2021 Sir Julius Vogel Award Finalists

The 2021 Sir Julius Vogel Award finalists have been announced. The awards recognize excellence in science fiction, fantasy, or horror works created by New Zealanders and New Zealand residents.

Best Novel

Best Youth Novel

  • Earthcore Book 4: HIgh Tide, by Grace Bridges (Splashdown Books)
  • These Violent Delights, by Chloe Gong (Margaret K. McElderry Books)
  • Golden City, by S.R. Manssen (Manssen Publishing House)
  • Follow Me In, by Terri Sinclair
  • Brasswitch and Bot, by Gareth Ward (Walker Books Australia)

Best Novella/Novelette

  • Hexes and Vexes by Nova Blake (Witchy Fiction NZ)
  • How to Get a Girlfriend (When you’re a Terrifying Monster) by Marie Cardno
  • No Man’s Land, by A.J. Fitzwater (Paper Road Press)
  • Marbles, by Sean Monaghan (Asimov’s Science Fiction, July/August 2020)
  • Riverwitch, by Rem Wigmore

Best Short Story

  • “Salt Water, Rose Red”, E. Celeste (Dually Noted F(r)iction Log)
  • “Synaesthete” by Melanie Harding-Shaw (Things in the Well)
  • “For Want of Human Parts” by Casey Lucas (Diabolical Plots)
  • “The Good Wife” by Lee Murray (Weird Tales, issue 364)
  • “Arachne’s Web” by James Rowland (Aurealis issue #132)

Best Collected Work

  • The Voyages of Cinrak the Dapper by A.J. Fitzwater (Queen of Swords Press)
  • Year’s Best Aotearoa New Zealand Science Fiction & Fantasy Volume 2 edited by Marie Hodgkinson (Paper Road Press)
  • Ghost Bus – Tales from Wellington’s Dark Side by Anna Kirtlan
  • The Better Sister and Other Stories by Piper Mejia (Breach)
  • Grotesque: Monster Stories by Lee Murray (Things in the Well)

Best Professional Artwork

  • Cover art by William Dresden for Scary Tales, NZ Secondary Students Anthology by William Dresden (Young NZ Writers)
  • Cover art by Laya Rose for No Man’s Land by A.J. Fitzwater (Paper Road Press)
  • Cover art by Laya Rose for Year’s Best Aotearoa New Zealand Science Fiction and Fantasy Volume 2 , edited by Marie Hodgkinson (Paper Road Press)
  • Cover art by Vivienne To for The Chaos Curse, by Sayantani DasGupta (Scholastic)
  • Cover art by Emma Weakley for The Stone Weta by Octavia Cade (Paper Road Press)

Best Professional Production/Publication

  • This is Not the End, by Deanna Gunn, chapters 1.5-2.10
  • Masterpiece (Or Artful Dodgers) by Michelle Kan
  • Fantastical Worlds and Futures at the World’s Edge: A History of New Zealand Science Fiction and Fantasy — Simon Litten and Sean McMullen
  • How New Zealand’s Best Fantasy and Science Fiction Authors got Shafted on a Global Stage, by Casey Lucas (The Spinoff)
  • Wonderland Nights: White Rabbit’s Diary, by Sky Bear Games (Steam)
  • Aotearoa is Not Middle Earth by Alexander Stronach (The Spinoff)

Best Fan Artwork

  • Ministry for Public Art fan art by Shaun Garea (Estrata Productions)
  • Oriental Bay Piranhas by Shaun Garea (Estrata Productions)
  • Destiny & dead people tea by Michelle Kan
  • Faerie Ring (critical role) by Michelle Kan
  • Blue and Red (This is How You Lose the Time War) by Laya Rose
  • Gyre from The Luminous Dead, by Laya Rose

Best Fan Production/Publication

  • Codex, by Stephen Brough (Lost Arcana)
  • FIYAHCON Guest of Honour Speech by Cassie Hart
  • Mollymauk Tealeaf – Court of Jesters (showcase) by Michelle Kan
  • Phoenixine, edited by John and Jo Toon
  • Dramatic Chairing of the 2020 WSFS Business meeting by Darusha Wehm
  • CoNZealand Souvenir book – created by Darusha Wehm and Amber Carter

Best Fan Writing

  • Alone Together at the Edge of the World by Andi C. Buchanan (CoNZealand Souvenir Book)
  • Queer Speculative Aotearoa New Zealand by A.J. Fitzwater (LGBTQ Reads)
  • Review of Hello Strange, by Dylan Howell (My Opinion on Books)
  • SITREP, by Alex Lindsay (Phoenixine)
  • “What If” by Kyra Saywell (Poetry Box)
  • An exploration of menstruation in horror and dark fiction by Tabatha Wood (horrortree.com)

New Talent

  • Chloe Gong
  • Deanna Gunn
  • Kate Haley
  • B.T. Keaton
  • A.J. Lancaster
  • Deborah Makarios

Services to Science Fiction, Fantasy and Horror

  • Lee Murray
  • Cassie Hart

Services to Fandom

  • Nigel Rowe et al
  • CoNZealand Crew

The 2021 Long List for the award is at the link.

The Sir Julius Vogel Awards are administered by SFFANZ, the Science Fiction and Fantasy Association of New Zealand Inc. The awards ceremony will be announced by the end of May.

Where To Find The 2021 Hugo Award Finalists For Free Online

By JJ: DisCon III has announced the 2021 Hugo Award Finalists. Since the Hugo Voter’s packet will take awhile to arrive, if you’d like to get a head start on your reading, you can use this handy guide to find material which is available for free online. Where available in their entirety, works are linked (most of the Novelettes and Short Stories are free, as are the Pro and Fan Artist images, and many of the Semiprozines and Fanzines).

If not available for free, an Amazon or other purchase link is provided. If a free excerpt is available online, it has been linked.

If I’ve missed an excerpt, or a link doesn’t work, please let me know in the comments, and I’ll get it fixed.

Fair notice: All Amazon links are referrer URLs which benefit fan site Worlds Without End.

2021 HUGO AWARD FINALISTS

BEST NOVEL

BEST NOVELLA

BEST NOVELETTE

BEST SHORT STORY

BEST SERIES

BEST RELATED WORK

BEST GRAPHIC STORY OR COMIC

BEST DRAMATIC PRESENTATION, LONG FORM

BEST DRAMATIC PRESENTATION, SHORT FORM

BEST EDITOR, SHORT FORM

BEST EDITOR, LONG FORM

BEST PROFESSIONAL ARTIST

BEST SEMIPROZINE

BEST FANZINE

BEST FANCAST

BEST FAN WRITER

BEST FAN ARTIST

BEST VIDEO GAME

LODESTAR AWARD FOR BEST YOUNG ADULT BOOK

ASTOUNDING AWARD FOR BEST NEW WRITER

* 2nd year of eligibility

[Update: Now that we have learned that Clarkesworld had the Internet Archive remove its copy of “Helicopter Story” we have taken down our link to a different online archive’s copy of the story.]

2021 Recommended SF/F List

By JJ: This thread is for posts about 2021-published works, which people have read and recommend to other Filers.

There will be no tallying of recommendations done in this thread; its purpose is to provide a source of recommendations for people who want to find something to read which will be eligible for the Hugos or other awards (Nebula, Locus, Asimov’s, etc.) next year.

If you’re recommending for an award other than / in addition to the Hugo Awards which has different categories than the Hugos (such as Locus Awards’ First Novel), then be sure to specify the award and category.

You don’t have to stop recommending works in Pixel Scrolls, please don’t! But it would be nice if you also post here, to capture the information for other readers.

The Suggested Format for posts is:

  • Title, Author, Published by / Published in (Anthology, Collection, Website, or Magazine + Issue)
  • Hugo or other Award Category: (Novel, Novella, Novelette, Short Story, Related Work, Graphic Novel, Lodestar, Astounding, etc)
  • link (if available to read/view online)
  • optional “Brief, spoiler-free description of story premise:”
  • “What I liked / didn’t like about it:”
  • (Please rot-13 any spoilers.)

There is a permalink to this thread in the blog header.

Where To Find The 2020 Nebula Finalists For Free Online

To help propel you into your awards season reading, here are links to excerpts or complete works from the 2020 Nebula Award finalists.

Novel

Novella

Novelette

Short Story

Andre Norton Award for Middle Grade and Young Adult Fiction


2020 Novellapalooza

stack of books ©canstockphoto / olegd

[Editor’s note: be sure to read the comments on this post for more novellas and more Filer reviews.]

By JJ:

TL;DR: Here’s what I thought of the 2020 Novellas. What did you think?

I’m a huge reader of novels, but not that big on short fiction. But the last few years, I’ve done a personal project to read and review as many Novellas as I could (presuming that the story Synopsis had some appeal for me). I ended up reading:

  • 31 of the novellas published in 2015,
  • 35 of the novellas published in 2016,
  • 50 of the novellas published in 2017,
  • 38 of the novellas published in 2018,
  • 57 of the 2019 novellas,
  • and this year I was waiting for access to a few novellas from my library, so I was reading others, and thus my final total crept up to 59!

The result of these reading sprees were

I really felt as though this enabled me to do Hugo nominations for the Novella category in an informed way, and a lot of Filers got involved with their own comments. So I’m doing it again this year.

It is not at all uncommon for me to choose to read a book despite not feeling that the jacket copy makes the book sound as though it is something I would like – and to discover that I really like or love the work anyway. On the other hand, It is not at all uncommon for me to choose to read a book which sounds as though it will be up my alley and to discover that, actually, the book doesn’t really do much for me.

Thus, my opinions on the following novellas vary wildly: stories I thought I would love but didn’t, stories I didn’t expect to love but did, and stories which aligned with my expectations – whether high or low.

Bear in mind that while I enjoy both, I tend to prefer Science Fiction over Fantasy – and that while I enjoy suspense and thrillers, I have very little appreciation for Horror (and to be honest, I think Lovecraft is way overrated). What’s more, I apparently had a defective childhood, and I do not share a lot of peoples’ appreciation for fairytale retellings and portal fantasies. My personal assessments are therefore not intended to be the final word on these stories, but merely a jumping-off point for Filer discussion.

Novellas are listed in two sections below. The first section, those with cover art, are the ones I have read, and they include mini-reviews by me. These are in approximate order from most-favorite to least-favorite (but bear in mind that after around the first dozen listed, there was not a large degree of difference in preference among most of the remainder, with the exception of a handful at the bottom). The second section is those novellas I haven’t read, in alphabetical order by title.

I’ve included plot summaries, and where I could find them, links to either excerpts or the full stories which can be read online for free. Some short novels which fall between 40,000 and 48,000 words (within the Hugo Novella category tolerance) have been included, and in a couple of cases, novelettes which were long enough to be in the Hugo Novella tolerance were also included.

Please feel free to post comments about 2020 novellas which you’ve read, as well. And if I’ve missed your File 770 comment about a novella, or an excerpt for a novella, please point me to it!

If you see something that looks like gibberish, it is text that has been ROT-13’ed to avoid spoilers. (Please be sure to rot-13 any spoilers.)

(fair notice: all Amazon links are referrer URLs which benefit non-profit SFF fan website Worlds Without End)
Continue reading

Best Professional Artist Hugo: Eligible Works from 2020

By JJ: To assist Hugo nominators, this post provides information on the artists and designers of more than 800 works which appeared in a professional publication in the field of science fiction or fantasy for the first time in 2020.

These credits have been accumulated over the course of the year from dust jackets, Acknowledgments sections and copyright pages in works, cover reveal blog posts, and other sources on the internet. This year, Filers Martin Pyne and Karen B. also collected this information, and though we had a lot of overlap, their extra entries have greatly increased the information we are able to provide you. My profound thanks go to Martin and Karen for all of their hard work.

You can see the full combined spreadsheet of Editor and Artist credits here (I will be continuing to update this as I get more information).

In this post I will display up to 8 images of artworks for each artist for whom I have identified 3 or more works which appeared in a professional publication in the field of science fiction or fantasy for the first time in 2020. Clicking on the thumbnail will open a full-screen version of each work; where I could find a version of the work without titles, that is the image which is linked.

Please note carefully the eligibility criteria according to the WSFS Constitution:


Professional Artist

3.3.12: Best Professional Artist. An illustrator whose work has appeared in a professional publication in the field of science fiction or fantasy during the previous calendar year.

3.2.11: A Professional Publication is one which meets at least one of the following two criteria:
(1) it provided at least a quarter the income of any one person or,
(2) was owned or published by any entity which provided at least a quarter the income of any of its staff and/or owner.

3.10.2: In the Best Professional Artist category, the acceptance should include citations of at least three (3) works first published in the eligible year.


Under the current rules, artwork for semiprozines and fanzines is not eligible in this category. You can check whether a publication is a prozine or a semiprozine in this directory (the semiprozine list is at the top of the page, and the prozine directory is at the bottom).

Please be sure to check the spreadsheet first; but then, if you are able to confirm credits missing 2020-original works and the names of their artists from Acknowledgments sections, copyright pages, or by contacting authors and/or artists, go ahead and add them in comments, and I will get them included in the spreadsheet, and if the artist is credited with at least 3 works, in this post. If you have questions or corrections, please add those also. Please note that works may or may not be added to the list at my discretion.

PLEASE DON’T ADD GUESSES.

Artists, Authors, Editors and Publishers are welcome to post in comments here, or to send their lists to jjfile770 [at] gmail [dot] com.


(warning: this post is heavily image-intensive, and will probably not work well on mobile devices: flee now, or prepare to meet your doom extremely slow page download)

Only those bying stoute of heyrte and riche in bandwydthe shouldst click hither to proce’d…

NetGalley Member Login Data
Compromised

On December 23, 2020, the advance book review site NetGalley sent a message to its members informing them that the NetGalley login data for members had been compromised:

Notification of Data Security Incident – December 23, 2020

Dear NetGalley Member,

It is with great regret that we inform you that on Monday, December 21, 2020 NetGalley was the victim of a data security incident. What initially seemed like a simple defacement of our homepage has, with further investigation, resulted in the unauthorized and unlawful access to a backup file of the NetGalley database.

It is with an abundance of caution that we wanted to let you know this incident may have exposed some of the information you have shared with NetGalley.

The backup file that was impacted contained your Profile information, which includes your login name and password, name and email address. Also, if supplied by you, your mailing address, birthday, company name, and Kindle email address. We currently have no evidence of the exposure of any of this data, but we cannot at this stage rule out the possibility. We expect that you may have many additional questions – below are the questions we would have if we received this email.

I’ve had a NetGalley account for 6 years. On December 21, I received a notification from Google that someone had attempted to access one of my Gmail accounts using my password. Fortunately, I had 2-factor identification enabled on that account, which meant that any login attempt from a new device would require me to confirm with a 6-digit verification code sent to my cellphone. Apparently, after no verification code was entered within a certain period of time, Google had decided that it was an incident of a compromised password, and I was prompted to change that password immediately.

I wracked my brain for any other websites where I might be using that e-mail address/password combination, and came up with only one. I immediately changed my password on that site, and enabled 2-factor authentication on a couple of other different Gmail accounts, but I was mystified as to how my password had been obtained. Then 45 minutes ago I received this e-mail notification from NetGalley – and realized that I had forgotten that I was using that same login combination on that site, too.

If you are a NetGalley member, you need to go change your password there now. If you discover that you are unable to do so, the notification message linked above contains information on how to contact them to resolve the problem. And if you have any logins at any other websites using the same e-mail address/password combination as your NetGalley account, you will need to go change that login information immediately.

I also encourage you to consider enabling 2-factor authentication on any websites which enable that capability. It saved me from a great deal of grief here, and is well worth the extra effort. And I know that it’s a huge pain to have to use different passwords for different sites (as I mostly do these days), but it’s something you can do to protect yourself further.

If you have used NetGalley to obtain works from the Hugo Voter Packet, you will be affected by this.

Best Editor Short Form Hugo: Eligible Works from 2020

By JJ: To assist Hugo nominators, listed below are the editors of more than 1,000 short form works published for the first time in 2020.

Note that all of the works labeled “novella”, “novelette”, and “short story” are eligible in the corresponding Hugo fiction categories. If a work is not labeled, or it is labeled “short fiction”, its length has yet to be determined. Collections and Anthologies are not eligible for nomination as whole works, but the original pieces of fiction they contain are each eligible in the appropriate length category. Poetry and nonfiction are not eligible.

Note that the Short Form Editors listed below may, or may not, be eligible — that is, have the equivalent of at least 4 anthologies and/or magazine issues in their career, with at least 1 of them published in 2020. If I know for sure that an editor has the equivalent of at least 4 eligible works, they are labeled as “eligibility verified”.

These credits have been accumulated from Acknowledgments sections and copyright pages in works, eligibility posts, short fiction venue mastheads, the ISFDB, and other sources on the internet.

You can see the full combined spreadsheet of Editor and Artist credits here (I will be continuing to update this as short fiction venues post elibibility lists and I get more information).

Feel free to add missing 2020-original works and the name of their editors in the comments, and I will get them included in the main post. Self-published works may or may not be added to the list at my discretion.

PLEASE DON’T ADD GUESSES.

If you are able to confirm credits from Acknowledgments sections, copyright pages, or by contacting authors and/or editors, then go ahead and add them in comments. If you have questions or corrections, please add those also.

Authors, Editors, and Publishers are welcome to post in comments here, or to send their eligibility lists to jjfile770 [at] gmail [dot] com.


Some of the magazines listed below are Prozines and are not eligible in the Hugo Semiprozine category. For a list of Semiprozines vs. Prozines, see Semiprozine.org.

Short Form Editors

3.3.10: Best Editor Short Form. The editor of at least four (4) anthologies, collections or magazine issues (or their equivalent in other media) primarily devoted to science fiction and / or fantasy, at least one of which was published in the previous calendar year.

Continue reading

Best Editor Long Form Hugo: Eligible Works from 2020

By JJ: To assist Hugo nominators, listed below are the editors of long form (novel-length) works published for the first time in 2020.

Note that all of these works, unless they are labeled “nonfiction”, are eligible in the Best Novel category.

These credits have been accumulated over the course of the year from dust jackets, Acknowledgments sections and copyright pages in works, as well as other sources on the internet. This year, Filers Martin Pyne and Karen B. also collected this information, and though we had a lot of overlap, their extra entries have greatly increased the information we are able to provide you. My profound thanks go to Martin and Karen for all of their hard work.

You can see the full combined spreadsheet of Editor and Artist credits here. Thus far we have more than 300 Long Form Editor credits (I will be continuing to update this as I get more information).

Feel free to add missing 2020-original works and the name of their editors in the comments, and I will get them included in the main post. Self-published works may or may not be added to the list at my discretion. (Short form works will be in a different post. Please do not add them here.)

PLEASE DON’T ADD GUESSES.

If you are able to confirm credits from Acknowledgments sections, copyright pages, or by contacting authors and/or editors, then go ahead and add them in comments. If you have questions or corrections, please add those also.

Authors, Editors, and Publishers are welcome to post in comments here, or to send their lists to jjfile770 [at] gmail [dot] com.


Long Form Editors

3.3.11: Best Editor Long Form. The editor of at least four (4) novel-length works primarily devoted to science fiction and / or fantasy published in the previous calendar year that do not qualify as works under 3.3.10.

(Note that the Long Form Editors listed below may, or may not, be eligible — that is, have 4 qualifying works published in 2020. Editors whose eligibility has been confirmed are listed first.)

Continue reading