the game playable for everyone. It just released a “non-VR” update that makes the game playable for anyone with a PS4 or sufficiently capable PC. You can play with others whether or not they have headsets, and there are even graphical enhancements for non-VR players to take advantage of the lighter processing requirements.

So some strange thoughts transcend our wonted themes, and into glory creep

By John Hertz: Happening to read D. Hoffman, The Billion-Dollar Spy (2015; Adolf Tolkachev 1927-1986), I came across this striking passage (p. 163) about the subject’s son in 1981.

Oleg … a teenager [1966-  ] … interests ran … toward … arts, culture, music, and design….  attended a special school that emphasized English instruction.  He was already reading Kipling and Asimov

– my emphasis.  There’s glory for you!

                                            

[Title ref.] H. Vaughan, “They Are All Gone into the World of Light”, Silex Scintillans [“The Flashing Flint”] 2nd ed. 1655, no. 1; L. Carroll, Through the Looking-Glass ch. 6 (1871)

MacFarlane, Stewart, Lee Interviews

Curated by Carl Slaughter:

SETH MACFARLANE

Wall to wall carpet, wood, leather, house plants.  “It looked like a really plush corporate office.  That makes it the most realistic portrayal what it’s like in space.  If you’re out there for years and years, you’d go crazy if you were in something that looks like a submarine.”   Pre-Discovery and pre-Orville interview with Seth MacFarlane.

 

“When I look at the television shows that I responded to, if I watch a cop show, if I watch a medical show, I’m going to see the murder of the week, I’m going to see the disease of the week.  Growing up, I liked things like ‘The Twilight Zone.’ I was a ‘Star Trek’ fan because I didn’t know if I was going to see and adventure story, or a quiet relationship story, or a story involving some sort of social and political commentary.  To turn on a show and not have any idea what it is you’re going to see.”  Plus Seth MacFarlane’s imitation of Captain Kirk.  Also pre-Discovery and pre-Orville.

 

PATRICK STEWART

  • Patrick Stewart didn’t think Next Generation would last

  • Patrick Stewart on the moment he knew he was finished playing Professor X

  • Patrick Stewart:  “Warning:  Unknown British Shaekespearian Actor”

  • Patrick Stewart –  Larry King interview

STAN LEE

  • Larry King – Stan Lee interview